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HIGHLIGHTS OF THE '62 MIDWEST OPEN CHOMPIONSHIPS

Co-Sponsored By The M. G. A. and the University of Illinois, Ohicago By Robert E. BohZ A record 214 total men and women entered the 1962 Midwest Open held again at the University of Illinois Navy Pier Field House in Chicago. A record number of persons attended as spec tator,s forcing many to. stand throughout the finals. 170 of the entries were men representing over twenty colleges and Uni versiti es. A few staggered entries came from YMCA's and Turner organizatjons. A total of 19 teams entered and perhaps the most impressive figure was 40 persons competing in the All Around event. The Midwest Open has always had a tremendous appea l to the Colleges and Universities and is the real kick off to the Collegiate season. Many people refer to this as the "Little NCAA" as it provides a good basis for those coaches sporting strong teams. The womens entry was cons·iderably smaller, 35 total entries, 10 team entries and 18 all around candidates. The contrast is always perplexing and seems indicative of the need t o stimula te greater interest in womens gymnastics in our secondary schools, c olleges and universities. The private c lubs , Sokols, Turners, the YMCAYWCA's and the Recreation D epartments are hampered in their effort :;; to conduct concentrated programs. This is a story all of its own . . . I mention it briefly now, only because of the effect it has at many of our la rger meets . . . in partic ular the Midwest Open. These women are not to be counted out however, because what they lacked in numbers they picked up in quality. Herb Vogel's very talented Acrolympians with outstanding individual performances· by Judy Dunham, her sister Janice and Donna Schaenzer exemplify what a college progra m can accomplish. Other women performing fine routines were Ruth Ann Inskip co mpeting for Sokol Tabor in Chicago, Barbara Sweifel from M.S.U. and a real c omer, Collen Vlachos from Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania. The tumbling event was dropped from competition because of the lack of entries. The emphasis on the all around il1' the last few years has brought about a real sharp decline of competitive tum.bling. The men'·s events were conducted on a sec tional basis for the first time in the ten years the M.G.A. has conducted the Midwest Open. Becaus e the last few years have' brought such a large number of entnes, the preliminaries became long, exhausting ordeals. This year on an experimental basis we split the entries half to one section 'Lnd half to another and conducted two of the same event at the same time a nd qualified six men from each division. It worked real well. The spectators enjoyed it, the competitors preferred it, and as director of the meet, I was extremely happy to b e able to adhear to a decent time ::;chedule. In December 1963, the men's events will again be split by division, the o nly change being the ALL AROUND e ntries will comprise one division a nd the SPECIALTIES the other. Highlights of the men's competition was the outstanding all around performances of Gil Larose from th~ University of Michigan, Fred Orlofsky from S.I.U . and Gar O'Quinn from the second team entry from S.LU. "Salukis," who finished one, two, three in the order mentioned. These top flighters in th e all around had a tough time of it though m a tching skills with some outstanding indi-

vidual entries. Only in one event, the Parallel Bars, did an all around winner place first. Thi,s was done by Fred Orlofsky. In the other all a round events, Rusty Mitchell, S .LU. won th e free e x. event. The Side Horse was picked of by Bill Buck, Chicago Turners, the Ring event by Denny Wolf from S.LU. a nd Denny did it once more in the Horizon tal Bar, as such being the only double winner in the meet. Th e Long Horse eve·nt was won by Bruno Kla use from S.L U. The Trampolin e and Tumbling events were equally spectacular with Gary Erwin from the Univ. of Michigan doing a fine routine including a triple back somersault. The phenominal tumbling machine Hal Holmes made short work of thLs event netting a 97.5 the highest score given in all events. M. G. A . TO OBTAIN NEW FILM

The M.G.A. is announcing the rental and pUrchase of a new and thrilling gymnastic sound film entitied "Midwest Gymnastics." It has many exciting routines by top performers with slow motion sequences repeated from various angles. Watch for more details in the next edition.

BEN PRICE INVITATIONAL The "Ben Price I~vitational" is one of the season's top All·Around competitions in the Southern California area. This year's mee t at Pasadena City College proved ou t· standin g as usual with J erry Todd doing; a fin e job as meet director. Art Shurlock was the top scorer follow ed by Armand Vega and fifteen·year·old Los Angeles high school sensation , Makute Sa· kamoto. Routines and moves of note were Joe Kappi's floor Maltese and full· twi sting; semi to a split, iVlakato Sacamoto's peach basket immediate straddle on the P·Bars, Terry Montero's back giant hop to hand· stand reverse grip immediate stoop through high shoot to eagle gia nts, Jim Amerine's ring routine, Gary Buckner's tremendous hetch di smount from the High·Bar, Vega's Horse Vault and Shurlock's consistency in all events to come through with a top calibre routine to beat out Vega by a nar· row margin to win the All·Around.

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USGF Director Frank Bare congratulating Art Shurlock on winning the Ben Price Invitationa l. Other all-around placers pictured: L-R: Amerine, Vega, (Sublock), Sakamoto, Montero and Klus. Shown below: Buckner, Montero, Nappi and Sakamoto.

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Profile for USA Gymnastics

Modern Gymnast - January/February 1963  

Modern Gymnast - January/February 1963