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CALENDAR OF EVENTS Activities August 23 Bereavement Volunteer Training 50 Moffett Street, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Family Hospice is available to caregivers for up to 13 months following the death of a loved one. Volunteers play a significant role in the support of the bereaved. An additional training will be offered on August 27 and 28 for those who prefer evening training. To learn more, contact the Bereavement Department at 412-572-8829. September 6 Annual Memorial Walk & Run North Shore Riverfront Park (by Bettis Grille 36). Check-in and preliminary activities begin at 8:30 a.m.; Walk and Run begins at 10 a.m. See page 3 for details. Register at FamilyHospicePA.org or call Christine Jamison at 412-572-8812 by August 22. Proceeds benefit patient and family programs. September 20 Family Treasures Sale 50 Moffett Street, Mt. Lebanon. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. High-quality goods for resale. See ad on page 2. Presented by Friends of Family Hospice. All proceeds benefit patient and family programs. October 4 Patient Volunteer Training 50 Moffett Street, Mt. Lebanon. Contact Nick Petti, Manager of Volunteers, at 412-572-8806 or via e-mail, npetti@ FamilyHospicePA.org, for more information and registration.

Education for Professionals August 27 Communicating Bad News – Developing the Right Message Weatherwood Manor, 896 Weatherwood Lane, Greensburg, 8:30 to 11 a.m. Two free continuing education credits for RNs, MSWs, NHAs and PCHAs. Light breakfast served. R.S.V.P. by August 25. Contact Louise Farelli, lfarelli@FamilyHospicePA.org, 412-651-2591 or Julie Alakson, alaksonjc@upmc.edu, 412-582-5013.

Bereavement September 27 Triumph Over Loss Auberle’s Therapeutic Challenge Course, 1101 Hartman Street McKeesport. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. For grieving teenagers ages 13 – 18 and their caregivers. Pre-registration required. Contact our Bereavement Department at 412-572-8829 or visit FamilyHospicePA.org for information and registration. October 1 Growing Through Grief – Rebuilding Hope Southminster House, 801 Washington Road, Mt. Lebanon. Runs six consecutive Tuesdays through Nov.5 from 1 to 3 p.m. Pre-registration required. Contact the Bereavement Department at 412-572-8829 or visit FamilyHospicePA.org for information and registration. October 19 Fall Ecumenical Memorial Service St. Paul’s Cathedral, Fifth Avenue, Oakland. 3 p.m. Light reception follows. For information or to volunteer in support of the event, call 412-572-8829.

August 28 Communicating Bad News – Developing the Right Message Arrowood Independent Living, 512 Lewis Run Road, West Mifflin, 4 to 6:30 p.m. Two free continuing education units for RNs, SWs, NHAs and PCHAs. Light dinner served. R.S.V.P. by August 25 to Christina Romel, cromel@ltcmail.com, 412-651-1711.

Caregiver Support

September 10 Pain and Symptom Management with the Critically Ill Patient Presbyterian SeniorCare, 835 South Main Street, Hillsview Chapel, Washington, 4 to 6:30 p.m. Two free continuing education units for RNs, SWs, NHAs and PCHAs. R.S.V.P. to Kelley Mercurio, 724-223-5676, kmercurio@SrCare.org.

Caregiver Training ProgramTM All sessions are offered by appointment. Contact Cathy Lattore, 412-651-2568. Family Hospice Inpatient Center/ Mt. Lebanon 50 Moffett Street, Mt. Lebanon. Tuesdays from 10 a.m. to Noon. Family Hospice Inpatient Center/ Lawrenceville 310 Fisk Street, Pittsburgh 15201. Grove City Medical Center 631 North Broad Street, Grove City. Fridays. All Bereavement and Caregiver Training Programs are offered at no cost.

Family Hospice & Palliative Care 50 Moffett Street Pittsburgh, PA 15243

Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage Paid Pittsburgh, PA Permit No. 02743

2014 SUMMER NEWSLETTER

Having “The Talk” O

n a recent Tuesday afternoon in July, Family Hospice and Palliative Care Social Worker Jane Barthen stood up to address a large audience of residents at Providence Point in Mt. Lebanon. “You need to hear about my marital problems,” Jane began. “A few mornings ago, my beloved husband of 30 years asked me what I wanted for dinner that night. I suggested Italian. He said, ‘how about Chinese?’ to which I replied, ‘No, I’d prefer Italian.’” Later that night she came home to Chinese. Jane asked, “Why did you ask me if your intention all along was Chinese?” to which her husband replied, “I thought maybe you’d change your mind by 5 o’clock.”

Paying It Forward Every day for the last ten years, Lois O’Connor and M. Elinor Fleming, “Doe” and “Elly” respectively, called each other at nine o’clock in the morning. Cousins who became steadfast friends, each checked to make sure the other was safe and well. But beyond that, the richness of their friendship was such that Doe and Elly simply took delight in the sound of the other’s voice, reflecting on the news of the day and recollecting past escapades. Doe and Elly remained united even when opinions differed, especially when fun was afoot, and regardless of physical separation. Some years back, the pair dressed as flappers and surprised guests at a family reunion by performing an entire revue of songs; when Doe described the adventure recently, it was with an enduring joy. So when Elly received a diagnosis of end-stage pancreatic cancer earlier this year, Doe was, by her own admission, devastated. Elly’s response was different. She said, “Well, Doe, that means I’ve got to take a look at my life.” Doe recognized Elly’s characteristic willingness to accept her circumstances, born of a life well-lived and an abiding faith, manifest in her many years of service as a respected and beloved Christian Education Director throughout the region. “Everybody that knew her adored her,” Doe shared. “She had a dry sense of humor and didn’t take anything too seriously, least of all herself. She had empathy.”

Mission Statement The Mission of Family Hospice and Palliative Care is to provide compassionate, quality comfort care that enhances the lives of people with life-limiting illness and their families.

Board of Directors Doe followed her friend’s example of gratitude by making a financial contribution to Family Hospice and Palliative Care in Elly’s honor. She felt her gift could serve as a kind of “scholarship” for someone who might not otherwise be able to access the care that allowed Elly to live out her life in comfort and dignity in the environment of her choice. It’s a gift reflecting their years of friendship. “You do it,” said Doe of her contribution, “because it’s what your heart tells you.” Contributions to Family Hospice made by grateful family members and friends make up the largest percentage of the organization’s philanthropic support. Funds are used to provide services for those eligible for hospice but whose care is not covered by Medicare, Medicaid or private insurance. Support from donors also aids the organization’s outreach to bereaved family members, including support groups for adults and one-day camps for children and teens grieving the loss of a loved one. To learn how you can “pay it forward,” contact Lynn Helbling Sirinek,Vice President of Philanthropy, at 412-572-8874 or lhsirinek@FamilyHospicePA.org.

“The moral of the story,” explained Jane as the laughter subsided, “is that even after 30 years, you still may not know what your loved one wants.” Jane offered this anecdote as part of a panel discussion on the value of talking with your loved ones about what you want should your health decline. The event at Providence Point was hosted by Family Hospice volunteers Nancy Gannon, Carole Gilardi and Carol Vockel. Labeled simply “The Talk,” Family Hospice is facilitating an ongoing series of these discussions throughout the community. Joining Jane on the panel at Providence Point was Family Hospice Team Physician Dr. Myles Zuckerman and Elder Law Attorney Karen Timko of Julian Gray Associates. While completing a written document such as an advance directive is an important measure in conveying your wishes, all three panelists emphasized that dialogue among caregivers most effectively alleviates the potential for guilt and second-guessing that can haunt loved ones. “Without conversation, there are empty spaces left that can create a burden in decision making,” explained Karen. Ideally, the conversation should be ongoing and take place before a health crisis occurs.

Continued inside right

Robert E. Butter, Chair Deborah Brodine, Vice Chair Bruce Austin, Secretary Paul Winkler, Immediate Past Chair Kathi R. Boyle Kimberly Ward Burns

David Friedland, MD Robert C. Jackson, Jr. Joseph E. Kennedy Barry C. Lembersky, MD Lisa Turbeville Markowski Sandra Tomlinson G. Alan Yeasted, MD

Barbara Ivanko, President and CEO Franco Insana, Treasurer

Institutional Advancement Committee Lisa Turbeville Markowski, Chair Robert E. Butter Ruth G. Foltz Robert A. Frank Nancy F. Gannon

Caroline Hellwig Jane D. Johnson Joseph E. Kennedy Lila Prezioso Christine McMahon Tumpson

FamilyHospicePA.org


JOIN US IN REMEMBRANCE AND CELEBRATION Dear Friends, As this newsletter is arriving to you, I am celebrating my first anniversary with Family Hospice and Palliative Care. In marriage, paper is the traditional gift marking a first anniversary; it denotes the acquisition of knowledge. I can say most sincerely that I have learned so much in the course of this first year — about real neighborhood living and about the tremendous cultural and natural resources here in Western Pennsylvania, for instance. But above all else, I’ve learned about commitment. It’s the decades-long commitment of friends Doe and Elly to each other, steadfast even as Elly’s life drew to a close. It’s the commitment of Nick, our student volunteer and aspiring physician, to make his opportunity meaningful in support of patients and families, present and future. It’s the commitment of family and friends who return to our Memorial Walk, now a Walk/Run, in honor of loved ones lost, year after year. It’s the commitment between a parent and a child, between spouses, between friends, to talk with one another openly and courageously about end-of-life wishes. And it is the sustained commitment of our volunteers, donors and staff to the mission of caring for individuals and families facing life-limiting illness at the highest levels of compassion and quality. I’ve always felt that there are two types of people in hospice — those who care for the patients and those who care for those who care for the patients. I’m honored to be a part of the latter group here at Family Hospice and Palliative Care. That’s my commitment to you. Gratefully,

Volunteering Expands Student’s Classroom

Family Treasures Sale Saturday, September 20 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Family Hospice & Palliative Care 50 Moffett Street Pittsburgh, PA 15243 Don’t Miss It! This sale is loaded with: Beautiful furniture — sofas, tables, chairs, bookcases, and large office pieces Accessories — lamps, china, glassware Collectibles, including artwork Purses Scarves Jewelry Books This fantastic inventory is donated entirely by the community. Every dollar raised at the sale will go directly to Family Hospice for the comfort and care of patients and their families in all settings. Presented by Friends of Family Hospice.

Saturday, September 6, 2014 10 a.m. (Check-in opens at 8:30 a.m.) North Shore Riverfront Park We’ve added a 5K Run to this year’s event! Warm up for the Great Race with us!

The Walk is 1.5K or 3K if walkers make the loop twice. • Enjoy music, refreshments and social time with pets • Attend special video tribute for those being remembered • Participate in recognition of veterans • Kids can record their own newscast, compliments of KDKA-AM • Meet emcee Shelley Duffy of Star 100.7 and KDKA-AM radio • Cost is $30 per participant and includes t-shirt and time chip for runners

Register today at FamilyHospicePA.org or call Christine Jamison at 412-572-8812.

Kids 12 and under participate for free; children’s t-shirts are $10

Visit FamilyHospicePA.org for Walk and Run routes. Thanks to our sponsors: UPMC, Clark Hill, National HME, Cura Hospitality, Crowe Horwath, Fort Pitt Capital Group, Veritas, Presbyterian SeniorCare, ParenteBeard, Trib Total Media, KDKA-AM, Capital Wine & Spirits, Rusmur Floors, Culligan, Rivertowne Brewing, Aldi, First National Bank, Ameritas, Huntington, Bruegger’s, and Washington Health System.

Why We Walk “ My mother, Cynthia ‘CeCe’ Lackner, was extremely outgoing and truly the life of the party. Her huge heart and selfless personality always shone through everything she did. Coming together with other families to celebrate the lives of amazing people is something that my mother would have loved. Arm in arm, hand in hand, we walk to remember lives that were taken too soon, but celebrate the wonderful and loving years they spent on this earth.” - Kimberly Lackner Mauro

Please engrave the following name into the Celebration of Life Wall: 20 character maximum, including spaces. Please print CLEARLY.

Barbara Ivanko President & CEO

Your Name

Your Street Address

City, State, ZIP

Your Email Address

PAY BY CHECK: Make your $1,000 tax-deductible check to Family Hospice & Palliative Care.

This newsletter is published three times annually. Permission must be granted for reprinting of articles that appear here. Please direct questions, comments and/or requests to Liz McKenna at 412-572-8468 or lmckenna@FamilyHospicePA.org. Go Green! If you would prefer to receive your copy of our newsletter via e-mail, sign up from the home page of our website or contact Liz McKenna as indicated above.

Remember Family Hospice 171 on you United Way pledge

Celebration of Life Wall

PAY BY CREDIT CARD: ___ Visa ___ MasterCard ___ American Express ___ Discover Your Card No.

Expiration Date

3-Digit Security Code

Mail to: Family Hospice, Development Office, 50 Moffett Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15243

Nick Choi will soon begin his second year as a pre-med student at the University of Pittsburgh and as a patient volunteer with Family Hospice and Palliative Care. Although his freshman year coursework consisted largely of prerequisites, one gets the sense that some of his most important learning happened outside the classroom at Family Hospice’s Inpatient Center in Lawrenceville where he volunteers regularly answering phones, sitting with patients and playing the violin for guests. Before coming to the inpatient hospice center, Nick admits he expected to find mostly “old people lying in bed,” and initially, he didn’t think his time spent sitting with patients was much of a contribution on his part. “The nurses helped me understand that if I simply held someone’s hand and let them know I was there, it could be the difference in their sense of calm and comfort.” Nick’s greatest surprise has been the opportunity to interact with families; he describes their enthusiasm for his music in particular as “overwhelming and gratifying.” Nick now recognizes that the family’s needs are as significant as those of the patient, and he appreciates how and why the hospice team goes to such lengths to create a comfortable environment for all. With a new school year getting underway soon, Nick wants students who are considering volunteering to know that Family Hospice offers an excellent setting in which to interact with patients and families, an opportunity he was not afforded in the hospital where he volunteered previously. Says Nick, “Dr. White (Co-Chief Medical Officer and Team Physician for the Inpatient Center in Lawrenceville) became a doctor because he loved volunteering. He’s a great mentor.” Additionally, Nick finds that many pre-med students approach volunteering as a requirement, but he stresses that it can be meaningful in and of itself. Nick explains, “I played my violin for a professor in the School of Music at Duquesne. I was honored to have given the last live performance of music he heard. I also played on Valentine’s Day for a husband and wife. It’s real life. And I can tell you that being here makes me more loving towards my own family.” Intelligent, engaged and thoughtful in word and deed, it’s easy to imagine that Nick will succeed in his goal of

becoming a physician. It’s a goal his fellow hospice team members embrace. “If we have contributed to Nick’s development as a compassionate and knowledgeable physician,” says RN Clinical Supervisor Susan Whittaker, “we can count our lives successful. To have an impact that can carry on to benefit future patients and families...what a privilege.”

Having “The Talk” Continued from cover page

The panel defined terms related to honoring one’s wishes for end-of-life. For example, in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, an advance directive is comprised of both a living will and a health care power of attorney. A living will details desired medical treatment and only takes effect under one of three conditions: permanent coma, persistent vegetative state, or end-stage medical condition(s) that will take one’s life regardless of treatment. A health care power of attorney designates a person entrusted to make decisions on your behalf when you are no longer able to do so. The designation is not contingent upon blood relationship, age, etc. The person selected as one’s health care power of attorney should be an individual who will not be impeded by timidity or moral grounds in honoring your wishes. Karen suggests identifying three agents, a primary, a successor and a back-up to the successor. So why is all this necessary? Dr. Zuckerman offered the physician’s perspective. “Studies continue to suggest that advances in medicine make living easier but dying harder. More people experience chronic illnesses and impairments; more people are dying in hospitals and facilities. It’s the new norm, but is that what we want? These practices have evolved as a response to that question.” If your community, congregation or civic organization is interested in hosting “The Talk” please contact Lynn Helbling Sirinek, lhsirinek@FamilyHospicePA.org, or via phone at 412-572-8874.


JOIN US IN REMEMBRANCE AND CELEBRATION Dear Friends, As this newsletter is arriving to you, I am celebrating my first anniversary with Family Hospice and Palliative Care. In marriage, paper is the traditional gift marking a first anniversary; it denotes the acquisition of knowledge. I can say most sincerely that I have learned so much in the course of this first year — about real neighborhood living and about the tremendous cultural and natural resources here in Western Pennsylvania, for instance. But above all else, I’ve learned about commitment. It’s the decades-long commitment of friends Doe and Elly to each other, steadfast even as Elly’s life drew to a close. It’s the commitment of Nick, our student volunteer and aspiring physician, to make his opportunity meaningful in support of patients and families, present and future. It’s the commitment of family and friends who return to our Memorial Walk, now a Walk/Run, in honor of loved ones lost, year after year. It’s the commitment between a parent and a child, between spouses, between friends, to talk with one another openly and courageously about end-of-life wishes. And it is the sustained commitment of our volunteers, donors and staff to the mission of caring for individuals and families facing life-limiting illness at the highest levels of compassion and quality. I’ve always felt that there are two types of people in hospice — those who care for the patients and those who care for those who care for the patients. I’m honored to be a part of the latter group here at Family Hospice and Palliative Care. That’s my commitment to you. Gratefully,

Volunteering Expands Student’s Classroom

Family Treasures Sale Saturday, September 20 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Family Hospice & Palliative Care 50 Moffett Street Pittsburgh, PA 15243 Don’t Miss It! This sale is loaded with: Beautiful furniture — sofas, tables, chairs, bookcases, and large office pieces Accessories — lamps, china, glassware Collectibles, including artwork Purses Scarves Jewelry Books This fantastic inventory is donated entirely by the community. Every dollar raised at the sale will go directly to Family Hospice for the comfort and care of patients and their families in all settings. Presented by Friends of Family Hospice.

Saturday, September 6, 2014 10 a.m. (Check-in opens at 8:30 a.m.) North Shore Riverfront Park We’ve added a 5K Run to this year’s event! Warm up for the Great Race with us!

The Walk is 1.5K or 3K if walkers make the loop twice. • Enjoy music, refreshments and social time with pets • Attend special video tribute for those being remembered • Participate in recognition of veterans • Kids can record their own newscast, compliments of KDKA-AM • Meet emcee Shelley Duffy of Star 100.7 and KDKA-AM radio • Cost is $30 per participant and includes t-shirt and time chip for runners

Register today at FamilyHospicePA.org or call Christine Jamison at 412-572-8812.

Kids 12 and under participate for free; children’s t-shirts are $10

Visit FamilyHospicePA.org for Walk and Run routes. Thanks to our sponsors: UPMC, Clark Hill, National HME, Cura Hospitality, Crowe Horwath, Fort Pitt Capital Group, Veritas, Presbyterian SeniorCare, ParenteBeard, Trib Total Media, KDKA-AM, Capital Wine & Spirits, Rusmur Floors, Culligan, Rivertowne Brewing, Aldi, First National Bank, Ameritas, Huntington, Bruegger’s, and Washington Health System.

Why We Walk “ My mother, Cynthia ‘CeCe’ Lackner, was extremely outgoing and truly the life of the party. Her huge heart and selfless personality always shone through everything she did. Coming together with other families to celebrate the lives of amazing people is something that my mother would have loved. Arm in arm, hand in hand, we walk to remember lives that were taken too soon, but celebrate the wonderful and loving years they spent on this earth.” - Kimberly Lackner Mauro

Please engrave the following name into the Celebration of Life Wall: 20 character maximum, including spaces. Please print CLEARLY.

Barbara Ivanko President & CEO

Your Name

Your Street Address

City, State, ZIP

Your Email Address

PAY BY CHECK: Make your $1,000 tax-deductible check to Family Hospice & Palliative Care.

This newsletter is published three times annually. Permission must be granted for reprinting of articles that appear here. Please direct questions, comments and/or requests to Liz McKenna at 412-572-8468 or lmckenna@FamilyHospicePA.org. Go Green! If you would prefer to receive your copy of our newsletter via e-mail, sign up from the home page of our website or contact Liz McKenna as indicated above.

Remember Family Hospice 171 on you United Way pledge

Celebration of Life Wall

PAY BY CREDIT CARD: ___ Visa ___ MasterCard ___ American Express ___ Discover Your Card No.

Expiration Date

3-Digit Security Code

Mail to: Family Hospice, Development Office, 50 Moffett Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15243

Nick Choi will soon begin his second year as a pre-med student at the University of Pittsburgh and as a patient volunteer with Family Hospice and Palliative Care. Although his freshman year coursework consisted largely of prerequisites, one gets the sense that some of his most important learning happened outside the classroom at Family Hospice’s Inpatient Center in Lawrenceville where he volunteers regularly answering phones, sitting with patients and playing the violin for guests. Before coming to the inpatient hospice center, Nick admits he expected to find mostly “old people lying in bed,” and initially, he didn’t think his time spent sitting with patients was much of a contribution on his part. “The nurses helped me understand that if I simply held someone’s hand and let them know I was there, it could be the difference in their sense of calm and comfort.” Nick’s greatest surprise has been the opportunity to interact with families; he describes their enthusiasm for his music in particular as “overwhelming and gratifying.” Nick now recognizes that the family’s needs are as significant as those of the patient, and he appreciates how and why the hospice team goes to such lengths to create a comfortable environment for all. With a new school year getting underway soon, Nick wants students who are considering volunteering to know that Family Hospice offers an excellent setting in which to interact with patients and families, an opportunity he was not afforded in the hospital where he volunteered previously. Says Nick, “Dr. White (Co-Chief Medical Officer and Team Physician for the Inpatient Center in Lawrenceville) became a doctor because he loved volunteering. He’s a great mentor.” Additionally, Nick finds that many pre-med students approach volunteering as a requirement, but he stresses that it can be meaningful in and of itself. Nick explains, “I played my violin for a professor in the School of Music at Duquesne. I was honored to have given the last live performance of music he heard. I also played on Valentine’s Day for a husband and wife. It’s real life. And I can tell you that being here makes me more loving towards my own family.” Intelligent, engaged and thoughtful in word and deed, it’s easy to imagine that Nick will succeed in his goal of

becoming a physician. It’s a goal his fellow hospice team members embrace. “If we have contributed to Nick’s development as a compassionate and knowledgeable physician,” says RN Clinical Supervisor Susan Whittaker, “we can count our lives successful. To have an impact that can carry on to benefit future patients and families...what a privilege.”

Having “The Talk” Continued from cover page

The panel defined terms related to honoring one’s wishes for end-of-life. For example, in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, an advance directive is comprised of both a living will and a health care power of attorney. A living will details desired medical treatment and only takes effect under one of three conditions: permanent coma, persistent vegetative state, or end-stage medical condition(s) that will take one’s life regardless of treatment. A health care power of attorney designates a person entrusted to make decisions on your behalf when you are no longer able to do so. The designation is not contingent upon blood relationship, age, etc. The person selected as one’s health care power of attorney should be an individual who will not be impeded by timidity or moral grounds in honoring your wishes. Karen suggests identifying three agents, a primary, a successor and a back-up to the successor. So why is all this necessary? Dr. Zuckerman offered the physician’s perspective. “Studies continue to suggest that advances in medicine make living easier but dying harder. More people experience chronic illnesses and impairments; more people are dying in hospitals and facilities. It’s the new norm, but is that what we want? These practices have evolved as a response to that question.” If your community, congregation or civic organization is interested in hosting “The Talk” please contact Lynn Helbling Sirinek, lhsirinek@FamilyHospicePA.org, or via phone at 412-572-8874.


JOIN US IN REMEMBRANCE AND CELEBRATION Dear Friends, As this newsletter is arriving to you, I am celebrating my first anniversary with Family Hospice and Palliative Care. In marriage, paper is the traditional gift marking a first anniversary; it denotes the acquisition of knowledge. I can say most sincerely that I have learned so much in the course of this first year — about real neighborhood living and about the tremendous cultural and natural resources here in Western Pennsylvania, for instance. But above all else, I’ve learned about commitment. It’s the decades-long commitment of friends Doe and Elly to each other, steadfast even as Elly’s life drew to a close. It’s the commitment of Nick, our student volunteer and aspiring physician, to make his opportunity meaningful in support of patients and families, present and future. It’s the commitment of family and friends who return to our Memorial Walk, now a Walk/Run, in honor of loved ones lost, year after year. It’s the commitment between a parent and a child, between spouses, between friends, to talk with one another openly and courageously about end-of-life wishes. And it is the sustained commitment of our volunteers, donors and staff to the mission of caring for individuals and families facing life-limiting illness at the highest levels of compassion and quality. I’ve always felt that there are two types of people in hospice — those who care for the patients and those who care for those who care for the patients. I’m honored to be a part of the latter group here at Family Hospice and Palliative Care. That’s my commitment to you. Gratefully,

Volunteering Expands Student’s Classroom

Family Treasures Sale Saturday, September 20 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Family Hospice & Palliative Care 50 Moffett Street Pittsburgh, PA 15243 Don’t Miss It! This sale is loaded with: Beautiful furniture — sofas, tables, chairs, bookcases, and large office pieces Accessories — lamps, china, glassware Collectibles, including artwork Purses Scarves Jewelry Books This fantastic inventory is donated entirely by the community. Every dollar raised at the sale will go directly to Family Hospice for the comfort and care of patients and their families in all settings. Presented by Friends of Family Hospice.

Saturday, September 6, 2014 10 a.m. (Check-in opens at 8:30 a.m.) North Shore Riverfront Park We’ve added a 5K Run to this year’s event! Warm up for the Great Race with us!

The Walk is 1.5K or 3K if walkers make the loop twice. • Enjoy music, refreshments and social time with pets • Attend special video tribute for those being remembered • Participate in recognition of veterans • Kids can record their own newscast, compliments of KDKA-AM • Meet emcee Shelley Duffy of Star 100.7 and KDKA-AM radio • Cost is $30 per participant and includes t-shirt and time chip for runners

Register today at FamilyHospicePA.org or call Christine Jamison at 412-572-8812.

Kids 12 and under participate for free; children’s t-shirts are $10

Visit FamilyHospicePA.org for Walk and Run routes. Thanks to our sponsors: UPMC, Clark Hill, National HME, Cura Hospitality, Crowe Horwath, Fort Pitt Capital Group, Veritas, Presbyterian SeniorCare, ParenteBeard, Trib Total Media, KDKA-AM, Capital Wine & Spirits, Rusmur Floors, Culligan, Rivertowne Brewing, Aldi, First National Bank, Ameritas, Huntington, Bruegger’s, and Washington Health System.

Why We Walk “ My mother, Cynthia ‘CeCe’ Lackner, was extremely outgoing and truly the life of the party. Her huge heart and selfless personality always shone through everything she did. Coming together with other families to celebrate the lives of amazing people is something that my mother would have loved. Arm in arm, hand in hand, we walk to remember lives that were taken too soon, but celebrate the wonderful and loving years they spent on this earth.” - Kimberly Lackner Mauro

Please engrave the following name into the Celebration of Life Wall: 20 character maximum, including spaces. Please print CLEARLY.

Barbara Ivanko President & CEO

Your Name

Your Street Address

City, State, ZIP

Your Email Address

PAY BY CHECK: Make your $1,000 tax-deductible check to Family Hospice & Palliative Care.

This newsletter is published three times annually. Permission must be granted for reprinting of articles that appear here. Please direct questions, comments and/or requests to Liz McKenna at 412-572-8468 or lmckenna@FamilyHospicePA.org. Go Green! If you would prefer to receive your copy of our newsletter via e-mail, sign up from the home page of our website or contact Liz McKenna as indicated above.

Remember Family Hospice 171 on you United Way pledge

Celebration of Life Wall

PAY BY CREDIT CARD: ___ Visa ___ MasterCard ___ American Express ___ Discover Your Card No.

Expiration Date

3-Digit Security Code

Mail to: Family Hospice, Development Office, 50 Moffett Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15243

Nick Choi will soon begin his second year as a pre-med student at the University of Pittsburgh and as a patient volunteer with Family Hospice and Palliative Care. Although his freshman year coursework consisted largely of prerequisites, one gets the sense that some of his most important learning happened outside the classroom at Family Hospice’s Inpatient Center in Lawrenceville where he volunteers regularly answering phones, sitting with patients and playing the violin for guests. Before coming to the inpatient hospice center, Nick admits he expected to find mostly “old people lying in bed,” and initially, he didn’t think his time spent sitting with patients was much of a contribution on his part. “The nurses helped me understand that if I simply held someone’s hand and let them know I was there, it could be the difference in their sense of calm and comfort.” Nick’s greatest surprise has been the opportunity to interact with families; he describes their enthusiasm for his music in particular as “overwhelming and gratifying.” Nick now recognizes that the family’s needs are as significant as those of the patient, and he appreciates how and why the hospice team goes to such lengths to create a comfortable environment for all. With a new school year getting underway soon, Nick wants students who are considering volunteering to know that Family Hospice offers an excellent setting in which to interact with patients and families, an opportunity he was not afforded in the hospital where he volunteered previously. Says Nick, “Dr. White (Co-Chief Medical Officer and Team Physician for the Inpatient Center in Lawrenceville) became a doctor because he loved volunteering. He’s a great mentor.” Additionally, Nick finds that many pre-med students approach volunteering as a requirement, but he stresses that it can be meaningful in and of itself. Nick explains, “I played my violin for a professor in the School of Music at Duquesne. I was honored to have given the last live performance of music he heard. I also played on Valentine’s Day for a husband and wife. It’s real life. And I can tell you that being here makes me more loving towards my own family.” Intelligent, engaged and thoughtful in word and deed, it’s easy to imagine that Nick will succeed in his goal of

becoming a physician. It’s a goal his fellow hospice team members embrace. “If we have contributed to Nick’s development as a compassionate and knowledgeable physician,” says RN Clinical Supervisor Susan Whittaker, “we can count our lives successful. To have an impact that can carry on to benefit future patients and families...what a privilege.”

Having “The Talk” Continued from cover page

The panel defined terms related to honoring one’s wishes for end-of-life. For example, in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, an advance directive is comprised of both a living will and a health care power of attorney. A living will details desired medical treatment and only takes effect under one of three conditions: permanent coma, persistent vegetative state, or end-stage medical condition(s) that will take one’s life regardless of treatment. A health care power of attorney designates a person entrusted to make decisions on your behalf when you are no longer able to do so. The designation is not contingent upon blood relationship, age, etc. The person selected as one’s health care power of attorney should be an individual who will not be impeded by timidity or moral grounds in honoring your wishes. Karen suggests identifying three agents, a primary, a successor and a back-up to the successor. So why is all this necessary? Dr. Zuckerman offered the physician’s perspective. “Studies continue to suggest that advances in medicine make living easier but dying harder. More people experience chronic illnesses and impairments; more people are dying in hospitals and facilities. It’s the new norm, but is that what we want? These practices have evolved as a response to that question.” If your community, congregation or civic organization is interested in hosting “The Talk” please contact Lynn Helbling Sirinek, lhsirinek@FamilyHospicePA.org, or via phone at 412-572-8874.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS Activities August 23 Bereavement Volunteer Training 50 Moffett Street, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Family Hospice is available to caregivers for up to 13 months following the death of a loved one. Volunteers play a significant role in the support of the bereaved. An additional training will be offered on August 27 and 28 for those who prefer evening training. To learn more, contact the Bereavement Department at 412-572-8829. September 6 Annual Memorial Walk & Run North Shore Riverfront Park (by Bettis Grille 36). Check-in and preliminary activities begin at 8:30 a.m.; Walk and Run begins at 10 a.m. See page 3 for details. Register at FamilyHospicePA.org or call Christine Jamison at 412-572-8812 by August 22. Proceeds benefit patient and family programs. September 20 Family Treasures Sale 50 Moffett Street, Mt. Lebanon. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. High-quality goods for resale. See ad on page 2. Presented by Friends of Family Hospice. All proceeds benefit patient and family programs. October 4 Patient Volunteer Training 50 Moffett Street, Mt. Lebanon. Contact Nick Petti, Manager of Volunteers, at 412-572-8806 or via e-mail, npetti@ FamilyHospicePA.org, for more information and registration.

Education for Professionals August 27 Communicating Bad News – Developing the Right Message Weatherwood Manor, 896 Weatherwood Lane, Greensburg, 8:30 to 11 a.m. Two free continuing education credits for RNs, MSWs, NHAs and PCHAs. Light breakfast served. R.S.V.P. by August 25. Contact Louise Farelli, lfarelli@FamilyHospicePA.org, 412-651-2591 or Julie Alakson, alaksonjc@upmc.edu, 412-582-5013.

Bereavement September 27 Triumph Over Loss Auberle’s Therapeutic Challenge Course, 1101 Hartman Street McKeesport. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. For grieving teenagers ages 13 – 18 and their caregivers. Pre-registration required. Contact our Bereavement Department at 412-572-8829 or visit FamilyHospicePA.org for information and registration. October 1 Growing Through Grief – Rebuilding Hope Southminster House, 801 Washington Road, Mt. Lebanon. Runs six consecutive Tuesdays through Nov.5 from 1 to 3 p.m. Pre-registration required. Contact the Bereavement Department at 412-572-8829 or visit FamilyHospicePA.org for information and registration. October 19 Fall Ecumenical Memorial Service St. Paul’s Cathedral, Fifth Avenue, Oakland. 3 p.m. Light reception follows. For information or to volunteer in support of the event, call 412-572-8829.

August 28 Communicating Bad News – Developing the Right Message Arrowood Independent Living, 512 Lewis Run Road, West Mifflin, 4 to 6:30 p.m. Two free continuing education units for RNs, SWs, NHAs and PCHAs. Light dinner served. R.S.V.P. by August 25 to Christina Romel, cromel@ltcmail.com, 412-651-1711.

Caregiver Support

September 10 Pain and Symptom Management with the Critically Ill Patient Presbyterian SeniorCare, 835 South Main Street, Hillsview Chapel, Washington, 4 to 6:30 p.m. Two free continuing education units for RNs, SWs, NHAs and PCHAs. R.S.V.P. to Kelley Mercurio, 724-223-5676, kmercurio@SrCare.org.

Caregiver Training ProgramTM All sessions are offered by appointment. Contact Cathy Lattore, 412-651-2568. Family Hospice Inpatient Center/ Mt. Lebanon 50 Moffett Street, Mt. Lebanon. Tuesdays from 10 a.m. to Noon. Family Hospice Inpatient Center/ Lawrenceville 310 Fisk Street, Pittsburgh 15201. Grove City Medical Center 631 North Broad Street, Grove City. Fridays. All Bereavement and Caregiver Training Programs are offered at no cost.

Family Hospice & Palliative Care 50 Moffett Street Pittsburgh, PA 15243

Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage Paid Pittsburgh, PA Permit No. 02743

2014 SUMMER NEWSLETTER

Having “The Talk” O

n a recent Tuesday afternoon in July, Family Hospice and Palliative Care Social Worker Jane Barthen stood up to address a large audience of residents at Providence Point in Mt. Lebanon. “You need to hear about my marital problems,” Jane began. “A few mornings ago, my beloved husband of 30 years asked me what I wanted for dinner that night. I suggested Italian. He said, ‘how about Chinese?’ to which I replied, ‘No, I’d prefer Italian.’” Later that night she came home to Chinese. Jane asked, “Why did you ask me if your intention all along was Chinese?” to which her husband replied, “I thought maybe you’d change your mind by 5 o’clock.”

Paying It Forward Every day for the last ten years, Lois O’Connor and M. Elinor Fleming, “Doe” and “Elly” respectively, called each other at nine o’clock in the morning. Cousins who became steadfast friends, each checked to make sure the other was safe and well. But beyond that, the richness of their friendship was such that Doe and Elly simply took delight in the sound of the other’s voice, reflecting on the news of the day and recollecting past escapades. Doe and Elly remained united even when opinions differed, especially when fun was afoot, and regardless of physical separation. Some years back, the pair dressed as flappers and surprised guests at a family reunion by performing an entire revue of songs; when Doe described the adventure recently, it was with an enduring joy. So when Elly received a diagnosis of end-stage pancreatic cancer earlier this year, Doe was, by her own admission, devastated. Elly’s response was different. She said, “Well, Doe, that means I’ve got to take a look at my life.” Doe recognized Elly’s characteristic willingness to accept her circumstances, born of a life well-lived and an abiding faith, manifest in her many years of service as a respected and beloved Christian Education Director throughout the region. “Everybody that knew her adored her,” Doe shared. “She had a dry sense of humor and didn’t take anything too seriously, least of all herself. She had empathy.”

Mission Statement The Mission of Family Hospice and Palliative Care is to provide compassionate, quality comfort care that enhances the lives of people with life-limiting illness and their families.

Board of Directors Doe followed her friend’s example of gratitude by making a financial contribution to Family Hospice and Palliative Care in Elly’s honor. She felt her gift could serve as a kind of “scholarship” for someone who might not otherwise be able to access the care that allowed Elly to live out her life in comfort and dignity in the environment of her choice. It’s a gift reflecting their years of friendship. “You do it,” said Doe of her contribution, “because it’s what your heart tells you.” Contributions to Family Hospice made by grateful family members and friends make up the largest percentage of the organization’s philanthropic support. Funds are used to provide services for those eligible for hospice but whose care is not covered by Medicare, Medicaid or private insurance. Support from donors also aids the organization’s outreach to bereaved family members, including support groups for adults and one-day camps for children and teens grieving the loss of a loved one. To learn how you can “pay it forward,” contact Lynn Helbling Sirinek,Vice President of Philanthropy, at 412-572-8874 or lhsirinek@FamilyHospicePA.org.

“The moral of the story,” explained Jane as the laughter subsided, “is that even after 30 years, you still may not know what your loved one wants.” Jane offered this anecdote as part of a panel discussion on the value of talking with your loved ones about what you want should your health decline. The event at Providence Point was hosted by Family Hospice volunteers Nancy Gannon, Carole Gilardi and Carol Vockel. Labeled simply “The Talk,” Family Hospice is facilitating an ongoing series of these discussions throughout the community. Joining Jane on the panel at Providence Point was Family Hospice Team Physician Dr. Myles Zuckerman and Elder Law Attorney Karen Timko of Julian Gray Associates. While completing a written document such as an advance directive is an important measure in conveying your wishes, all three panelists emphasized that dialogue among caregivers most effectively alleviates the potential for guilt and second-guessing that can haunt loved ones. “Without conversation, there are empty spaces left that can create a burden in decision making,” explained Karen. Ideally, the conversation should be ongoing and take place before a health crisis occurs.

Continued inside right

Robert E. Butter, Chair Deborah Brodine, Vice Chair Bruce Austin, Secretary Paul Winkler, Immediate Past Chair Kathi R. Boyle Kimberly Ward Burns

David Friedland, MD Robert C. Jackson, Jr. Joseph E. Kennedy Barry C. Lembersky, MD Lisa Turbeville Markowski Sandra Tomlinson G. Alan Yeasted, MD

Barbara Ivanko, President and CEO Franco Insana, Treasurer

Institutional Advancement Committee Lisa Turbeville Markowski, Chair Robert E. Butter Ruth G. Foltz Robert A. Frank Nancy F. Gannon

Caroline Hellwig Jane D. Johnson Joseph E. Kennedy Lila Prezioso Christine McMahon Tumpson

FamilyHospicePA.org


CALENDAR OF EVENTS Activities August 23 Bereavement Volunteer Training 50 Moffett Street, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Family Hospice is available to caregivers for up to 13 months following the death of a loved one. Volunteers play a significant role in the support of the bereaved. An additional training will be offered on August 27 and 28 for those who prefer evening training. To learn more, contact the Bereavement Department at 412-572-8829. September 6 Annual Memorial Walk & Run North Shore Riverfront Park (by Bettis Grille 36). Check-in and preliminary activities begin at 8:30 a.m.; Walk and Run begins at 10 a.m. See page 3 for details. Register at FamilyHospicePA.org or call Christine Jamison at 412-572-8812 by August 22. Proceeds benefit patient and family programs. September 20 Family Treasures Sale 50 Moffett Street, Mt. Lebanon. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. High-quality goods for resale. See ad on page 2. Presented by Friends of Family Hospice. All proceeds benefit patient and family programs. October 4 Patient Volunteer Training 50 Moffett Street, Mt. Lebanon. Contact Nick Petti, Manager of Volunteers, at 412-572-8806 or via e-mail, npetti@ FamilyHospicePA.org, for more information and registration.

Education for Professionals August 27 Communicating Bad News – Developing the Right Message Weatherwood Manor, 896 Weatherwood Lane, Greensburg, 8:30 to 11 a.m. Two free continuing education credits for RNs, MSWs, NHAs and PCHAs. Light breakfast served. R.S.V.P. by August 25. Contact Louise Farelli, lfarelli@FamilyHospicePA.org, 412-651-2591 or Julie Alakson, alaksonjc@upmc.edu, 412-582-5013.

Bereavement September 27 Triumph Over Loss Auberle’s Therapeutic Challenge Course, 1101 Hartman Street McKeesport. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. For grieving teenagers ages 13 – 18 and their caregivers. Pre-registration required. Contact our Bereavement Department at 412-572-8829 or visit FamilyHospicePA.org for information and registration. October 1 Growing Through Grief – Rebuilding Hope Southminster House, 801 Washington Road, Mt. Lebanon. Runs six consecutive Tuesdays through Nov.5 from 1 to 3 p.m. Pre-registration required. Contact the Bereavement Department at 412-572-8829 or visit FamilyHospicePA.org for information and registration. October 19 Fall Ecumenical Memorial Service St. Paul’s Cathedral, Fifth Avenue, Oakland. 3 p.m. Light reception follows. For information or to volunteer in support of the event, call 412-572-8829.

August 28 Communicating Bad News – Developing the Right Message Arrowood Independent Living, 512 Lewis Run Road, West Mifflin, 4 to 6:30 p.m. Two free continuing education units for RNs, SWs, NHAs and PCHAs. Light dinner served. R.S.V.P. by August 25 to Christina Romel, cromel@ltcmail.com, 412-651-1711.

Caregiver Support

September 10 Pain and Symptom Management with the Critically Ill Patient Presbyterian SeniorCare, 835 South Main Street, Hillsview Chapel, Washington, 4 to 6:30 p.m. Two free continuing education units for RNs, SWs, NHAs and PCHAs. R.S.V.P. to Kelley Mercurio, 724-223-5676, kmercurio@SrCare.org.

Caregiver Training ProgramTM All sessions are offered by appointment. Contact Cathy Lattore, 412-651-2568. Family Hospice Inpatient Center/ Mt. Lebanon 50 Moffett Street, Mt. Lebanon. Tuesdays from 10 a.m. to Noon. Family Hospice Inpatient Center/ Lawrenceville 310 Fisk Street, Pittsburgh 15201. Grove City Medical Center 631 North Broad Street, Grove City. Fridays. All Bereavement and Caregiver Training Programs are offered at no cost.

Family Hospice & Palliative Care 50 Moffett Street Pittsburgh, PA 15243

Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage Paid Pittsburgh, PA Permit No. 02743

2014 SUMMER NEWSLETTER

Having “The Talk” O

n a recent Tuesday afternoon in July, Family Hospice and Palliative Care Social Worker Jane Barthen stood up to address a large audience of residents at Providence Point in Mt. Lebanon. “You need to hear about my marital problems,” Jane began. “A few mornings ago, my beloved husband of 30 years asked me what I wanted for dinner that night. I suggested Italian. He said, ‘how about Chinese?’ to which I replied, ‘No, I’d prefer Italian.’” Later that night she came home to Chinese. Jane asked, “Why did you ask me if your intention all along was Chinese?” to which her husband replied, “I thought maybe you’d change your mind by 5 o’clock.”

Paying It Forward Every day for the last ten years, Lois O’Connor and M. Elinor Fleming, “Doe” and “Elly” respectively, called each other at nine o’clock in the morning. Cousins who became steadfast friends, each checked to make sure the other was safe and well. But beyond that, the richness of their friendship was such that Doe and Elly simply took delight in the sound of the other’s voice, reflecting on the news of the day and recollecting past escapades. Doe and Elly remained united even when opinions differed, especially when fun was afoot, and regardless of physical separation. Some years back, the pair dressed as flappers and surprised guests at a family reunion by performing an entire revue of songs; when Doe described the adventure recently, it was with an enduring joy. So when Elly received a diagnosis of end-stage pancreatic cancer earlier this year, Doe was, by her own admission, devastated. Elly’s response was different. She said, “Well, Doe, that means I’ve got to take a look at my life.” Doe recognized Elly’s characteristic willingness to accept her circumstances, born of a life well-lived and an abiding faith, manifest in her many years of service as a respected and beloved Christian Education Director throughout the region. “Everybody that knew her adored her,” Doe shared. “She had a dry sense of humor and didn’t take anything too seriously, least of all herself. She had empathy.”

Mission Statement The Mission of Family Hospice and Palliative Care is to provide compassionate, quality comfort care that enhances the lives of people with life-limiting illness and their families.

Board of Directors Doe followed her friend’s example of gratitude by making a financial contribution to Family Hospice and Palliative Care in Elly’s honor. She felt her gift could serve as a kind of “scholarship” for someone who might not otherwise be able to access the care that allowed Elly to live out her life in comfort and dignity in the environment of her choice. It’s a gift reflecting their years of friendship. “You do it,” said Doe of her contribution, “because it’s what your heart tells you.” Contributions to Family Hospice made by grateful family members and friends make up the largest percentage of the organization’s philanthropic support. Funds are used to provide services for those eligible for hospice but whose care is not covered by Medicare, Medicaid or private insurance. Support from donors also aids the organization’s outreach to bereaved family members, including support groups for adults and one-day camps for children and teens grieving the loss of a loved one. To learn how you can “pay it forward,” contact Lynn Helbling Sirinek,Vice President of Philanthropy, at 412-572-8874 or lhsirinek@FamilyHospicePA.org.

“The moral of the story,” explained Jane as the laughter subsided, “is that even after 30 years, you still may not know what your loved one wants.” Jane offered this anecdote as part of a panel discussion on the value of talking with your loved ones about what you want should your health decline. The event at Providence Point was hosted by Family Hospice volunteers Nancy Gannon, Carole Gilardi and Carol Vockel. Labeled simply “The Talk,” Family Hospice is facilitating an ongoing series of these discussions throughout the community. Joining Jane on the panel at Providence Point was Family Hospice Team Physician Dr. Myles Zuckerman and Elder Law Attorney Karen Timko of Julian Gray Associates. While completing a written document such as an advance directive is an important measure in conveying your wishes, all three panelists emphasized that dialogue among caregivers most effectively alleviates the potential for guilt and second-guessing that can haunt loved ones. “Without conversation, there are empty spaces left that can create a burden in decision making,” explained Karen. Ideally, the conversation should be ongoing and take place before a health crisis occurs.

Continued inside right

Robert E. Butter, Chair Deborah Brodine, Vice Chair Bruce Austin, Secretary Paul Winkler, Immediate Past Chair Kathi R. Boyle Kimberly Ward Burns

David Friedland, MD Robert C. Jackson, Jr. Joseph E. Kennedy Barry C. Lembersky, MD Lisa Turbeville Markowski Sandra Tomlinson G. Alan Yeasted, MD

Barbara Ivanko, President and CEO Franco Insana, Treasurer

Institutional Advancement Committee Lisa Turbeville Markowski, Chair Robert E. Butter Ruth G. Foltz Robert A. Frank Nancy F. Gannon

Caroline Hellwig Jane D. Johnson Joseph E. Kennedy Lila Prezioso Christine McMahon Tumpson

FamilyHospicePA.org

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Family Hospice & Palliative Care 2014 Summer Newsletter  

Family Hospice & Palliative Care 2014 Summer Newsletter  

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