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University of Rhode Island Kingston, Rhode Island

1984 RENAISSANCE

X\ feeling of

smallness

envelopes

you as you first step onto URI soil. You look around, trying to orientate yourself to this new and seemingly vast environment.

Look

over

there

.

the tallest academic

.

.

Chafee Hall,

building which

Students and parents alike cheer on the RAM players to yet another victory. Then of course there Is the campus pub where students come to party hard after a tough week of

hitting

the books.

All of this and

more

towers above the rest; the Quad with people shuffling back and forth to

at URI. Yet there

games in process and friends socializing with football the friends; and don't forget

photographer

classes,

ultimate

frisbee

stadium, where fans range In age from the very young

to the

old.

moments

that

are

symbolizes life those special

only

a

staff

could catch with his These are the camera.

roving highlights of college life The anxiety on the face of a freshman soon replaced by .

.

.

new

t|99

confident

the graduating happy times are happy memories when we depart URI for

look

of

senior. The not so replaced by the taken with other

us

pursuits.

A secret smile comes to your face as you remember those many special many laughs and those few tears shed as you say farewell to friends at graduation and

friendships, the

those crazy,

nearly carefree, collegej

days. You learned the skills needed

fol

1 your future careers In the classroom, but the life experiences came from the outside social occasions, the

diversity In

of

people

contact

with

you are constantly and from the

organizations

you belonged to In order to make URI that much more

special. Now, with diploma In raise your glass to and say: "The

a

one hand, you toast in the other

Possibilities

Are

Endless."

Dawn MIrone

^^li^

.^j<i^i^ DAWN MIRONE Editor in Chief

COLLEEN DRISCOLL Associate Editor

AMY AARON Senior Co-Editor

JOANN VISCO Senior Co-Editor

COLBY LUNDGREN

Sports Editor

GARY PAZIENZA

Photography

MARCIA DOLLINS

Editor

Activities Editor

MICHELLE BRENNAN Assistant

Photography

KAREN GOLICK

Copy

Ediior

CHRIS ALEIXO Copy Editor

ARTZIEKY Editor

Business

Manager

LESLIE ROSE Assistant Business

Manager

PATRICIA NIELSEN Production Advisor

BRUCE HAMILTON Advisor

-

-

Tabic of Contents

Academics Student Life

Organizations Atliletics

Seniors

i^A

special Events

The America's Cup Gone With The Wind .

.

1983

.

was

the year America lost

a

prized possession that It had held for nearly 125 years. The America's Cup was taken away by the crew of the Australian yacht "Australia 11." The yacht itself was the topic of controversy throughout the trials. The keel, which had wings protruding from Its sides, was said to be illegal. After several meetings with the New York Yachting Association, the claims were dismissed and the grand finale between the U.S. yacht "Liber ty" and the Aussles yacht "Australia 11"

was

set.

America

jumped

to a three to one

advantage and things were looking good for Captain Dennis Conner and his crew. However, a change from heavy winds to light winds shifted the advantage to the Aussles, due to the fact they had a lighter yacht. Australia sailed to three

straight

vic

tories, sinking Americas hopes to

re

tain the Cup. America will have to wait three years to see if she can get back what had been hers so long. This time however, the advantage of home waters are with the Australians, for the race will be held off the coast of

Perth. Geof Rellley

Politicians Battle It Out The are

ing four

question people In America asking nowadays "Who Is go

to lead the nation for the next

years?"

Well, election time will soon be here and the politicians are busily canvassing the United States try ing to drum up support. Ronald Reagan is campaigning for yet another term In the White House. His charismatic leadership will offer tough competition for the battling Democrats, who are each vying for the party's nomination. URI journalism students covered first-hand some of the heavy democratic polltlcing going on in New Hampshire, where the primaries are the first In the nation and the area residents pride themselves on that fact. The eight major contenders for the Democrat presidential ticket were: Reubin Askew, George McGovern, Fritz Holllngs, Alan Cranston, John Glenn, Jesse Jackson, Gary Hart and Walter (Fritz) Ivlondale. As the weeks progressed and the primaries moved from state to state, three fighters have emerged from the battleground. Former Vice President In the Carter Ad ministration, Walter Mondale, ap pears to be the frontrunner. However the "new Ideas" can didate, Gary Hart, has been giving Mondale a run for his money. Jesse Jackson has gained tremen dous headway in the campaign "rainbow coalition." with his Jackson has remained in the limelight of media coverage as the Black contender for the first highest office In the land. He has also organized a large-scale voter registration drive around the country. But alas, who will emerge trium

phant? Only

the

polls will

tell.

Dawn MIrone

14 /

Special

Events

j '

Special Events

/ 15

The DAY AFTER at U.R.I

.

.

-More Than Just

a

Nightmare

special Events

/ 17

''Trivial Pursuit" The New^ Cam^pus Craze What 1951 film featured Ronald a chimp? What film has Marion Crane stabbed to in the Bates Motel? What death drink is the best thirst quencher? If you know the answers to these questions you've probably been playing the new board game sweeping the dorms (and the 'TRIVAL PURSUIT." country) 'Trival Pursuit" is a Canadian board game that tests a player's knowledge of trivia. The questions come from the categories of geography, history, science and nature, sports and leisure, and entertainment. Teams of players compete against each other in answering the wide variety of questions. The object of the game is for the players' game pieces to go around the board, landing on different col ored squares (categories) But you don't have to be a trivia buff to enjoy "Trivial Pursuit." It's a challenging game which forces

Reagan raising

.

people to think together and together. The game has

Both Lapointe and Brady the audience observe that becomes as much absorbed in the do the players. game of trivia as The audience's applause when their winning team got a right answer and the "OHs!" when their players missed the trivia question made this quite evident. "Trivial Pursuit" is the perfect game for a dorm activity, a party, or anywhere because the energy level of the people Involved is, as Lapointe said, "INFECTIOUS!"

work

proven to be a favorite for dorm students and dorm staffs alike and is rising in popularity throughout the campus. The popularity of the game spurred on the Idea of a large scale "Trivial Pursuit" tourna ment. Michael Lapointe and Mark Brady, both Residence Hall coordinators, organized the competitions In the Winter and again In the Spring. Six dorm teams were pitted against each other. The Office of Residential Life was the primary innovator of both tournaments. Both Lapointe and Brady had organized the semi-final competltons In which 14 dorm teams competed against each other in hopes of making It to the finals. The final events were held in the Memorial Union Ballroom and came complete with several television screens so the au dience could watch the action up close. Throughout the in tense the audience games, cheered on their players. Prize drawings were held sporadically to break up the game. Winners

Dawn Mirone

won Caserta Pizzas, Casey's din ners for four, and gift certificates. Three faculty judges were also on hand In case of a disagreement over an answer.

The game is fun, Lapointe said, adding that many of the activities planned In the Residence Halls focus on physical events. "Trivial

Pursuit" is like "mental gym nastics and very informational." "The exciting part for me," said Brady, "is that the game is mental

ly stimulating."

Special Events

/ 19

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PRESIDENT EDDY

22 / President

Eddy

.

.

This year was the start of a new era at the University. It was the beginning of URI's 9th Presidential career here. Edward D. Eddy came to URI on October 1, 1983, from Penn sylvania State University, where he served as Provost. He replaced former President Frank Newman, who left URI to join the Carnegie Foundation. Eddy, 62, was selected from a field of 200 applicants in a sixmonth search. Eddy's love of education and impressive background have helped him to ease into his first year at URI. He is the premier authority on the land-grant college system In America, under which URI was built. Eddy wrote a book enti tled, "Colleges for Our Land and Time," the only complete history of this country's landgrant universities. Eddy is also the recipient of seven honorary degrees and has received the National Brotherhood Award for the Na tional Conference of Christians and Jews. Eddy earned his bachelor and Ph.D degrees in humanities disciplines at Cor nell, and took a masters divinity at Yale.

.

A New Era Begins

Here at URI, he has outlined five

priorities which he has continuous ly stressed. These Include bringing about a greater public recognition of the uniqueness of URI; the development of a budget strategy which will help recognize our potential; a thorough review of URI's dropping enrollment and retention rate; the cultivation of relations with alumni and friends, both politically and financially; and to strive toward a continuation genuine excellence in all that we do.

Eddy called his first semester here "exciting," and said that 1984's biggest challenge will be to set in motion and continue a sense of momentum that the University is really on its way toward a "gen uine jump in quality." Eddy believes URI under estimates itself, and hopes his positive tone and love for the University will help spread the word of URI and its resources.

Kathy Rainaldi

President

Eddy

/ 23

Anatomy of a Journalism

Major DRESS:

Rumpled sweatshirt, blue Jeans with small notepad In back pocket, Bogarttype hat, tape recorder packed in jacket pocket, camera hanging around neck, port-a-pack harnessed on back, newspaper in hand, dark glasses complete the outfit so potential interviewees don't recognize the J-major.

HANGOUTS:

The Good SC Cigar, The Great Swamp Gazette,

Renaissance, WRIU, SVC or the Journalism office. (If they aren't here they may possibly be in class.)

HABITS:

late to class because of late night

Always

deadlines, frequent headaches due to VDT

(Visual Display Terminal) eyestrain, avid reader of The Providence Journal and Newsweek magazine (because of Journalism assignments) and viewer of at least three news shows per day. ,

WORKING ENVIRONMENT:

Offices cluttered with

newspapers, books,

crumpled papers, halfempty cups of coffee and ashtrays filled with cigarette butts.

EXPRESSIONS:

"My whole copy was erased by this@#$* VDTI", "Who's doing layouts?", "Did the copy go to press?", "What do you mean there's no footage?", "My tape

ran

out and I lost the

best part of the Senate

meeting!" Dawn Mirone 24 / Journalism

Majoi

Journalism

Major

/ 25

Perfect Places to

Study? If you

are on

the URI campus with the intention of

studying, you have no excuse for not doing so. If you look hard enough, you are bound to find a study spot made exclusively for you. Here is just a sampling of the popular places to study on campus. The infamous University Library is the place for the "serious studler." You probably went there many times with high hopes of leaving within the hour, but never actually seeing the light of day again. Finals are always a fun time at the library. You get there at 8:30 in the morning all psyched to study, and end up stu dying on the stairs. Such Is the life of the "serious studlers." The commuter lounge Is another place you might try to study. But there are three words which have often curbed people's studying habits in the com muter lounge: BIG SCREEN T.V. Need I say more? The Ram's Den Is the ideal studying spot for those

26 /

studying

students who love to eat while studying. People claim they go there to study, but everyone knows their true intentions are gossiping with friends, of course. All In all, an excellent place to avoid studying. After failing miserably in the Ram's Den, students often escape to the Browsing Room. A perfect place to study (on the surface anyway.) It is quiet and comfortable. But comfort is the main problem. After sitting on the soft cushions for a few minutes, students end up catching a few winks of sleep. So you see, studying can be a problem at URI. All spots have their advantages, but these advantages are not necessarily academic. As in the case with most students, you probably end up back where you started from YOUR OWN ROOM!

Karen Golick and Chris Alelxo

Food for

Thought

A very Food, Glorious Food serious and fulfilling pursuit of college students is that ot food. This is an ac tivity that every student can sink his or her teeth into. In tour years one can ex perience ail the different tastes and styles that URI and Rhode Island have ...

to offer. Of course there are many factors which will determine the choice such as: time, budget, current cravings, at mosphere, and mobility. To begin with, there are the three dining halls (we

W/illiams

can't forget these) Roger and Butterfield serve the standard dai ly fare, and Hope Hall has the specialty dinners ranging from roast beef to the .

popular breakfast night. always the chance that your dorm will be having one of the notorious Fall or Spring cook-outs. Everything seems to taste better on a grill, even those hamburgers and hot dogs. Besides the excitement of the ever

There Is

If there

are still rumbling stomachs to quieted, you might try Kingston Pizza, Mor's, The Cuproom, The Ram's

food, these cook-outs provide an oppor tunity to enjoy a few games of volleyball, croquet, frisbee, and a chance to enjoy

be

being outside and socializing. If you are really lucky, your dorm may have a clambake. Somebody couid volunteer a special (and secret) recipe for clam chowder, and no doubt the smell

campus. If you have the time and mobility to go off campus, then you can spend many happy hours sampling Rhode

of steamers and corn will draw college students for miles. Even those people new to The Ocean State learn to ap preciate clambakes and the abundance of seafood. Specialty dinners are another favorite activity. These can revolve around countless numbers of themes, many with an international flavor, or they may be a simple potluck dinner. The potluck dinner allows everyone to be involved and to try out their cooking skills, as well as trying out their eating skills when everything is ready. Even if you are not Betty Crocker it's still fun to create own.

a

concoction of your

Del

Den, The Coffee Bake and Caserta's

on

Island's culinary delight. It's guaranteed that you will find something to satisfy even the most selective eaters. If it is true that man cannot live by

bread alone, then it is also true that col cannot live by pizza and or can they? hamburgers alone The variety of food choices on campus and off campus are so extensive that we

lege students

...

can

safely say

The Possibilities Are

Endless! The

Galloping

Gourmet

College Professors Making the Grade? Learning Is a funny thing. It Is funny In that a major aspect of the experience is drawn individual teacher. the Students at the university find that there are a variety of teachers with their own unique methods of Instructing to pick and choose from. Mr. Con D. Cending is one type of professor. He may appear passive and subdued outside of class, however his true colors are Illustrated in the classroom set ting. Mr Cending Is the type who takes immeasurable pleasure in from

terrorizing

(and

tyrannizing)

students. transformation he The undergoes can be likened to that of the fictional character. Dr. Jeckyl/Mr. Hyde. Yes, when the transformation occurs, Mr. Cending's mere presence in a 100yard radius causes students to quiver in fear. Mr. Cending talks "at" students, often punctuating his lecture content with his own opinions (which he expects to be taken as undisputable fact) This Great Communicator of personal knowledge will overwhelm and humiliate any student who dares to ask a "dumb" question. Iiva Relic (Ms. Relic as she prefers) is another type of teacher. She Is not ferocious as Professor Cending mainly because she lost her bite quite some years before. Ms. Relic is a teacher who is well beyond the age of retire ment. She's the person who never leaves her classroom because in the back of her mind is a fear of being sent away to the "Old Teacher's Home." Unfortunately for the students in this situation, the class material is as outdated as Ms. Relic herself. She tends to teach the same old tired curriculums year after year after year zzzz. .

.

30 / Teachers

.

.

You'd almost think she would know her lectures by heart. However memory lapses force Ms. Relic to refer to the yellowed pages of notes she has faithfully carried around for years. Although the curricula are the same, class lectures often stray off into unforeseen directions. Talk of the grandchildren or The Great War usually pop up. Other times she tends to doze off in mid-sentence. A quick shake of her arm or the dropping of a book is almost guaranteed to bring Professor Relic around. This brings me to the type of teacher that never needs a shake. Dr Noah All is a variety of pro fessor who views solitary research work as one of life's single greatest pleasures. He is quite brilliant in his field, however he lacks the ability to communicate on the level which students can understand. As a matter of fact,

teaching pupils is

group of

college-aged seen as quite a bore by He much prefers talking to a

Dr. All. other Ph.d's rather than to the lower-echelon students, which is no

well-kept

secret.

Dr. Alt is the sort who struts into class at the precise starting time, lectures from precise notes and struts out of class at the precise ending time. Office hours are limited. However if a stray student happens to catch Dr. All out of class, he or she will quickly regret it. Why? Because the student will have probably interrupted the instructor's researcti work. On the other side of the coin, are the teachers like M. T. Heded. She is frequently late to class and virtually never prepared. Homework assignments are sparse and rarely collected. Class sessions are generally cut short due to Ms. Heded's lack of adequate material. The style of instructing is very laid back and relaxed, so relaxed that neither the teacher nor the students care much about what is going on in the classroom (by the way these classes are perfect for catching a few winks of sleep) The general appearance of Ms. Heded is disheveled. Clothing is .

and coffee-stained. Notebooks have papers all askew. Ms. Heded's class notes on the blackboard appear similar to the

rumpled

of a two-year-old playing for the first time with crayons. This disorganized professorial type often loses her train of thought in mid-stream. Making appoint ments to see Ms. Heded is useless since she tends to be absentminded, so much so that she never does learn the names of the 15 students in her class. Often the students are recognized in class lectures as "Hey you!" or "You in the red-striped shirt." Ms. Heded brings me to my final

scrawlings

professorial these a

rare

type.

Unfortunately

and women do not go by because they are so to find on a college campus. men

given

name

These instructors are dedicated to their professions and strive to make class discussions enlightening and interesting. Their personalities are dynamic and outgoing. One of the best aspects of class time is that students' views are respected and encouraged in class. Students are also strongly encouraged to seek help after class hours if they need to. This type of teacher makes class lecture exciting and current, but unfortunatley there are only a few of this type around.

Dawn Mirone

College: It's

32 / Academics

Not

ALL Work and No Play

Academics / 33

Student Life

Homecoming Extravaganza

36 /

Homecoming

Welconve Home David Packer Homecoming

/ 37

The Trials and Tribulations of RESIDENT ASSISTANTS known as

They're

party poopers

and downright pains They're treated like (or worse yet, police of ficers!), and are not supposed to have social lives or problems of their own. They're often disrespected, verbally harassed, and misunderstood by ignorant .

.

.

narcs

in the aliens

.

.

.

butt.

peers. But when those same peers need KNOCK, something KNOCK, KNOCK! It's the Resident Assistant's door .

they pound

.

.

on.

A Resident Assistant Is more than simply a hall babysitter. That's part of it. But certianly more goes into an RA's job of organizing and supervising a 250-residence hall than most people realize. RAs work with the Residence Hall Coor dinator (RHC) to assure a safe and comfortable living environment for students. They're the ones who sort the mail, fill the soda machine, make the posters, and run the dorm social

and educational programs. They're the ones who stay in (even on Thursday nights!) in case someone has a problem or needs a helping hand. They're the ones who advise or comfort the homesick freshman, provide direction and sincerity to sophomores, lead an ear to juniors, and share an understanding smile with seniors. They're the ones who people can for just conveniently turn to about anything. RAs are human too. They have feelings, faults, uncertainties, and problems just like everyone else. They don't always have all the answers, and they're not perfect. But they do try to help people. That's their job. A Resident Assistant must assume several different roles at once friend, counselor, social

empattietic

.

director, listener,

.

.

aid, speaker, administrator, leader,

resource

planner, organizer, and student. It's not an easy task. But for those of us who have ever had the pleasure of being cursed at by drunken rowdies or survived ...

Thursday, Friday,

Saturday night appreciate the responsibilities and challenges of being a Resident Assistant. And for those of us who have also given new hope to a suicidal student or provided security to a frustrated on-call

...

or

we can

.

freshman

.

.

succeeded in pro mpting an entire floor to participate in a dorm function or received a simple "thank you" from a depar we can ap ting dorm resident preciate the intrinsic rewards and satisfaction that that same RA job or

...

...

...

bring. Being a Resident

can

Assistant isn't fun (and living may not be URI residence halls without them. And

always easy next-door

or

to

one

But couldn't last URI residents KNOCK, KNOCK, KNOCK. .couldn't either.

either!)

.

.

.

.

.

Janet Simmons

Resident Assistants / 39

SPRING BREAK the Warmth

-

Just when the winter blues hit you and the homework starts to pile up, dreams of a tropical vaca tion creep into your mind. Yes, it's Spring Break time again. Pack up s our swimsuits, shorts and tanning oil and head to Florida college spring break capital of the world. Your first day there and the breeze is gently blowing through the palm trees as you slowly sip that cool, refreshing strawberry daiquiri. You stretch out in your

lounge chair,

while you

dangle

one

foot into the water of the swim

ming pool. It feels great to leave the East Coast with Its minus 10 degree weather and blustering snowstorms. What a change of it is in Florida-80 degree pace weather and not a care in the worid. You reflect back to your last great decision: scrambling to book a flight out of Rhode Island, while some of your friends decided to up the car and drive down. Now the hardest decision you face is which beach to head to first. Of course there are plenty to choose from. All of them have the pearly-white sands and turquoiseblue waters. So you drive your car to Daytona Beach. The surf is high and there Is plenty of traffic right on the beach. The sand has been turned into a freeway as you see dunebuggies race down the stretch of sand. So like everyone else, you steer your car onto the sand and drive along the coast un til you find a piace to park. Or maybe you decide to spend an afternoon at one of the quieter and less congested beaches. Palm

just pack

Feel

Beach and Cocao Beach offer solitude and a gently rolling surf. But like most college students out for a good time, you spend several days in Fort Lauderdale. The area is filled with students from across the United States with the same thing on their minds FUN! Along the strip are the overlycrowded watering holes. Each of them boasts of drink specials and live bands or other activities. There's Penrods and The Button with the long lines of thirsty people waiting for some room at the bar. The sidewalks are packed with people socializing and shopping. The nightlife looks to be promis ing: more drink specials, college night parties, wet T-shirt contests and a Belly-Flop competition! Because you decide to cash in on some more adventure, you take a drive to the biggest playground in the country Disney Worid. With all of the rides, games and feature attractions you could spend the entire week here just expioring. Seaworld is right next door and so is Epcot Center. There are all sorts of seal shows and whale and dolphin tricks. But look out for those alligators you just never know when one might crawl up to you on the beach someday. Unfortunately, the fun comes to an end. You swear that this was the quickest week of the whole year. The next thing you know, some

.

.

.

you are pulling on your heavy, winter parka and snowboots.

Dawn Mirone

Spring

Bteak I 41

Spring

Break

.

.

.

^

42 /

Spring

Break

.

Spring

Break / 43

Excitenvent

Begins

at

ROSECLIFF

a

We arrived at the front door in chauffer driven Volvo. This

Newport estate, sized

"summer

jammed "Evening festivities

with

a moderately cottage" was

couples.

of

Elegance" being given by

The and the

Weekenders. walked to the door, I noticed the name, ROSECLIFF, As

we

engraved on a gold-antique plate in a white-stone block. In a moment

of

contradiction,

I

stopped thinking the invitation was

from Mr. and Mrs. Week

Mr. not and Mrs. Rosecliff. I turned to tfie doorman and inquired, "Is this the home of

ender

Mr. and Mrs. Weekender?"

!lM^

He grunted, snatched my hat and coat and shut the door behind me.

I found myself in a small but elegantly decorated atrium, listen ing to the echo of shoes on the marble floor. My attention was diverted for the moment by a rapid flash of light In the distance. The

main attraction velvet

an

red-carpeted

enormous

staircase

spiraling to the left and right out lining the shape of a heart. Couples gathered, posing to have their pictures taken by the photographers below. I was then swept Into a majestic ballroom. I found myself among 275

of

the

from the URI

wealthiest

socialites

community. Mingling

among these debutants was the wealthiest couple of them all President Eddy and his wife Polly. White

quets

table of

clothes

adorned the room, while across the floor ballads played by the

whirled

renowned

'Shittons.'

bou

with

long-stemmed

roses

couples to

Many

the

worldother

remaining stationary were served hors'd'oeuvres and punch. When midnight rolled around, the dimly lit lights and the ballroom disappeared and I found myself back at the wheel in a beat-up blue volvo wagon.

Kathy Carr

Don't RAIN On My Parade

46 / Rain and Mud

It's

and up after a great had a fantastic weekend, and the last thing you want to do is raise your head from the pillows. But, after pressing the snooze button on your alarm five times, you finally get up. You over a

Monday morning,

you're waking sleep. You

your early morning doubts, and resolve to have a good day. You take a nice hot shower, put on your nicest jeans, and make the come

long trip to the door. When you finally get there, you look out the window,

and worst your nightmares are realized. It's rain at URI! Your mood ing ruined, you venture outside and head for class. Of course, your class is at Fine Arts, and you have to walk across the quad. Walking across the Quad in a rainstorm takes skill and daring. You better have kneehigh boots on, or your favorite pair

of white Pony's will soon be a nice shade of brown. But that's the beauty of URI dur muck and mire at experiencing this we all learned phenomenon to stay in bed, and press that snooze button one more time.

ing

a

rainy day:

its finest.

After

once,

Chris Alelxo

Rain and Mud / 47

Simon Sez

48 / Simon Sez

MAYBE

TOMORROW

.

.

.

It's very difficult for me to write this story. I have an urge to do Anything else! something else But everybody procrastinates. Some just do It better than others. I think I do It better than most. I'd tell you about It but I do not want to do It now. To tell you the truth, the only reason I'm starting to write this Is because I have a paper due tomorrow, and my book Is on the other side of the room. That would mean getting up, going to the other side of the room, coming back, and getting re-settled. I'll be back in a minute, I've got to get a drink in the Ram's Den. Anyway, where was I? Oh forget It, someone will probably do this story next year. I don't have the time right now. .

.

.

Everett Mollo

FINAL EXAMS

.

.

.

Final Exams: These two ap parently harmless words in still

a

of

us,

feeling

of dread in each

for

one

reason

or

Oont Lcf )Oi.ii Pipci

Fdjl^f.tir! Sche-oluls.

CIRC

tre.cz.t.

another. As freshmen, we all suffer from a severe attack of tunnel vision. We've heard all the

rumors

"all-nighters" blue

about and

pulling filling up

book after blue book,

but the week itself wasn't

as

It was expected worse. But only because we made it worse by our wild im aginations. Instead of study ing as we normally did, we we

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Confr^-

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spent

more

G.P.A.'s. We

hours now

with

were

On

Cdoi/'t/J

r.r.i.

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our

know that

wasting our time, since what we figured out and actually received were two totally different things. we

For Seoond '5eme5+cr

Houjina

Tutors

Co<yn5elir j

The Agony and the Ecstacy When

around, and

our

second

we came

secure.

year rolled back confident

After

all,

we

were

sophomores, and we knew everything there was to know. But when finals finally arrived, we were snapped back into reality. After a week of cramming and numerous cups of coffee we knew we still had to come up with reasons ex

plaining how

a

2.0

really

isn't that

bad.

In

our

look

at

junior year, exams

we

from

began a

to

new

perspective. We spent all semester studying hard and living from test to test, until finals finally descend ed upon us. By this stage in our careers, final exams only served as an obstacle in delaying our Christmas break and the annual

ski trip up North. And now it's our senior year. By now, finals are just a drop in the bucket. What with senior portraits, preparing resumes, and numerous job interviews, there's hardly any time to worry about finals. You just take them as scheduled and hope for the best. The funny thing is, you find yourself doing better than ever, and not knowing why. But after all the anxiety involved with freshman and sophomore years, you realize it's just one of the benefits of being a senior. So en joy it, and good luck. Oh, gotta run now.

and

We have finals in ten minutes we

haven't started

studying

yet. Everett Mollo and Chris Alelxo.

Dorm Life

Brings

Friends, Fun, Good Times and Memories I remember my first day on cam pus. Lugging my trunk to the sec ond floor of the dorm. Standing in front of the door to my room, I turned the handle slowly in

anticipation. I remember the door and

an

believing a word said. But after I tacked up posters on the walls and put down the carpeting, the room some

miraculously

transformed

into

place that didn't look quite gently pushing open panning the room pale yellow

from wall to wall cinderblock walls,

floor,

I remember not

they

.

a

.

.

bare grey tiled a bare

empty desk and

a so

terrible.

my years here. I remember the single carload It

throughout took to

bring my belongings to campus Freshman Year. Now I think I need a 18-wheeler to clear the place out. I sit

down for

realize that I won't

back

the bull

.

.

.

through my strikes. I'm really

mind.

Reality

in it the

and

possessions, the

book

I guess I'll memories.

room

would

gain

half

empty cup of coffee. My shelves reflect the memorabilia I've collected a

and

miss this

sessions; the laughs and

gong to miss those cinderblock walls and greytiled floor. The desk is not empty, but cluttered with books, papers

life.

moment

just

but the memories locked up the special friendships and

room

bed. So this was my new home. I turned to Mom and Dad with a look of gloom printed on my face. They quickly reassured me that by the time I unpacked all my worldly some

a

Now I look back for the last time upon my years spent in that dorm room and the memories flow

all-nighters and the gatherings (It's amazing

tears;

social

how many people those rooms)

can

fit in

one

of

.

...

always have

the

Dawn Mirone

Living in the

Dorms and

LOVING IT!

Remember your roommate? And the weirdo down the hall who listened to loud African music? How about your first gang-shower? Still have your toiletry bucket? Chances are, you have many classic memories of living in the URI dorms. Toga parties Secret Santas Popcorn "The Mail Is In" Some of best (and worst!) your memories probably stem from your years as a URI dorm resident. There's something very special about sleeping, eating, .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

studying, partying, laughing, crying, and surviving among 250 different personalities. There's something special something very, very special ...

.

.

.

about Dorm-Life. Anyone who has ever lived in a URI college dorm has earned at least the ink on their college diploma, because Dorm-Life is, indeed, as much a part of a URI education as pre-registration in Keaney, classes In Chafee, and final exams. Certainly life in one of URI's 18 dorms isn't always pizza and beer. There are new roommates to relate to, loud stereos to ig nore, thick textbooks to open, and many sad suppers to swallow. There are also rules, RHCs, RAs and sometimes riots. But Dorm-Life has as many advantages as well. It can be as

satisfying and rewarding as each person makes it. Where else can you open your room door and be barraged witia, visitors or play ping por] pool, or pac-man only a stairv away. Where else can you wakf" up at 7:45 for an 8:00 am class pull an ali-nighter and not even realize it be treated to tuna-melts and fish-atasty la-Rita in the same day hear Luke and Laura's voices echo an entire throughout building sleep with open windows on take a mid-February nights scalding hot shower (flush!) on cool Autumn mornings. Where else can you live, learn, and grow along with 5000 different people, and still maintain a sense of your own individuality? Where else but in the URI dorms. ...

.

.

.

...

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

...

College usually lasts four years. Dorm-Life may last less if you choose the commuter, line, or Greek scene. That's why it's important to take advantage of and reward every opportunity Dorm-Life has to offer lasting friendships,

special

moments

and memories, insight on peo ple, and self-growth and

maturity. Such things cannot be ex under Mom and Dad's roof. That's why There's something very special, indeed, about Dorm-Life.

perienced

.

.

.

Janet Simmons

Dorm Life / 55

Dorm

Life and Endless Possibilities

Dorm Life / 67

BEING A GREEK and GREEK

.

Those

LIFE

.

two

.

words

mean so many different things to many different people. First of all, there are the stereotyped images of sororities and

fraternities: The Clean Cut Snob who is

a

only because he is rich, and the Joins a House because "who cares why I'm in college." These images become shattered when one member

Drunken Slob who

takes

a

closer look at the facts. It is true

that there

being

a

are

added monetary costs in

member of

a

fraternity

or

sorority,

but when these costs are totaled up the actual money spent Is equal to or even less than dorm costs. As for not caring

college, tacts show that there are college dropouts among Greeks than any other lifestyle, Greeks usually partake in more campus organizations, and their G.P.A. is usually higher than other lifestyles here at U.R.l. Well, enough about stereotypes, and about less

more

about actual Greek

Life.

Parties

and

meetings you may say? Well there is much more to Fraternities and Sororities that.

One

important function of

fraternities

than

and

sororities

is

to

serve

society. Each year many Greek Houses participate in philanthropic projects to

58 / Greek Life

Wanting It No Other Way!!!

raise money to benefit special charities. Here at U.R.l. such projects include Phi

Kappa Psi's Bounce-a-thon. Theta Chi's Paddy Murphy, Lambda Chi Alpha's SPK (Sorority President Kidnapping) plus many more including the many candy.

grams sororities sponsor. All ot the pro ceeds go to charities such as Cystic

Fibrosis, Multiple Sclerosis, and Meeting Street School

only naming a tew. things that sorority or do. one important

Besides all the

fraternity

members

idea remains. This is Brotherhood and

Sisterhood

and it is here that one finds

long lasting friendships, friendships that last for

lifetime. All Greeks know that once you are a sister or brother, you are one for life no matter where you go to across

a

this nation.

It is true that Greek

Life is not for

everyone tiecause of the responsibilities Involved, the lifestyle itself, etc., but for those that are part of the Greek

System

THEY WEAR THEIR LETTERS PROUDLY AND THEY WOULDN'T WANT IT ANY

OHTER WAY!!

Colleen Driscoll

1

^ i

i!

irC3-, JeI E;^^L H ^g| ^^JB11^ mmB

Greek Life/ 61

GREEK WEEK .Let the Gaines .

.

.

.

.

Begin!! One of the highlights of the year for the Greeks is the Greek Week Competition held during the sec ond week of April. The week of games encourages better relation ships between sororities and fraternities by teaming one sorority with two fraternities for the com petition. The competition includes Individual events as well as team efforts such as the tricycle race, Volkswagen push, swim relays, etc. The highlight of the week competition is Greek Sing. It is the one competition in which each House pulls together as one unit. The winners for Greek Sing this Chi year were Sorority Division Omega, the Best Conductor Chi Omega, Best Accompaniment Sigma Delta Tau Fraternity Divison Sigma Chi, Best Con ductor as well as Best Accompani ment also went to Sigma Chi. The overall Greek Week Competition was won by Alpha Zi Delta, and Phi Gamma Delta.

62 / Greek Week

Greek Week / 63

64 / Down the Line

Living Dow^n the Line and Loving It!!

.

"Oh no! The electric company is

threatening to shut off the lights again! What are we going to do?" Unfortunately, this phrase may be all too familiar for those students who live "down the line." Living down the line can best be describ ed as the great learning ex perience, an experience which In volves paying bills, cooking meals, cleaning, freezing, but most of all, lots of fun! Living down the line Is just one of the many alternatives students have to living on campus and many students take advantage of this alternative in their third and fourth years here at U.R.l. Living down the line means living offcampus in one of southern Rhode Island's many beach houses that rented to thousands of are students each year. Let me tell there Is really you firsthand, nothing like it! The freedom, the feeling of home, independence it's great!

(cont'd

on

p.

67)

Down the Line / 65

'

Down Ihe Line

Although there's

no

substitute

for living down the line, it does have its negative as well as Its positive aspects. It takes a very versatile person to be able to live a person that down the line possesses some of the following the ability to live like qualities an eskimo In the winter, bundled up in layers of clothing because you can't afford the heating bill a certain degree of inventiveness when you are trying to think of yet another way to fix Kraft Macaroni and Cheese for the fifth night in a

Mathematical

row! when

abilities

you're at the supermarket figure out if the groceries trying to

you have are worth more than you have in your pocket (including A certain amount of change) !

1-E^ Utjcomcinto]^cx.

Spftnq

physical conditioning possessing

a

(Chcc)^

the

P &orrt SpCftq ix'iaK par-N '

Spnna pd^u^ Sfjalrot^i yoiir priic pArfy find pur YirqmihJ pvtij (pmL 2iS yijur fsfcr.^t fish eantJ -> CornL es \j0UL ire p^i-g Mi youx qiriffiCiYt pirt-xi '

? a

a a ?

'^

a

a

loSd youK rrKfilS pi^r-^ii JS /naTffijW/ Sict pdr-h/-?

a

\DSi pur k^ft-i'tM pwfy "%Ut o^ots -Unt ntiqhhorhotipirif fri- afddtLdhon pmy

SIC your- old

M(niSp^hJ ^

a

8

&f* pdf+^ a K&+kir,id i^n parf\J "lot ujiii pu-t pur mimi sn filC pdff u ,

^nd...

OU/ IdSt

fdr-hj

ability to shower, run to your change, get in your car,

room,

oi^)

,,

.

[tnasj^t]

mi^cL. P.Q, Il2ij Sdi-urda-j rli/iM' IjOII-5-CS: L) Villhat iMnL [no s-tm/'^n,'*-

drive to school and run to your class in 10 minutes for your 8:00 A religious attitude for class! the prayer that you sometimes need when your car is on "E" and you've got $1.00 and need to make it to school! Living down the line involves be ing a jack of all trades, but it is an experience that is highly recomwhere else could you meded clear your mind about the "F" you an exam on by walking down got there's nothing like the beach It!!

Mary-Anne Murphy

limo-

nn^srrT *

war

'bornt^td' atauy

ldSffil)

ioiCB

g

no-naJ

t

Down the Line / 67

Not ANOTHER LINE!!!

When you

were

kids in

grade

1

school, your teachers always said

'

that the shortest distance between

t

two

,

I

points

was an

orderly, straight

line. At the time, you truly believed in the existence of such a line. But you then entered this beloved university, and you finally realized that the only straight line on campus was In your Math 107 class.

This opinion was strengthened when you went to registration down at Keaney Gym. How many times did you stand in the English line for an hour, only to find your desired class section closed? A straight, orderly line at registra

tion? That would go against URI tradition. How about when you finally did get a class, and you couldn't stand it. That's when you all got dropadd forms and packed yourselves tightly in the registrar's office. It may have been uncomfortable, but it sure was a great way to meet people up close and personal. Speaking of comfortable sur roundings, did you ever try to get athletic down at the Keaney weight room at 3:00 p.m. on a Monday? Unless you're heavily In to

bodybuilding, you waiting 2

didn't feel like

probably hours for

or an hour between sit-ups. And after you shed all your ex weight at the gym, you went to pack it back on at one of the dining halls. If you like to eat at 5:00, you undoubtedly knew you had to get there at 4:30. Those half-hour lines were definitely killers, and definitely not worth It. But you always put up with them, because it was all part of the learning experience. The lines were no fun at the time, but sometime In the future you just wish could stand In one might you just one more time.

bench,

cess

a

Chris Alelxo

Please Insert Your Card .

The spring semester brought changes to the URI campus, including the closing of the cam

some

pus

branch

of

Rhode

Island

Hospital Trust. Responding

to the current trend toward the use of automatic teller machines for banking, the fulla underwent "reconfiguration" into a "satellite" branch, with all banking done by

service

branch

computer. For students, this meant longer lines at the two ATM's, and deal mass hysteria when both machines went down and the last bus for Providence was pulling away as you wait for the money to pay for your ticket. The URI branch, located in the Memorial Union, now has only one teller to handle corporate relation ships, such as the University Club service and two customer representatives to open and close

ing with

accounts.

A senior vice president from Hospital Trust said that the change was a response to quick turnover in the URI accounts and a

reliance on automatic teller machines which replace human tellers. new

.

In addition, the R.l. State Credit Union, also located in the Memorial Union, has picked up the ability to handle cash transaction. So students can, if they want to, talk to a real, live

Employees

teller. This is just one of the many ways URI has been hit by the age of technology.

No Pets On Campus

DOGS, SNAKES, SPIDERS, CATS, HAMSTERS, GUINEA PIGS, GOLDFISH and even BIRDS among the list of animals that be found on campus at U.R.l. Many animals seem to have made their homes among the busy lives of many college students. Why do these students take the risk of getting caught with an Il legal pet? The answer varies. Some keep a pet solely for com are

can

pany, especially on those long weekends when everybody has gone home or Is out. Others say a pet is someone (?) who is always willing to listen to one's problems. And still other people keep a pet In their dorm room simply as a con versation (What other piece.

reason

could

someone

have for

having a pet snake!) Along with these good points that having a pet In a dorm room come the bad points. Whose turn it Is to feed the pet, change the lit ter or buy the food to name a few. The worries of getting caught and losing the cute little animal are other examples of problems that must be dealt with when

keep

a

trying

to

pet hidden behind closed

doors. It seems to me that besides these few minor drawbacks, the risk of keeping a pet In a dorm room is well worth it. After all, a pet often becomes one's best friend.

Marcia Dollins

i Return of the Pub Listening

to

a

jukebox playing

your favorite songs, or maybe just enjoying a mellow guitarist while sip ping an ice cold beer. What more could a hard working college stu dent ask for? After three seemingly endless years, the University's Pub re opened on the first day of classes in September of 1983. Students were welcomed with back "Miller Nights," "Stroh's Nights," and various happy hours. The pub was closed down three years ago mainly because the drink ing age was raised to 20 years old, said the Pub's General Manager Dan The Tenzer. only place students could be served alcohol on campus was in the America's Cup Room. The Pub had many problems with re-opening, Tenzer said. The South Kingston Police and the Universities administration were afraid of drunk driving and other related problems it could cause. "We had to start from scratch," Tenzer said. Along with the installa tion of the new jukebox, there was plenty of electrical work to be done. During the day from 11 to 4, Mon day through Friday, the Pub serves sandwiches, chips, and other snack-type foods. The Pub serves beer and wine from 4:30 to 12:00 a.m. during the week and opens at 12:00 p.m. on the weekends. The opening of a Caserta's Pizza adjoining the Pub has helped the snackbar. Caserta's cannot serve soda and the Pub does. "When the Pub first opened, many students did not realize it was open seven days a week," waitress Laura Onoratti said. The Pub has really picked up ail the nightly specials, super socials and entertainment. Most of the Pub's business comes from on-campus students, fraternities and sororities. However,

during the day you might see pro fessors come in for something to eat.

The

has four and about

operational

employees,

Pub

including

waitresses,

waiters,

bartenders

managers

40

other and

doorpeople. Every night there are drink specials and occasional enter tainers during Friday's happy hour. Guitarist Ray Boston played during a happy hour in October. "This is all new to us," Tenzer said. Right now we would like to en courage super socials, entertainers and maybe get a few bands in the future. Beth Bacchicchi

Students "Get It Up" at the Pub Time

What

Time! This tion and

It?

Is

Cock-Tail-

common

was a

ques the

throughout

answer

Ray Boston appearance in the Pub. Singer Boston returned to URI this fall and

capacity crowd

was

of

met with a

Ready-to-Party

students.

guitar playing, singing quick wit always seem to at a rowdy audience who are

Boston's and tract

eager to loosen up with beers and good music.

a

few

Sponsored by Weekenders, delighted students with

Boston some

of

his

own

renditions

of

popular 70's and 80's music. Kazoo-playing students accom panied Boston's singing and guitar playing. The happy hour started the school year on an upbeat note. Dawn Mirone

The Wonders of Modern Science .

Editors Note: The Photography Editor begged for a chance to show his "talent" other than behind a camera. The rest of the staff takes no responsibility for any trauma or shock resulting from the copy which you are about to read.

Aprons Goggles Aseptic Breakage cards if any of the above technique .

.

...

.

...

...

words send a cold shiver down your spine, then you too have experienced LAB MANIA!!! Who can possibly forget the joys ofCHM 226; the vacuum filtrations, the reflux reactions, the creation of dyes which never colored the cloth

76 / Lab Life

.

.

but permanently stained our hands the colors of the rainbow, Somehow, a business major will never be able to appreciate the sight of a frustrated pharmacy student begging on bended knee to the solution in front of him in the hopes that a precipitate will form. Of course, if chemistry doesn't

red eyes staring back. Happy hour at Casey's? Not for the L08 section of MIC 201. Today Is the day to gram stain a species of bacteria only found In three day old Butterfield tasty tuna melt. The period finally ends though the last beaker is washed.

happen to turn your head, perhaps the fun-filled world of genetics or microbiology is the thing for you. Pseudomonas Fruit flies, aeruginosa, the assortment Is endless. While other students play frisbee on the quad, genetics students look at the 6353rd generation fly and hope to see

agar plate streaked, microscope put away. A smile slowly creeps onto your tired face as you think about the expression on the TA's face as he tried to figure out why your solution was green when everyone elses was pink. Gary Pazienza

Lab Life / 77

College Kno'wledge We'll always see it in our dreams college thoughts with college scenes from hard-packed snow, ice and gloom to green grass cuttings, bright spring bloom, milling students. Rams Den dinners, minority grads and down-the liners co-eds smiling, pastel dress, one

ton

sundae, Oktober Fest,

student elections,

cheering ramettes,

RIPIRG, Cigar, the Great Swamp Gazette, Saturday action, Rhode Island Rams,

Day, the Zarchen scam, library sanction, Adams Hail closing. and pretty girls posing, blues, Registrar cocky seniors, bewildered freshman, Eddy Eddy and old Frank Newman, B.M.O.C, the new epidemic, finding the "A" in the word academic, big things learned here at college while chasing points, losing knowledge, first day classes, in the wrong section, a course required, no selection, looking forward to high G.P.A.'s, book reading madness, college days, all night cram, no inspiration, exhausted student, vegetation, absorbing wisdom, exam expected, miss one word, you've been corrected,

the Parent's

midterms finished, head for the clubs,

Cuproom, Shillers, Zoo, and Pub, hanging out; partying late, quickly forgetting your class at eight, across the campus, late night roam, stumbling drunk, heading home, get into bed, turn out the light, out of the picture, out for the night, waking up, it's graduation from four short years of education college fun to nine-to-fives these were the best years of our lives.

from

Carl Fritz

College Knowledge

/ 79

Rhode Island's Sunvmer Wonderland The Spring season is notorious for bringing out the best in people and the worst in students. Those warm sunny days are hard to resist. As we begin the search for our shorts, we start to notice the effects of the weather on our spirits. The campus looks beautiful and we feel an aliveness that has been long buried under the winter blues. Unfortunately, as students, springtime is the most trying. There is no longer the excitement of being at school as there is in the fall. In fact, the only excitement seems to be in finishing the year and heading on to new ventures or out into the summer sun. Studying becomes almost impossible, and going to classes seems like tor ture. We can't concentrate on anything academic for more than five minutes, while our thoughts turn to the inevitable and the ob Even THE BEACHES! vious though there are many good places on campus to catch a few rays of sunshine, what couid possibly compare to the beaches. ~

After called

Rhode Island isn't le Ocean State for You won't have any dif nothing ficulty finding the beaches, but you will have difficulty deciding which beach to go to, when to go, and what to bring. If you are not a hardcore afi cionado of one beach, you will be able to enjoy the variety of visiting different ones. Rhode Island has so many beaches that you should be able to find a at least couple of favorites the research can be fun. There are too many beaches in this state to mention them all, but there are a few that should be noted. Different ones provide different possibilities and here the Possibilities are Endless! If you travel down to Galilee, you can spend some time on the beach, or take advantage of two very pleasant distractions. As a person who enjoys seafood, you are in the right place. Although you certainly have a choice of where to eat, you should stop by the deck of Champlains for a great view of the boats and a good selection of food. George's also provides a nice deck from which to view the sights and enjoy some liquid refreshments. Narragansett beach is another possibility. Besides soaking up the sun, relaxing, or watching the surfers, the stores 'ight across the street are a nice

a nice time for a walk along the sand. If you are a real beach lover you may choose to go all three times! Once you have decided when you are going, the next question is what to bring along. Do you want to bring a friend or is this a much needed solo trip? How many times have you heard somebody say, "I need some time to think, I'm heading to the beach." Should has you bring your books

always

anybody

ever

really managed

to

at the beach? How about the times when you feel like being active? It might be the perfect day to remember that frisbee, kite, or favorite fourlegged friend. The beaches in Rhode Island

get any work done

diversion and fun to explore. Scarborough beach is a third option. Here you will find many people enjoying the sun, sand and perhaps a pizza or two at Caserta's. If you are seeking a quieter at

mosphere you may

want

to

try

There isn't Moonstone beach. anything here except the beach, but it is nice and may be the

perfect escape. Now that you have figured out which of the many beaches to visit, you may be thinking about when the best time is to go. An ex hilarating run early in the morning could be the perfect wake-up. A few hours in the afternoon might be a good break, and allow you to slow down and think over the day's events. Of course evening Is

a great escape anytime. No year is complete without the leisurely walk along the beach. This can be a great way to sort things out and listen to one's own thoughts, or it can be a nice way to spend some quiet time with somebody else. It is safe to assume that many problems have been solved, many hurt feelings soothed and many dreams strug gled with at the beach. There is something comforting in looking around and seeing miles of sand, and hearing the gentle rumbling of the waves. Somehow it seems so much easier to put things into perspective in this setting. C. Shell

provide

lemorial nion

f

1^

tudent Life Activities

Organizatiorps i

Relations -Research/

Jr

.^:\

t^^^'?-'':

.^Jf

Organizations

THE RENAISSANCE STAFF AT THEIR BEST?

84 / Yearbook

BUSV. BUSY. BUSY

U.R.l.'s yearbook, known as the Renaissance is filled with lots of photos of the year's events at U.R.l. This group of hard working students spends MANY hours trying to make the best possible yearbook.

Yearbook / 85

THE GREAT SWAMP GAZETTE

The Great Swamp Gazette is URI's award winning news and feature magazine. This magazine offers alternative for the URI community reading and they welcome writers for news stories, feature stories and short stories, and poetry.

86 / Ttie Gazette

THE URI SKI CLUB The Ski Club started the year

early in October by trying to pick up some of the pieces from the previous year. As an organization set up for the benefit of the students, it was goal to make sure that the club would continue and would our

provide ail who joined In with the best possible ski trip in all aspects. The annual trip to Sugarbush was held in January and was a great success. Lodg ing in the luxurious summit con dominiums, excellent ski condi tions, and an unbeatable schedule

of

parties

everyone vacation.

of

a

assured

fantastic

ski

MORTAR BOARD

Mortar Board is a national honor society for college Juniors which are

seniors.

scholastically qualified are given applications and twenty-six students

are

selected based on and with

outstanding leadership community service, along scholastic ability.

Ski Club / Ivlortar Board / 87

THE GOOD 5^ CIGAR Bring Students the News

Why do you do it? We at Cigar are constantly ask this mind-boggling question. do we Why spend 40 or

the ed

more

hours

a

week here, sur

crisis after crisis, headache after headache and

viving

after complaint. Because we love it. Even if the lead story fell through or the film loaded got backwards so there are no pictures for tomorrow's

complaint

paper. will There always be Another another chance. strive deadline to for, another lead story even better than yesterday's and another edi tion to be proud of.

88 / The

Cigar

1

^^^ri^^M^^^^^V^^^^^^^^^^^^^^B

Cigar Classifieds^

r^

1

^

& Business the window

please newspaper which comes out four times a week is a full-time job. It means a max imum of 5 hours sleep, lots of coffee and missed meals, and

Running

a

the embarrassment of explain ing how you meant to write your speech 201 paper but the typesetting machine broke down, the Cigar van was in an accident and six editors had the

flu. It

handling 40 com about that editorial you knew you'd get flak for, and listening to the Dean's office's reasons why we should not have of director new the called minority student services to tell before him he got the job means

plaints

.

did. But there is

.

special

that deadline pressure. Knowing that you have done your best, and that tomorrow's paper is on its way to be printed into 7000 copies gives us the satisfaction we need to press on. So even if the front page looks crooked and we're not ecstatic about that letter to the editor that questions my morals, it's okay. Tomorrow is another issue. And the challenge of tomorrow makes more

bearable.

.

they

a

s

unity here at The Cigar, and a feeling of accomplishment and pride that makes it all worth while. Seeing people actually reading our work, and learning more about URI from it helps us get through

today

sense

of

L*i

Kathy Rainaldi 1984 editor in chief

i

THE DANCE COMPANY OFFERS OPPORTUNITY

The University of Rhode Island Dance Company, comprised of students and community residents, is devoted to the artistic of As an ex dance. performance tension of the regular dance cur riculum in the Physical Education Department, the company offers its members choreographic oppor tunities and training in the technical aspects of production. Artists-in-residence programs pro vide additional options for students to study on campus with leading professionals in the field. Auditions are held in eariy Oc tober. Admission to the Company is determined by an adjudication An board. Apprentice Dance Troupe (ADT) is open to all in terested students or universi ty/community individuals who wish to improve skill and expertise In dance. Although the company emphasizes the styles of modern and jazz, choreographic works in modern ballet, folk and ethnic forms have been incorporated into the Company's repertoire.

90 / Dance

Company

THE SURF CLUB WINS N.E.'S

The URI Surf Club was readmit ted early this fall into the URI pro gram. The club got its start again after Richard Ryan (president) and Josh Burdick (Vice president) decided that there was a large in surfing in the URI com munity. With over 40 members, the URI Surf Club is a real threat to local surf teams throughout New England. Most of the members are not from the New England area. They are from all over the world in places ranging from Italy, Cuba, Hawaii to New York, New Jersey R.l. and The diversity of the member's backgrounds aids in the competition scene. The New England Championships were held in 1983 in Nar November, ragansett, R.l. URI members swept first through fourth place in the A-AA Men's Final, beating teams from New York, Mass., New Hampshire and Rhode Island. The finalists were: first Chris Burns, second Josh Kurdick, third Rochard fourth Peter Kent. There Ryan, was also a strong individual show ing by Andy Cook. Hopefully next year's team will be as successful as this year's surf club. terest in

S.E.C. BRINGS ENTERTAINMENT TO U.R.I SEC

brings

a

variety

of entertain

ment to the URI community. The committee started the year off with a tribute to the Beatles. The Broadway

production "Beatlemania" took URI students back to the 1960's, Hallo ween

was

celebrated

with

Steve

Smith and the Nakeds. Not only did students

enjoy music campus, they were also entertain by with mime Trent Arterberry's performance of "Silent Moves" In Ed wards Auditorium. Simon Sez challenged the student on

ed

body

to see if there was anyone who

could

keep up with him popular game. Dancing shoes was put

in that

ever

for Let's Active and Critical Few as well URI's annual Spring Weekend Concert and the Bluegrass Festival. on

again

as

SEC is made up of a general are interested in better entertainment at URI.

membership who

FOLLIES BAZAAR MAKES PHCSFESSIONAL ALBUM

Follies Bazaar is an organization" for URI undergraduates that pro vides students with an opportunity; to record and practice a profes-' sional quality record album on a| annual basis. Students submit original com positions on cassette and these songs are reviewed by the Selec tion Committee. If a song Is chosen to be on the album, the: composer and his or her group record and mix these songs on 24 tracks at Normandy Sound, Inc. in Warren, Rl. The album is usually released In May and goes on sale in the K.S.S. Record Coop in the Union.

FOLLIES 24 92/SEC/Follies

DAYMARE

WRIU PLAYS IT ALL FOR URI

WRIU AM-580, FM-90.3 is a student run radio station at URI. It is the largest education station in R.l. AM broadcasts on cam pus only with news, music, game shows, and other pro gramming. FM programming in cludes a variety of music, news and public service messages. WRIU transmits 2700 watts and is licensed by the F.C.C. It can be heard from Long Island, New York to coastal Massachusetts. All personnel from manager to disc jockeys are URI

undergrads.

"

LB/LS PROVIDE A "BIG FRIEND FOR RIDS Little Brother/Little Sister gives URI the opportunity to become friends with underprivileged children from the South County area. One to one relationships are formed between a URI student and a child. The student becomes more than a simple friend with the child and the relationships formed often carry on longer. A van picks up and drops off the children and many social events and parties are held throughout the year to enter tain the kids.

94 / LB/LS

C.H.E-A.R.S. OFFERS INFO. ON ALCOHOL C.H.E.A.R.S.

(Campus

Health Education Alcohol Resources Service) is a peer counseling and alcohol informa tion center, which is located in 406 Roosevelt Hall. The organization offers infor mation on all aspects of alcohol, conducts workshops throughout the campus on such topics as Drinking and Driving, Physiological Effects and the like. C.H.E.A.R.S. is available to the entire campus, on Monday through Friday from 1 1 a.m. to 4 p.m. for walk-ins and also offers a hotline. It is staffed by trained volunteers and provides refer rals to the alcohol educator.

SPEAR OUT WITH SPEAR EASY Peer

and sexuality is available at in located 408 Roosevelt Hall between the hours of 11 and 4 Monday thru Friday. Student volunteers are trained in a special section of the department of Nursing's Human Sexuality class. Ail conversations are con fidential and the atmosphere is comfortable. Besides the walk-in center and hotline In Roosevelt, workshops are offered on various aspects of sexuality, in cluding birth control and sexual harrassment, in and out of office.

counseling

information

Speakeasy,

CHEARS/Speakeasy

/ 95

ARMY RESERVE OFFICER

TRAINING CORPS PROGRAM The Army Reserve Officer Training Corps Program offers students the opportunity to experience a lifestyle that is academically enriching and physically challenging. Army ROTC has been an integral part of the University since 1894, and has con tributed more than 1850 officers to the service of our country. The URI ROTC program is con ducted on an informal basis with par ticular attention devoted to individual desires and career objectives of the cadets. Through practical training in management, leadership, and group dynamics, the program prepares students for both military and civilian careers.

Students enrolled In the program have the opportunity to apply for two three year full-tuition scholar

and

ships. Additionally they may such

courses as

attend

airborne, air assault,

weather survival ranger, school. Preparation for the Army is also available. Flight Program Upon graduation, cadets are com missioned as Second Lieutenants in the United States Army, and have their option to choose active duty, or reserve component duty in conjunc tion with their civilian schools. and

cold

CAREER SERVICES HELP PREPARE FOR THE "REAL WORLD "

Career Services is an organiza tion that most students do not utilize until their senior year when obtaining a job tops the list of priorities. And even then, most students leave the University with the feeling that Career Services is a sort of job placement center, which in fact it is. But even more than that, as the four career counselors readily agree, the office has many other services to offer URI students. From resume writing workshops to

professional

career

counseling,

the staff at Career Services is busy offering services to accommodate students eight hours a day. As seniors already know the office of

variety of career develop workshops, ranging from preparing for interviews to apply ing to graduate schools, available practically every day. Instrumental in providing ser vices to students, CA's undergo an Intensive training program fers

a

ment

prepare every September to themselves for leading workshops and performing a host of other ser vices. These "CA's" act as peer counselors, and learn to answer

questions ranging from "How do I resume?" to "What can I in?" Available every day from 2 pm to 4 pm for walk-in hours, the CA's see as many as eight students a day and offer helpful referrals and advice. Also essential to the office's success is its receptionist, Jane Kilner, who returned to Career Ser vices after a year's absence. Jane is the lady who keeps things roll ing, doing everything from assign ing students their interviews to making sure the recruiters' day runs smoothly. It's not unusual to see a line of eight or nine students in front of her desk waiting to ask Jane questions, and it's not unusual to see her keep her cool after answering the same question make

a

major

50 times or more. The core of Career Services is the professional staff that counsels students on a daily basis and organizes special events. Pat Maslin-Ostrowski, coordinator of

development programs, works with the CA's to organize to all interest of programs students. This year, a series of entitled speaker programs career

"Profiles of Success: A Career Conversation Series," covered such topics as dual career couples and entrepreneurship. With guest speakers, many of whom were IJRI graduates, the programs gave students a special personalized insight into career topics. One program even broke a Career Services record with 80 people in atten dance. Also notable is "JEDi A Journey to Educational Deci sions and Insights" that was held in September of 1983. "JEDI" was a major fair where undecided students gained a better insight into the various majors available. So as graduating seniors head into a world of Help Wanted ads and job interviews, most of them will remember sit ting in at least one workshop in Roosevelt Hall, or dropping their resumes off to be critiqued and thank Career Services for preparing them a little more.

by

Kevin

Sylvester

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS ORGANIZATION

The purpose of this organization is to provide a common meeting place for ail members of the

university community, especially those from foreign countries, with the objectives of fostering the academic,

cultural

and

social

aspects of the university life.

Events of the year 1984 includ' ed International Week (February 27-March 3) which included crafi exhibits, food fairs, films, a dinner ,

dance, fashion show and picnics. We feel that our organization contributes to the enrichment ol the university life, and we believe that 1985 will bring an even bigge( variety of events from the side cl Student International the

Association.

98 / International Students

MEMORIAL UNION BOARD OF DIRECTORS

The Memorial Union Board of Directors exists to serve the camous and students in making the Memorial Union a vital portion of the college experience. The Union 3oard is a group of volunteer students concerned with day-to day operations and programming n the Memorial Union. The pro gramming council consists ot comnittees such as travel, concerts. Spring Carnival, films and much Tiore. The Operations Council ;onsists of several committees in;luding Union Operations and -ood Sen/ices. These committees /vork closely with the staff to nonitor building usage, policy, and services to the Student ComTiunity. The rewards of joining the Jnlon Board can be unlimited.

Board of Directors / 99

HILLEL: Center for the Jewish

Cotnnvunity on Canvpus

B'nai

B'rith

Hillel

foundation

is

more or less the center of activity for the Jewish community on Campus. The core group of the organization is composed of those students with strong Jewish lifestyles. This group runs many activities including socials,

classes, lectures, religious services, concerts and a meal plan. At URI, there are between one and four socials per month, and intemational Mishnah class, a mini course for credit on Jewish and general themes, a lunch program, Sukkot, Chanukkah and Purim services, a concert series,

daily Kosher meal plan and a Passover meal plan. Hillel reaches other Jewish students through "Outreach:" They reach other students by running programs in dorms, frats, and sororities, having Board meetings in the dorms, frats and sororities. Both the student leaders and the staff have helped in this by introducing themselves and talking with students. Hillel also helps Jewish students a

from Iran, Israel, South Africa, Central America, Belgium, Soviet Union and

Italy with employment, housing registration, religious and financial problems.

Hillel reaches commuters and them become involved

helps by sponsoring

lunch program during the day and by making Schidduchim (matches)

a

between

commuters

roommates.

looking

j I ,

for (

A

Judaic library at Hillel is also There are books about American Israel, Jewish history, Jewry, Torah, and many other topics. URI Hillel educates the entire cam available.

community as to upcoming, religious holidays and have had therri placed on the University calendarlj This was done to bring forth the con-1 flicts between a student's right toi observe his religion, (Rosh Hashan-| nah) and his University obligations pus

,

(mid terms)

.

URI Hillel also works closely witti URI students for Israel by lobbying, and educating the community. Hillel also is involved in a resource* development program to raise funds from parents, the local community, the University, the Jewish federation of R.l. and other sources. A Jewisti Art Festival, Tikun Olam, Holocaust education and

Campus Jewish Ap peal are some of the these activities sponsored by Hillel.

STUDENT HEALTH ADVISORY COMMITTEE

The

Student

Health

Advisory

Committee, otherwise known as SHAC, is a committee made up of and both graduates undergraduates that get together and make suggestions on the University Health Care Program. The group also helps with the Health Fair held in the Union.

STUDENT TECHNICAL SERVICES

Student Technical Service is run students. It's purpose is to pro vide good quality sound and lighting equipment for the campus community. Student Tech. Ser vices (STS) has provided concert sound and lighting for many events held by Weekenders, SEC, and Union Board. Additionally, technicians are made available to show movies and operate sound and lighting equipment.

by

i.i^

SHAC/STS/ 101

THE 1983-1984 THEATRE DEPARTMENT The 1983-84 URI/Theatre produc tion season opened on October 19th with the premiere of a new play, LIV ING IN KLUZEWSKI'S SHADOW, by Robert Boston-based playwright, Clyman. In keeping with the Theatre Department's longstanding commitment to the development of new plays and playwrights, Mr. Clyman had the opportunity to contribute to the script and to truly create a role. The brilliant cotlaborations of Bertoit Brecht and Kurt Weill were realized in the presentation of the classic musical, THE THREEPENNY OPERA, in December. This celebration of low life at its height In Vic

AS YOU LIRE IT

'

J ,

( |

PRESENTS torlan England stretched the talents and abilities of theatre students in another direction the challenge of the musical and its inherent demands on the

singer/actor. HOOTERS, a contemporary comedy by Ted Tally, led off the spring season of shows in February, having recently enjoyed a

successful

run

off

Broadway,

the

play is perceptive and hilariously funny, while addressing itself to sexual roles, myths and fantasies both founded and ill-founded, existing in late adolescent and young adults.

LIVING IN

RLUZEWSRI'S SHADOW

Trieatre / 103

WEERENDERS REEPS WEERENDS FILLED WITH FUN variety of entertainment sponsored by Weekenders to

A wide Is

keep the weekends alive at URI. Weekenders sponsors such events as the one ton sundae, the semi formal at Rosecliff in Newport, various bands in the ballroom and numerous other activities.

AMATEUR RADIO CLUB ALLOWS WORLDWIDE TALR is just Ham average interested in radio. Tliere many facets to amateur radio.

The

someone are

The technological, experimental builder or all around tacker. In the club's radio station you may find

something going on day or night, weekday or weekend, year in and year out. Whenever you want to get away from the hustle and bus tle of campus activities, you can pop down there to relax. Talk to someone on the other side of the world or someone on the other side of the street. If you don't want to use your voice, there is always Morse code and teletype. When the weather is warm, you can always hear the mechanical

teleprinters rapping away outside, as

104 / Weekenders/ Amat. Radio

far away

as

the Quad.

COMMUTERS GET TOGETHER IN THE LOUNGE

The Commuter Association is located on the third floor of the Union. There is a commuter lounge that is used by commuter students. They plan social ac tivities and events to keep com muters involved with URI. They hold meetings in the commuter lounge. The staff is composed of commuters and the lounge pro vides a common meeting piace for all those students that commute back and forth to campus.

Commuters / 105

RINGSTON STUDENT SERVICES

Kingston Student Services is a corporation on campus that is run exclusively by students. Its pur pose is to provide services to the students of the Kingston Com munity as well as allow its membership the opportunity to get practical business experience. Currently in operation we have Union Disc, our record store. The Book Co-op, our used book ex change, The Youth Hostel, located on

Route

138

and

Sound

Lighting Equipment, which we to student organizations

and rent for

various functions. The policy making managers of the Company are the Board of Directors. These eight directors are the decision makers and en trepreneurs that provide direction and plans for the future of K.S.S. Many new business ventures are in the making. Within the next few years we will be expanding our

operations to provide more quality goods and services to the U.R.l. community.

WORLD HUNGER COMMITTEE

PROTESTING THE ITON SUNDAE The Catholic Student Association Is two An groups. "Student Board" evaluates and sets goals for Catholic Campus Ministry and plans and organizes Catholic Student activities. The "Late Bloomers" (22+years) is an organization for graduate students, older students, and alumni. Both groups plan social, cultural and religious events. The Catholic Student Association seeks to foster a Christian Community

composed of undergraduate

campus by coordinating and pro spiritual, cultural, and social activities through the Catholic Center. Membership is open to any URI student interested In fostering Christian ideals. This year the Catholic Student Board developed educational pro grams to be used at Sunday liturgies, on

gramming

CATHOLIC STUDENT ORGANIZATION

sponsored

Halloween,

Christmas,

and Mardi Gras extravaganzas, directed the programming of weekend movies in conjunction with the Saturday luncheon program at the Catholic Center. The Late Bloomers (22+) group focused on discussions of the Catholic Bishop's Peace Pastoral and moral issues. World

Hunger/Catholic student

/ 107

U.R.I.S.S.C.

URI SI1JDEM13 SOCSt FOR

BLESSED

ARE

cm9E

THE

PEACES '""ERS Join Us

in our

CflMDus

fo

'

Mmr/i Arouwd

support

.^^[("peterMiNfltioN

^hePAlestiNWN

]

for

People /r

TOUR GUIDES; AN IMPORTANT PART OF URI Tour

guides play a very impor URI, for these people the ones who show incoming students URI. They are the people who give or help give someone an impression of URI that may make them chose URI as the college they attend. Prospective students hear about all aspects of the University from a URI student. The admissions office employs and trains all the tour guides. tant role to

are

108 / URISSC /Tour Guides

RIPIRG The Rhode Island Public Interest Research Group, Inc. (RIPIRG) is

*v

a

statewide,

which

independent, non organization

interest conducts

profit, public

research,

develops educational and advocates

on

programs, behalf of the

students, citizens, and consumers. RIPIRG works on issues which af fect the health, welfare and well being of citizens of Rhode Island. Past issues have been in the areas of environmental

rights, transportation,

sumer

protection, con policy, justice

energy and the

system. RIPRIG is funded by students on member campuses which have af filiated with tfie organization, foun dation and government grants, and private contributions. The main office and headquarters of in the are located RIPIRG Memorial Union. The Interfraternity Council and the Panhellenic Association are the governing bodies of the 16 fraternities and 8 sororities on campus. They work together to promote good relations between the Greeks and the URI Ad ministration. They govern and oversee judical and financial mat ters and promote and serve the Greek

community on campus. They organize and participate in yearly philanthropic events to raise money for charity including; Blood drives. Jump Rope for Heart, Kingston Improvement Associa tion, RacquetbaU Recreation Run, and the URI Bake-Off, which raised money for the Paraplegic Association of Rhode Island. In addition, each house participates in their own

philanthropic project

yearly.

At the March 1984 Northeast In Conference

terfraternity Council

URI's Pan.helienic Association won award of Excellence for Com munity Service. This award was based on the 25 Panhels from Maryland to Maine. Also at the conference, Terry Tinkham was an

elected Vice-President of NEIFC in charge of fraternities in R.L, Mass., Conn., and New York City. These awards show the growth of the

organizations and the poten tial to strive toward excellence. IFC and Panhel will continually strive towards making the URI Greek Community the best it can be. two

INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL AND PANHELLENIC

ASSOCIATION

RIPIRG/IRC Pantiel / 109

THE NEW RAM BAND

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ft;

110 / Ram Band

.'.

,f3jK

is

The

looking great!!

university band is made up people, including the

of about 100

drill team, dancers, feature twirler well as the musicians. Some

as

members

Music majors, but likely to find a Com puter Science, Zoology, Engineer ing or Business Major in this organization. They all have one thing in common: they are willing

you

are

are

just

as

sacrifice

to

towards

their

time

work

to

goal for

a common

a suc

with

ing

style. While consider options, a new develop

our new

our

cessful show in return for some good times, new friends, and an

ment arose. Our first home game was going to be televised, and the

unforgettable experience. No longer "That" Ram Band, the URI Ram Band has adopted new image as a more dedicated and sophisticated marching band.

appearance of the band was a sudden concern. We decided to

It

started

2

change from

years a

swing

and continued

we

with this past of the bicenten

You

uniform.

noticed

no

had found

have

may

longer sport

patriotic red, white, and we

a

style

on

year's "burning" nial

with

ago

to corps

our

the

blue

uniforms

sadly

outdated and totally incompatable

dig

out

dickies

the and

pep the

band's new

white

uniform

became white pants with a short sleeved blue golf shirt. Once the

to be a smash!

Besides

supporting the team, recognition in our own right from the campus, community and other university bands. We participated In our first competi tion this year and we placed first In our division. Next season we hope to host a collegiate marching band competition here at URI. Yes, we'll we

strive for

weather turned cooler, we were thankful for the heavy sweatshirts

have more hard work in the

fall,

but

any

(compliments of the athletic department) that arrived half way through the season. It was not a smooth running year in the uniform department, but with our new

member of the Ram Band!

uniforms next season, we're

it's

worth

it.

Just

ask

sure

Ram Band / 1 1 1

THE STUDENT SENATE

The Student the Senate, backbone of URI, is where at URI. The senate is a group of dedicated students who spend many an hour working hard at making URI the best it can be. Student Senators represent all the various "types" of students at in URI an attempt to meet everyone's needs. The senate works with matters concerning all aspects of the

changes begin

University including money, budget, academics,' organization and is also responsible for funding the many organizations at URI.

....

WHERE CHANGES BEGIN

Organizations

/ 1 13

BILL GANNON

114/ Bill Gannon

AIR BAND CONTEST

Air Band / 115

Enjoy It for Many Moons

.

.

.

STUDENT LIFE I

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I gasp and jump back as I meet my reflection in the mirror. Could this possibly be me? Could I have really changed so much in such a

short time? Yes, it is true. This could be

a

humbling experience. I've changed from that scared and shy very

Capturing the

Essence of U.R.I.

kid who ago. It's seem as

came

funny, though

here a few years because it doesn't I've been here that

long, and yet I can definitely see I've grown-up that I've changed more. I suppose that it shouldn't of a surprise. much be that really After all, there were a lot of new ex to get I to learn had here. periences along with people who were dif ferent from me. I had forgotten that so many of my friends in high school were so similar to me same background, values, and ex pectations. I never realized that there were so many other types of people around. I think this realiza tion hit me when I met my first roommate.

Even though I would never admit it, it wasn't easy being away from home. I guess I took a lot of things for granted. It wasn't too bad

I how to do my laundry learned the hard way why you should never put white underwear in with pink and blue shirts. I prob ably forgot to tell Mom how good her cooking was, and how nice it was not to have to worry about like the phone some of my bills bill! I also realized that I missed those talks I used to have with my

learning

parents. They were always good at listening when I was trying to make decision or at helping me to sort It out my feelings and thoughts a

is not

easy to do that

over

the

phone. Somehow it also seemed budget my money when I I guess home was living at easier to

because I could always convince Mom or Dad to "lend" me a few bucks. I didn't know it at the time, but being away from home takes some adjusting. I can't believe that I slept through all my 8 am classes the first week of school because I was waiting for Mom to knock at my door. I forgot to budget my time in the beginning. The work was more dif ficult than it had been in high school, but I couldn't seem to find

the time to do it. I was busy during the day, and then at night. I kept finding myself drawn into conversa tions either in somebody's room or often times in the hallway. There was nobody to remind me to do my homework although some pro fessors hinted at it. Then again, 1 had to learn the hard way when ex am time and final grades appeared. The weekends were difficult in the beginning. I wanted to meet people, but I wasn't quite sure how to do this. It took me awhile to learn to socialize more and avoid lonely nights and days in my room. I found that I needed to change some of my expectations of other people. It wasn't that they were in ferior to me, they were just dif ferent. When I learned to look at people in terms of what made them special, and what they had to give to others, I really learned a lot probably some of the most impor tant things in my life. I guess I started dreaming at one point about what I wanted to be if I ever grew up. when I grew up It wasn't always an easy decision. I found some areas that interested me, but I wasn't sure that I was ready to make a commitment to one field, or even sure that I would still want that kind of job in five years. I had some doubts about my abilities to be successful, (after all, the classroom is very different from the workplace) and I worried about whether I was really good enough. Somewhere along the line that worry mixed with excitement and anticipation. Maybe I could do a

good job

I

am

pretty

smart.

I

had learned a lot, 1 felt I could han dle this job and I could even do it well. Surely I'd get recognition for my work if not an early raise. After awhile I began to settle down. I liked what I was studying and I was going to get a good job and do well. I had learned that "Yes" I could survive away from my parents. I realized that college wasn't the ultimate test of in dependence, but it was a great step. If I could survive in college, then I could survive on my own in "The Real World." It's a nice feel ing to know that I can be inde pendent. I liked the people I spent time with, I had finally found my friends in this mass of people. I had some good times, had a lot of laughs (which balanced out the tears) and learned to share with other people. It was great to have that special friend I could really ,

open up to and be myself without worrying about being liked. It was nice to find someone who thought I 1 have some was pretty special. great memories from my four years at URI. I can remember how I felt being a freshman here, but when I look at myself as a senior I can't believe how much I've changed. I was challenged in so many ways. I learned to believe in what was im not what portant to me somebody else told me to believe in. I learned what right and wrong meant to me. I found my thoughts, my ideals, my

feelings were always being challenged in and out of the classroom.

Some

of

those

late

night/early morning talks in peo ple's rooms should have earned philosophy credits. If I wasn't sure who I was when I came to URI, at least I'm sure that I have a pretty good idea of who I am as I leave here. It wasn't easy being chal lenged, (at times it was kind of painful) and while I wasn't aware of it when it was happening, it was definitely growing up. One of the

most important things that I learned was to believe in myself and to like myself for who I am. There may be other times when I'm startled by my reflection in the mirror, but at least I feel confident that I'm going to like what I see. Now that I've grown-up this far, it can only get better. And tor all of us professionally and personally the Possibilities are Endless! I suppose that I shouldn't take any of these changes for granted they didn't always come so easily. I didn't think that I would ever be a senior in college now I can't believe that I was ever a freshman. I learned so much here things that will never be reflected in my transcript, only in myself. As I leave URI I'm taking so much with me not just all the things that I've accumulated or four but a years tilled with memories new me.

J. A.

URI Life/ 119

Those WILD And CRAZY

College Days

.

.

.

College

Lite/ 121

Making Major Decisions As at

we

URI,

look back on our years remember all the ex

we

periences that we have had. The experiences are as different as

appear to be less successful than others. Of those techniques which seem less effective we have:

all the students here, but there few things that we have in common. One example is that of choosing an academic major. No doubt the act of deciding on a major is a crucial one in any college setting. Even the most laid back students come to URI with at least some thoughts of sometime selecting an area of study to concentrate on. Some of us may have known which area we planned to pur sue as soon as we were able to walk and talk. Others may have a received subtle, (and not so sometimes subtle) message from parents about what is best for us. Still others may have decided to wait until they received threatening letters telling them they couldn't graduate without a declared

because you can pronounce the of all the professors in that department, selecting a major because you don't want to feel left out, and selecting a major so people will stop asking you if you have selected a major

major.

yet.

we are all different peo with different ideas, expec tations, and approaches, it seems likely that there would be many different ways to choose a major. These ways merit men tion here, although it should be noted that some approaches

To be fair, some mention should be given to those people who aspire to be permanent This can students. be ac complished in one of two ways. The first way the people never decide on a major. Instead they just collect academic credits in

are a

,

Since

ple,

selecting

a

major by drawing

out

of a hat, selecting a major in which class times don't interfere with the soaps, selecting a ma jor with the fewest number of textbooks, selecting the same major as a roommate or friend to assist in the tedious job of

taking notes, selecting a major because it impresses other peo ple, selecting a major because senior year you find that you just happen to have enough credits in this area, selecting a major that

won't

interfere

anything else, selecting

a

with

major

names

any and all departments, being careful never to accumulate the correct amount for a degree. The second way, people con tinually change their major. This can be done at various intervals: daily, weekly, bi-weekly, month ly, bi-monthly, each semester etc... Of course one needs to be careful when changing daily not to run out of majors too soon. A very creative person could add a twist to this process by creating original majors. A true student might avoid making a choice altogether and major in

everything. Of those techniques which appear to be more successful, we have: selecting a major because you enjoy studying that

particular field, selecting a major because you enjoy the field and good at it, selecting a major

are

because you have known other people who worked in this area and it appealed to you, and of course the old standby of selecting a major because you have had a chance to explore other fields (through coursework or practical ex perience) and you feel that this is the kind of work that suits you best. Some of you may be wishing

that you had known about these techniques earlier, when you were choosing a major. Take heart, if your method wasn't mentioned here, you may want to share it with others for future reference. If you are skeptical about some of the techniques mentioned here, start asking other people how they selected their major. You may be sur prised at some of tfieir answers. Dee Clare

Sports

2 (/)

O

A string of six victories at the end of the season gave the team the most wins in their history (144-2) a fitting finish to a record setting campaign. The Rams closed out the 1983 campaign with a 2-1 triumph over Fordham in the Bronx, as they lost only one game in its last 1 1 outlings. Winning five of its first six, URI moved into 19th place in the Na tional rankings, and for most of the season were placed second or third in New England by the coaches' rating board. Among those victories was a 1-0 win over NCAA-bound Providence College. A 12-0 drubbing of Fairfield tied the Ram record for most goals in a game, established by the same score versus Holy Cross in 1979. The team registered 10 shutouts, also a new mark, and finished with a record of points-per-game offen sive average of 7.65. ,

o

IBIMllll

Wl

?

Senior goalkeeper Scott set two records: most shutouts in a single season (8.5) and best goals against average in a season (.76) He allowed only 13 goals in his 17 games and an made average 6.18 saves per team Senior contest. captain Barry Knapp set a record for the most games played in a career

Gillespie

.

(71). Juniors Tony Fontes and Gil Monteiro tied for the team scoring lead, each with 29 points. Fontes had a team high 12 goals plus 5 assists, while Monteiro scored 9 goals and topped the team in assists (11). Geza Henni completed his 15th season as the head coach with a record of 159-69-24.

Although a club team by official status, the schedule comprised of boasting all varsity teams. Initially, with no pre-season, no scholarship athletes and very schools

limited resources, the team was at a distinct disadvantage in this fine field of competitors losing its first four games by a total of eleven goals. They were outscored by their opponents 16-5. From this point, despite being plagued by injuries and academic scheduling problems, the team rallied through hard work, deter mination and spirit exemplifying the finest attributes of athletic endeavor to win seven of its last nine games, finishing with a win ning record of 7-6-0 on the year. They outscored their opponents 33-15. This phenomenal performance included a berth in the finals of the RIWSA state championship at Providence College. After a halftime tie of 0-0, the team bowed 31 in the final minutes of the game. Because of the successful ef forts of all involved, the team has been elected to varsity status for the 1984 season and will compete as a NCAA Division III contender. The performance and leadership of seniors Kristine Powers, Joyce Gawron and Kristen Lomker will be sorely missed. Tom DiPitro

Cheerleaders

Cheerleaders

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After returning from a suc cessful two week preseason tour of England, and under a new coach the WRam Field Hockey team posted a 4-10-2 record. Coach Tracey Andrews used the speed of senior Tri-captain Linda Herron and junior Lynne Starses to quickly move the ball on to the Rhody attack, along with the precision passing of sophomore Roseanne Primavera and freshman Carl Guliia. The defense was anchored by junior Tri-captains Deb Murphy and Andrea McGinn. Their sure stick turned op away many ponents drives. Sophomore Jackie Molne held true at sweep, with junior Deb Robson having a ban ner year in goal. The mid-field was controlled through the hustling efforts of seniors links Karen Murphy and Holly Kenyon, with freshman Sherry Shoemaker and junior Janet Boyle balancing out the defense at side backs. The team is looking forwaf'd to the '84 season as it only loses two players to graduation. With ex

perience under its belt the Rams' '84 campaign should prove to be successful. K.

Murphy

FIELD HO

fcy^*^ii^7^

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1

'

Whether snakes of

it be dodging the the Great Swamp,

climbing Yawgoo, relaxing through "Paradise Pasture," or rolling over Wolf Rocks Road, the team, joined by Coach Copeland on his bike, was working together, lead by TriCaptains Don Legere, Greg Hale

>>

C ;3 o

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and Joe Swift, to show that the 1983 Ram Harriers would once again make their mark on the New England level. it was time to breed recent history. For the second year in a row, the team broke into the top Seven in the New England Cham pionships, lead by an impressive third place finish by Greg Hale and a tenth place finish by a much im

proved Joe Swift. Contributing to this effort were the team's consis tent three, four and five men: Don Legere, Mark Galloway, and Dale Boucher. Fine efforts were made from Bill King and freshman Chris Magee. But it was not the mud and rain of Franklin Park that marked the end of the season for some. A ninth place finish in the ICAA Championship at Lehigh made Greg Hale the best URI finisher in 34 years. This finish qualified him to participate in the NCAA Cham pionships, the first runner to do so since Bob Black, who won the NCAA in 1949. Adding character to this years squad were Jim Scanlon, Paul Hanks, and Marty Susia, and of course the alumni whose presence

greatly appreciated. exception of our only graduating senior. Bob Kostelak, we'll all be together again next bushwhacking the terrain year of South County. were

With the

Don

Legere

n 'w^C,

At first glance, disappointment may appear to have been what characterized the URI Rams 1983 season as the Yankee Con ference title eluded them just as it to be in sight. Midappeared season heart-breaking losses to Boston University and the Univer sity of New Hampshire prevented the Rams from capturing the crown for the second time in the past three years. A closer look will reveal a season much better than their 6-4 Rams record indicates. The became the first Yankee Con ference team to defeat the University of Delaware since the Rams did back in 1967. Since then, Delaware had racked up 31 consecutive victories over Yankee Conference foes. Ouarterback Dave Wienke, a first time starter as a senior, tied former Ram quarterback Steve Tosches' 1978 mark of 22 complete passes in one game. The Governor's Cup was one ti tle that did not elude the Rams as they defeated intrastate rival

Brown University for the first time since 1978. Wienke became the first quarterback in Ram history to throw for over 2000 yards in a single season as he threw for a total of 2, 1 17 yards in 10 games. He also broke the URI total offensive record set in 1982 by Dave Grimsich, and the Yankee Conference singleseason

passing record, formerly

held by Ken Sweitzer of Connec ticut. To top it all off, Wienke's 150 completed passes were the most ever thrown by a Ram quarterback. The old mark was set by Larry Caswell in 1 969. Senior Jim Adams and Sophomore Dameon Reilly con sistently made key catches while assisting Wienke in setting four marks. Each averaged 3.2 catches a game while racking up 1191 for the yards passing minded offense of coach Bob Griffin. Seniors Steve Caizzi and Dave Neill led the ground attack as they gained over 700 yards. Caizzi rushed for a total of

touchdowns in ten games. the Rams were led defensive back Tony Hill whose nine interceptions set a URI and a NCAA Division AA record. His most memorable one seven

Defensively,

by

came

on

Homecoming

Day

Northeastern University he sprinted 94 yards for a touchdown that provided the stimulus for a Ram victory. The

against as

longest

interception

back for

player yarder

ever

run

touchdown by an URI Bob DiSpirito's 74 back in 1950 against a

was

Brown. In the pits. Senior Mark Dennen led the Rams with 61 tackles. Senior Gerry Favreau and Junior Jeff Chenard sacked enemy quarterbacks a total of 16 times which cost opponents over 100

yards. The Rams put

on

a

clinic for

audiences as CBS Sports provided regional coverage of the Rams impressive 24-16 victory over the University of Maine. area

fin

This year Ram coach Bob Grif was awarded with his fifth win-

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ning season in eight years at URI. With Wienke, Adams and Reilly, Griffin put together perhaps the best passing attack in the Yankee Conference this year. Continued success for the Rams next year will depend on whether or not someone can be found to get the ball to receiving ace Dameon Reilly as consistently as Wienke did. Rich Kelly should provide the needed muscle to put the ball over the goal line in short yardage situations. Dave Alexander

WINTER S

1

1

z

itfMi

..

3 o to

^!fe*,

The

WRAM

Swimmers

were

again led by considerable talents of senior co-captain Sue James. She fittingly ended her last year here at Kingston by establishing

o

her ninth individual school record in the final event she competed in at the New England Champion ships. In the four years she swam for the University, she scored over 300 points in championship com petition, was the only swimmer to ever qualify for a national cham pionship meet, and received the High Point Trophy for dual meet

competition every year. Ttie swimming talents

of Michele tremendous also a Mulligan asset to the team. Michele went on to prove that she was one of the top sprinters in our region by finishing third in the 50 yard Freestyle at the New Englands, and finaling in both the 100 yard and the 200 yard events. She, along with Sue, co-captain Kathy Cower ('85) Nadrah Zubi ('86) and Grace Sue Quintiliani ('86)

walk-on,

freshman,

were

% ^

,

,

,

Abbott

('86) gave Freestyle contingent. ,

us

a

strong

her third she is a great championship swimmer as she swam her way to three lifetime best times in the 100 yard and the 200 yard Breaststroke events, and in the Breaststroke leg of the 400

Amy Colby ('85), for again proved that

year,

yard Medley Relay. She

was

a

finalist in all of these events. Along with Karen Wunsch ('86) Rhode Island had another fine year in this ,

stroke specialty. The WRAM Swimmers received considerable backstroke help from freshman Maria Bednar, and div ing help from Kery Griffin ('86) and Sheila Qunitiliani ('87) These three showed great promise while struggling with injuries and lack of .

easy one for The Swimmers. Our program is going through a re-building period when program goals are being re-evaluated and recruiting has become more selec tive. Losing only one athlete through graduation, and having a solid nucleus of returning veterans is going to provide the team with a great deal of continuity and base on which to build. At the Fourth Annual Awards Banquet sponsored by the Fast Lane Club on April 28th, Sue James was the awarded Outstanding Swimmer Award and the High Point Trophy, and Lisa Billings was presented the Most Improved Swimmer Award. an

experience. The 1983-1984

season was

not

Michael Wescott

\

i

Jy

5

Swimming Team of their most suc cessful seasons in its short twelve year history with their highest ever showing at the 65th New England Championships. Led by senior John Taffe who won three New England titles, the Rhody swim mers scored a record 265 points to place fourth out of the thirty teams competing. John won the 100 yard and the 200 yard breaststroke events, establishing new school marks in the process. Don With Dave Sullivan ('84) and Duncan ('85) Roger Schenone ('87) John also swam to a first place finish in the 400 The

Men's

completed

one

,

,

,

yard

Medley

Relay;

they

established a new team record by over four seconds. The men swam and dove to the finest dual meet season in four years with wins coming over the of Universities Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Vermont. They also defeated two teams

they lost close

meets to In the 1982-1983 season, the University of Lowell and the Coast Guard Academy. During this part of the year the team set three new school records something unusual in a sport where new are standards generally ac complished only at the end of the

year.

Although the team's focus again going to be on the England Championships, the once

was

New men

still went to the second Atlantic Ten Swimming and Diving Cham pionships the week before looking to perform their best times of the year. Twenty-three seasonal best times were recorded, seventeen personal best times were set, and four more school records were established. During the final weekend of the year at the New England Cham pionships, the Rhode Island swim mers and divers continued to show improvement. Tim Fitzpatrick

('86) had an outstanding showing in the Individual Medley and But terfly events. He swam to a sec ond place finish in the 400 I.M. and a fifth place in the 200 yard event, to go along with a fifth place in the 200 Butterfiy, Freshman Chip Church recorded two third place finishes in the 500 yard and the 1650 yard Freestyle, and the 200 yard I.M. Other swimmers and divers who scored points for the team at this meet were senior diver 1 Meter Dave Venerus (14th Diving) and junior Kevin Salisbury 200 Butterfly). (16th At the fourth Annual Awards Banquet sponsored by the Fast Lane Club on April 28th, John Taffe was awarded the Outstand ing Swimmer Award, and the High Point Trophy, and Kevin Salisbury was presented the Most Improved Swimmer Award. ,

Michael Wescott

The URI men's basketball team did not have a very successful in terms of wins and losses, but something can be said for the endurance and stamina of the squad. Led by seniors Kevin Compton, Roland Fiore, Marc Upshaw and Chris Cummings, the Rams asfounded onlookers by winning the games in which they were predicted longshot losers, and by keeping the score close in the waning minutes of several other season

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contests.

The Rams lost seven games by three points or fewer, two In over time; three by one point, and three more by two points. All of the two-point defeats came on baskets by the opposition at the final buzzer. Compton evolved as the offen sive leader of the club, which com pleted its season with a 6-22 record. That established a new record for the most losses in a single season for a Ram club. The "Cat" finished his career at URI averaging 11.5 points per game. He tallied a career high 26 points against St. Bonaventure

January 7, 1984. Compton, and following, he recorded 24, 18, 21, 12, and 13 points respectively, for a six-game

University

on

That game sparked In the five games

average of 19.0. He also 33 minutes of playing time per game for the year. Todd Bozeman was the overall team scoring leader with an 11.9 ppg average over the season, while accounting for 310 points. ppg

averaged

At the conclusion of the season, the Fast Break Club announced that Bozeman earned their Most Valuable Player Award. Bozeman shot a consistent 80 percent from the- free throw line, and was credited with 28 steals and 94 re bounds during the 26 games In which he played. Upshaw returned to the court after nearly one year on the rehabilitation comeback trail from

injury he suffered last Although he missed seven managed to tally 245 points to bring his career total to 1,363, which was good for nine teenth place on the All-Tlme URI list. He averaged 11.7 ppg, 6.2 rpg the knee season.

games, Upshaw

and scored 47 of 73 shots from the line. Tony Taylor was the other player finishing with a scoring average in double figures. His 11.0 ppg was the result of his scoring 308 points. Taylor tallied a career high 28 points against West Virginia at the Providence Civic Center, in a game in which the Rams won, 98-84. He also was named the Defensive Player of the Year by the Fast Break Club.

Fiore, in his first season as a Ram, proved to be the biggest sur

prise for the club. His aggressive style of play, and his forceful at tempts at rebound made for He

ex

8.9 137 ppg, and was rebounds and 26 steals. Fiore also totaled 116 personal fouls. He started all but one game for the Rams, and averaged 31 minutes of

citing games.

play

per game.

averaged responsible for

8 (a

Chris Scotti,

a

Cummings shared

freshman, and the

duties as combined

The two both big men were in points produc tion, Scotti started 17 games, and led the team with 33 blocked shots, good for seventh in the As a Atlantic-10 Conference. first-year player, he appeared quite impressive against the the

well,

center.

and

relatively equal

more-seasoned veterans. Another freshman to impress the Ram faithful onlookers was 1982 High Tucker, the School Player of the Year in the state of Delaware. Tucker aver

Tony

in all 28 games. He also was respon sible for 48 turnovers and 1 1 blocked shot attempts. Tucker ac counted for 18 points, his highest for the season, on the very first of the year, against game Canisius. Paul Dudzinski played a limited role for the team, but did see some action in six games. It was reported early in the season that Reggie Home had left the University of Rhode Island, and its basketball program due to reasons not relating to the sport. He participated in seven games.

aged 6.6 ppg while playing

four of which he started. Coach Claude English did not have his contract renewed after three seasons as head coach. He did opt to complete the season at the helm. His record at Ram men tor was 25-58. Sophomore returnee Rusty Cor dua did not play at all, and neither did freshman Jesse Long. Cordua suffered a deep thigh bruise in pre-season practice, resulting in calcium deposits. Long severely sprained an ankle and subse quently underwent surgery to

repair ligament damage. Randy Hausmann

BASKETBALL

I I '

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I

Just two seasons ago, the URI women's basketball team had trouble breaking even. They were satisfied with their 15-14 record, and thrilled with their Eastern Regional Tournament berth. This season, however, the WRams were harder to please. Satisfaction to this club was and revenging the Rutgers Scarlet Knights in the Atlantic 10 Conference Championships. The 1983-84 WRams are satisfied, to say the least. Although the team didn't quite reach their 20-win goal, an 18-12 overall slate certainly isn't shabby in the powerful ATC. Besides, their other goal was the more mean ingful one. Just ask the Rutgers Scarlet Knights. The fifth-seeded WRams mer season

cilessly upset first-seeded Rutgers in the ATC championship, 81-70 (after upsetting Temple in the They quarter-finals, 82-75) .

finished second in the tournament, their highest finish in conference history, and laid the groundwork

for a glowing WRam future. Coach Nancy Langham and her assistants John Spless (first year) and Bob Schneck, predicted a winning season last November. But what they built and witnessed in five months was a Cinderella story. Five WRam records were set throughout the season; the WRams 68-60 upset over

Syracuse was their first over the Orange women in four outings; their 66-58 upset over the Univer sity of New Hampshire was a WRam first in seven outings (four seasons); and their come-frombehind Rutgers victory was an ultimate WRam first.

Basketball

m

\

RAMS

VISITOR/

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Although the squad jumped to a 6new year triggered demoralizing five-game WRam los ing streak. Similar to past seasons, mid-January was colder than ever for the 6-8 Rhody. But starting with a 73-65 Boston University burn, the WRams snapped out of their mid winter slump and proceeded to pocket eleven out of their next 13

Smith leaves URI after becoming highest scorer in WRam Hoopster history, with 1,341 points and holding five all-time records for

games. The victims included a stun ned University of New Hampshire squad, Seton Hall, ATC powerhouse West Virginia, Connecticut, Fairfield,

Hogan,

3 1983 record, the

a

Montclair,

UMass,

Maine,

Temple, and Rutgers. Unfortunately, the WRams seven-game February fury ended in the ATC Championship finals. Penn State beat Rhody 99-64

] f-

and

moved

on

to

National

Competition. But the WRam

hoopsters

are

right

where

they want to be among the of Eastern supremacy College women's basketball. And thanks to the leadership, talent, and desire of

BQ

T**^**^ t-

"--"-"" T"

four seniors, and

especially two year Carol Smith and Helene Roher, the young 1984-1985 WRams will be heading in the right direction. co-captains

the second

steals and assists. Roher, who's ex perience and leadership guided the

squad, ends her career points and 708 rebounds.

Although

the

Smith, Roher, and

club

with

point-guard

reserve

890

loses starters Maureen

center Barbara

Miltner, assistant coach spies have,

completed perhaps the most promls-' ing hoopster recruiting year in WRarr history. With the club's already-solid

Washington-Quantmeyer-HathawayRyan base, 1984-1985 could very well

be the year of the WRam

In

Kingston. Contentment next

season

won't

bel

20-wins, or a Syracuse and Rutgers upset. Satisfaction in 1984-1985 will] mean

revenging

the Penn State

Lady

Lions, capturing the Atlantic 10 Con ference

Championships, and chatting with Cheryl Miller and company in the of the national tournament lobby headquarters. Janet

Simmons!

sj^M.

/

n4 They almost did it in 1983. URI's volleyballers came as as they have ever been to breaking down the door separating the WRAMS from Na tional prominence. If not for a lapse in the Atlantic 10 Con ference Championships, the hinges on that door may have given way. Disappointment over that lapse, however, can't take anything away women

close

S

from

the

team's

tremendous

accomplishments. The WRams, under coach Bob Schneck, started kicking and clawing when another team may have given up to turn a mediocre start into the best overall record in the team's history, 29-15. URI was 26-23 a year before. After a 7-8 early-season mark, the spikers caught fire, winning 20 of their last 24 regular-season matches. Included in that surge was a string of 10 consecutive vic

tories. The late season explosion seemed to point the way to a strong showing in the ATC's. Rhody did start well in the con ference championships, sweeping past West Virginia, 15-6, 15-12, 15-5. But eventual winner Penn State treated the WRams in a similar manner, disposing of the upstart Rhody spikers in three,

15-11, 15-6, 15-6. From there, URI took another step backward, falling 12-15, 155, 10-15, 11-15 to Temple and

15-13,

13-15,

3-15,

15-17

to

Rutgers. A win over George Washington, 15-13, 15-7, 15-10 gave the WRams third place in the tournament behind Penn State and Rutgers. URI sophomore Sue Scott was named to the all-ATC tournament team for the second straight year for her role in the WRam effort. For the regular season, Scott placed third in the ATC in both hit ting efficiency (.319) and kills per (4.1) while ending up game seventh in the conference in aces

per game (.575) Junior Ginny .

O'Brien and Nancy MacDonald also ranked among the top10 in the ATC in three categories. O'Brien was third in aces per game (.624) sixth in hitting effi

sophomore were

,

ciency (.274) game (2.88).

and ninth in kills per

MacDonald was fourth in the blocks per game category with an average of 1.8, while posting a No. 6 ranking in aces per game (581) and placing seventh, behind

O'Brien,

in

hitting efficiency

at

.259. Other WRams earning a spot in the ATC's top-10 were sophomore Dee Dee Hull and junior Nancy Nydam in the assists per game category and sophomore Diane Garceau for blocks per game. Hull was second in assists with a 10.4 average. Nydam averaged 1.3 assists each time out, good for sixth. Garceau's 1.27 blocks per game put her at sixth in the ATC. Steven St.

Angelo

^t/A

With

one

it for the URI

exception

was

a

hockey reigning They champions of the New England Small College Hockey Association and they were out to prove they could do it again. And they almost

perfect club

g o

a:

season

team.

were

did. Led by coach Tom Macari, they had roared thorugh not only their own league to finish with a 9-1-2 NESCHA record to clinch the divison title with one game remain ing in the regular season, but they also dominated most of their nonleague competition to finish with a 13-4-2 overall season record. Rhody opened the season on a winning note with a 8-3 victory over the Stoneybrook College. Later in the season they destroyed Brandeis University 15-0, Clark 90, Central Connecticut State

University 15-1, Wagner College 10-2, and other various assorted teams.

Then it was on to the play-offs. Their first victim was Worcester Polytechnic Institute. The Rams showed no mercy as they blasted WPI 8-2. The Community College of Rhode Island was out for blood the following night, though, as it proved too much for the Rams, as they edged Rhody 5-4. Sparking the Rams in their win ning efforts were Dave Cloxton and Jim Allenson. Cloxton, who Most the team's was voted Valuable Player by his peers and the coaches, led the team, in overall scoring with 18 goals and 31 assists for a total of 49 points. Allenson received the top Scorer award for the NESCHA for his 15 goals and 1 1 assists for 26 points in

league play.

Backing

Cloxton and Allenson's

the offense were Tony (14-13-27), Norm LaFleur (4-9-13); John Shola; Art Floru (8-11-19) ; Phil Hadfield (4-11-

efforts Perna

on

who won the Most Exciting Bob McLeod (6-9who was named the team's Most Inspirational Player; John Howard (3-8-11); and Art Gow

15)

,

Player award; 15)

,

(1-1-2).

Providing a superb effort in front of goalies Scott MacBeth and Er nie DelGizzo were (0-2-2) defensemen Dave Colson (2-6-8) who was named the squad's Un sung Hero; Steve Peltier (7-1623) ; Dave Foster (0-5-5) ; Paul Rasieleski (0-5-5) ; Anthony Hamel (7-6-13); and Roger Briggs (3-4-7) who was awarded the Most Improved Player. The season may not have ended quite the way the Rams had hoped for, but they left the lockerroom after the league finals with their heads held high and maybe just a little more determination in their eyes. There's always next year. ,

,

Katie Bitter

INTRA

SPRING

SPRING SPROTS

Hit hard

by

last

year's gradua

tion, the URI Men's Lacrosse team very heavily this year, resulting in a very young and inex perienced squad. Looking to recruited

rebuild the team, first year coach John Hooper faced many hurdles as poor weather delayed the seasons opening, and a rash of in juries depleted the squad. The season opener against Boston University proved to be an indication of the Ram's fate for the season, as the Terriers prevailed in a nail-biting, overtime win. With two more one-goal losses, followed by a couple of tough defeats. Hooper restructured his team and brought URI back to basics. The Rams responded by winning their last four games out of and provided the con seven, sistency that was not evident in the beginning of the spring season.

In its first victory of the young the Rams tripped the University of Connecticut 8-7. off a late rally by the Holding Huskies, URI's defense tightened

season,

itself and forced UCONN to turn the ball over to the Rams. A hard-

fought

victory

Southern

University

a

strong

Connecticut

State

team

over

(10-8) gave URI

the

revenge it seeked from an earlier overtime loss to Southern. The season closed with a pair of ruthless victories over State rival, Bryant College, 17-3 and 15-1. These victories signified the young Rams' comeback and at the same time pointed the Laxmen in the direction of a strong season for 1985. Consistent performers for the team were attackmen Bar rows, Slack, Weiss and Unsworth; midfielders Smith, Baker, Nelson and Finn: defensemen Mahoney, Hannifin and Willis: goalies Lerner and Rocchio.

A.

Quagmire

f^ |^

^^

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Miami of Ohio) a pair of games with arch rival Rutgers, the team which eventually took it all in the Atlantic 10 Conference. URI sandwiched another split

Editor Note: The RENAISSANCE were no WRams Softball pictures available for use in the 1964 book.

over

un rather all ended It ceremoniously, with a double shutout over the Lady Friars of Providence College. No big deal. As they say, "Not with a bang.

with Springfield between a 7-0, 10-0 bombardment of Bridgeport and a 3-1, 9-6 sweep past St. John's. But things still didn't look half bad heading into the impor tant portion of the season. That final thrust began on a sour a with note, newly-ascended Eastern powerhouse Adelphi out of a 1-0 win over squeaking the WRams. C. W. Post fell to URI by the same score later that day. A no-sweat, seventh-straight RIAIAW state title was tainted somewhat by the announcement that coach Nancy Langham would not be at the helm next season. Langham, will instead, focus her complete attention on the women's basketball program. Yet the WRams had to put that bit of information aside and continue toward their goal. Ahead, was the most important weekend of the year, with six ATC contests in a

regrets that there

Sadly, the WRams of the URI Softball team (21-11) never ful filled their dreams of making it back to the NCAA Championships without

a

time-tested,

veteran

squad. And, after having seemed collision course with that end, the reality of seeing the chance disintegrate wasn't a pleasant on a

thing. The season began with a fairly successful road trip to South Carolina. The WRams snared five of seven games during the visit. Then came the onset of the "splitsies." The WRams split a doubleheader with Central Con necticut, then another twin bill with Sacred Heart and (after a 2-1 win

bonanza. Al stake the bid to the ATC Cham pionships that the team so desperately wanted. It would be, they had hoped, the next step on their way to the NCAA's. URI needed to take at least one game of the two at the University of Massachusetts to qualify for that bid. UMass quickly backed the WRams up against the wall with a 9-1 firstgame clobbering. Then came an with extra-inning nail biter the URI season hanging on every pitch. The contest was deadlocked at when zero UMass went to work in the eighth. And with two out and two on, it happened. An un earned run effectively ended the WRams' season. What they had worked so hard for had van ished. But their heads were not hanging. They had come this far and they weren't going to quit. It

three-day was

time to show the kind of character built into the team. And that the WRams did. A 1-0 loss to Temple the next day stung a bit more. Still no surrender on the WRam's part. They turned on Temple in the second game to walk away with a 6-1 win and a split. Again the next day, URI fell far behind quickly against Penn State before exploding for an 11-8 win. The Lady Lions, however, were not about to let themselves get beat twice. The WRams fell in the second game, was

7-2.

The season officially closed with a sweep (3-0, 4-0) over P.C. Overall, URI had six hitters at the .290-plus plateau. Tracy Turner led the way at .337 (11 RBI) followed by Deb Pereira at .310 (17 RBI), Lori Whidden at .295 (4 RBI) Maggie Smith (4 RBI) Brenda Weaver (10 RBI) ,

,

,

and Maureen Hogan (11 RBI), all at .293. As a team, the WRams batted .278, 54 points higher than their

opposition. The .278 average represents over

last

a

jump of 41 points batting average

the team's

season.

Steve St.

Angelo

Sportscope

!

L

iff^

mtth^

LACROSSE

LACROSSE

The 1984 team set 49 and tied team and individual records, its spectacular move up the baseball ladder, after having established 43 similar marks in 1983. The 1984 records included most games played hits (40) (361), runs (257), extra-base hits (103) doubles (58) homers (38) and team batting average URI qualified for post (.285) season play for the first time in its 75 seasons, finishing second in the eastern division and playing in the seven

continuing

,

,

,

,

.

championship

versus

.

bi

defending

titlist Temple. Unfortunately, they lost that contest to the Owls 6-3, 6-4. URI went into that final needing only one win to advance to the NCAA's. Among individual ac complishments, junior catcher Dave Haring set five records for hitters, including back-to-back grand-slam homers vs. Kentucky Wesleyan and a new single-game mark for RBI's (8) Later, Haring whacked back-to-back three-run homers vs. UMass and ended up the season with marks of 52 hits, 34 RBI's, 154 at bats, and a total of 79 bases. His overall batting average was. 338. Senior tri-captain and outfielder Steve Godwin established three records enroute to the second best career hitting averages in history (.330) He holds marks for and season career runs (74) (12), and career stolen bases .

,

(22).

Sophomore DH Tony highest batting (.411) in a season for

the

Hill had average a

player

with the most at bats under 100 (39/95). He also established a new season's slugging percentage record (.674) Senior tri-captain and pitcher new seven Tom Messier set records and tied another, enroute to a 6-4 record. He established game (16), season (84), and career (167) strikeout marks, set a new record for wins in a season (6) and tied the career mark for victories (13) He also opened the 1984 campaign with a 7-inning .

.

no-hitter against Murray State, only the fourth no-hit game in the Ram diamond history. John Norris completed his 15th season as head coach with his best spring ever (22-18), most wins in a single season, first time in the post-season playoffs, and a career record of 171-241-2. The only other baseball coach at Kingston with more victories is the late Frank Keaney who coached

19

seasons

(177-71-1)

.

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Seniors

Thinking back on the past four years, I find it difficult to believe how quickly the time has passed. Just the other day my parents helped me move into Brassier Hall where I placed my high school yearbook on the shelf, took a step back and a deep breath and my college years began

.

.

.

It seemed each time I returned home for a weekend or a vacation, I was so much more "brilliant" and prepared for "the real world." I could not wait to drill my parents in History or Chemistry to show them how much I had learned in such a short time. The truth of the matter, I was trying to impress them and convince myself that I was capable of retaining this wealth of

was

knowledge.

I feel

as

though

I have

changed

a

great deal since those "dorm-life I have made many friends and memories that will linger on throughout the years. I am certainly older now and hopefully wiser in my decision making processes. The University of Rhode Island has been more than the college I

days."

attended. It

was a

place

to stum

ble, to fall, get back up again, and walk on. My education at U.R.l. has afforded invaluable ex me periences and has taught me many lessons. I have been exposed to countless academic and social situations which hopefully will prepare me for what lies ahead. When leaving U.R.L, the most important attribute which we should possess is the desire to

learn. When one door closes, has The door another opens. closed on our collegiate life, but the door to our future has just begun to open. Beyond this door lies more knowledge and experiences than we can imagine. It is imperative that we anticipate, await and ac cept them with enthusiasm and op timism. Our quest for knowledge and thirst for continuous growth are a large part of what makes us so special and unique. Each one of us has his own goals and the

career

objectives,

one common

however,

denominator

we

four years at the University of Rhode Island. Let's remember U.R.l. as the beginning of our education not the ending! Amy Aaron

share,

is

our

Food Science and Nutrition

Human

Development and Family Studies

Grace Akinrolabo

Lanita Allen

Textiles. Fashion Merch. and Design

Elementary Education /Psychology

Beth L. Alexander

Pharmacy

Diane M. Amaral

Management

Information

Cathy Altiero Management Science

James C. Amato

Systems

Accounting

Pamela-Jo Ambrose

Pharmacy

^ i

Thomas Archibald

Mechanical Engineering

Robert C, Baboian

Geology

Lynn Barker

Agriculture and Resource Technology

Rachel Beaulieu Medical

Technology

Marian Beckman

General Home Economics

Thomas A. Btais Electrical

Engineering

Lise Bosman

Management

Information

Systei

Jeremy A, Brenner

Management Science

Michael Callahan

Julie Cameron Human Development and Family Studies

Angela Caporelli Agriculture and Resource Technology

Christopher Capozzoli Computer Engineering

Electric

Carolyn Camevale

MariAnneCarolan

Nursing

Debra Choiniere

Michael Chmtelowiec Electronic

Computer Engineering

Human

Development and Family Studies

David

Chopy

Chemical Engineering

Lynne Clachrie Textiles, Fashion Merch.

and

Design.

Douglas J.

Clark Natural Resources

Chemical Engineering

1

Andrew Cline Mechanical Engineering

,^^^^H^^H Kathleen

CoHey Accounting

Wendy S. Conklin Agricultural and Resource Technology

Stephanie

M. Cruz

Finance/ Marketing

Anne Cullen

Management Information Systems

Michael Cunniff

Dear Motn and Dad Freshman Year ? URI is great. I've met

so

many

new

peo

ple. It snowed here all day yesterday, and last night some students got out of hand. They "bombed" a few police cars with snowballs and proceeded to attack the campus police station. What a mess! The football games are a lot of fun, especially when I follow the game. The fraternity parties we've been going to on the weekends have been fantastic. The din ing hall food isn't as bad as everyone warned me it would be. You can't beat the burgers, fries and ice cream they serve at Hope Dining Hall. Don't worry though, I'll watch my weight! I've learned so much in the short time I've been away. I feel like a new person! See you soon

Mary

Sophomore Year

?

the fourth fioor in Browning Living Hall has been quite an experience. Now that it's Spring Semester, the music never stops and the frisbees are flying! Spring on

Weekend is coming up, and Squeeze is one of the bands who will be performing. I'm sure they'll be as great as James Taylor was in February. I still can't believe I waited in line for J.T. tickets from 4 am to 10 am. (I snuck into the Union through the Pub door!) It was worth the wait,

though. I've been watching my weight like I promised, but I just can't seem to shake that 10 pounds from freshman year. I've discovered a new place to eat since I realized how bad the dining hall food real ly is. It's a place called the "Rams Den." The food is pretty decent and the prices aren't bad either. I guess I'll survive after all! Miss you,

Mary

210 / Dear Mom and Dad

s

"^ Junior Year I can't thank you enough for letting me off campus and into this beautiful beach house. We haven't heard from the monsters, I mean landlords for a long time, but the less they know the better. If you get the chance, can you send my monthly allowance a little sooner? I've been spending time in the Ram's Den between classes (of course) and those coffees sure do add up. My friends and I have discovered that the prices really aren't that low, so we've found a new place called "Del-Mor's." Hopefully their Italian food won't affect my weight, which is leveling off, by the way! If it's any comfort, Referendum number 8 was passed, so URI is in a little better shape, and 1 thought I'd try to do my part. If I don't hear from you, I'll assume the check got lost in the mail. Your daughter, move

,

Mary

-^ Senior Year it's hard to believe four years have gone by already! URI has been a fantastic experience, and I can't begin to thank you for your endless compassion and understanding. 1 only wish the university had a special diploma for the graduate's parents. I have so many memories which I will keep with me and look back on. The way the campus looks in the fall when the leaves change, the football games, fraternity par ties, the dorms and my "com muter" days. But most important ly, I'll remember the people who picked me up when I fell down, patted me on the back when I suc ceeded, and cheered me on when I needed confidence. It's been

great. I love you

Mary

Amy Aaron

Dear Mom and Dad / 21 1

Sandra D. Padova

Pharmacy

David Diana

Geography and Marine Affairs

mmu Mark P.

Mechanical

Doherty Engineering

James Dolce Jr.

Electronic

Computer Engineering

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Pamela A. Durkin

Psychology /Secondary Education

Samar Ead

Industrial

Engineering

Peter Esposito Geography and Marine Affai

Karen M.

Feoberg

Edward Fernandes Electrical

Engineering

Poland Fiore

Economics

Elizabeth

Fitzpatrick Accounting

Marie

Flaherty Psychology

Margaret A. Fletcher Spatial Development in the Urban Environment 219

Human

Pamela J. Francis Development and Studies

Family

E3f\ E Meg A. Frost Management

Valerie Fuchs

Marketing

Michael A. Gania

Denise E. Garde

Management Information Systems

Lori Gersten

Mathematics/Speech Communication

Paige Gettemuller Sociology

Gregory F. Glovach Engineering

Industrial

Carole Gunst

Gene

Elementary Education

Mechanical

Hackney Jr. Engineering

Mary-Beth Hadfield

Elementary Education

Georgios Hadjitheodorid Electrical

Engineering

It seems only a short while ago That we walked up that long road May a bit excited or do something To see someone And wondering about the future.

Now here we are At the end of that long road. It seems we have come too soon I feel as if I'm in the middle

Wanting to see new things But wanting to stay, too. But we all must go Our time is up together I won't forget the friends I've made And all the things we've done. For we are all unique As individuals and also together. So here's to being friends May it continue as we change Let's hope we've learned from each other The true meaning of friendship. Take care my friends, till we meet again. Author unknown

228

Seniof Week

Paul J

Hastings Pharmacy

Richard Haworth Civil

230

Engineering

Victoria L Haven

Zoology

Anne

Hayes Accounting

Lorraine

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Heidi J

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Jack

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Political Science

Sue

Hennessy

Food Science and Nutrition

Robert

Hennrgan Microbiology

Textiles. Fastiion Merchandising and Desic

Suzanne M. Hein Textile Marketing

Barbara Hellner

Speech Communication

Allison Henstiaw Home Economics Education

Susan Henzel Natural

Resources/Geology

231

Kimberly Hutchinson Agriculture and Resource Technology

Thomas lacobucci Production and Operatic

Brian lannuccillo Civil

Engineering

Anne Joaquin Elementary Education

Philip Kapanakis Engineering

Mechanical

Alan Kellman

Management Science

Aldyth Lynne Kendrich

Charles Ladas

Maryann Lacey

Carol Lafond Industrial Engineering

Marketing

Beth Ann Laliberte

Nursing

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Laurie Lautensch lager Management Information Systems

Deirdre Lavallee

Chemical Engineering

James Leimbach

Geography and Marine Affairs

Michelle Lesperance Human

Development and Family Studies

C

j-e

Lmdbera

Pema/

Hygiene

Kathleen

Lindsay Pharmacy

Robert

Industrial

Liptrot

Engineering

Bioltjgy

Sarah Litchfield

Textiles, Fashion Merchandising and Design

Urban Social Processes

243

Fashion Through

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Attire

Graduation

Day

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Dino R. Marsocci

Accounting

LeeC. Martin Industrial Engineering

Barbara M. Mattos Food Science and Nutrition

Laura Maxwell

Economics and Political Science

Patricia A, McAvinn

rJancy B. McConaghy

Marketing

Laurie J.

McDonough

Kimberly A. McEwen Psychology

Beverly K- Medeiros Nursing

Mark D, Mello Chemical Engineering

Celeste J. Miller

Michael S

M

Bernard Moran

Lynne S. Moretti Engineering

Civil

Deborah L. Mueller

Marketing

Deborah Munroe Civil Engineering

Dierdre L.

Murray

David F. Neri Electrical Engineering

Ruth E, Nsrons

Physical Education

Darlene M. Novak

Agriculture and Resource Technology

Wendy Medical

A. Nyrr Technology

Terence O'Brien

Kristen M. Oconnell

Physical Education

Kathleen M. O'Neill

Resource

Development

#

IVHv

Richard J. Ostheimer

Rhonda M. Palombo

Psychology and Secondary

James M. Paulette

Mechanical Engineering

Education

nmm Stephen

M. Peiti

Lauri Pietruszka

Brian F. Piette Industrial Engineering

W^fm

Anita L. Prellwitz

Speech Communications

Susan Prescott

you'll

PERMANENT

do

a

great

Thanks for

Debbie

there Love

being

Steve

always

and Trish

job. George

Dorothy: I shall h, what would I have done without you this year niiep in touch.

the

Amy, may you always never-tiring enthusiasm!

of

reqards

scarecrow

I never could have made it thru these 4 years without your continual love, support and mail! thanks for

George achieve

miss you the most!! The

listening, caring, loving and letting my best friend and I love ya! BARB

your

me

grow. YOU're

Mom, thanks for everything Love, George Rob and

Pop Thanx for

the wild times

Love Deb

Sigma Nu You Kathy 0.

Graduation is just the start for Herm and Hermette

Ruth

CRASHOHMYGOSH.OHMYGOSHCHRISWHATAMIGO INGTODO

to

Yo-Ho, King Richard, Moonlight

Leo Good Luck with the

Bay, "salt" and everything

else "in the whole wide world" that confronted

always be friends. This

is

just the beginning. All

at

me

Iggy's

for another round

Love

Kitten (xx)

I'll miss you PYT's!! Love ya Beth Ann

Chris and Carol, I'll be there in Nance: I'm

fiber ho CAB

habits were

18 yrs. Thanks for

always being

there Love Jane

.

.

.

Rosecliff

.

.

.

.

AirBand

Weekenders, you guys

year! Love,

to mi

I

so

you

JM, LF Our last semester

ED P.

BAL All my love, Ka

much

are

.

.

.

Sundae

w

I

the best Love YA CL

TO the fowls thanks for the

Becky, .

going

spirit!

Thanks to all who belli

lercurioface Thanks for the affair I'll miss you Carrface

.

You'll Knock 'em

Hey Wayne and Kikko! Looks like J.D. helped

Joe KM RW meet

Shittons

"Big Eight"

out! KDO

us.

my Love, Lois

Ray

Thanks to the besl

housemates ever!!

boatride in E. Greenwich

We'll

BA

Ryan: See ya in 7BI

Nancy, Marge, Joyce and Amy

CAB

Here's

Phyllis

deserve the Best!! Good Luck!! Love

.

.

.

Boston

Well do ya feel

Lucky??

We'll do ya Punk?

MURPH

the best! Good luck next ADPI

Pat

You

are

the best!! Call

me

for the

POP

Whether you realize it or not, you have t closest and dearest friend these long 4 years. OUr fun times, long chats and working together will always be

Deb

well as your understanding. Thanks up with my craziness! Babs

remembered for

putting

Forever Fowl!

Tything.

You've

taught

me so

as

Greg

Donna G. After 4

ANNE Lonve has committed fondest of memories

in Mike

MARK

I'll Miss

great years

Lauderdale, You're killing

me, yo

you're all right, San Juan

you!!

buddy.

Love WB

Tot.,

rvc,

Turn off the H "'

-

''-

eatr

always remember

GCT

I'll

Murph,

The Nutcracker will

the

good

never

times

Love C

be the

'

sai

You, Aim Sue H.

Happy Travel

to

a

Michigan, Nice Shorts, Drop'em, Sure attitude problem? Sleep? I need a drink! What is that? Got a quarter? K JN SSL LMP away

Senior Bunk

weird Bird! Love Dee

Omega Norm, You're the greatest office mate. Thanks for your support and laughter. I'll learn to sail one of these days!! Love, PAT Mark You're

a

great friend and I LOVE YOU!! Greeny great years

Love

always

Pro, Clare

great friends Love Laurie

new

tradition! Good Times Chi

out of here

someday in HOC

Bear, Screw, and the rest of the gang

was a

great Senior Year

Love Col

LB

always be times together. I Love

Phyllis Nan Pat El DB You're

A

Day

Andy and Bob I'll get Stephen Hi

from

Love Class of '84

Thanks! It Beanie Thanks for four

we're

zone,

our

YOu'll

a

part of

You. L.

me.

Thanks for all

PERSONALS thanks for

ears

being

Marje, Allan, Pete Sigma

you're the Best! Keep up the good work CL

Christopher D. Smith Simpson

URI

JAn. '82

Crawford '84

Carol L.

Mindy

miss you. Love Pat.*

Thanks

Thanks for Ihe

Kris

Love Denise

good times Denise

made it! From your Debrotherized

Tray Thanks

'Bruce, Thanks for all the support, patience, encourage ment and smiles. You're the best boss ever! I'll real!

Pete

good friends XO

you!!

Big

B

Chief

Arnie, Good Luck in Grad-School!! Love Sharon

Lynne

we

such

I'll miss

Geo

Anne

Ox

Steph

Lax

for

YO Fuzi Lisa

always being

friend

a

Lauderdale

Love Deb

Girls Girls Crack Skull

Proppa

GOOD LUCK Love MURPH

Murph PS. I Love You Carmel

Cindy W.

I'll

never

you MOM SIGMA Luv LC

forget

4

10 Davlsville

ly sisters in AX ( LOVE YAH

Nancy

A CHI O and FSU I Love YOU ALL! Oh Gosh Year!!

GregDBBalls

VANENE """"jrado

.

.

class

Heineken

.

.

.

..liss you all

'

-"

.

.

.

.

no

place

like

AIM

Have you felt Codish

Lately? Capey

Michael I hope you find your Alaska!! Good Luck!!

''-

Bethany

.

.

.

.

.

Tuesday nights bats windsurfing

.

isehead

".

There's

Village Lane

home! Love YOU

.

.

.

rainbo'

.

.

.

.

.

EV

jobs?

(Babe) YOU're

a

terrific friend and I'll miss

you!!

Love

Love Pat

Forever Friends! Love Colbs

SMK

Bridget

Pam Mel and Val I Love YOU! Love

Rich, YOu're unbelievably special Thanks

Amy

You're

great friend keep in Touch! Luv, C

Dani

a

Love

Ann, My dance partner, advisor, and friend, I'll miss you Colleen

Col

38

Maple Ave. will

be the same!! LUV JLM

never

To the class of 1984ELF MU/SA Staff: Thanks for so

FOur great years

together

I'll miss

youl Love

terrific two years. I've leanred you! Love Pat

a

much from you all. I'll miss

EK

I'll miss you all! GOOD LUCK! SIGMA Love

Theresa, the future is Nance: "I will

Sue, Cheryl, speak to you long as I love unless you apologize!!" Love Ka M.J. Sue and Celeste Thanks for the best Jeanette

Roses

red, Violets

are

again

never

are

year!!

ours

babe all my love,

Wendy

Andy

as

Barrys, N.Y. I'll Miss the fun!

Hinchie, master plan Love Poppa Jodie The Crazy things Tray Poppa

blue, ther'

we

did. Keep in touch Love

Christian Barbara GS-15 These times There's

no

we

will

never

doubt SPot will

forget

always

.

.

.

JST

like you

Ya!!

Keep

in

touch! Christian T. Hot

Dog this year

was

the best Pistachio Love Ya Beh

Beh!! David in

shining

Love ya. BA

Watta

My Knight

Nancy

That's what he said! I LOVE YOU! Love Aim

armor

TO the Loonies from Coonie I Love You All!! Love Maureen

We had

a

,

__.

.

ues-Sat.

Party I Love _.

.,

Poppy

When you put your hand in a flowing stream, you t( the last that has gone before you and the first of is still to come.

Paula Pride Textiles Fashion Merchandising and

Design

Teresa (^. Quattromani Textiles. Fashion Merchandising and

Design. 266

^^ btepfien

.

p L. Procter

Patricia E. Quetta Human Development and Family Studies

Michael C. Proliop

Catherine A. Puleo

Economics

Nursing

Debra A. Quinn

David M. Racano

Accounting

Linda I. Rasmanis

Computer Science and Mathematics

P^'"f"f' Biology

Laura J. Rich

Spanish

Elizabeth Ring Geography and Marine Affairs

MarkD.Rerick

Reed A. Richard

Psychology

and

English

Robin A, Ritter Food Science and Nutrition

Mark

D^Resnick

David Reswick

Marketing

Lessica A. Richter

Pharmacy

Mario Ritualo Civil

Engineering

Deborah A.

Rieger Management

Kimberly

A. Rizza

Textiles. Fashion Merchandising and

Design 269

Susan A. Roessler

Helene 8. Roher

Psychology and Elementary Education

Elizabeth M. Rolando Political Science and

History

Hallie G, Sammartino

Ellen B, Schaeffer

Psychology

Raymond G. Schnell

Robert J, Seccareccia

Maria L. Servadic

Physical Education

Marketing

Albert Shakan

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Gail M, Sheahan

Michael T. Shrake

James B. Slavin

Mechanical

Engineering

Michael A. Solomon

Dale L. Somerville

Pharmacy

Agriculture and Resource Technology

Valerie L. Sottile

Squadrito Engineering

Michael A.

Electrical

Denise J.

Chemical

Stacey

Engineering

Barbara L, Stantc

Civil

Engineering

Gregory N. Sundberg Production and Operations Management

Lisa A. Sutherland

Nursing

Richard Tammaro

Chemical

Engineering

Arthur Therouxx

Electrical

Engineering

Janet C.

Timperly

Michael Trofi Electronic

Computer Engineer

f^mI Gail L. ValNere Industrial Engineering

-

4>T

Robert V. Varas

Fisheries and Marine Tech

David P. Very Political Science and Economics

Gary D. Viall Pharmacy

Richard Vinacco

Psychology

Patricia A. Vincent Human

Development and Family Studies

Theodore C. Vinski Electronic

Textiles, Fashion Merchandising and Design

Computer Engineering

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Raymond G. Walker Chemical Engineering

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Christian Whatley

Jane L.White Communication

Speech

Janelyn Wilson Elementary Education

Martha A. Wilson

Geography and Marine Affairs

Human

Raymond Young Development and Family Studies

William

Industrial

Young Engineering

290 / Senior Week

Senior Week/ 291

292 / Senior Week

Senior Week / 293

294 / Senior Week

Senior Week / 296

296 / Senior Week

Senior Week / 297

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Aaron. Amy; 108 West Maple Ave. Monsey, NY 10952 02693 Abjornaon, Robin; 76 Robi '

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Bvingof.John:

131 White A

Barker, Anne; 304.J Pawtucket Ave, Apl.

in; 332 Tyrflsbor

ingslown.RI

02852

Boylston, Robin; 47

Barker, Gregory; 1 62 Larchmont Road. V Barkof, Lynn; S3

AdogokB. a, Share

Blackburn Lans

Bracci, Lloa; Ministerial Road, Wake

W

Brackenbury, Tammy; 190Brookhi

Barlow, Donald; 3C} Coweesel Drive. Broc Barrtdi, JoaephiniK 150 Cannon Stfeet.C Bamea, Robert; 32 BarnoM, Julie: 55 F'terce Road, Saunderst

BrodtHiry. George; 125 Shannon A\

Bradley, Diane; 331 Old Sachems H

Barone. Anihony;

Atrlck,

BarraH. Mark; 85 iBarren, Mary-Elleii;

Agnail Dawn; 339 H; Agnailo.

14 Greenwich

Blvd.,

AtMfn, Joyce;

'

Brady, Suzanne RFD 1,

Virginia; 17 Co Resl Road,

Kingsion,

Barry, Cara; 55 Beacon Circle. Cranston, Rl 029 1 0 Baraamian.Janece; 54 Byron Ave. Rumlord, RI02916 Bartley, Suaan; 475 Red Chimney Dr Warwick, Rl 026BC

Kingston, F 3 Margaret Henry, t

Brady, Theddeus; RR2 B

.

Aloxandor, Botti; 4 1 Karpswell Street. 69 Brookwood Road. Warwick. Rl 02889 Atoundar, Jamaa; _..59Bfookw .

_

Baaa, Raymor>d; t006 OkJ Saplisl Road. Noith Kingstowi

^1 02906

Braunalein, Wendy; 36 G^nwixtd Dnve. Tiumbu Eastw. Drrve. Ptainv.ile, CT 06062 Brayman. Leslie; "ie; 7 Eastwood Pine Cone Drive, Barrington, R) 02806 "

....

Mariam; Alaxanian, Marl Alftord, Call Calhy; Hlllview Drive. Westerly. Jana; Algar, Jai C Alglar*. Carolyn; Alglara.

F

Cedar Drive, Collsneck, NJ

Alton, Donna marl

Brenrun, Marjorie; 40 Walnut Dr N Kingslown. fll 02852 Brennan. Patricia; Langworthy Road. Wesieriy. Rl 02891 Brenner, Jeremjn 334 Winter Streel. Woonsocket, Rl 02895 .

Ailing, Nancy;

P 0 E

GraniieStreel,Westerly,fll02891 Tias Oiney Common. Providence, Rl 02904

Beatrice, Stephan; 1:; m,

Brlndley,D

Amy; Curtis Corner Road. \

Baa udry, Laura

Beaudry.

Falls!

ainut St., Central Rl 02863 Bnlto. Linda; 2 Blossom Street, Fairhaven. MA 027 19 Brochu, Holly; 972 Newman Avenue, Seekonk, MA 02771 Brockwell, Mark; 20 Unda Lane. Westport, CT 06880 Brogno, Gary; Scenic Heights Drive. Wesleiiy. RI 02891 Bromell, Hockie; 46 Beer Street. New Haven. CT 0651 1 4102920 11 02906 Brosofaky, Daniel; 194 Sixth i

Beauchemin, Ketly; 1

2 Oaklon S Micheal; t42 Oahlon S

Beckman, Marian; 68 Narraganse Riverside, Rl 02915 Beebe, John; 95 Coggeshall A

Brown, Chriatophen 192 Fleetwood D

illophr;&2HydeS Anderhoggan, !

Begin, Alh i; 205 Becker Avenue. Riverside, 1 Harrison Avenue, Newport, ^1 02640 1. David; id; 12 Belanger, Roberta; 1 14 Pleasant Street, Nor

AndaraoR, K Andoraon, L

n.JeHery;RFD2Box [), Le

Belcourt, Temrah; 5 1 Roseland Avenue. Merio

iier

Road, Narragansett, F

Aniconl, Vara; 66 Sarasota Avenue, Narraganse Benoon, Mark; 422 Toilsome

Anihony, John; jJ6 Chapmar Apkarisn, Janat; 29 Bu<lock<

,

Apl 38. East

Rl 02B82

Belt, Jr. Arthur; 36 Hammond Streel. Newport, BellJno,_David; Lacy Lane, Saunderslown. fll 0 Bender, Paul; 58 Lydick Avenue. V Bennett, Ann; RRl Gardner Road.

Bentiey,

[

Hill

11(

Mar; C/0 Baker. 01

Narragansett.

4 Curtis Corner Road. V

Brunhuber, John;

1

Ingston, Rl 02892

Road, Falrlield, CT 06432 i, Saundeislown. Rl 02874

1; 3333 D

Bucklin,

Kathleen!

Budwey. Martha;

Archarnbaull, Saitdro; 43 New London Ave, West Warwick. Rl

'

02893

Ardtatani, Falamah; i Armacoat, Liaa; 47 Co Armalrortg, Barbara; 14 Prospect Avenue. Glen Cove Arnold, Karon; 6 Wedgew< "

Bukowtkl, Karen;

Beretta, Maria; 36 Sea Breeze Lane. Berelto, Raymond; Box 323 B East

Narragansett,

ucou.

Bump, Elizabeth; RFO

1

02895

Berg, Laurie; 50 Sunnyside Avenue. Berg, Michele; 203 Coggeshall Aven Bergemann, Diane; 140 Coweselt A

Buon^ulo, Jo An 023 18

Buratti, Ronald; t

02893

uair

Ri

Aaprlnio, Ann; Aalhallor,Jamoa;PU

AlansaoH, SuzanrM;

V

ll,

Joseph; 21 Bucklnghar iry lou: o Vancouver Avenue. wan*r;k. HI 02.

ot;

14

Uppei College Rd., Kingston.

Rl 02881

zanne; 86 Greenfield Street. Pawtuckel. Rl o;

Atwood. Stophon; PO Box ZZi. Kenyon. Rl 02836 Aubin, Laura; 57 Evereil Street. Newpon, Rl 02640 Audatta, Grachiua; Websler Hall Beilevue Ave. Newport,

'1 Schaeller I

IJ 07728

,

Biahop, Greg; 602 Covingion Place Vi Augualowaki, Llaa;

172 EltiE

Avant, John; 42 1 Beach Ave

Bishop, Bishop, Slavan; 8 Restmere Toi Binby, Heather; Cole brook Road,

Avigoa, Suzanno; PO Box 2( Ayraaa ian, Gary; t37Camdf

Lillle

Compton,

Rl 02837

"""""^

Blaia.l

Babwh, Glonn; PO Box 73.

Bablania, Elans;

BlatI, Gregg; 237 Winding B Blozensky, Lauren; 1392M

Cal>ral, Hai>cy; 5 1 Sylvan

BIydenburgh, David; 39 Edgewi Badway, Malv Baglinl, John;

Bagllni.Michi Bailoy, Joan; E

Bakor, Brian; Francis Road, Noflh Sciluaie, Rl 02857 Bakwin, Pater, 905 Junipei, Boulder. CO 80302 Beltou, Martin: George Schaefler Dnve. Peace Dale. Rl 02879

Bocchio.Scolt;3 1 Bunting Roa Boaller,John;47C1 Sandy Pt. A' BolanI, Oavid; 24 1King Road, Mi Boiavart, Ronald; Boland, Franklin; Bonnelt, Stephan Booth. Raymond;

Borrelli,D'abra;'3'1

Beverly

Sheile; Route

1

A.

Carferty.'palric'ia; t 02904

Road, Chepachet, Rr02814 Caizzi, Stephen; 8 RitJgeway Drive, Warren, Rl 02685 Calirf, Caroline; 2 Arciero Court, Narragansell Rl 02B82 Calise. Joeeph; 63 Onondega Road Narragansett fll 02882 Calitri. Paula; 26 Locust Drive, Easl Greenwich. Rl 02818

Calrone,Debre:Mapleville

Circl

Cape

N

Berbariai, Robert; 680 Ware Streel, Mansdeld, MA 02048 Barbelo, Linda; 55 Truman Street, Johnston, Rl 029 1 9 5

Scituale, Rt 02857

F

Cehir, Robert; 45 Woodmoni Streel, Providence Rl 02907

Borrellt, Perry; 98 Angell Road, 1,

Barden, Charfea; Pole Bridge Road Box 74 RR2. NoMh

NJ 07840

Byrne, Susan; 32 Channing Street, Newpon fll 02840 Bymea, Carolyn; 77 Palmar Avenue Riverside fll 02915

1 77 Carder

Baboian, Roborl; 84 Ruh Stc BMxala, Gari Ann; 75 Entieli BKCsrI, Michael; 233 Varnu

Burtel, Robert; 175 High St., Peace Dale, fll 02883 Butts, Oatwrah; 154 Pequot Trail, East Greenwich, Rl 028 IE Byrd, Ruasell; 1282 Kingston Rd, Apt. 2. Kingslon 'ri 02881 Byrne, Cheryl; 220 Cheslnul Drive. East Greenwich Rl 0281

Bynw. Christine; 67 Bald Eagle. Hackellslown.

Plymouth Road, East Providence.

HI 0291'

Cellaghen, Kathleen; 6 Onondaga Lane, Medlield MA 02052 Callaghan, Laurie; 98 Beach Sireel, Westerly. Rl 02B9 1 Callahan, Carol; 12 Farmstead Lane Waterfofd CT 06385 Callahan, Michael; Coloura, John; 8 H( Cahrerl, Terri; 32 1 buynne uiive, t-eastervi Coma, Jecquelyn; 170 Maylaif Road, Fairl

hria. Lynne; Indian Cedar Park.

Campbell. Nancy:

RR

I,

3, Bon 2278, Knolly Oak Ln Coveiit

Campo. Philtp; Compopwno, Cerota; 7442 Foontautfiead Dr Arwantjale.

Kenyon,

Curran,Teraaa;' Curro, Slephen; 7 1 Boght

Cranslon, t

1,

11 02935

Curry, Clare; 105 Sharon L Curry, Daniel; 185 Vine St.

1 Warwick, irwick, Rl 02886 11 02862 Nnnagonselt, HI 02882 h Scituale, F

Curtin, Chrlatinei 90 PerkI Curtis, Devtd; 24 Weatherl Curtis, Jeffrey; 2

mly,RI 02891

'

.

Ceitnata, John; CS E*?npv.\>,TO Avf^fp Wateft^r'v CT WO Conning, Dtai>e; iO,iK,-s.v p.. ve Cmi^su'-i t<iO,'9,\i

Rl 02636

Douglaa; 6 MIddlolon Avenue, Newport, fll 02840

.

lO Alcar Dnve, Johnston, Rl 02919

Clays, John;

h

Clays, Patrtek:

Rtidman Streol

1 1

ottey. Kalhleen: 1 16 Leigh Sl

Thomaa; 485 Red

I.

Warwick, f

.

Newport,

>.

Rl 02640

Chimney Drive. Warwick.

Rl 02BS6

--2866 19

Cepotortgo. Rtcherd.

-v-

'0 Nenv

CaporeNi. ArtgeU: Copouoti. Chrialophor > Copron. Robert: <96i Nc^ CapweO. Bormiety. Cbof, Peter. Car4i. Jwnee; t^

Cohen, Enkk

4 Windward

Colovecchlo. GuMo; 2

ham Rd

Olve, Barringion. Rl 02606

Fairway Diive, Cfansion,

Madison, CT 06443

., Cranslon. F ook Street. Nl

Rl 02920

Cole, Donita; 88 Schraalenburgh Road, Haworth. NJ 0764

Colet1a,Cralgi 514 Newport

,

S, Kingston. HI 02881 1 e

Av

Drive, Cranalon. F

Dambruch, Lynn;

~

5 Poilelt

Stroel, Cumberle

:

Cerdflh>. Jernee CwxJin. HKheet

'^'

Cerey.lialthew:,>^-j-vCertone. Rusaefc 4^ Hd>e CwiMNv Cvol; r9 HoOan 1 Cartoon, Jemw; P 0 Bo 1 Cartoon. Thomae: '0 Pertn* Stieet, Cotenvy CarwucheeL Pamele: 3r<en*i3 H* Road. Eiet Camevale, Canfyn; lO OW Sth3oswBb Road. J

CeWneon, Roger; 5 1 Alger A Cetoon, Davtd: 15 Vrvian Ave Complon, Kavln; 1839 W Huntingdon Street, Philadelphia

Danuazar, Stephen; 2

'rovldence. RH 11 02836

Conklin. Wendy; 26 Wendell Place.

Clai

Warwick. Rl 02688 . 3 Tuckermai

Conion, Stephen; lO Butler Ct

Connor, Kalhleen; Connor, Tanya; 39

Conway, LudMe;

f

Davis, Robert; 42 E. Nauraushaun

02905

12

Heritage Drive. Kingsti ""

De

Ceeore. Rotayn; 10 Eva

De Fantt,

Josoph; 6 Conno 7 1 Dockray

Westerly. Rl 02891

DeFenli, Paul;

Cook, Andrear; R F Cook. Mark; i3Shii Cooper. Diane; 6 Cardinal Drive. Wallmgtotd.

Copley. Brian; 49

Avenue.' Pearl River,

Davis, Tracey; Tamanaco Road, Bradlord. Rl 02606 Davison, Mary; 1 1 1 South Main Street. Pitlslord. NY 14 Daartay, Arthun Ross Hill Rd.. Bradford. Rt 02808 Dawson, AlHaon; 88 Falrhill Drive. Longmeadow. MA 0 1 Day, Carole; 33 Pontiac Hd.. Narragansett. HI 02882 De Ambrose, Eileen; 1 16 Glen fload Woon!

Peace Dale, Bl 02883

Conway, Peul; 166 Station Stree' Conway, Susan; 50 Concord Avi

CT 0

,

Connen, Patricia; 5 Valley Drive. Bnstol. Rl 02609

Connolly, Micheal; 152 Grand Avenue, Cranslon,

iwn.

Narragansett,

Dauk, Paul; 7 Rocky Point Road, Howayton, CT 06853 Davidson, Gary: 11 LIberiySlreet.MalIck, MA 01760 Davias, Cllve; P O Box 343. Kingston, fll 0268 1 Daviee, Laura; P.O Box 424. Wakelield, Rl 02880 Davla. Deidra; 29 Halmo Streel. Providence, Rl 02909 Devta, Deniae; 230 Diamond Hill RO Warwick. Rl 02e8< Davfs, Jay: 1207 Fooihill Way. Mountainside. NJ 07092

Conboy, Mark; Apt 304. 20 Higgins Lane, Smithlield Cor>ca, Thontaa;

aIHgIs,.

5 Brown Street,

ox

De Luce,

1032. Charlesiown.

Tony; 57 Cognewwaugh Johnston, fll 02919

L6

De

Coppotelii, Lori;' lOPeachlreoLn.Bx

3693,'

Corbelt. Brenda; 82 dd Rnref Rd C/o Cauiey. 11 02840

Cordero, Vincent; 1201 Wore Cordingley, Jemea: 26 Arhng

Merchant, Padova, Sandra; 122 Marmora Road, Parsippany N. Penfllia, Michael; 18 Columbine Lane. Norwalk, CT C Rouln, Leo; 88 Sauga Avenue, North Kingston. Rl 02i Rugglaro, Diane; 7 1 Perry Street. Newport, Rl 02640 SantiB, Anthony; 33 Pequoit Street, Portsmoutn, Rl C Slatanls, Tracev: 147 Dalehlll Dr.. East Greenwich H

Coren. Cheryl; 64 C<<ttside Dn B. Cranston. Rl 02920 eiore: 28 Coooer Corio, Setvelore; Cooper Street. NonhPi 02904

Corttey, Corkey,& Carolyn;

PO Box 106,

Thompson Ridge,

Decarvaltw, Drew; 99 Jay Street, Rumlord, fll 029 Deceeare, Brands; Byron Randall Hd., Scituate. Rl Decyh.Ulano; 19SiiithSI Providence, Rl 02906

h

Cormier, Oevldi Oavldi itOO North Road. Peace Dale. HIO Cormier, Horr, 7 Ann Street. Newpon, Rl 02840 Cornell. Leurte; ft

.

Deegan, Robert; 2l Degrephenrted, grephenrf BartMra; "

Corrtea, TlMima*; CorneO, TlMma*; 5 Gaii Averfue. Cia 5 Corr, SmaniM: Box 532. Shady H

~

66 Oakdale fl

HI 1102852 02852

_.ea:nFOi.v RFO 1 Corr, Thereto;

Delnee, lnee,Che<. Cheryl; 4

.

.

Deineo, ~iinea, Sandra; ;24 Epwor l

Correia, Tereea: 51

HI 02640

135

Daylor

=11 02882

Conrtai. Carol: 4. Coota. John: 88 1 Coota, Manuel: 2 Coeto, Robert;''' Robart; 58 Spywood Avenue Coeta, Susan; 102 Rhode Island Avenue. Pawiucket, Rl 02860 CcMtwitfno, David; 12 Varnum Coetello, Kevin; 1 30 Ruggles A a Way. W. Cooler, Catherine: 22 Cross Westpon. ( Coetigan, Stephen; 220 Cottage Street. Pawtucket, F Krelen Court. Wan Cote, Diane; 24 K 14 Ridgeway D Bfion: i4Ri Cole. Brian: Cotter, Tlnwlhy; Z. E CettreO, Helen; Box Ci&b. Asnaway. hi UZHU4 Rich> Laun Drive. Apt 5. Kenyon, Rl 02636 Coumoyer, Richard; Courtemancha, Raymortd; F .

Cetiaeir, Claire;

4 1

Santo, Jean; 307 Mayfleld Avenue, Cranston, Rl 02920

Thrushwood Place.

Ceulu, Roland; 132 Chestnut

Hili

Ave

,

Waterbury, CT 06708

e

Delvecchio, Jerllyn; 48 Easton Ave Wanvick, Rl Demetteo, Laureen; 3 Schlike Drive. Westerly, Rl Demera, Kenneth; )5 Beaumont Streel. Rumford. Oempaey, Nell; 120 Greenway West. New Hyde P ,

Denis,Gary:277 Ward Street, Woonsocket Rt02 Dennen, Mark; Breezy Lane, Norwalk, CT 0686 1 I, Paul; 14 upper College Road, Kingston, F Cumber" Deperry, ry.Joseph; Joseph; 108 Sun Valley Dr, Dr., Cum"berland. Depln, Janice; 683 Warren Street. Fall River, MA 1 Oi Oerderlan, Nancy; 164 Belvedere Drive, Cranston, Rl 02920 Rock Street, Westerly. Rl 02891 Derouin, Scott; 19 Ro "

Deeroaiara. Coleen;

1

Cranston, Rl 02920 '

reel.

Crwidrt, Patty; Box 619. Westerly. Rl 0289 1 Crausman, Irene; 10 Chester Ave Bristol, fll 02809 Crawford, William; 40 1 Scoll Road. Cumberland, HI 02664 Creamer, Ann Marie; 1 7 Stephanie Drive, Nonh Providence. .

r,

Road, Westerly, fll

DekKtzla, Art; Country Dnve. Kenyon, Rl 02936 Deluce, Debra; 126 Broadmoor Rd., Cranston. Rl

Peula;3S4S Per Road, Apt 302. Narragansetl.

I

Rl

02882

Dl Lanrta, Jenal; 5 Loxli Dl Malo, Anttiony; 2 Wi.

Dl

3.

Newport.

Rl 02840

Johnston. Rl 02919

Orio, Ronald; 25 Bra

tr, 397 County Road. Bainngton. Rl 02806 }9 Plaintield Sl , Providence, Rl 02909 i, Jacquelyn; Betty Pond Road, Scituate. Rl 0283 1 lins, Elizabeth; 30 Wildwood Drive. Branlord. CT 0640!

Houisquissol'Park,

Lincoln, Rl 02865

2

Blrchswamp Road,

\

y.CTO 7 La<i Laurie; RFO 1 , Madlm Ave

Croesley, ReMn;

T 06040 Bradford C 1 rd. Rl 0289 V 02905 -2901

Cniickahank, Cruz, Stephanie; 3 Cui, Ke-Heng; F e Village, Kingsloi Cullen, Anne; 2: PI Box 344. Peacdalo, F Cullen, John; in; PO N Cuius, Pamela; River Rd Ua tela; 400 New .

Jwmt Drib CuHy, Mary; 55 Tnjesdale

f

Robert; 53 Oakdale R

CuRy, Cumminga, Christopher

h

Kingstown,

10520

whegan. ME 04976

Dlloranzo, Paul; 55 Elmcrolt Ave., Pn Dimauro, Llssa; 295 Potter Rd.. NortI Dimauro, Ronald; 295 Poller Hoad. r Dineen, Richard; 5 Paul Road, SlamI

F

I

Cummiskey, Cindy; Escoheag

Hill

Road, Escoheag. F

). Box 4, Rehobolh, ^

Olsano, Joeeph; S Rd. Saunderatowa fll I.. Wakelield, Rl 02879

mnifl. Robert; Pole 3i

mninghem, Brtgld; 1 1 Murphy Circle. Mld'dletow>, RlbiwO Cunnirtgham, Cormac \venue, Newport. HI 02840 -.__^

Dobbe, Rebecca; 22 C Dobson, Syhrla; Old Ir

Gognon, Dennis; 31 Providence Avenue, East Pro\ridence Oagnon, Mary;

.

RFD_ 1

.

Saunderslown. Rl 02874

Rd Apt 3, Kingston. Rl 0266

n

Sireel, Dedham, MA 02026

lerly,

Kingslc

02889 :k,NJ 08811

P O Box 55. Peace

02863

Gam mage, , Lynn; mil Gam Sharon; 445 Ocean Road. Gammino, _

nselt, R1021

02920

Wendy; 33

Hasting:

D

Rl 02903

Fell man, R

(,Paul;'36BonAirA

Gallogly, Gavin; 100 Peabody Galpei

Felag, Mar Donley, 1

1

Gallagher, Grace;

Rl 02891

sl. North

51

Box 20 1

Faunce, Howard; 25 V\

I

Dooley, 1larbara;

P

02915

A

Farrell, Elizabeth; Dotierty, Mork; 95 Thames Sire

Michael; 37 Lower College Rd,. Kingsli

les, Edw

a

Terr;

1102871

Dore, Wi Ittam; 76 Purgatory 1 Dorocz, David; 4 Lincoln Ave ,

Gregory; RR5

Box

Dougherty, Timothy; 167 WesHield Drive, Hollislon, MA Olf

Douglsa, Joseph; 3 Branch St., Peace Dale, Rl 02983 Douglas, Robert; 83 Martin Avenue, Barrington, Rl 02606 Dew, Deborah; 58 Maple Street. New Bedlord. MA 02740 Dowd. Elyae; 455 Oradell Avenue, Oradell, NJ 07649

Pillion, James; 36 1

d

Mam Stie

Dowd, Kevin; 73 Aldetbrook Dr Cranston, Rl 02920

c Road. Glastonbury. CT 06033 i:340N 6 Clyde Sire

Saybrook. CT 06475

je,

Westerly, fll 02891

Garvey, John; Congdon Hili Road, North Kingstowi Garvey, Scoll; Bayberry Lane 3, Cohasset, MA 02i Gately, Joseph; 55 Townsend Avenue. Braintree. MA 02184 11 02879 Gates, Mitzi; 65 Woodrull Avenue, wake! Gaulhler, Benoit; 74 Bristol Ferry Road, F ~

Finkle, Amy; 20 Rodman Street Apt 5. Nanagar

Finn! Kelly; PO Box 224. Peacedale, Rl 02883

Downing, Caryl; Apt Doyle, Mary; 1 Veteran

Flnnerty, Edythe; 36 Flume Street.

Doyla, Mary; 25 Beaini

Jwih

Kingslown.

F

WesI Warwic Flora, Roland; Oakwood Drive. Peace Dale, fll 0 Fiach, Lori; 29 Magnolia Drr 3, Spnr 'ert Stre

Fiaher,

~

Gazebien, Donna Gearty, Rabbin; 5

Geduldig, Abby;

I

Geelhoed, Tera;

12 Morse Street.

1102813

Freeport. ME 04032

Galb, Amy; Pond Road. Shelburne. VT OS Gemma. Michael; 75 Fifth Ave.. Easl Gre

Gencoglu, Benan P.O Box 55. Kmgsion. Rl 02881

Fitzgerald, Jeanne;

i,Jose(rti;

2 1 Sale

Fitzgerald, Robin; 139 0akl Fitzpatrick, Elizabelh; 1 10

Genlol,Mary:

5 13

Tupelo Road.

11 02879

V

1

i. CT 06902 Gentile Jr.. Chariea; G 5 Chamberlain Drtve. Shelton, CT 06484 Gerdea, Donna; 25 ~

Flaherty, Maria; 35 Carnatir Flanders, Scott; 400 WoodI

1, Kathryn; 0 Bemodi 85 Ferncrest Ave Cranslon, Rl 02905 Gershkoff, oft, Bernodine; .

0 r,

Flo Ic her,

Gersten, Lori; 38 Chatham Road, Cra

Angell S

Christopher;

Margaret;

F

Floody, Patrick: i Flora, ScotI; 465 Cot Ledyard Highway. Ledyard

Folay, Paler; tO Leonard Bodwell. Narragansetl. Dukeahire, Marii; P 0 E

Fonlaine, Arnold; 32 Campbell Dunley, Susan; 107

Giglio, Edward; 90 B

Fenseca, Mario; 42 Frances Avenue. Cranslon. F

sireet,

n

Pawtucke

Road, Pawtucket, F

fi

Duquelte, Cathy; 33 : Durand, Chrialopher

Gingerella Jr., Wil Forsyth, Andrew; 5 Giorgi, Stephen: 3

Edgar, Treci; Henry S

ards, Raviraj; F

Frat>cis,Pamala;97LarchSt Apl 16, East Pn ,

1. Cranston, Rl 02920

Egan, Mary; 43 Grai Egalhofer, t

Franco, Joseph; 79 Upper Drive, Old Saybrook. CT 0'

Glovach, Gregory: 100 Beauf Gocha, Wendy; 35 Bloomtield Godbout Jr., Edmond; 181 R

Colege fld., Kingstor Godin, Steven; 22 1 School St

Frectielte. Mellaaa;

t River

\ 18702

Street Apl 2. WesI T 06611

6 Glenfi i; 50 Sirathmore Roac

CT 06473

Elliott, D >,

t, Gerald; 13 Benefit Streel, W(

Ellis,

i2AtiagashT

Escalera, Richard; 14 Champlin Ter Esposito, ErnesI;

4 Huron Avenue,

;9

Maryjean; Froal, Jonathan;

Ealevea,blga;463Juni Elhier, James; 153 High

15 Ceniral Av<

1 1 Couch Stree

Framinghar

Eapoaito, Paten

4

le

Complon,

fll 02837

Froal, Margaret; E

irragansett, Fucile, Pamela; 30 Toppa Boulevard, Newport, HI 02840 3086 Susan fload, Belln i; l;3086Si "

Ewer, Angela;

Chapel

e Dale, F Faella, Helen; Saugatuckel 5 Chambly A Iri Pagan, Patricia; nt, Leonard; Box 349. baunoersiown. m u. -

Gomez; Deborah; West Main Road. Little Compton. Rl 02837 Gonzalez, Ricardo; 1 17 Ferry Street, Newark. NJ 07105 Goodwin, Robert; 31 Bayview Ave., Portsmouth. Rl 02871 Gorham, Nicholas; Cucumber Hill Hoad, Rosier, Rl 02825 Gormley, Use; Susan Bowen Rd. Box 27i, Greene, Rl 02827 Oorriaran, Miriam; 38 Paddock Drive, Warwick. Rl 02886 Goshdigian, Michael; 13 Chiistopher. Wakelield. HI 02879 Gosaelin, Marc; 49 Kepler Street. Pawtuckel, Rl 02860 GoHschling, Lisa; 235 Forest Avenue, Middletown, Rl 02840 Gouin, Charlas; 1247 Old River Road, Manville. Rl 02638 Gouin, Slephen: 223 Dana Sireel, Woonsockel. Rl 02895

t. Peacedale, Rl 02679

t, Tracy; 3 Oyster

-

.

_

'

Fricke.

2223 First /

Ive,

Fregaau, Jean; Freitaa, Frei~taB,^nlhony;

Narragansett.

High Stre

Esposito, Maria;

'iy.RI 02891

02840

Ericoon, Jeff ery; Douglass Hook flo: j. Chepachet, f

Narragansett, Rl 02882

Massapoag Avenue. Sharon. MA 02067 J. Fiandolph.

fll 02886

John;b3 Hathaway Lane. Peai Ellia, Linda; lOCherry Creek Rd., Ni EIz, Nancy; 6 Rllchey Place, White F Enoa, Gregory; 1 12 East Shore RO.. Eoga, Theresa; 32 1 flexland Dnve. E

31 Road,

Jeffrey;

Villlam;5iANinlgret Road. Narragansett.

t

Fuller, Robin; 26 Sweet Avenue. F'awlucket, Mark; r ^

Gouveia, Jooeph; 2 Beverly A nOf

Goyatte, Michalle; lOSlinwo ( Grady, C I 2 1 Blue Bonne! RO Cranston, Rl 02920 Gredy, Idward; 1, Charles; 90 Youngs Avenue. WesI Warwick. Rl 02693 P 1, Mary; 32 Peters Lane, WesI Warwick. Rl 02893 "

.

-

F

Rl 02682

,

---

Applelown Road, Greenville. Rl 02828 Sremmaa, ConaUntine; 67 Olympla Avenue. North 9

Fofrbrothers, Richard; 270 R tc; 20 Jonathan Way. ICranston, fll 02920 Falk. Eric; K, r, Eliza Elizabeth; 7 "

"

Lexington A 52 Dover Streel. PawtuckeL Rl 02660 ll Delivt ', CharK 110281;

ta; 327

Farley, Sharyn;

Gadoury, Cheryl; 1056 Boston Neck Road. Narragam 02882

Gadoury, Linda; 501 Hill Streel. Coventry, Rl 02816 Gadoury, Michael; 28 Hector Avenue. Cumbeiland. R

Providence. RI029t1

Srande, Stephan; 23 Nicholson Crescent. Middletown, Rl

Packham Lane.

HIgglna, Corlnne; 3 1 Deacon Avenue. Kingstown, Rl 02852

V

Net Rl 02840 Mn, Kalhlaan; 30 Casllehill Avenue.). Newport, Hill, Laurie: 66 OsceolD Dr.. Narrnganseit. fll 02682

Johnson, Janet; 6 Mead

k Road, East G

Johnaon, Jannlfan 57 C

set, Pleasantvllle, NY 10570

Hinchtme. Deborah; Whispering Pines Rood. Wyom Johnaon, Kimberly; 19 Caslle Drive, C Johnaon, Robe '

arlorle; 686 Pleasant Slieet, / stRoad, Road, Osford, CT 06483 Hisaey. Jennifer, 9 Ciesi

100 Pound Htll Road, North !

Origlack, Jeltrey;

"

"

"

h

thrills. Nikki; Oa^ Street Ashaway. Rl 02604 d

Graebien.

Mary,

Street,

Johnaon, Sally

Mysllc. CTO Jonas, David;

Street, Newport, Rl 02640

J06 Hrsi-ivoii Avenue, Lincoln, fll 02865 Hogan, Charies; .M K.'iwon Avenue. Wakelield. HI 02879 Hogan, Karen; 19 Lwiy Pond Hoad, Coventry. Rl 02816 Hogan. Maureen; 230 Main Sl,. Lot 10, Walllnglord, CT 06492 Hogue, Robert; 35 Hope Ave., Portsmouth. HI 0267 1

Hoay, William;

Hohman, Chrialopher 596 Puinam Pike, Greenville. Rl 02828 Hotberton, Kathr. Hillside Park Oardnei Road, West Kingston,

'^ '

Gwemero, Ralph;

HoldBworth, Mark; 1051 Main Street, Weit Warwick, Rl 02893 Holland, Kevin; 22 Upper College Rd Kingston, Rl 0288 1 Hotter, WliHam; 44 Bel Air Road. Hingham. MA 02043 HoHoway, Dabro; 256 Giants Neck Road. Nianilc, CT 06357 Holntee. Andrew; Easl Shore Road, Box 339. Jamestown, Rl

II 029 IE

65 Burnett Sl

h KIngslOi Jonaa, Randall; 101 Prospe Jonea, Tracy; 27 Windy Ridge, Trumbull. C Joaaph, Louis; 109 Dover Sireet. Providence, mi Ui;uq Joaevska, Vloleta; 25 Church Street, Elmwood Park, NJ 07407 Jourdan, Edith; 28 Carriage Drive, Lincoln, fll 02865 Junkmann, Joan; Saybrook Hoad, Essex. CT 06426 Jurgalon, Lauren; 4 Canierbury Drive, Georgetown, MA 0 1633 Kacheio, Eugene; 155 Easl Allendale Ave., Allendale, NJ 07401 Kaczanskl, Joseph; 201 Mecanhur Boulevard Ave., Coventry.

.

i'

Gwgltetti.Chrtatopher

Kagan. Beverley; 235 Fifth Street. Providence, Rl 02906 Kaiser, Chariea; 1435 Bedford Sireel. Stamford, CT 06905 Kalalaraki, Paula; 26 Blackburn Street, Pawtucket, Rl 02861 Kalunlan, Balh; 498 Gauvin Dnve, Warwick. Rl 02666 Kona, Jaen Marie; 490 Marlborough Ave Woodridge, NJ ,

07095 nepKina, Bethany; Howaro Rvenue, nope, mi Ui;o; Hopkina, Jomeo; 89 Garnson Road. Chalmslord. t^ Hopkino, Jeffrey; Spnng Lake Road, Glendale. Rt ( ttopklne, Julie: 4 1 Broad Rock Road. Peacedale. F

Hackrwy. Eugene; 9

Hogerly. StMrio.

^1 028 IE

Home, Reginald; 170 Mof Homer, Pani; 48 Millpond Kigslown. Horvat,Joan;flFD2 Box 76. Polebnde Hd I

:^

.

02657

Hoaaaini, Sadreddin;

P 0. Box

246, Kingston.

Rl 0288 1

Hovey, Stpehania; 706 Orange Center Road. Orange. CT

-<*f9:'

10 Wheeler Road. Simsbury, CT 0 Kataaros, Susan; 134 Brockton Avenue, Haverhl Kaveny, Roaamary; 60 Stratford Road, Kay, Linda; Taltersall Drtve, Lincoln. Rl 02865

Karpa, Suaan;

Narragansett.

Xaenan,ir 02818 ^1 02L 02840. Hchaal: 247 Euslls Avenue. Newport. Rl H 02905 76 Linden, Kington, HI 02881

lwe,ChriBtophar;

Howard, Judy; 88 Ntchols Road. Nonh Kingstown, Rl 0285! Howe, Robin; 56 Atumni Avenue, Providence. HI 02906 Howell. Palriela; 1471 Warwick Avenue. Apt 6. Warwick, HI

Boston Neck Roaa Apt 4. 1

^1 02920

035 Kaana, James; 17 Spring Streel, Foxboro, MA 02035 ran CIIH. CIIM. Nar Narragansett. fll 02682 Kearney. Anne; Anawan Court, East Gre lountryC Keesan,FrancM;4Country Keenan, Edward; 263 Doyle A

F

F '

Kapanakia, Philip;

Karbaaal, Mllre; 19 West Bay Drive, warragansei

Howard, Andrew; 84 Oakdale Road, North Kingstown, Rl

Hil Road.

Haipem. Sarah;

orrlngton, CT 06790 Winsor Roac

. Marc; 2203 Diamond HUI Road D. Woonsocket, Rl 02895

Kellay, Hancock.

Kelley, Patrick; 6 1 East Bowery Sireel. ^ Road. Kenyon. KoHay-Wagnar, Wagner, Corrine; Biscuit Cily Ro,

So Sandy Lane Menoen. CT 1 Hartd. Francis; Joe Nausauket Road, Wanvick. Rl

Gregory;

Hanatwich. Daniel: 62i

i

Joyce Drtve, Temp*

Henuahevsky, hraruta; 95 Supenor View Blvd 2 Marceia Road

"

r,

HJI

N

.

Parsippan; 02886

'37

.

Cypress Avenue. Tivenon,

Rl 02878

I lar rington. Oaniefc 2489 Pawtucket Av

Harrington, Paula; 39 Cydesdale Dnve. (

1394 F 028 IE 6 CordaviHe Road. Ashiano, MA 0 1 72 1 Hunter, AHco; 346 High St Mystic. CT 06355 Hurlay. Susan; 123 Pembroke Lane, Coventry, fll 02816 Huriey. WMam; 39 Townsend Si Barrington, Rl 02806 Hurley. WiUiam; 78 i/2Cotla> Street. Providence Rl 02905 Huaaay, Palrtda; 2-34 Kenneth Avenue. Fair Lawn, NJ 074 lO Huaton, Milton; 5A Conunicul Road. Narragansett, Rl 02882 Hutchinaon, (CimtMrty; 26 Lovig Lane. Hamden. CT 065 18 Hutchinson, Patay; 57 Third Street. Piovidence. Rl 02906 Hwtchlnaon. Teri; 13 Norman Street. Gardner. MA 01440 Hyrtea, Loulae; 3 Onondega Road. Narragansett, Rl 02862 Hyrtea, Tinwthy; 3 Onondega Road, t ,

h Fair _.rStreet.WanK:k. Street. Wanwick.RI RIC

Mart; 129 Pleasant >Tr(

Rd

,

HI 02806 Kinoston. Rl 0288 1

Barnngton.

Jox 5 1

Baywje Aver^ue

.

li

tacusis, Joeeph; 30 M* ladavaia, Santa: 148 v^ lannucci, Douglaa; 30 Forbes Street. Rtversi

fll 02836

(1:91 9 1 AthononStreei.Milton.MA02te6 Athenon Street, h Margaret; "

le Meadow w Road. Rockawi Re

,.

IJ 07760 j.Paut;37RobtnRoad. Keily,il t 820 Poinl Judith Road, Nan'agansat!, f Ket^r, David; Kelly, Kathleen; 30 Mohawk Trail, Narragansetl. fll 02882 Ketty.r Kelly. Ketty,lLori; 1 1 Keify, -

"

'

"

Sanora; tidj Miimgy bireei. jonnsion, mi u^s Kelty, Sandra Kelly, William; 3 \ Silver Lake Avenue, Wakelield, fll 02879 Kandrick, A Lynne; 9 Crescent Street. Providence. Rl 02907 Kendrtck, Chrialine; 25l Orchard Streel. Cranston, Rl 02910 Konaalty, Sharon; 26 Orchard Drive, Hope, fll 02831

Kennally, Thomas; 1 5 Nathaniel Road, Barrlngtor Kennedy, Joseph; Kingslown,

F

Kennedy, Kevin; Diamond Kenyon, Heily; Box 11 18. Charlesiown. Karigan. Victoria; 39 Knov

Westerly,

Rl 02891

Rl 02813

Kam, Jamas; 40 Fonin Rd Kerr, Brian; 33 Holbrook A

Karahaw. 02652

iklnen, Oregofy; 18 Mam lalar, Rhonda; 62 Ridge E Khanna, Shyama; 1 17 Drake fload. Somei

-<

Has ion. Robart:

Haetlnge,

5 Manor fload.

Barnngton

Isharwood, Sandra; 2

Rl 02306

Gate Drrve. Setauket. NY ii 733 45 Sunset Lane. Pontand ME 04102 Paul; "r. 67 Broad Sireet. Ashaway. Rl 02804

HaaaetL Je>;

i5 Gienmce Drrve Cransion

t^mkkm, Broofca; Browned Street, Warren. Hi 02885 H8wUna.aitam: 125 A/nold Ave Cranslon Rl 02905 Hawertt), Rldiard; 2 1 Broadv^w Avenue. Cumberland,

fli

02864

Hay, Kim; 365 GraryJvie* Road, East Greenwich, fll 028 IE Heyaa,Anna;4 Vciory AverHje, West Wanwick. R I 02893 Hayea, Lorraino: i South Road. Apt 2c. Kingston, fll 0288 Hayman, HeM: 68 BaHey Lane. Georgetown. MA 0 1833 Hazard, Conotwio*; 20 Church Street. Peacedale. Rl 028 Healey. ESzabafh; 40 Ccnnr^on Drrve, Wan*rK;k. Ri 0288f Heatoy, Palrkia; 165 Hedlarvd Avenue. Rumford fll 0291( Heath, SheNo; RFD 1. Boi 508, New Ourhan. NH 03855 tor, 2 Conrad Street. Myste. CT 06355 "

"

i; 24 South D

3.

Bo?95. Foster. HI 02825

Rl 02840 Q'. 78j Kay St . Newport. I: ---^' t. i,HolD Hour 53 New Lexington Road, t

02852 Creston Way V Henn. David; -id; 9 Cre ly, Susan; Cod Fish Hill Road, I 4 Rob n, Rebert; Hennigan, "

14 Mollus" urrve. oaurmeism/w".

"*'

on: Hansftaw, AJBaon;

1 18 16 n

Hiiisdaie, Legion Place. Hiilsdate,

Longmeadow Road, Lincoln, Rt 028 Rl 02806

Jacfcaon, William; 105 Herriage Dr., Kingston. Rl 02861 JacotM, Timothy: 24 1 East 6lh Avenue, floselle, NJ 07203 Jacobson, Kevin; HR 2 Ramble Rd.. No Scituate, Rl 02857 Jacquea. Marie-, 10 Renehan Ct. West Warwick, fll 02893 Jaffa, Jerri; 124 MerrymounI Drive. Warwick, Rl 02888 Jakob, Richard: 19 Edgewood Avenue, Westerly, Rl 02891 Jolbart, Mary-Anna: 5 Eleanor Drive, Coventry. Rl 028 16 Jamea, Eunica; 12 Jay Drive, Nonh Kingstown, Rl 02852 Jamea, Susan; 13 Old Cart fload, Soulh Hamilton, MA 019E

m \jco'-

NJ 07642

Kilty, 1,

Luela; P 0 Box

1

142, Charli

Kim.

Norman; (orman; 8 Morpheus Drive. Cumberland. Rt 02664 Klncaid, id, Janel; 16 Flynn A Avenue, Cranston, Rl 02920 23 Rhode Island Ave,. Narragansett, fll 02882 Kindred, ad, Uura; Laura; 2~119H .

_

load, Warwick. Rl 02888

__

'

-

Colloge Rd.. Kingstor

it

Point fload. i. Saundt Saunderstown. Rl 02874 It, JiR: 35 Arizona Avenue, flockvltte Centre, t C 06851 <!CT Joworskl, Janice: 392 Newiown Avenue, NonAralk, 2920 Janiaon, Myrtte: 48 Hill Top Drive, Cranston, HI 02920 Rl 02906 Provic Janklno, Kim; Ktm; 8 Hopedate fload. Providence. Jenklna, Verentca; 6 H Hopedale Road. F A 9 Middletc Avenue, Jennlnga, |a, Roy; Roy 1, Timothy: tl Washington Sire l'

um

John; 96 Whillier Avenue. Providence. Rl 02909 AkMe; 1 1 2 Chace Ave.. Providence, Rl 02906

>ln, Ann Marie: 69 East Matn Street. Jewelt City, CT 0635 1 "3 East Rocks Hoad. Nonwalk, CT '

132 Pine Valley Drive, Medford, NJ 08055 i;.132Kirby, Richard; Diamond Hill Road, Cumberland, Rl 02864

KlrkWood, Chriatophen 967 Kingslown Rl 02882

Kirwin. Kavln; Box 302, Kinoston Rl 02flRl Kiatler, Nancy; 5924 Long> KItchin, Bhiriey; 743 Indlar Corner Rd,. Slocum, Rl 02877 KIttell, Dale; 205 1 Soulh County Sloci Rl 02877 iunty Troll, Slocum, Kixa, Andrew; 349 Vin. Sireet. Pawtucket, Ri 0286 1 Klar, Joyce; 38 Tangier ~

Kllmas,Danlal;2 Knepp, Barry; 1 1 Knight, Ariane; E Knight, Rodrvey; 4:

"

-

-

Rr02852

06851

1 16

Lockhaven Road, Warwick. Rl 02889 .

07040

Johnaon, Elizabeth; 32 Athenon fload, East Greenwich, fll

Hd.. Peace Date, F

Kimer, Margaret; 20 Narr Ave, 156 Pier Village, Narragansetl,

John, Anthony; 110 Lexington Ave,, Nonh Dartmouth, MA John,

Higgira, Bartra;

HI 0261

KllUan, John; 170 Alex. McGregor Road. Pawiucket. Rl 0286i Kitllan, Robert; i70Alexandef McGregor Road. Pawtuckel. F

1 Hope Sire 41Ho.

Rl 02852

Jena, GIIHan: 37 L Jarman, Kelley:

Denea; Johnson, Cattiertne; 44 South Rd Kingston, Rl 0266 1 Johnson, David; 65 Indian Rd East Providence, Rl 02915 Johnson, Debra: 37 Boyden Parkway Soulh. Maplewood, NJ 95 Rector S

Kiaty, Elizabeth; Phillips Lane, Harmony. HI 02629 Kilguaa, Steven; 44 Hana ford Drive. East Greenwich, KHIheffer, Pater, Rl 1 12 Box G, Carolina. Rl 02812

'

I,

Terrace. Dartmouth, MA 02747

Kidd, Jeffrey: 38 Church Sireet. Tivenon. F Kktdar, Bruce; Coast Guard Ughtstallon. \ Kidder, Laurie; F Kieke, Burrwy; 100 Cranslon Circle, North Kingslown. Rl 028

Klng,Jody;

r,

"

_

Henry. Lorry;

1

Jackaon, Jamee; 22 flobbms Drive. Barnngton,

H^

Konleov. Howard; 90 De'dham Road. V Kopolan.Karan; 18 Meadow View Bou Providence, HI 02904

Kerch, Judith; 862 02871

Koehoffer, William; 1 Koalalak. Robert; 38 Wtieaton KoUer, Kimberly; 200 H

A

irragansett, Rl 02882

Marwell, Chriatine; 70 Line Marwell, Jeffrey; 85 Easl A

Lewia, Mary; 25 Carrlngton Avenue, fc Lewie. Paul; 193 Heathcote Road, Etn Laydowi, Doreen; 5 Olympla Avenue, ^

04074

Kozlewski. r, 50 Steuben Street, Providence, fll 0 Xraamer, Richard; 565 Black Rock fld, Coventry. Rl 02816 KrajewaU, Joseph; 67 Landmark Roai ..

.Newport.

Llberman, Cartyn; 125 Hemlock Drive

02911

Malt>er,Jennltar;l45 Granby. CT 06060 Malhawaon, Jeffrey; 2

Kraue, Joeeph;

1 144 Alcott Sireet, Philadelphia, Krailick, Robert; 4 3 Bayberry Road, Bridgewater, NJ 0

^102905" 2161

-

-

-

Mattoa, Barbara; 6 Barney S

-

PaHi; 2 LMngsl Livingston, OakO

LaFrentero,Theraaa;P.O. Box 312, Peace Dale, RlOi L Hond, Elizabeth; 2 Poner fload, Middletown. Rl 02i Lobbe, Ann; 12 Pocono fload, Middletown. Rl 02840

Laeay,Haryann: 69 Central Sireel. Bylleld,

Lockatt, Elizabelh; PO Box 91 16, c/o Ben Lockett.

MA01922

LoenB,Chafiaa:RHl. Box 115A, Chopmist HilIRd

03104 West Shore Road, Warwick i

Craig;

m,

McAvinn, Patricia; F

15 8

A

D

Rrglade

1 Westport, I

327 Gi Loe, Camila; lamila; 3

,

Rl 02874 19

:

Lorber.Uaa: t9Gre

Lafazia, Frank; 57 Orchard Ave. Warwick, Rl 02866

Lagotta, Anne;

,

Lombardi, Jantea; 21 TopSI.. Westerly, Rl 02891

02886

Lofreniera, Sarah; 30 Barber Heights

NY 12309

Schenectady,

Lachance. Elizabeth; 150 Pickenna Street, Manchestc

Ladaa. Charley 435 Middle fload. East Greenwich, Rl

fll 02881

ninglon, CT O6032 Matoee, Jooeph; 2

LJvenspire, Slanlay;

Kutcher, Joeeph; 58 Bradford Streel. Warren, Rl 0288.

.

3ICI..RFD4, Esmond, F

Lloi, Sandra; 73 Burbank Street, Cranston, Rl 02910 Listen, Prancia; 102 Eileen Drive. North Kingstown. RI 0285

KueMar, Daeno; 26 Juniper Way. Basking flidge. NJ OJ Kuhlmann, Laurie; 64 Deer Run. Fairfield, CT 06430 Kuntamatar, Elizabalh; 70 Oak Dell Circle. East Green

College Rd Kingston,

il

Lindbarg. Clare; 19 Hillside Ten-ace, Hingham, MA 02043 Lindsay, Kathleen; 6 Edna Streel, Coventry, Rl 02816 Liptrot, Robert: Pole Bridge Rd., North Scituate. fll 02857

Krueger, Elizabelh; Knov

Lachapelle, Michelle; 2902

HI 02840

02911

Leylegian, Sara; 432 Westhlll Rd., Sta

Kramer, Joeeph; 1 Helen Street, Apt. E

Lowe, Thomaa; 7

McCabe, Alexandra; High Stre

Lucock. Cynlhia; 6 Ro Luk, Cttung; RFD 3. B( Lundgren, Colby; 53 1 Lusaier, Elaine; 12 Spi

McCelM, RolMrta Anrte; 2.

McCabe. Melanie; 74 Don

Lamb, Barbara; 45 Oregon Ave Lamb. DavM; 99 Hansen Drive,

Lambert, Lynne; 25 Oak Hill Dr Lamond. Catlterir>a; 2 Poder R

McCaffrey, Cheryl; P.O. Bi

McCaffrey, Mary; 1 79 Nort McCarthy, Brian; 34 Malhc McCarthy. Carof; 32 Luke I McCarthy. Ellzabath; 16 K HcCluakey, Colleen; 2' McConaghy, Nancy; i:

L uaa tor, Pierre; A shew

Lyman, Ctwrtee; 9 Myrtle

Landfiekl, CUudine; 7 Gi

Malias< 2^ Lyrtch, Maliaaa; Lynch, M 02638

Landry, Susan; 76

~

Lynch, Susan; 96 governors un^ Terren 16 Elsenhower Lynch. Terrenee;

Rume me Streel, Pawiucket, F

Lynee, Deborah;

Lang, Marie:

HCCormick, Christopher; 22 Glossop S

KriaHne; 2

Lyons, Lyona, Richard; 60

Road.'siratford, CT 06497

Lanz, Cynthia; 135 Fox Hill

:,

F

02806

r;35Pledn MacLeod, Susan; 3 Cushing fl MacMaater, Bonnie; P 0 Box _

Lapolla, Deniae;' 63 Messina Street. Providence'. Rl 02908 Lappin Jr., Jamee; 8 1 Washburn Avenue. Easl Providence.

Rl

.

McEwen, Kimberly; 30 Dudley Avenue, Old Saybro

McGonn, Johrt; 44 1 Mail Rd Slocum. fll 02877 McGannon, Diana; 2 1 Gould Street, Wakefield. Rl 0 McGaary, Allaen; 18 John Street. Newport, Rl 0284 McGetrick, Kimberly; 1 Richard St Apl. 203. Cran; .

02916

Wesieriy. Rl 02891

Larhdere, Stephen; 16 Vineyard S Lartcin, Kathleen; 18 Kenyon Ave.. Larodie, Marie; 7 Villa Avenue, Brii

Laraan, Scoll; C/O

1

Strawberry

Magill, John; 223 Division Stre Magill, Nancy; 98 PolTard Avei Mattoney, John; 32 Surrey Lai Maira, Stephanlo; 10 Love La

Hill Ave. 3C. Stamford, CT

Philip; 22 Glossop S

McCrae, Wendy; 497 Ralhbun St. McCrudden, Vincent; 62 West d

MacDonald. Jane;

Lapldee, Hartorla; 122 Governor Bradlord Drive, Barrington.

02910

HcGoldrick, NIkoo; 27 Chester Ave Westerty, F .

!,phepacher

f

i. CT 06437

Makowsky. Lisa; Shore Rd., Westerly, F

McGulnneaa, Patricia; RFD

1

.

South

02804

Laraon. Curt; 35 Cindy Ann Drive. East Greenwich. Rt 02816 Lalhan, Lori; 2! West Bel Air Road, Cranslon, Rl 02920 Uloa, HaWI; 42?W Avenue, Westerly. F Laudone, Robert; 7 Highland HIg leGraniCIro

Lautanschlagar, Laurie 32 Coi^r Place. Harrington

MaSoy, MaHoy,

"07640

5 Continental Drive, Middletown, Rl 02840

02881 212

Sandy Une, Apt. 4303. Wanivick.

fll

Covingion

F

McKieman, Judith; 50 Colony Road, Westport, CT 06880 McKieman, Sleven; 132 Hanalord Drive, Easl Greenwich, fll 02618

McKinney, Geraki; 80 flodney Road.

-

6 Norman Streel, Newpon. F -^e Lawleaa, David:

Martdros,John;ei Hilltop Road. Portsmouth, Mar>ay, Williatn; PO Box 764. Newport, Rl 02

F Avenue, Wicklord, Rl 02852

d Sireel.

Ashaway,

Lawtor, Jaan; 20l'prospect 19 Parkside U Brun, Valeria Rl9ParksWeD Streel. Barringion, Leach, Carolyn: 50 Third Streel , '"

'

Manion, Eileen;

56 Brookfield

F

Manning, Margaret; 3399 Brookline Drive,

1086

Lebzaltar, Jennilen 29 Heritage Drive. Sparta, NJ 07871 Lea, Bruce: ISH Rolling Green. Newport, Lea, Francao; 13 Slept>en Streel, Green' Lee, Hwe; 126 Mt. Pleasant Avenue, Pro vidence, Rl 02906 Lea. Hwe In; West View Drive, Wakefield fll 02679 ,

Lea. Janet; 124 Albemarle Road. While 1Plains. NY 10605 Lea. WiMam: 66 Don Avenue. Easl Provi Laaman. Joanne; 1226ATuckenownRc WesI Allenton Rd., N.

Kingstown,

fll

02852

Legere, Donald; 89 Wildrose Avenue. Scjuth Portland, ME Leitman. Jacob; 467 Pleasant Streel, Paiwtucket fll 02860 Leimbach. Jamea; 7 Pine Streel. Wakefi

Leaparence. Michelle;

Wa

McLaughlin, John; 47 Mapiecre

47 Hebert Street

Laloumeau, Ranee; t067 Mendon Road. Cumberland, Rl le,

Westerly,

LevaWee, Gary; 41 Mello Sl., West Warv, Lovesque, Paul; 80 Harbour Avenue, Wt Lavaaque, Paul; 3 Luke Street. Nashua. Lwin, Uaa; 44 Fowler Ave., Pawiucket, 1=11 02860

Rl 028!

i.

^1 02661

Pawl

McLaughlin, Paul; 88 Brookfietc 02915

McLean, Bruce; 88 Brooklield fl

Narragansetl E

02893

1102683

Marcolte. Joseph; 119MagillSt.. Pawtucket. fll 02661 Maroolta, Margaret; 66 Weekpaug Road, Westerly. Rl 0289 1 Marcouz, Lee; 52 Cumerford Sireet, Providence. Rl O2909 Marcoux, Rita; 36 Perkins Road, Londonderry. NH 03053 Mofcua, Robert; 23 Willow Drive, Cranslon, Rl 02920 Mardix, Ron; PO Box 186, Kingston, Rl 02881

NY 10548 McMahon, Thomas; 58 H McMaster McMaster, Mork; P.O. Box 1406. Kingston, Rl 02681

Morenna. Pamela; 1 65 Kings Highway, Miflord, CT 06460 Margolick, Daniel; Genevieve Streel, Puinam. CT 06260 Marianl,Doria: 45 Saratoga Avenue. Pawiucket, fll02861

McShane, Kenneth; 19 Betly-HIII McVay, Robyn; G

Marino, Kenneih; 111 Mulberry

FJd.,

McNally, J

1102840

1102852

McCarthy, Judy;

13

Orvll'le Drive, Middlelown. fll 02640

McDonough, Laurie; 537 Middle Road, Easi Gre Bristol, RIO2S09

McNally, Ida; 19 Grotto Avenue, Providence,

Rl 02906

Morkay.Debra; 826 Cottage Street, Pawtucket, fll 02861

Rl 02863

Lamire, Palrida; 28 Zanfagna Street, Jc Lamoia, DavM; 5 1 Jul^n Sireel. Pavrtuc Lamer, Andrew; 16 Litlle Lane. Wesi Hairtford,CT061l7 LascauH, Debora: '44 Vincent Ave., Ea;

31 Wobi

02916

Manning, Mergarat; P.O- Box 1495, Kingstor Manning. Tharesa; <30 Frank Street, Watertot Manning. Valerie; 3 Myrtle A Mannlr>g. Manze. Lisa; 250 Great Road, Maynt

Laaae, Conehiia; 2 Laathar,HoWn;2

Lamay. Joy; 186 Earle St.. Central Falls.

11 02660

McLaughlin, Oeeffrey;

"

Laahy,J< Laahy.J

^

McLaIn, Cynthia; n5WelNngtor

Drive, Cranstor

Mannir>g, Jennifer; 1 146 Perry Hgw, Wakelle

'^

Leahy. Joanna; 9 Randall A Laahy.Ji

Looming, Halan; 320

Drive. Wamvick. HI 02886 McGuIri, Susan; 65 Evenll Street, WanAiick. fll 02889 McOuy, Allan; 13 East Shore Drive, Coventry, Rl 02816 McKay, Robart; 36 Fashion Drtve, Warwick, fll 02666 295 West McKanno, Carol: Wreniham Road, Cumberland, Rl

Malone, Lorama; 72 Wash it

Makwf. Shelley Lyn; P O E Mamalekia, Constantino; 37 Lower College Road, Kingston.

P

Lavoilaa, Deirdre: 2! Lavoie,Hark;li Lavoie,Hark;lORic -

McGuire, MorytMlh; 55

Erin; 33 Glen Hills C Thomas; 33 Glen H

Medelroa, Barnard; 43 Academy A Medelroa, Beverly; 76 Fi Marquette, Ktmbarty; 24 Terrace CT, Ballslon L Marqula. Steven; 185 Grand Avenue, Pawtucket. Rl

02i

Maraoeci, Dino; 109Tlmbef line Road, Wanvlck, RI02eE Martell, Nancy; Granile Ave., Westerly, fll 0269 1 Martalla. Joeeph; 169 Viceroy Road. Waiwick, fll 028Si Martin, Jamea; 109 County St.. F^ehoboth, MA 02769 1 eel er Avenue, r

Melo, Maria; S20 P

433 School Hoi Park Hoad,

Pli

Martinalli, Ann Marie; 101 East V

h Rd.,

Narragansett, Rl 02882

It Street, Wakelield, Rl 02879 Menlhen, Suzon; 59 Flodman Streel, Peacedale. HI 0288 Mercier. Walter; 1 29 Oakland Avenue. Pawiucket. Rl 02f Mercurle, Anihony: SeUing S

Merhei, P'aul;

He

Marian. Pater; &

Meshenic, Peter; 287 S

lian, Veda; 27

Enterprise Terrace, Kingston,

F

Benjamin; 440 Veidl Road. Shelter Harbor W

' Pappadia, Frances;

Pappanikou, Lisa; 9i Pare, Brian; 44 Pione

Sireet, Old Saybrool^, CT 0 4 Broad St

Nelllgan, "

Oakland Avenue, Pawiucket, Rl 02861 Be fload. Bedlor Kelty; 1 144 Babbitt fload, Sharon Sireet, Cra 70SharonSI "

.

Joseph;

igton Sireet, Providence,

"

,

fr

.

College fld. Kingston, ,

F

], Kingston,

Meyere, RichanI Miano.

Road, Hingham, MA 02 St., Andrews Way, York, Highway, Lillle Compton,

3f

I, East Greenwich,

^

2

Wampum Ti

Miceti. Bemodet

J, 15 ;,

02919 818 02879

Rt.2.SnBkBHlilRi

..Wesieriy, F

Stephens

m; 9

Mary; 47 Montague^ leph;

Ledyard Sl., Newport, Rl

C

55_^ 1

Prospect Street,

Palel, Raaeah; 28 Cross

9 C Cowessetl /

>:2SSlerrySt

Patrone, Joseph; Star Ri

Ap't6,

hard; 52 Thames Sireet. Newport, hi u; t; 39 Cooke St., Pawiucket, Rl 02B60

Paulette, Jamea; 375 Cc Pearson, Chrialopher; 2

Nguyen. Tam; S3 Goodrich Hindeck. Marr

^

Hisari*. Edr

Av

Peltegrino, Stephanie; 50 Manning Sin Pelletier, Ronald; 2 lO Cottage Sireet, Peloquin, Ernest; 338 Manion Ave.. Pi

4

Nonnonmachar, Ralph; P.O Box 265,

V

Moniz. Chriatme: ;

n

43 Coulters Road, Cranslon, Rl 02920

r,

Stephen;

1.

Kavin; 5 Falrtield Drive, Westerly, Rl 02891

Pereira, Douglaa; 2

Northup, Patricia;

jr

Nota, David; P 0 I

Monraugie. Mate; S

Village G

Peck, Keren; Pedro, ), David; 499 Aquldnec

0

Nig relli, Marilyn;

1936

.

Nguyen, Tan; 53 Goodrich Avi Nguyan,Trang;Box3B1, King Nicholas, Qragory; 8 1 Longvii

i:

Perfetlo,Ralph:'5l-

Fields. Wesi Nyack. t

College Rd,, Kingstor

Perklna.Cherrle; t306To

1. Newport, Rl 02640

Moore. Adam: i367

Perrolta, Suaan; Box 416 1 Perry, Dabra; 43 Gilboly D 1 05 Sherm

Perry, Randall;

Peterson, Philip; 7 Dudley Avenue. Newport, Pellt, Thaodore; 22 1 George Arden Avenue, Pe I racca, Bernlce: 12 Jacqueline Dnve, Prov

0 Connor, Karen; 5 Huntley C< 0 Connor, Kevin; 27 Corcma C 0 Donnell. Stevan; 143 Edmoi 0 \.

David; 5

t.

1

Flaherty. Brian;

32 Ellery

A

Pawtuckel Rl 02861

Moreau. Ttwmaa; i Moretti. Donald; 3

Moretti. Lynne;

i

lOf

-ir

arltjorcugh,

h

),

Mary; 265 Ma

ph:& Marie 5

>.

O'Brien, Patrick; Scallop Shell Road. South King

166 Blanchard _

tiS^leO-^

_

O'Donnell, Kevin; 92 Bethel Street. Warwick. Rl Oakley, John; 7 Irving Road. Nalick, MA 01760

Morrio, Robert 156HenT3geRd Morria, Stephen; 1 Hedgehog U

Ogden,Wade;3Capion Farm Drive.

^23 S Motto. Victariaq 7

Phlllipa, AH Phillipa, Ro

f

Phrathep, [

f

Orleck.

Muaiar, Deborah; 39 Pme Tre HuKgwi, Judith; P O Box 50!

Lafayette Road, Barrington,

tl

Ch^l; 2 Harrison Ave.. Soulh Kingslow

Orzechowaki, NerKy; 106 William St.. Manchesv

Stre

Quonochoniaug RFD,

i;

249 Tuckerman Avenue, Midd 2

Kingstown

i

Wan,vick! Rl

Oliva, Cynlhia; 49 Ponliac Road, Narragansett,

ullo, Edward; 4

Pickaring, Steven;

Bradli

293 Manville Road, Woons

Pieraon, Diane; 71 Boon Streel, Narragansett I, Lauri; 1 Sandy Lane, Randolph, ^ i;59fl Pimefltal, J

Jth,RI 02871 MA 020; ett, Rl 02882

jhloo,

Rl 02857

HuKfM, Pamela: 203 Garden I Mtovo. Edwwd; 1291 KingstO' Munro, Slaphert; 293 Bryant S Munroe, DalMrali; 74 Ltoyd A> Murdeclc Jamee: 24 Fortm fld

Murphy. Affyeon;

159

Oatiguy, Jamea; 165 Buena Vista

Oaliguy, Lynn;

Ripple L

Middleburg,

73 Rhodes Street.

V^

II 02920

Oawald, Daniel; 264 Snake Hill Re Ouimette, Carol; P 0 Box 1403, \ Ovorend, Michael; Pairview Ave Owen, Milton; 6 B Walker Sireel, 1

Ptsarczyk, Scoth 424 Maple

Pace, Ann; 24 Brown Sireel, Have

Plan, E. Wtnnaid;

,

.

Murphy. Julia; Apt. W Pier Village, f Hwphy, Karen; Ide Street. Wakeftek Murphy, Karen; 7 Edgewood F;

PachiacD, Dianne; Mount

Ptascyk,

Hope Gr

(

Poggie, Erika;

t 1

31 C

Upper College Rd., Kingstor

Polniek, Ullian; 90 1

Holly

A

02852

Pirier, Marysa;

Pogenu.

Murphy, Patrick: Box 212. 1 Murphy, Sean; 16 Friendshii

Murrey, Btve*; 870 Mass A^ MivToy. Dierdre; 424 Alps P Murray, John;

77

,

60 (

NJ 07645

11 02908

Jward; 8 1 J.F. Kennedy Drive, ^

Poland, Lucy; 65 M Potlto, Janat; 274 F

Pomeroy, Jody;

d, Newport,

P (

1,

Say les Avt

Murrey, Kerry-Lynne;

Kingston!

Theresa; 275 High Sireel. Wes

PO B

^"'

11 02920

Murray, Lauri;

e, RID291,

Palm, Alison; Box

1

56 Cheslnul

Ridge Road, Mahopac.

10541

Palmiari, Julia; 124 Fordson Avenue, Cranston. Rl 029 1 PalomlM, Rhonda: 1 1 1 Audubon Rd,, North Kingstown, 02852 CT 06040

i. Newport, Rl 02840

Pangborn Jr., Joseph; 200 vincen! Ave., Apt, 15, Nonh Providence. Rl 02904

slon. Rl 02920

CT 06514

Pooler, Jayne; 3 1 2 Gooseberry R

Portaluppl, Jon; 5 1 Woodland

Powell, Brian; 14 Bartlett Hoad, N Powers, Bonnie; 285 Fair Haven I Powers, Kristine: h |j'07945 7 Sweet Fern Drive, Cranston, Rl 02920 Powera, I, Michael; 78 S Powers, Mieheel; 143 East Shore Drive, 3, Coventry. F Powera, Walter: 78 Sweel Fern Drive. Cranston, Rl 02920 _

""

.

_

"

,

6 Round T,

Paolino, David; 39 Colonial Avenue, Cranslon. fll 029 IC Paolucci, John; 52 Andrews Ave.. West Warwick, fll 021

Re

Rooney, Everett; 77 Cooper Road, Warwick, Rl 02886 Rosa, Robin; 9 1 Highland Avenue. Barrington. Rl 02806

Staphan; 62

r,

ragans J,

Rose, Barbara; 43 Mark Drive. North Kingslown. HI 02852 Rose, Cheryl; 6 B Charlesbank Way. Wallham, MA 02154 Rose, Lauren; 80 Pine Hill Road, Wakelield, Rl 02879 Roaenberg, JaHrey; 539 Ashwood Road, Spnnglield, NJ 07 Rl 028i Roaengren, Kurt; 569 Kingstown Road. Peace Dale, Roaenthal. Kevin; 1347 E 17 Streel Apt 2E. Brooklyn. NY

11 02661

>aula; 157 Chaplin 5 fleise

11733

Proulx, Richard; 52 Collage Street, Warren, fll 02885 Provunchar, David; 38 Cherry Sireet, Warren, fll 0281 Psikakos, John; 1426 Park Ave., Cranslon, Rl 02920

Roaara. Richard; 220 Park Avenue, Warwick, Rl 02889

Roasoni, Maryann; 204 flochambeau Ave., Providence. Rl 02903 Rotondo.

Cynlhia; 80 Lookout Ave Cranslon. Rl 02920 Rolaky, lleno; 87 Spear Street. Oakland. NJ 07436

,

F 8I1 Rabanstsln, Stephanie; Rocand, David; 138 0aklana Avenue. Krovioence. nixjc Racca, Joseph; 138 2 Primrose Drive. Riverside. R10291

2

R

Spring Green

Kingstown,

Kingstov^r

02852

Rudzinaky, David; 43 Brookside Ave,. Belmont. MA 02 178

Ragoata, John; 22 Plaza St.. Cranslon. fll 02920 Hahlll, Mary; 85 Fuller Sireet, Pawtucket, Rl 02861 flalaai. Mohammad; 37 Lower College fload. Kingston,

>amala; 64 Burlingame fload. We;

Ruhlln, Jeanne; 719 Chesse Spring Road, New Canaan, CT Ruiai, Msrybalh; 25 Glen Way.

fll 0267

Rak, Kathleen; 38 Bourbon Street. Porismoulh,

argaral; 30 South fld

Kingston. F

,

Watch Hill. HI 0269 1

RuBsall, Lisa; 12 Kenyon Road, Cranslon. (1102910

t, Kalhy; RFD 1 Box 732, Falrtield, ME 04937 II 02909 Rand. Karen: i Rwiieri,Jano:i:RFO l.Box 107. Sau Rasmanis, LIimIs; 1

Ryan, Kaihryn;

781 Ten Rod RoaO No'tn King&iown, Rl 0265

Ryan, Slephsn; 60 Cresihdl Dnve, Easl Greynwicti, Rl OP.B 18 Ryan, Theresa; 8 Canlone Road, Narragansell, Rl 02682 Saccoccio, Augustine: Burnt Hill Road, Hope. Rl 0263 1 Seecocdo, George; 575 Dyer Avenue, Apl c-31. Cranslon, F

Rawley, Margaral; 80 Henderson Road, Fairlield. CT Raymond, Richard; 2 Summit Avenue, Narragansetl, 244 Mam Streel. Wakelield. HI 02879

David; Reedy, Bridget; 20 Rose Ct., Narragansell, fll 02882 Reed,

Rl

Shaw, liana; 904 Boston Neck Rd.. Narragansell. Rl 02882 Shea, Luanna; 34 Day Streel. Whitman, MA 02382 Sheahan, Gall; 96 Parkway Dnve, Warwick Rl 02806 Sheehan, Palrlck; 55 Idolsione Lane, Matawan, NJ 07747 Sheldon. Kendall; 29 Congdon Ave North Kingstown. Rl

2 1 Manoi Manor House Road, Budd Quitzau, Curtis; 21

1 10 Ten Rod Road. North

Stephen; 37 Hedley Circle, East Providence.

Shaakan, Ann; 75 West Glen Drive, Stamford, CT 06902 Shatz, Lee; 32 Fort Avenue, Cranslon, Rl 02910

.

Rouillier, Donna; 129 Park Stieel. Pawiucket Fll 02860

Quetta, Patricia; 550 H

Rafferty, Michelle;

Shaken, Albert; 2945 Mendon Road, Cumberland. Rl 02864 Shannon, Jena; 42 Alex McGregor Road, Pawtuckel. Rl 026f Shanos, Gregory; 160 Budlong Avenue. Warwick. Rl 02666 Sharizer,

Rm!] sKen; 2^7 Lake Street.' Wakelield. HI 02879

Puglieoe, Claudia; 326 Sharon Street. Providence, fll Pitfae. Catherine; 75 Dorchester Hoad, Emerson. N j I Pundye, Ravana; 35 Jefferson Drive, East Greenwich, Pumell, Kevin; 153 Soulh fload Box 255, Kingston, fl Pyle, Sarah; 12Church St.. Bristol. Ri 02809 Pytka, Albert; 134 Her QualtromanI, Leslie: Quattromanl, Teresa;

Maria; 10 Sagamore Dnve. Simsbury. CT 06070

Shafar. JoAnn; i'i Maomi Drive. Ledyard. CT 06339 Shaffer, Suaan: 4 1 Cedai crest Road, Canton, MA 02021 Shak, Samaon; 37 Lower College Road, URI, Kingslon. Rl

Sedlier. Ellen; 85 A Sadowsl Sadowski, 14 Prudence Lane, 1 Began. J 8egan.Jane; 78 Craigle A Avenue. Wc SaillanL Mary Anna; Anrta; 78Craigle

Reale, Eva; 5 Lawlon Streel, Westerly, Rl 02891 Radihan, Judith; 132 Hutherglen. Providence, Rl 029

Saliba, Nabil; 255 Bonnet Point

igansell. f

fl

Regan, Judith; Queens River Drive, West Kingston, Rl Regnler, Chrialine; Fletcher Road, North Kingstown, Rehl, John; 5 Plum Court. Wappingers Falls. NY 1259 Retd, Andrew; lOO Liverpool Street. Warwick, fll 028: Id London Sireet. East Greenwich. Rl 02816 Sanlla, Donald; 283 Greenwood Street. Cranslon. Rl 029 10 Sansoucy, Diana; 7 Meeting Streel, Coventry, fll 026 16

Raid, Jamea; 136 Custer St., Apl. D, Warwick, Rl 026 Reldy. Jamea; P.O. Box 95, Easl Holden, ME 04429 Reilly, Denial; 39 Laurel Lane, Simsbury. CT 06070

Reilly, Gregory; 74 Gram Terrace, Portsmoulti. Rellfy, Michael; 1

Sanford, Janice;

College Rd Kingston.

II

.

Rt 02881

Rl 02( 7 1 Vandewaier

Santangelo, Steven;

Streel, Providence, Rl

b, Maple Valley R

t, Gorh la,

Sentilli, Anthony; 63 Conanicut fload. Narragansell. fll 02682

Elian;

Singer. Eileen;

I

165

Remington. Bonita; 8I6 Kingstowi

, R

Ap,

,apse.R,0.e

iHi

RematMcker, 02908

Rendine. Patricia; RFD 1. Box

Skelly. Susan; 15 F Skenyon. Slephen

Savaga, Kevin;

340

dence.fll 02908

SwM"o"a.;

Sami, Gregory; tOLawnacre Drnie. Cram

Rarick.Marii; 161 Angell Aveni Roanick, Beverly; 30 Ingieslde Reanlck. David; 20 East Bel Air Reonlck, Mark; 39 Sachem Dri' Raataino, Roeaann; 1 Horizon I Relelle, Deniae; 42 Houston Dr

Skuce, Margaret; G Slader. Eric; 7 Mari

Tiffany Avenue. Wan-

11 02860

Savaalono, Mary; 19 Fairview Avenue. Wt Slediik. Paul; 6151

,

BlDOmtiE ^orlh

iSunnybro

Kingstown,

Rl

iriaganseti, WA02t84 V 02906

t, Vincen I; 9

Scallop 5

Richer. Joseph; 21

1

irragansoli.

1 18

Hill Rd Harboi

Schacknar, Calharinej 30

Narragansett

Smllh, Angela; 250 Ocean H<.use Road .Cape Elizabeth, ME

S^^etSe.'^as'iKLk.NJ

1

Schaeffer, Ellen; 135 Sayles Avenue. Pav Schaffron. John;

Mount Saint Chark

Schargel, Pamaio;

Rlchtarik, Judith; 3 Victory Avenue. West \ Richter, Jessica; G If lord Parkway, Hudson Richter, Susan; 5 Robin Circle, Easl Green'

Rieger, Daborah;

Scarduzio, Nancy; 20 Oak

Sluaarz, Linda; 60 1 Smalley. Jeanne; 5

Smilh.Boyd; l07MedwaySt Provider R F D.. East Monipelter. .

'

Smith, Carol;

1

Penney; 17 Joy S 1 (, Bradley; Bredley; 138 Heritage Ave r'orismouin, ki u^u/ i Schmldl, Chrialin; 57 Anne Lane. North Kmgsiown. Rl 02852 r,

Smilh, Chrialopher; 568 Hope Sl

.

Pro\

.

.

Farmington Chase 0

ian

|Sba.

Smith, Deen; Watch Hill Road. Westerly Smith. Ellen; 30 Cartier Street. Cranstoi

Stre

06032

RIgnoli, John; 24 Valley B Riley, Chrialopher; r ~

Schomp, Kathleen; Schomp, Richard; 1 Schrader, Joseph; C Schrimmer. JeHrey;

Riley! Hkhael; 95 Caniage Dnve, Soulhport. CT 0

st, Old

Saybrook,

C

iringlon. Schuellein, George;

1

Riaica, John;

>,

i, Thomaa; 68 Grove Ave

10940 S Box 14 15. Kingston, Schuli, khuli. Suaan; Schulz, T Sc 3chwab-l hwab- Bou draa^ Chrialine; 323 Victory Highway. ^ Smithfield, Rl 02895 Schwartz, Sharon; 96 Sweetbriar Drive. Cransir Sclamacco, Stephan; 99 Grant Streel. Apl 3. V

Rmar.Roblri;841Klgh Mario;

Rtzza,!kimberiy; 4791^ Rtzza, Rlzzuto. Maurice: 31 F Rlzzuto, Lorraine; WIK Roberts, Lorralni Robertson, Dale; 207 C Lorraln 2 Robin, Lorraine; Mei Robins Robinoon, Robitai

Scorpio, Virginia;

^len: 60 Fairway Drive, Narr Vincent; 36 Sherbrook Dri-

Heights,

N,

kalhlaen; 39 Powell

Avenue, Newport, Rl 02840 Roher, Helene; 14 Quake Lane. Peail River. NY 10966 Rolando, Elizal>elh: 131 Seascape Ave., Middlelown. Rl 02 Romano, Frank; 16 Penel Drive, West Wanftrjck, Rl 02893 Rondeau, Denise; 49 Lorraine Avenue, Coventry, Rl 028 1 6 Rondeau, Donna; 49 Coweselt Ave. Apt 9. West Warwick, l 02800 11 02693 Rooney, Edward; 136 Honeysuckle fload, \

^^^ggggbV^.M

I,

"

"'

xia,Robai

kfld.Apl 18.

f

Selecman, Christin FL

330*19

Selvllelli, Paul: 7 Pi

1

'

_

Road. Barrington, fll 02806 30 Kingswood Road, Bns 1445 Warwick Avenue Apt .47. Warwick,

Spachman, Rogar 5 Lodge Streel, Cranslon. Rl 02920 Spadar, Kannelh; Breezy Knoll Road, Greenville, Rl 02821 Sparling, Stevan; 66 Lotly Road. Cranslon. fll 02920 IJ 07430 HlQhw.

fll 02840

Seabury, Beverly; 2

Seftea, William: 90'^

..Hope,

02914

Rl 02831

Drive! Hackett Siown, NJ 07840 Stept)eri;ea Lawrence Dri Joseph;

Newport,

11 02893

Indigo R

1

East Pi

Lee; 7 Barnngton Place, h

Soucy, Joaeph;

Souza, Joeaph; ),

07922 4

Soprano, Frank;

.

e

92 Dean S

,RI 02861

fll 02806

Soeha. Edward; 75 Allerton Avenue, Easl Providence. Rl

Lisa; 1 l

h

Apt 502, Hollywood,

J. Port!

lh,Rl 02871

Spodaryk, Gayl; 2i

Sposato, Calhy; 6 Benjamin Streel. Westerly, F I 65 Indian Trail. Saunderslown. Spragua, Mark; r tO Allen Avenue. Warwick. 1 Sprague, Patricia; Sprouts, T Siiuadrito, Michael; 3 Patly S St. Oermalne, Nancy: 37 Annie Stre

:l 02874

^1 02886

Staabner. Nancy-Sue; RF D 1. Blue Hill Road, t-obanon, Cl

George; 332 VimByard Road. Wanmcl Stalde.Marti;7tRLX-knj, Slang. 11. William; -rr-H:,<.-..., w..^..L n, n-.((96

Slattotd.

11 028B2

Welesko. Mark: l44Tennysc

Rl 02908

Whalley. Chriatian; 669 Kingston Rd Peace Dale. Rl 02863 Whaeler, Sandra: 4 1 Lilac Lane, Fairlield, CT 06430 ,

Whilchar, Charyl; Jerry Brown

Steer*. Robart: '0 B^

i

Stephenson, Mark; 3 While, Kelly;

47 Weslminster Drive. West Hartford. C

Whitehead, Richard; 72 Lorelei Dnve, Saunderslown Whitehead, Sleven; 17 Fraternity Circle, Kingston, fli d AvrHie, Ciansiwi, F

Whitford! Timothy; 9 Easlnoi Whorlakey, Douglaa; Kirii,,,U>u, HI 02881

Turner, Brian; l-O hr.w J

Tye. Randy; '^B Carlton SUeel. Brookline. MA 02146 UndarhiH Karan- Chapman fload. Weekapaug, Hi 0289 1 Upshaw. March; 1347 20lh Sireel. Columbus, GA 31901 Urain. David; 1 Lincoln Ave Holden. MA 01520 .

>. Victoria; S Ann Marie; G Vaccaro. ro.AnnM Vedea. ia,Melisaa:2i9Godlre Melisaa: Valaitia. Dawn; 1

Road, Newporl, RI026 Nawlon, MA021

17 WillardSt

,

Wiarda, Keilh; 101 Deer field Road, Wayne. NJ0747[ Wichland, Deanno; Apple Hilt Road, East Sullivan, Nl Wianka, David; 908 Wood Court, Lisle. IL 60532 Wlggln, JaHrey; 62 Pepin Street. WesI Warwick, Rl 0

Wignot, J

r,'shary'l; 2 *.

1

Metlhaw;

?r

Ctiapel R

Wilay, E IS,

Margsrel;

5

I. Care

:

iwiKlberg. Gregory;

Vaitcouyghen. Dorothy; Box

:

Williams, II I,

Slephen; 2

Wlllinger, JeHrey; nttieny; 22 Upper College

Syhna.Eri Syhna.E

Vartanian. Kirken

Togg. Shawn; 64-66 Ortoleva D Tatpeie. Mary Ann; iS flHjgel^^ Dr K

BolJart 7 Scenic

Vew &

Tanglewood Lane,

NortI

Wilson, Douglas; 89

Winkler, Phyllis; 9' Winn, Lawrence; 4 Easl Greenwich F Esrrrond.

Winnard, Wendy; E

.

Ktfigs Highway Ext

'

4

6;

R

Sytvia-Gory^ Sytvia-G

.

Gales

Wlnthrop, Sera;

Ferry. CT 0

4 (

Wlnthrop-Oney. Rl d Dale Drive, BallstonLake. t Vanlurino, Angela; 17 Middlebury L

02835 North

Kingstown,

F

Wilbeck, Bridgil; 2

Taylor. Taylor.

Very, David; 14 10 Main Street Wesi Warwick, Rl 02f Vessella.Joaeph; 246Fairla>> Dnve Warwck.RI 026

Rotwrt .-

Sharon

Taylor, Ufva,

;

:

Viall, Gary; 176 Cove Avenue Warwick, fll 02886 Viau, Jearmina; 3 Bush SHeel Newpon. fll 02840 VicarJo, Midkael; 169 Home Avenue Providence. Rl Vktecco Jr., flicttard; 58 M*ddleton Sireet. F>ravidenc 02909 VincenL Patricia; 103 Deepdale Dnve. Middletown. t

..

5;.

.

?= G-ee^-r^aco* C 'C-^

TempeeL Mary:

Nc-in i

Kola, Arthur 270 Fiat Avenue. Cranston. HI 029 10

Teaawr! MichaBo;

'0 G'hAan Avenue North 5m.

C?S?f

Teeartora. Aaron: 3 ' Kennedy Streel. Woonsock Tetreaufl. David: 235 Baxter Street Pawiucket. Tezol. Ersin: 37 Lowe* College floaO, Kingston, f

Wood! Jamia; Bok

:

Wood, Kimberly; 2

Wood! Tracy: EIok : iiimoie Blvd

.

MassapeQua.

t

h Place, Miami, FL 33157 Wooll, Emily; 1 Wordell. Ann; fl )- u i.uakoaie.ui Ub6fU Worthley, Keilh; 4 Dorset Circle. Andover. MA 01810 Wright, David; 13 Woodland Road. Lexington, MA 02173 Wright, Rotiert; 75 High Sireel RFD, Hope Valley, Rl 02832

Weddicor, Robart; 33 Sunder Ie

Thayer, Cynttiia: 2 i;37L

Thaophaiwua, Artgeloa;

J

ten,

Cynlhia; V

10590 sUo. Robert:

Ih

1*6 Clover Lane.

Bloomfield, CT 06002

Thomaa, Amt; '7 Sii^re-, fload Barr.r,gion R I 02806 Thomas. Bwe*; 6 Peacn Avenue. ProvKJence Hi 0290 Thompeon. Kennettt; 35 Berr^a'd Street Prondence. F Thompson. Mmr- 25 Granite Street Westerly. Rl 0289 Thompson. Michael; Boi 2930 Leuba Road, Coventry "

Thompson. Hancy:

7

tO North QuKlnessell Road Norrt

Thorps, Owinia: 27 Pleasant Street, ThreetMr, John; Thurman. Karon;

N

Kmgstown.

HI 0

Ih. Portland Ofl 97202

rmipertey, Janat; .

Robert;

Hioer.

1 1

Erft; 494 Rooseveii Ave Freeport, .

1

.

11 02693 Rl Walker, Raymond; 29 Pensaukee Avenue. North Provid' 02911 Was, Jeen; 2 1 Natick Ave Warwick. Rl 02866 Wadick, Rose; 60 Broadway Apt 208. Providence, fll 02 Walah, Diana; 1 7 Davjsvllle Lane. Narragansetl, Rl 0286 Walah, John; 1294 Log College Drive, Warminster, PA 1 Walah, Lvnne; 23 Meetinghouse Lane. Easton, MA 0231 Walsh, niliam;T.ltn...:-id Slater r,v,ile Rl 02876

I.

P 0 Bob 9431.

NY

Watkina, Patricia; 47 Garden Stre Watkina, Watkina, Watler; 2 (

02852 i;

Chrietophar; 6

Torgan. David: 22 W^gate

R

Zerbarini, Paul; 2

II 02893 ^1 02886

isSire

erIy.RI 02891

Zlcojohn, Mary; 72 Benson A Zieky, Arthur; 49 Fairlield Rd

,

West Hartford, CT 06 1 17

Zifcak, Marcia; Box 149, North Road. Pascoag. fll 02659

Zimny Jr., Edward; PO. Box 1412, Kingston, fll 02881

Gibson fload. Bristol fll 02809

Toppi. Denise; 9 Brenda 51 Evans Streel. Newport. la, Brenda; Topp.na.

Zannini, L

.

Tidsell. Martha: 6

Togoen. Neigon;

Rl 02852

WaKla,Christophe lstopher:_205 Cioton Avenue. Ossining. NV Walker, Elizabeth; Patricia; 43 OM Carrage fld Apt 133. West W WeHier, iHier,Pal

Aspen Court Wayne. NJ 07470

Tirpaeck, Martha; 3

Kingslown,

KigslOwn.RI 02852

1 7 Green Court, Cranston. Rl 02920 Wales, Jennifer:: i7Gi

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Watson, Suaan; 197 Ivy Sl Providence. Rl 02906 Watt, Linda: 65 Maior Poller fld Waiwick. Rl 0266f Weah, Oabrlel; 160 Crook Manor. Pawiucket. Rl 021 Woatherby, Jane; 603 Thames Sireet. Apl 5. Newp .

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Suaan; 924 Duneiien Drive, Towson, MD 2 Weedon, Phyllis; 39 Ebony Drive, East Greenwich, f

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when I There times were thought this year would never end. But looking over the months spent in the Renaissance office, I can see how quickly it all went. Of course there were all too many late nights spent laying out the pages, coordinating photos and the chaotic rush of deadline but the end justified pressure

Closing

the means. As yearbook staffers, there probably isn't a one of us who could forget the pizza and beer parties in the pub, nor the crazy times spent joking in the office. own had our even We "Springtime Flood" when a water main on the second floor broke and

water

gushed through

ceiling. The staff

and

our

publisher

had to scurry around with um brellas trying to save our layouts and pictures from disaster. But we persevered and were able to

produce the highlights of 1984

in

this book. theme Our Possibilities Are

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Editor's Message

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was "The In Endless." these 320 pages, we tried to cap ture those four years spent at U.R.l. These pages contain the happy times, the wild and crazy times and maybe just a few sad

times. But before going on. It's impor tant to note that this book could not have been produced without a very strong-willed and deter mined group of people, and for tunately we had that here. We were

able to face and

overcome

setbacks, including late deadlines. Spring Break photos many

which finally surfaced in July and relative inexperience on a project this immense. of in Chief As Editor Renaissance, I wish to thank all of those people who helped to make this years book a possibility. First I wish to thank Colleen the Associate Editor for the tremen dous help you gave in setting up the staff and your time spent on laying out the book. You were always ready with the aspirin dur

ing our deadline rushes. Art, you are a mathematical wizard with your ability to keep our continued

on

p. 311

finances

straight

and even

to add more color to the

helping

yearbook.

As Business Manager, you went above the call of duty in helping with each department. Thanks for a shoulder to lean on and those en couraging words during those long days spent working on the book. Colby, you took over the role of Sports Editor several months into the year and did it all in stride. Thank you for all your hard work and dedication throughout the year. Senior Editors Amy and Joann, my thanks for all your toils in coor dinating the senior section. You both deserve awards for your pa tience and hard work. Thank you Ivlarsha for taking over the Activities section mid-year and for teaching the rest of us how to do layouts. Chris and Karen, as CopyEditors you made sure no errors slipped by. Karen you really picked up the slack with your typing and layout work. Chris, besides your sharp editing skills you also made sure we had plenty of pictures of you around the office. Gary you deserve thanks for

your work as Photo Editor. You made sure we always had enough photos available for the book and then some. No one managed to your quick snapshots, perhaps you should try landing a job on "Candid Camera."

escape

To Assistant Editors, fvlichelle and Leslie, thank you for your time and great amount of help in putting this yearbook together. Thank you Karen Devitt of Taylor Publishing Company for spending countless hours with the staff helping out in every aspect of the book. Without your endless pa tience and expertise this yearbook may not have been a reality. John DeWaele of T.D. Brown, thank you for all the time you spent helping out the staff and for your many photo contributions. You always made yourself available to us when we needed your assistance. To Pat Nielsen, graduate assist ant, my thanks for your help in pro ducing the book and for your managerial skills. Your quick sense of humor helped carry us through the year. Bruce Hamilton, Yearbook Ad

visor, thank you for the support into the months. Also thanks for the shoulder to cry on. By the way don't forget about the

throughout the year and summer

.

.

.

celebration! Thanks are in order for all the people that helped make this year book complete. They include con tributing writers and photog raphers, the Student Senate Of fice, Mel (vlurphy, Ivlrs. Nye in ac counting. Norm Windus, Lauri Pietruszka and The Good 50 Cigar. To friends who have helped me throughout the year as Editor in Chief, especially Jenny, thank you. I'd like to add a special thanks to my parents for always standing by me with unending support through these college years. To put an end to this awards ceremony, I would like to wish the best of luck to all the 1984 is this book graduates dedicated to you. Best of luck to next years staff, I hope you have as much fun work ing on the yearbook as I have. And don't forget "The Possibilities Are Endless!" Dawn (vlirone .

.

.

Editors

Ivlessage

31 1

The 1984 RENAISSANCE Executive Staff

When you were freshmen and you thought college would never end. How many times would you have to walk through the slush and mud on the Quad at 8:00 in the morning? Would those lines in the bookstore ever end? And when, if ever, would you finally finish study ing and get some sleep. You would sit at your desk studying while at the same time mumbling to yourself "So these are the best years of my life!" When you became juniors, you began to realize that four years can go by very quickly. The mud became more bearable, the lines became shorter, and you did get to bed. As seniors, you have reached the sophomores

end of your undergraduate career, and you can no longer count on next year. You are finally ready to con front what you've been hearing the dreaded about all your life "Real World." Remember that ex pression? When you were in high school, you heard "Wait until col lege!" Now that you are in college it's "Wait until you meet the real world!" It's as if everything you've ever done before graduation doesn't count, and life begins after college for real this time. Well, contrary to what you might have heard, four years of college teaches many things friendship, teamwork, patience and intellectual

understanding. But probably the important lesson learned has

most been perseverance. This determination of the human spirit is different in everyone, but it exists just the same. It is a strength of mind which says anything can be achieved if it can be imagined. Let's face it, if you can make it to Chafee in a hail storm, you can certain ly get a job! An exaggeration, maybe, but you go about the two the same way with your head down, always mov ing forward. In short, perseverance which guided you through those countless registra tion lines will also guide you through the rest of your life. There will always be rough times, but they only serve to make the good times better. After all, a situation is only as bad or good as you want it to be. Remember, you have the perseverance because you graduated from URI dammit! Chris Aleixo

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