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RENAISSANCE

1982

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1982

RENAISSANCE University of Rhode Island

Kingston, Rhode Island

IMPRESSIONS

You know, it .

.

you get used to

seems

being

August thought processes

comes

mer,

that

just when

home for the

along.

and start

Enter

sum new

thinking

.

.

.

SCHOOL. ;ms to take forever, J freedom, partying, friends, and boy and girlfriends takes ,

About three days before the end of vacation you go on a wild buying ;. Buy posters. Buy food. Buy booze. Pack the car. Drive to CJRI. Moving in's got to be the best day of Just pure fun and reiaxaevery year No

precedence.

.

.

.

back with friends.

That first night back, even hassles of parking and rearra room, might be called the ante the last, although we experienced that feeling yet. And then there's the first ca the new year, "Dad, you shoul ignad of a roommate I've got. some place I can't even prom name of." Nearly four years later, you you leave that ignad. And yc that college isn't the big, uc

Halloween. My favorite. The day can be yourself (or someone else) and fit in no matter what. Want to be a human tarantula? Sure. How about something so bizarre people still haven't figured It out. It's a guaranteed good time too, you know, no matter where you go. A Ram's Den party. This year Parallel Fifth and the Probers sent us be-bopping around for a few good you

Jf

Mtz^^m t

_

fe "-

HBift

4r

H

H4 sr.ytf

3. S'^:

hours. Then there's the down-the-line par like, and

"

ties with electric-aid and the

contests to see who's the funniest

looking. Try to go through the whole night without revealing your identity "

PT

too. That's fun.

The bars are Interesting because you get a nice blend of normal and abnormal people. Those without costumes stare at the remaining weirdos because they're dressed up. But who's the weird one? This is Halloween fellows.

IMPRESSIONS Homecoming

.

.

.

.

.

.

Octoberfest. GRl

football. Lots and lots of sudsy stuff in "Styrofoam" souvenir mugs. Lord knows more reminiscing for the others that have left us behind. It's a time to remember the finer side of social activities, past and present. "Hey Sue, haven't seen you in a

Hey John, how's Douglas? An engineer?

while.

barely

sit

on

a

bar

/^cDonnel-

You could stool at the

Willows." A time to forget about studying for at least a day, and usually the weekend. Enjoy the smallest state's state

school,

one

forgotten by

some

of the westerners, those who haven't discovered electricity yet. But a school especially ap preciated on such a natural high of a

day.

IMPRESSIONS

.

.

.

Before the monsoons and the bliz zards (yes, about a week) there are of course the beaches. The beaches that make Rhode Island "The Ocean State," Sand Hill Cove, Bonnet, Scarborough, Green Hill, 'Gansett Pier, Harbour Island; did I forget

anything? Skipping Management 305 on a Tuesday morning and traveling to the beach with

a case

and what and

whoever. Think of

it. How many other can boast the beaches of CIRl? How many can boast the down-the-line life? It's called Growing Up on Your Own, and isn't that what college is all about? Run through Bonnet to 'Gansett Pier and follow the water and the rocks. The sand. Feel calves, hamstrings, and stomach muscles relax. Get together on a Saturday in ear ly May. Blow off work. Who cares? The end is near.

schools

in

u

T^l u u rrrrrriTLj

^=^-t;'^

Have you ever driven through Saunderstown or Bonnet at night and gazed across the shimmering water? If you have, then you've seen that alighted invitation to Newport the Newport Bridge. The crossroads to fun. Sometimes the crossroads for on ly one car at a time, if you've ever crossed the

strip

on a

sleety January

night. you cross the umbilical cord of life there are things like One Pelham East, The Black Peari, and Yesterday's, you can't even recount But

once

them all. You could

go through all of Newport during your four years and

of the still miss some many attractions. The mansions, the cobblestone streets, the restaurants, the tourists

"^^

and the races. A good alternative

nightlife.

to

the

area

IMPRESSIONS

.

.

Back to school, going backdoor through Plains Road on a Sunday night. To the left, woods. To the right, the vast expanse of a lighted up rural University, glowing like a star from afar.

Yup, gotta like it. It belongs to you; it's what you pay the zillion dollars a year for. A feeling of, "Yes, I go to URI, and URI is a part of me." The feeling doesn't fade, whether you're a first semester freshman or a second year graduate student.

Calm. Plains Road. Serenity. Does the hustle and bustle of 12:28 on a

Tuesday really exist? Hard to im agine. Nature, 100-acre piond. Turf farm. Jogging down Plains Road on a warm, yet cheerful September day escape academics.

the

turmoil

of

the

Do you know Plains Road, the new home of the WRIU tower? If you don't take a left at the traffic lights two streets prior to the main en trance, you might not. It's a sneaky way of sliding into the University while avoiding the excess hysteria (if you don't desire that extra excite "My road." ment). It's kind of like

f!^

If for some strange reason you know where the library is, have you paid attention to how you got

ever

there? The brick walk, the small trees, the benches where students and faculty munch and gab. The lights at

night, making the library almost desirable even though you say, "Do 1 have to?" It's one of the nicest walkways at URI. Early on a foggy evening, those the campus in a state of

lights put

drowsiness and some students in a state of reverie. Thoughts of weekend parties, or who. Gradua games, or you know tion. The trip to Florida. They all

clear when you walk down the brick path to the lost continent the library. And there it stands in all its glory. Have you ever noticed that it doesn't blend in like the Engineerina buildings do? Or Bliss and E seem so

Don't you get the feeling that some strange power emits from it? Big. Greyish-white with the steps leading

building of wicked knowledge. The path, like up to the

disects

carpet, monstrosity.

the outline

super red

a

of

the

the lights at Stop. Look up night. Then loofc; at the library. This at

ain't

high

school guys.

IMPRESSIONS

.

.

It's weird if you've ever been in their locker room over the past few years. No nasty looks. No quiet responses. No screaming coaches. Minus the disappointment. Tears of

joy,

not

.

.

.

Yankee Conference Co-champs. Do you feel the impact of that? Number one from Squashed by .

.

.

nearly all. Sure you've seen Tommy Lasorda squirted by champagne, but to have

Yes there is a God and he wears blue, gold, and white, and yes he had his day, Dennen did. Two, not one, two fumble recoveries when it looked like URI might Oh, I can't say it. Mr. Dennen was a dic tionary of excitement. He deserv ed to be. Jon Rodgers, URI's own Marcus Allen. Jim Roberson, Den nis Talbot, the big play men. Can I ...

say on

something the team?

about every

player

Sure, but then this

been there in the victorious locker room that sunny fall Saturday when URI did IT beat UConn. Crown the Rams. No more laughing at those Rams, I'll tell you. They did too.

opening would be the middle and closing of the yearbook as well.

Mark Dennen, hardly and only sometime

ference

a

likely

hero

starter

at

of the heroes. He linebacker, was like a two year old at Christmas. one

It didn't matter all that much when URI got blown out by Idaho State in the playoffs. We were the Yankee Con

Co-Champs. ifOg,

M

^^jm

1982 Renaissance Student Life Academics

Seniors

Organizations Athletics

flCia

A

LEE GREENWALD Co-Editor-in-Chief

LAURI PIETRUSZKA

Sports

TERESA PAGLIONE Co-Editor-in-Chief

Editor

PETER MINIATI Assistant

Sports

Editor

JODI FOURNIER Business

Manager

ANN MAYER Senior Co-Editor

KIMBERLY B. POTTER

ROBERT JEFFREY

Activities Editor

Copy

CHRISTINE BYRNE Assistant Activities Edito

JOANNE CARDUCCI Assistant

-

.

.*/

Photography

Editor

PATRICIA HUSSEY

Edito

Assistant

Copy

Editor

BRUCE HAMILTON

STUDENT LIFE

A

Kaleidoscope of Life Styles

There are many different types of lifestyles at URI. Most freshmen come to the school as either dorm residents or commuters, and they eventually go Greek or choose down-the-line living. Whichever lifestyle one

chooses, the experience is shared by many. "Where's B suits Halls Phone calls and Tower?" Dorm Olympics dining halls semi-formals in Connecticut .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

unregistered

parties

.

.

.

RA's the residents' best friends .

.

study

roommates

.

lounges

Everyone must certainly remember his first impres sion of the dormitory. The crowded lobby, the check-in, the walk through the corridor, the unlocking of the door, and suddenly the room hits you. Initial reactions varied from "This is going to be great!" to "How will I ever

decent-looking?!", to "Oh God, this is ab solutely pathetic!" As distressing as it may have seem ed, it didn't take long to transform that "pathetic" little cell into something that could be called home. Those lit tle personal touches. Pictures of friends that you were going to leave at home, made room 571 "my place." Some people are not quite satisfied with Dorm life though. For them, an option is Greek living. make this

Sororities Rush activities Initiation Pledge pins Greek Brothers and sisters Greek week alphabet Frat parties Chariots Happy hour and super socials at

Fraternities Houses

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Caesars Greek life is a definitely different type of on-campus to a house is more than just finding a place to live. It rheans a lifelong commitment to the house. The houses also offer several types of activities from inter-house socials to Paddy Murphy week. Still, though many students look for other ways to live. Some

living. Pledging

choose down-the-line. "who has the Real houses balanc car?!" empty fridges paying the ing the budget bills Bonnet, Matunuck, and Par every place in between ties! Making it to classes on .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

time

"Living down-the-line is a good preparation for life after college. I never imagined that managing a household could be so hard." Any down-the-liner can tell

I'

-^Thc first storm of the year left Brian

Taplin

^Sig Ep

I!

is

sfioveiing

ttirows

TTDorm

rooms

"

TRelaxing

in

a

over a

foot of

snow.

Down-thfrliner,

flis way out of Bonnet Shores.

toga party with DZ.

cramp students life

a one room

replica

of

style.

homeaway-from-home.

you about the problems they encounter just trying to live comfortably. "It really makes you appreciate those little comforts of home, things you take for granted like gas, heat, food, money." As difficult as it may seem, most down-the-liners will also talk about how good it feels to be out on their own. "It's exciting when you pull off a really successful meeting or party at your house." Some, though, still refuse to leave home. They go out and hunt for a decent and reliable car, or if they're lucky they may already have one, and everyday they begin the drive to school.

Flat tires ...

.

.

on my tail The "Mom leave me Good home-cooked

Police

.

Oh, No! No Gas!

carpool alone!" food

lot .

For some people easiest choice. They

.

.

.

.

...

.

commuting from home was the already had a private room or a

roommate, and there wouldn't be the hassle of moving into a dorm. The problems, though, sometimes outweigh the advantages. Leaving your house at 10 minutes before 9 for a 9:00 class can make for a headache or two. Students at URI have many different types of lifestyles to choose from. Whichever one they choose, they are sure to be happy. Good friends and good times

compatible

make any

lifestyle

fun.

"QH^ Karen Canaan

A never ending complaint heard around URI is one concerning the state of food on campus. Just as URI

offers many different lifestyles, it of fers many different eating facilities.

Obviously the most frequented places to eat on campus are the din ing halls. These institutions are also

choice. For breakfast and lunch they must find food elsewhere, but they do not find this to be too much of an inconvenience.

the most criticized. As freshman Julie Wojnowski states, "It's generic. They buy the food at the beginning of the month and freeze it 'til the

So wiien

things

start

shipment." Unfortunately, there is only so much anyone can do with such large quantities of food. So when things start looking really bleak it is always comforting to

lootcing always comforting

that the Ram's Den and DelMor's are waiting not too far off. The students who live in the fraternities and sororities have a more positive attitude toward their meals than do those in the dorms. "It's good because you know the cook well and you see the food that comes in. There's also a better selec tion and you eat right in the houses. Of course you have to do the dishes,

Den and Delmor's

next

know

but that's a small price to pay," says Guy LaSorsa from Fiji. All frater nities are equipped with their own

18

kitchen and dining room, however not all sororities are. The gids who live in the sororities without these facilities dine at the fraternity of their

Different Life

Style!

bleak it is

to

know that the Ram's

waiting

are

not too far

away.

is eggs and brocolli." Down-the-line housemates Lynn Bramandee and

Melanie Lawless explain that there are different ways to cope with their food budget. "You end up eating at the Ram's Den a lot and the more you eat out the less you pay for food at home, so it all equals out." And of course there are the com muters who can go home to Mom's good cooking every night. Accord ing to Phil Canaan, "It's really not that great. You don't ever appreciate something good until you haven't had it in a while."

Through all the complaints most everyone will agree that they all manage to eat every day. Any freshman plagued with the "freshman fifteen," or the fifteen that pounds every student supposed ly gains in his first year, will be able to prove that it is possible to eat than one's share URI offers many eating facilities as well as numerous candy and soda even more

Many of finding food

the inconveniences of lie with the down-theliners. "The food is better because you cook it yourself. Of course there is less time for grocery shopping so a lot of the time you open the frigerator and find that all you have

.

machines. So whether

pizza, salads, can

or

yogurt

be assured that

faraway.

.

.

candy bars, are

they

craved, it

are

not too

iQnm Karen Canaan

EumliBrfBki fanms

Different Life

Styles

19

Students Won't Allow

Handicap to

Get in the Way the mud.

in

Trapped

leave the dormitories

Unable to

during

incle

ment weather.

Going uphill to your classes. These may not sound like major difficulties to the average stu dent or faculty member at URI, but handicapped, these problems.

to those who

are

situations

definite

Jane

are

Thierfield, coordinator of

ser

vices for students, faculty, and staff who are handicapped, says that ac

cessibility

is

a

big problem.

Her

job

includes helping handicapped students settle into their dormitories, assisting in scheduling of classes to aid in convenience, and making sure that the University complies with Federal Law

*'504,

a

new

law for

handicapped people. Jack McKen na, a quadraplegic who attended CJRI for

a

semester

because

of

but then withdrew

various

difficulties,

related his feelings on Miss Thier field. "Jane sets up everything for us; she arranges for us to have classes and coordinates them. She deserves a medal in my opinion. I also think she deserves a bigger of fice." Theirfield's present closetsized office is located on the third floor of the Memorial Union, in the student life department. Many of the tribulations that han dicapped students face each day would not even be considered by the average student, unless he was placed in the same situation. Students on campus did exactly that this year during Handicapped Awareness Week, a program de

signed to acquaint the campus with the problems faced by handicapped students. It involved direct participa tion, such as trying to maneuver in a wheelchair for a full day. McKenna operates a powered AHandicapped Awareness Week offered the cam pus different opportunities to experience firsthand some of the problems students encounter, by spen ding a day in a wheelchair.

wheelchair around the campus. When asked about snowstorms, he says, "I still slide when there's ice on the ground, and they only plow one two paths, and I have to search for those." In general though, "I find the University pretty decent (as far as accessibility). There are better and worse places than this," con cludes McKenna.

or

Although Meg petes in the 100-

u!

that Meg has accrued ai proud of. At the 1980 Inte Palsey n>" mark, Meg brought ho le

accomplishments

ething

everyone is

onai Cerebral

medals. Then in tWc auium the National Cerebral Pa

of 1982, Meg ' International Cerebral mer

Copenhagen,

.,-...

r-

Palsey

Denmark. She

Oly

'

Athlet

to do." The >r<ijtv nivfK

sports pre

Meg st

a

feeling hard

as

thinks about the dedication of the lople who help her.

cc

"" up, sh" "when I compete I don't feel like the busir """ '"i a handicap, I just f"' ther student or athlete, e are all proud of. T. J. Paglion

Asking Meg

to sum

everything

-*

Becky Strycharz, URI,

maneuvers

wheelchair around

a

freshman at

an

unpowered

the campus.

A

problem she encounters daily is pushing herself uphill to classes from in Tucker. "The sidewalks also have roads gigantic potholes," she explains. this on problem she Elaborating says, "The first two weeks of school her

room

and

was totally sore from pushing myself, but now I'm used to it." Strycharz and McKenna both had

I

many difficulties concerning mud around campus. "You sink in it like quicksand," says Strycharz. She

also adds that many of the pathways are caked with mud and loose

gravel. One wishes

quadraplegic student,

who

remain anonymous, with agrees that there is a problem and stones loose gravel on the sidewalks. "With the renovating of to

the sidewalks all the way around the quad, loose stones are a problem." are concerned haven't had too This student that for the most part "teachers are very good about helping out. They will usually move their classes if possible to the first floor of the buildings, if they had

As far

these

as

classes

students

problems. (anonymous) states many

been scheduled for the second or third floors." He also mentions the fact that there are still bathrooms in certain buildings that "don't accommodate

that perhaps they should be remodeled. But in conclusion, all three believe that the University has done much in taking care of their basic needs. They all agree that they wish to be treated the dent.

as any other stu wraps it up best by

same

Strycharz

stating, "like every student here, you just have to get used to it."XJLIL!J^ Dawn Mirone

wheelchairs." He goes on to say though that "I strive not to be made special. I want to be like everyone else." Strycharz recounts a different type of problem with cer out

tain bathrooms on campus, par one in Ballentine. "I'm really short and I have to almost do gym nastics to get up on it." She believes

ticularly

Handicap 'Meg Frost

21

A Place to Work; A Place to

22

Union Acti

Play

& The commuters, the Greeks, the dorm residents all have at least one in common besides enrollment the University. It is a place to which everyone must go at least once a semester, if not once a day as many do, for one reason or another. Set aside to the south of the campus is the Memorial Union, known to students as simply "The Union."

thing at

For

the Union is just a place books at the beginning of each semester or to cash a check now and again, but for others it is more. For the students much involved in the Union activities spon sored by SEC, SLS, and the Union Board, this building can be a to

some

buy

veritable home away from home. Some other offices located in the are the Student Senate, the Cigar, and the Renaissance, as well as several retail stores and two Union

The

Ram's Den is another fre visited spot, for relaxation,

quently eating, or meeting people. Its main purpose is to provide a spot for com muters to go during their free time, but it brings together many other kinds of people. The list of activities is endless the Union has been the host to many

concerts,

dances,

meetings, lectures, malls,

name

It is

place

a

and

special sales,

hours to

just

a

coffee

few.

to which

everyone mast go at least once a semester, if not

once a

day

.

.

.

AAThls form within

banks.

the

of

many

studying

occurs

comfortable

study

regularly lounges

Lee Greenwald ?A student stops to look over the offerings that up by the many vendors in the Union.

are set

Union Activities

23

Since the to

drinking

age has

jumped

twenty, 2/3 of the student popula

tion is

underage. Because of this the Resident Assistants in the dor mitories have been presented with a more rigid set of alcohol guidelines to follow, and the dorms have had to seek more activities that are not alcohol related. Paul Dahlgren, Associate Director for Residential Life, stated that the University

is in

state and its

compliance with the drinking laws. He also policy has re

said that the alcohol mained basically the

past

two

years,

disagree. Dahlgren

same

for the

although

others

said that the residence

halls have a few more specifications than they have had in the past. For example, there should be no more than six people in a room when alcohol is being served, and there

should be

no

minors.

According

to

Wendy

Elliot,

a

residence hall coordinator, the alcohol regulations "are the same rules as two years ago, but they af fect more people now." Because of the change in legal drinking age, Elliot said that there has been an ef fort to have more "non-alcoholic pro-

Many opted

Students have to go off campus

to local bars. grams, like trips, coffee houses and more educational programs." She stressed that ideas from

students in the dorms are helpful should be and encouraged because "we have to cater to the of the students' needs," because most of the students are not of legal age to drink. For an alcoholic party to be

majority

organized

in

a

dorm, permission

forms must be filled out

by

two

residents who are legally of age and will claim responsibility for the party. These forms must be returned to the Residence Hall

Coordinator at least 5 working days before the party. The hall coordinator must then bring them to the Office of Residential Life to get them approved. Elliot said that the parties "are more structured than they used to be and there is also more atten

day stressing the policies. Dahlgren, however,

alcohol

much

stress

tion drawn to where held." Agreeing with

every

said that the dorm

that

they are being Dahlgren, she parties "follow the

rules that a bartender has to deal with. These are state drinking laws and this is a state University." Elliot wishes to uphold the state laws while making life in the dorms liveable for the residents. Bill Toth, who has been an RA for 3 years, said that when the drinking age was 18 there were not any en forced rules "about parties in private rooms and t'l' lialiways." However when the age was changed to 19 and subseauently 20, there was a crackaown on the number of parties. Toth said that "you always had to same

register

a

party, but only

one

person

had to."

Cindy Gardiner, who became an RA when the drinking age had turned to 19, said that during her RA train ing periods there were discussions

there

ever

was

denied

placed upon this issue, or that more workshops were dedicated to the alcohol policies. Gardiner said that she was amon the first students to be introduced tc the new policies. She said that the planning for activities was difficult because "much of the activity (on campus) centers around alcohol." Since the

plemented, opted to go and

parties

drinking age was im; students have many off campus to local bars for their social life. Drink new

ing may well be going on behind closed doors in the dorms, but the days of wild keg parties until dawn are

long

since gone.

Dawn Mirone

The 20 Year Old

What

Drinking Age

Happened

to the

-^-^If

they ask ginger-ale. The

Party?

me

what's in the

glass, I

can

say it is

ruies don't allow students to walk

around the halls with alcohol.

Week

Inspiration Drastic

Change

From 20 Years

Ago

phrase instills in fear fraternity and sorority the curiosity and sparks pledges, and often hostility of members of non-Greek the community. the A guest speaker at Intrafraternity-Panhellenic leadership "Hell Week." The

,

conference this year was the founder of an organization who seeks to make the Greek system safe for its participants. It is not against frater nities and sororities but against ! initiation

dangerous known

practices, better

Eileen benefits

Stevens

hazing.

as

the

recognizes

a

Greek

offers. leadership and

Strong friendships, responsibility, par in philanthropic and ticipation cultural activities, social develop ment and most importantly, a feel ing of belonging and self-worth. The quality of each chapter house house

Ain

1947, the end of Hell Week

was

symtjoiized with a lampshade at the Sophomore

Court.

Hell Week, the walkers ordered a

During

bucket of hot water back

is the sum of the characters of its in dividual members. Hell Week, more correctly termed Inspiration Week can be compared to try-outs for an athletic team. Those pledges who

have the

willingness and ability

contribute, will be initiated. The tivities

comprising

to ac

Inspiration

an

not Week are designed with malicious intent. Rather they pro mote unity in the pledge class, (a key element in the functioning of any organization) and an apprecia tion of the workings of a fraterni ty/sorority and the commitment it

entails. As one

walking

can

across

easily

observe

campus,

no

by

two in

not everyone is a

dividuals alike; member of the sailing club, student lecture series, or the Cigar staff. And not everyone is or should be a member of a Greek House. Inspira tion Week, if planned properly with due consideration to safety, offers pledges an opportunity to decide for full participation or none at all. are

Patricia

Gingras

A

Lifestyle Unique

Down-the-Liners Survive

on

Cinderblock walls are a thing of the past now. You've made the choice to live Down-the-Line. No

dining

more

hall

food,

or

bathrooms

shared by a dozen. You have a kit chen to cook whatever you're in the mood for, and a shower with hot water

past 8 o'clock

am.

Being a down-the-liner isn't even comparable to campus life as new responsibilities emerge when the bills arrive in the beginning of Oc tober. What happened in September? That month really flew fast. by September was the month of getting use to the new lifestyle. Taking a swim before classes wasn't unusual

you try to stretch out the Even though you're back school, you're not on campus 24 hours a day so other activities take priority now. Thursday, Friday, and as

summer.

at

Saturday nights find

you can always down-the-line party. Some to show off the new liv parties arrangements while others ap a

have

ing preciate the freedom of not having any restrictions put on them. Sitting around the kitchen table eating fresh fish from the docks, the first set of bills is discussed. Why is the electric bill

so high? You learn you're paying for the elec you can't leave lights on all A garbage pick up bill? Whoever heard of paying the gar

that when

tricity, night. bage

men

At least heat

on

pick up your garbage. haven't had to turn the

to

we

when you is it all

worth it? A

of

majority

would

answer

make it

on

down-the-liners

yes. It's

your

own.

a

challenge

to

You're forced

yet.

When you decide to move off campus, many students don't realize the added responsibility you have on

It's

a

challenge

to make

besides shoulders your your schoolwork. Being short-sighted, all that you see is the freedom. No

it

R.A.'s writing you up for more blasting your stereo. No more house mothers waking up as you come in late after a wild social. But after a few months, reality strikes you as the phone company threatens to disconnect your phone or the oil

budget your money. You may have to give up buying food for a week in order to pay a bill, but it definitely teaches you not to spend

company won't deliver oil unless it's

28

cash-on-delivery. This is begin to ask yourself

Downthe-Lir

on

your

own.

to

your money foolishly. Down-the-line living grow up

begin

to

on

your

own.

appreciate

makes you You actually all that your

to

GRl

Their Own

^^An on

decide save

of being off campus is cooking own. but a disadvantage is the weekly shopping. Don Tower and John Costantini a loaf of buying generic bread in order to

advantage

your

grocery

on

money.

-^Laundry usually piles up as the trip lo Burke's is always dreaded, but eventually when you run out of clothes its a necessary trip. ^T Munchin out while

TMost students have year. A a

large

potluck

studying

a

;

least

one

is

a

familar

sight

party during the

supper i

crowd.

parents have done since you were born. After going to classes and then

group of friends, or having a suc cessful Sunday brunch is something

home

that will always be remembered. Then when the last month's rent is paid you know the semester is about to be over. For some the beach in terferes with studying for finals.

working part-time,

you

come

but it's your night to exhausted cook dinner. Now you experience mom has done for the what your ten years. One of the hassles of

past

living off-

campus is doing your dirty laundry. Living in a dorm or Greek house of fers the convenience of doing the laundry right on the premises. Now you have to dnve to a laundra mat. In the dorm you do your laundry to studying, while down-the-liners

avoid

study To

to avoid counter

takes books to the beach to read at least a it only reading four pages. You don't know what living down-the-line is all about until you experience it first-hand.

Everyone and

swears

chapter, leaving

T. J.

Paglione

doing laundry. the

threats

phone company or the high down-the-line living offers a

of the oil bills,

place to experience the real worid even before graduating. Being able to prepare

a

full-course meal for

a

Down-the-Line

29

It's URI

a

Dog's Life

be appreciated from many points of view. There is the view of the teachers, student, ad ministrators Well this is the unique view afforded a dog at URI, me. Wait a minute, I know what you're thinking, how can a dog write? Well if you had been at this in stitution of higher education as long as I have, you'd be able to write too. It seems to me that the faces here at URI aren't changing like they used to. It looks like people are here much longer than four years. Now I'm not one to complain but you people are starting to cut into our "Dog's life" cliche a little. I bet you're thinking to yourself who the hell is this dog to give me advice? Well, I'll tell you. First you pay $6,000 a year to go to this establishment, I pay nothing and can

.

.

.

have meals thrown in. In addition you spend nights on end in the library looking at the books on the shelf

or

bending

over a

cil in hand. All I

for is

with pen

pad

the

ever use

library

nap between sunny days. Is it all worth it? besides when it's all over Hell, a

quick

.

All-nighters,

exams,

reports

.

.

you have to go to work for the next 20 can retire and So years. Why? you do

exactly

what I'm

ing myself doing

as

doing

little

as

.

.

.

.

enjoy possible. .

.

Dog

?This

dog is finished

^Sandy

for the

shows off the

new

day

as

he leaves his

bandana to everyone

passing on the quad. His master, Scott Gregory, during a nice Fall day.

rests

All in

a

Day's Work The

.

.

.

Opposite Sex: Where to Meet Them

AWe have to

^There

32

Finding

a

Date

on

Campus

stop meeting

are some

like this

advantages

to

working logethi

Something

seems

unusual about

tonight. It's a Saturday, and ting here in my room while

I'm sit all my dates! I've never

friends are out on quite been able to figure out why they always have dates and I never do. I've had enough of this. I'm going to find myself a date! There's

only

problem. How do I go about it? I guess a good way might be to follow around a friend of mine and see how it's done. It shouldn't be

one

someone

who has lots of dates, you

know the them

see

day! as

type more

It can't be

well

be

I

You

mean.

a

who "may God knows

married,"

day has just begun. It's 7:00 already out of bed. I not usually get up this eariy

The

never

than 10 minutes someone

AM and we're

don't

until at least 7:30. Well, I guess this is of the sacrifices you must make.

they're boring! Who would be good? Maybe someone who goes out on a

one

date once in a while and has some of the same classes as I do. Wait a minute my roommate! Yeah The Perfect Choice. We have a lot of classes together. I suppose I should get started now. No. No, I can't do it. I'll start out with The Dating Game in the morning.

meet

say mealtime is a good time to people, so we went off to breakfast. No luck. Our first class is in Pastore. Chemistry is not all that interesting, so we decided that today we would sit in the middle of the class. That way we could check everyone out. Boy, I've never noticed some of these bodies!!! My next class isn't for another hour, so I usually go home and take a quick nap. Not today. Today we're hitting the Rafri's Den. That's one of those mandatory places if you're go ing to play this game. It's definitely unfamiliar territory, and I feel a bit uneasy as I go in. I don't know any of the people in here, and I'm not even

They

I've had I'm a

enough of this. going to find myself

date!

my roommate does either! We ended up sitting with some we didn't know, since there were no empty seats. I later found out that they are down-the-liners who are serving their mandatory sure

people

hour in The Den. I got the scoop on the parties going on tonight, and since they are down-the-line parties, these two will be there. No luck yet, though. Our next class is in Ballentine, a class I've never been on time for. My

maybe

"quick nap" usually

runs

a

little

overtime, but today 1 got there at twenty of! Boy, this crowd of people is

amazing! Some of these students really nice! There are even some professors.

are

cute

^Expect

the

you in the

library

the person next to could be the person you write home

unexpected

...

^On

days enjoyed

sunny is

quad

everyone and

a

the

by

definite

already 12:00 when 1 get out of usually exhausted. really want to go to sleep, but if 1 want to follow through with this I need to keep going. My roommate and I have to think of some exciting places. "Yes, there's the library, third There are floor's the best place It's

this class and I'm I

.

.

.

tables where different groups con dorms, Greeks, down-thegregate liners, everyone. Just sit somewhere and start talkin'!" No luck.

"Okay, try the pool. Always a good place to observe some breath taking bodies." Wow! This is the break I've been

waiting for. I fell

twice! Unfortunately unrequited love, though. love

it

in

was

We decided to go to dinner so that we could talk about how well the day went. This is where I met my love. We bumped into each other at the salad bar, exchanged Excuse Me's and confirmed a dinner date for tomorrow night. I sure hope it works out. If not, though, dates

together

have friends and friends are poten tial dates, so I can always find so meone

else. This has been so I'm going to

eventful day,

a

rather

sleep!

Beth Anne Steinman Robert Jeffrey

?The

library i

your books.

34

Finding a Date

on

Campus

than

just studying

Sniffing

Out the Trends

The Latest Craze: Pacman The morning alarm sounds as another day breaks and I rise from the warmth of cotton sheets and turn on the stereo for some re juvenating music to start the day. Suddenly I am whisked away from the serenity of my dorm room and brought into the world of video games. Gathering my towels for the shower I find myself moving to the beat of "Pac Man Fever." After showering, dressing and breakfast I trudge off to class, passing by a car that appears to have a moving ob ject in the rear window. As the car

Walkman

slows I am able to clearly see what the object is a waving pink plastic

Within

hand, with the message "Have

a

day" inscribed Resisting the urge

palm.

eye. Of course, he is a male, but he is walking in a very strange stride and attached to his head and ears are miniature headphones which are connected to a cassette box, that he firmly holds in one hand. After at tempting to decipher what this mechanism is used for a smile crosses my face. "What a dedicated student! Listening to his foreign language tapes before and after classes, now that is someone who will make it in life!"

continued

on

approaching

on

the

to wave

nice

back I

my way to class. Upon the quadrangle my

eyes are blinded in a yellow shirt

by a young girl clad bright enough to be a product of radiation leakage, a flourescent green shirt and a pair of magenta pink shoes. "Maybe she has she

a

defect in color

co-ordination,

certainly didn't put that on pur posely," I ponder as she walks by.

seconds

of

that

first

en

counter another student catches my

^students much time in the game

spend they

as

room at

as

can

the

Union. The video games are

irresistible.

Trends and Fads

35

I

silently exclaimed. I finally reached building and upon entering I am greeted by a girl who has in some the

way injured her head. 1 can tell this because there is a bandana tied across her forehead, probably situated in that location to

cover a

something. Then, as she nears, the reason for her wearing the head cloth becomes quite obvious, for on every article of her clothing and even on her book bag and pocket book are monogramed in itials. "The poor girl! She had ob viously suffered from some sort of concussion (the reason for the cloth circling her head) and she must often enter into a state of amnesia and by looking at her blouse cuff, or sweater or handbag she can recall who she is!" I thought with some lit tle pity for her. scar

or

Seated

in

the classroom and arrival of the other students and the professor I gazed out the second story window, when

awaiting the

suddenly I behold a sight that is a bit difficult to comprehend. Walking below me is a couple, hand in hand. However it is not the fact of what they are doing but what they are wearing that baffles me. The young man barely has any hair, at least not

a

...

flourescent green a pair of

shirt and

magenta pink shoes enough to shampoo and from his left ear (I presume it is his left ear, after all he is with a female) dangles a shiny silver "earring." He is dressed from head to ankle in black leather and his ankles are covered by a pair of red socks and he wears Converse sneakers on his feet. The dark color of his suit contrasts with the giri's, because she is wearing a miniskirt of purple and green plastic, accom

panied by Her

a

yellow plastic jacket.

and feet are covered by a of white hosiery and a pair of plastic loafers. Whereas the

legs

pair

red young man had hardly no hair, she did. But it was cut so close to her neck it appeared to be a hat and at

36

Trends and Fads

the very tips of it were colors of pur ple and red. Gazing upon them, the

for such a preposterous way of dressing dawned on me. "Of course! They were returning from an and overnight costume party what a clever idea of dressing as a typical couple from Pluto. They cer tainly were creative!" I admired. As class began I noticed one of the students had problems with both of her knees, for she wore a thick cotton legwarmers on each leg. She had most likely injured herself in some sort of sporting event. I came reason

1 because this conclusion remembered how my brother had to wrap his legs when he pulled the muscles in them during basketball. "It must be terrible to have to put those things on everyday, especially when she wears pants!" 1 thought At that moment my professor began talking about how mathematics can accurately solve the Rubik's Cube, and he proceeded to explain in such detail that we spent the entire class probing the mystery of the Rubik's to

Cube. Nina Sue Adams

^^PACMAN is the game of the year. Everyone I

talking

about it, and everyone is

playing

-^Jim Gulluscio and Brad Preston

night

out in

are

it.

psyched

for

e

Newport.

AThe latest

craze on

campus

.

.

,

Sony

Walkmans.

your eyes focused on those hands while they display their expertise in

^Keep

incredible

solving

the

RubiksCube.

Trends and Fads

37

Strangers in a Strange Land A number of students

college

careers

during their

decide to

study

in

a

for a semester or a variety of reasons. Some

foreign country year for students

a

see

as a chance to finally language they studying since high

it

become fluent in the have

been

school. Others view it to

tunity

meet new

learn about "how the

other

side

live."

as an

oppor

people and to people on the

Whatever

reason, most agree it is

a

the

great learn

ing experience. Here at URI, there is a foreign ex established with France. I'Universite d'Orleans in

change program

Eleven students from URI are now at I'Universite d'Orleans for one year, and ten French students are present ly studying at URI.

Every French family which has a daughter involved in the pro

son or

the

gram pays board for

tuition,

room

and

one of the American students. In return the same is done for the French students by the American parents whose sons or daughters are involved in the

program. Most of the French students concentrating their studies

science, two

are

majoring

in

are

in

English,

business student. Although there are similarities ex the two educational between isting programs, some differences can be noted. Dominique Bourrellier, who is a junior majoring in Biology, said

and

one

is

a

that, "the American program gives a lot of choice." There is a greater choice of courses at URI, such as art, theater, political science, and speech communication. These do not exist in the curriculum at I'Universite d'Orieans. The courses that students take at I'Universite d'Orleans are geared strictly toward their major field of study. There isn't as much flexibility in their curriculum as there is at URI.

^These students from i'Gnivi

e

d'Orleans

are

spending

??Across the River Seine

v

of the Eiffel Tower

Communication

the year at ORl.

versite d'Orleans that students from CJRI

spend

a

year at

through

the

(

has not really problem and the students adapted easily to their new en vironment. As Dominique Bourrellier said, "American people are open and friendly." been have

a

Another difference which exists between the two cultures is the rela between students and pro fessors. As Corrine Deloy, a junior

tionship

studying English said, "Tfie relation ships between students and pro fessors are not so hierarchial over here, and the conversations are easier." Many of the French students liv-

"Life

on an

American

campus has been really a new life for all of us."

in the dorms notice that the students are very open and friendly. They were not used to the blaring

ing

music, screaming girls, and doors left open. In France at I'Universite d'Orleans students live in single rooms, the doors are always closed, and there is not much interaction among students in the dorms. There are more rules imposed upon the students living in the dorms. to Corrine Deloy, "Life American campus has been really a new life for all of us. A lot of activities, such as sports, political speeches, theater plays, and movies are available in an American univer sity. For us it seems like a little city, you can live in it without really

According

on

an

needing

to move outside a lot."

For any

student,

it is

a great op For the has been a to master the English language, learn about American culture, and to establish new friend ships. It is an experience they will

portunity French chance

never

to

study abroad.

students

it

forget. Patricia

Hussey

w^lHv!^

StudSts Wait Hours

I 1.

The Great

American Smokeout

Campaign to Quit

Smoking

The URI community was asked to stop smoking for a period of twentyfour hours, starting at 11:30 AM on Thursday, November 19, 1981, as part of a nationwide campaign called The Great American Smokeout. The smokeout, sponsored by the American Cancer Society, is designed to help make people aware of the dangerous effects that cigarette smoking has on a person. There are social effects, such as being banned from specific sections of a restaurant, but more important are the physical effects. Among these are increased risk of lung cancer, short ness of breath, and an overall higher rate of lung cancer among smokers over

non-smokers.

To kick off the non-smoking cam paign, the Cancer Society set up a huge ashtray, complete with homemade cigarettes, bigger than the biggest of us. People who wished to quit smoking were asked to throw any packages of cigarettes that they had

with them into the ashtray. Those who did were given yogurt, T-shirt transfers, buttons, and decals to let everyone know that they had quit. There was entertainment by Coda, a band of Music Department students who kept the non-smokers' spirits high. Some people, however, were op posed to having people plead with them not to ruin their lives. These

people outwardly demonstrated their feelings by "lighting up" in the room where were

crowd

the

semi-reformed

sitting. Some of

television, listened

just hung generally

even

reformees

smokers sat

and

in the

watched

the band, or around. The mood was anti-smoking, and by 1 to

o'clock there were about 600 pledges to give up the Habit for twenty-four hours.

VQOiJj, Robert

Jeffrey

Joanne

Carduccil

the list of students that have quit smoking. evidence here shows that several peo-

42

Smoiteout

It

was

a

normal

Thursday afternoon

for most URI

students, that is, until 5:21 pm. That's the time people in Dorr, Ellery, Fayerweather, Gorham, Hopkins, and

Roger Williams Dining Halls found themselves in the dark. Those who were studying were mortified to see their lamps quickly fade off until even the was glow

gone. The TV addicts were equally stunned to watch the little dot on the screen disappear. And pity the poor peo ple attempting to eat dinner in Rojo's, the famous Roger Williams complex eatery. There was a rapidly growing shortage of clean plates, trays, and silverware, and even

tually styrofoam trays and plastic deployed to help the starving

flatware had to be students eat. The turned but as the dinner hour emergency generator on, wore on it finally gave up and died, leaving the diners in total darkness. The mood of the de-lighted residents was one of en

joyment, to study,

since lack of

and heat made it impossible up with sufficient funds to go Janet Apkarian, and Sheriann Welch, suitemates in Fayerweather, voiced this opinion, "It was fun at first. There wasn't enough candle to study by, so we just played cards and listened and many

out to dinner.

light

came

Lynn Lancellotta,

portable radio." The novelty soon wore off, though. The serious studiers found it necessary to move to friends' dorms or the Memorial Union, and the partiers could have no fun. A series of underground cables was blamed for the blackout. The power for the dorms on the South side of the campus had to be interrupted in order to repair the line. The southerners were not notified of this, though, and many of us woke up to find that we had missed classes because our alarms did not ring. By Monday, everything was back to "normal." "CaiSJ^ to a

Robert

Jeffrey

1

W^ ^vT

Letters Home to Send $ Go Gnanswered

Lack of

Causes Search for Job

Money

.

There comes a time in every URI stu dent's life when those letters to dad no longer return money, not even the invest ment in a stamp! Panic sets in as the search for a job begins. The words HELP WANTED take

{or

green,

on

since

a

new

they

employer's office. The first question that is posed to the student is, "You are on work study, I assume?" The student's face falls responds negatively.

employment

opportunities

are

the bulletin board outside the Financial Aid Office or the Employment Section, Room 315, both in Roosevelt Hall. Appearing here are jobs to tickle anyone's fancy. There are marketing

posted

Student

on

survey interviewers, door monitors for the residence halls. Cup Room waitresses, specimen slide makers, and even lab glassware washers. There are, of course, the traditional jobs such as typists as well.

The words HELP

WANTED take new

on a

golden nrieaning

.

.

.

Where

If you could be our hypothetical student, don't despair; non-work-study jobs do exist on campus, but their number is limited and their discovery requires determination. Most

.

golden meaning are mentally

translated into dollar signs!). The student, clad in his best jeans and rugby shirt, enters big prospective

and he quietly to now?

.

The Memorial Onion also posts job op portunities on a bulletin board on the main floor. Although most of these jobs usually carry

the

Work-study

there

label,

are

exceptions. More and more students will be looking for these exceptions as the effects of So, start Reagan's budget cuts are felt looking early and Good Luck! .

.

.

Patricia

Gingras

r^'fl

'4'4Jackie Cowles and Laura that

a

sense

Cumminos realize washing

of hunnor is necessary while

dishes in the dining hall. ??These workers on

are

putting

last minute touches

the tables before everyone enters the luncheon

Parent's

^At the bookstore, money

as a

Judy O'Leary

earns

is

spending

cashier.

?The intramural referee indicates that

players

on

Day.

shooting a

one

of the

foul shot.

Jobs

on

Campus

45

Most students

are

homeward bound the minute their last

A Different Vacation for When

someone

vacation,"

what

"school think of?

mentions

do

you

Working more hours for extra money? Doing next semester's required readings? Sleeping late and watching TV? Taking a trip to palm-tree land? Or spending time with that special someone? Where do you spend most of your vacation? Students are homeward bound the minute their last exam is But

some students prefer to stay off-campus house during vaca Some long for the peace and quiet of solitude in their own home. Opting for solitude means you can do what you want, when and how you want to do it. Imagine, having no wor ries about waking anyone up in the over.

in their tions.

alarm

Off-Campus

having your roommate's wake you up two hours early.

morning,

or

You can cook what you want to eat and when. If you want to run around your house naked all day, so be it! You can play your favorite jazz album (that

your housemates hate) as loud and as often as you want. When alone, you can think out loud (a nice way of say ing talk to yourself) and sing along with the radio, off key, of course.

Yes, vacations especially when stay around campus alone, are great. Except How many of your friends stay near you

.

.

.

campus for the duration of a school vacation also? Can you count them on one

hand? The

the house to

tranquility of having for a yourself is great ...

B-Jll

^The quad is

never

always before

46

Campus During

Vacation

without

someone

either wall<-

playing frisbee. Not a sou! could be during Spring Break. Ballentine railings are lined with students waiting for the last minute in to class. rushing -

found

exam

is

over

Students

while. It's nice to unwind alone after exam week. But, eventually that need to go carousing at favorite watering holes, and to hear anyone else's voice but your own, becomes overpowering. Now you start to wonder what you doing here, alone, dying for a Miller and a Pac Man fix. So you .

.

.

are

desperately stalk the campus, search ing for any familiar face. You recognize a few faces in the library, but unfor tunately, no one is from your genera tion. The lone secretary walking across the quad looks like the lady you once said "hi." to. Forget it. She'll never remember you. Ah ha! Head for the bursar's or financial aid office. You can always find a few students there slow ly cutting through red tape.

,

-4Every Willows

If

you're lucky, you will eventually run into an aquaintance, strike up a conversation, and make plans for a heavenly night at Willows (or anywhere to end the monotony of Love Boat and Fantasy Island). Did your new-found "best friend" tell you how bored he/she has also been, staying around campus this vacation? Did you both make a pact never to spend your school vaca tions at GRl?

Well, it's finally your big night

out.

packed.

Two

weekend is

packed,

during

Christmas

tion it's

a

elderly

the but

vaca

different story.

men are

asleep

table and the bartender is a book. And the Pac Man machine isn't even plugged in! What

on

a

reading

waste of an evening! You and your friend hit two other, often-called "hot-spots." You finally a

conclude you're living in Zone episode, everyone

a

Twilight

seems

to

have disappeared. Where do all the students who stay around here go during vacation? There has to be one hangout. Too bad you can't find it.

when you

Vacations

stay around canapus

are

great. Both you and your friend are deter mined to have a good time at the Willows. After all, it's a Friday night the place has to be packed! Sure .

.

So you do your time during vaca By day, walk the ghost town like campus, sit and watch the wind swirl an old Cigar across the quad. By night, become a walking T.V. Guide, addicted to popcorn and Tab. But be consoled, at least you'll be relaxed and even anxious to go back to classes when vacation is over. You'll even be glad to see your housemates again. tion.

.

ly

other students in the who are smart enough to to the usual Friday night

there

are

Debbie Canto

area now

scurry

hangout.

Oops! There are only three cars in maybe you're parking lot early? The hours tick by. You keep drinking beer after beer but can't seem to get drunk just when you really need to, to forget how bad this has been. No, Willows isn't night the

...

.

.

.

Campus During

Vacation

47

A cup of

Java,

the

tinkering

of

china, and the trembling of voices.

Every o'clock

Thursday afternoon at 3 sharp, a crowd of students

at the Memorial Onion's television lounge. It wasn't for the devotion of General Hospital or any

gathered

of the

daytime soaps. It was for the Board's Coffee Hour. It's a chance to partake in a free cup of Gnion

coffee, entertainment, and an occa sion to mingle. This social gathering was a

revived tradition from earlier

days

at

URI

when

were

served

coffee

and

the usual afternoon tea. To this ritual, entertainment was added. It provided the talented students on

crumpets

during update

campus with the opportunity to catch a glimmer of local fame. Showcases ranged from dueling

A Revived Tradition

From Earlier

Days.

guitars, jazz bands and dancers to dialogues via the theater depart ment. To every faithful devotee that attended these caffeine breaks, cof fee was what Thursday afternoon could not be without. Linda McFarland

'Jllliy,

Entertainment and

Coffee Stimulate

Happy

Hour

Coffee Hour

49

Aldrich Second Annual Dorm

students

50

Dorm

Olympics

together during

the softball

Takes]

Olympics

TAt the end of the week

a

cookout

next to

Pond allowed the students to relax and talk results of the Dorm

Ellery

over

the

Olympics.

Dorm

Olympics

51

1

as easy as it looks. The object was pass the orange with using just your chin and chest.

?^It's not

?The

pool offered

a

variety

dorms. Here the females have the 50 meter.

52

Dorm

Olympic

of

just

races

between the

left the blocks for

Dorm

Olympics

53

? A Chi O. of the

54

Greek Week

Fiji,

Blueberry

and Theta Delta Ch: Pie

Eating Contest

held in

Keaney

AZ, SX, ZBT Capture

Greek Week Title

?

Showing off their trophy is Alpha Xi place for the sororities at Greek Sing.

Delta's conductor who

brought home

first

Greek Week

55

?Sigma Delta Tau's Greek Sing conductor encourages

for their

her

grand

? Steve

A

JMj^H

1

A^

chorus

finale.

Servant

r^mHB^- J

is

^^Oj^s

IM

M*tb

K^HI^^P^^^K?

56

Greek Week

Greek Week

57

ACADEMICS

T Thousands

of

college students

demonstrate in

against Reagan's student loan and federal aid budget

1 ^\ p D Qv

Events That Left

IMPRESSIONS

,

Washingtoi

cuts.

/r

HrND5

MILITARY

'TN*. A mid-summer

night's

dream. This

captures the romantic and enchanting aura

surrounding

the culmination of

romance of the decade, the royal wedding between Prince Charles and Lady Diana. The pageantry and ex quisite detail of the occasion received total media attention and captured the

the

hearts of millions of viewers who

en

joyed the chance to share a fragment of a modern-day fairy tale. Another wedding ceremony, while more bourgeoisie, captured just as large an audience. Luke and Laura, the soap opera king and queen from General Hospital, were officially wed, despite disapproval of other cast members. Soap opera mania hit col lege campuses around the nation for another year,

GRl included.

Buttons,

bumper stickers, and tee-shirts, to name just a few, publicized the popularity of "the soaps." Some marriages, however, ended in

60

National Events

tragedy. The drowning death of inter nationally renowned actress Natalie Wood

stunned

and

saddened many people. John Belushi, another wellknown actor, who had the gift of mak ing people laugh, died of an overdose of cocaine and heroin. On the international scene, a great world leader who made his mark on in Middle East. The and of warmth, personality, courage the man, Anwar Sadat, president of Egypt, made his assassination even more shocking and sorrowful. Another man with similar leadership qualities earned the respect of the workers whose rights he fought for, and the disdain of the authoritative of ficials he opposed. Lech Walesa, leader of the Polish Solidarity Party, led

history the

as

a

Soviet officials. Americans ex pressed their opposition to the Soviet Government's intervention by placing economic sanctions on Poland. An international jet-setter who sum and

mered in nearby Newport also at tracted the attention of millions. In one of the most spectacular and controver

sial

cases

of the

decade, Claus

von

peace-maker, emerged

strife-inflicted

fellow

workers through strikes, pro tests, and boycotts until he was finally placed in a detention center by Polish

Newsmakers don't have to

be government

leaders to be famous. Bulow was found guilty of attempted murder of his socialite wife, "Sunny." The murder weapon; an insulin-filled

hypodermic the the

needle. The intricacies of

enough to baffle modern-day Sherlock Holmes! case

were

even

The U.S. space shuttle Columbia

f

during

il

National Events

61

Newsmakers

radical, rich,

or

don't

have

to

be

government leaders

to be famous. An unidentified man,

hero in his own right, helped many fellow passengers to safety before drowning in the wintry waters of the Potomac river in Washington, D.C. The plane he was riding in landed in the icy water after crashing into a nearby bridge. Seventy-eight of the passengers were killed, an unfor tunate occurrence which spoiled the holiday season for many American families. Inadequate de-icing of the aircraft was thought to have been the cause of the fatal accident. Sandra Day O'Connor also became famous in 1981, as the first woman to be appointed as a Justice to the United States Supreme Court. She is representative of the women of the '80s; one who balances family life and career development. Beyond the international scope and into the stratosphere, the Gnited States has sent Columbia, its Man Made space shuttle, into space. Launching from its home base. Cape Canaveral, Columbia has orbitted the earth three times, returning with valuable scientific data. The re usability of the space-shuttle is its notable advantage over previously

a

designed spacecraft.

62

National Events

Back idea

of

on

Earth, in some areas, the conquests is absurd;

new

day-to-day

survival in one's home is

the

major challenge. El Salvador, a central American country, has been torn by civil war. The Gnited States is supporting the El Salvadoran government through

both

military

aid

and advice. This controversial situation has been compared to the Viet Nam crisis and has inspired peti tions and protests, reminiscent of that era as well. The situation is

politically

charged as well, with Castro, possibly supported by the Soviets, aiding the rebels who are

opposing the government. Argentina, a neighboring country in this strife-inflicted area, has taken the Falkland Islands, an oil-rich group of islands which is a posses sion of Great Britain. Great Britain dispatched naval aircraft carriers to the islands to regain control. Good and bad all news just over

the

same.

Patricia

1

Bulow. After

mpted ^The funeral

procession

AARescue workers into

a

on

of /

r

Sadat

in Wash.. D.C.

1981 marked the first time

AJuly Day O'Connor,

an

on

the Potomac River

commuter-packed bridge

Arizona

a

few months in the

murder of his

was

Newport Superior Courl.

wife. Sunny.

October 10, 1981 in Cair.

secure a on

rope to the

fuselage

of the Air Florida

jet

that slammed

January 13, 1982. to serve on the

appointed appointed by President Reagan.

a woman was

Appeals Judge

Gingras

U.S.

Supreme Court- Sandra

National Events

63

Hands-on

Experience Students Gain Experience Outside Classroom

(JRl offers more than 80 curricula but a few of them cannot be taught completely in the classroom. The ones that cannot stress hands-on ex perience as a major part of the learn

ing

process. Some of these courses of study nursing, dental hygiene, phar macy, education, fashion merchan

are

dising,

and

journalism.

Students

enrolled

in

these

cur

spend many hours doing ex actly what they will be doing once they get their degrees. Along with attending classes at (JRl, nursing students spend 5 of ricula

semesters going to local hospitals for up to 12 hours a week to practice clinical techniques. Nursing students practice general nursing at the local hospitals. They also witness several operations and help a woman through pregnancy and birth before they graduate.

their

Student nurses often deal with life death situations at the hospitals and they are often called upon to ap or

their academic knowledge. The dental hygiene program is also based on learning by doing. Stu dent dental hygienist spend 12 to 16 hours a week working on students' local and elementary school children's mouths. They also prac

ply

on anyone else who may want have their teeth cleaned in the Dental Hygiene Clinic in Washburn Hall. and associate's ORl offers bachelor's degrees in dental hygiene. It is the only school in Rhode Island offers that programs in dental

tice

to

hygiene. Students in the program practice mannequins and each other for the first semester of clinical techni During the next three ques. semesters, they work on the public. on

64

Hands-on

Experience

'

VDT's allow students

^^?At 7am, clinical at the ^The Dental TChris

nursing hospital.

on

Hygiene Clinic allows

Capozzoli

The

students hav

works

Cigar

slaff to prepare the final copy

board the bus that takes I

the students to get

during a micro-processor

experience

patients.

on

lab.

^?The Pharmacy students gain experience through the internships they havi

Students enrolled in the education are required by law serve an internship of one full

in

extemships and clerkships at GRl. pharmacy students have complete another 750 hours in an

program at (JRl

After that,

to

to

internsliip

semester.

The

students teach in public Student teachers are not allowed to take other courses or jobs the semester of student during teaching except for a seminar every schools.

Saturday

morning

that

during

semester.

Students

gradually

get

more

A few of them cannot be

taught

in the classroom. responsibilities as the semester pro Student teachers learn gresses. about teaching activities, but mostly discipline. The pharmacy

GRl

program an extensive program for out-ofthe-classroom studies. Pharmacy students can spend up to 750 hours has

a

total of

before they can take their state board exams for licensing. involve

seven

weeks of

techniques,

case

studies,

Clerkships clinical

making recommendations to doc tors, researching and labs. Externships involve filling prescriptions. In ternships are completed outside of GRl in pharmacies and hospitals. Journalism majors at GRl are not required to fulfill internships but many do. Many aspiring journalists work during the summer at local newspapers or wire services. Journalism students can also get some hands-on experience by work ing for The Good 5< Cigar, which is published 4 times a week. Students who wish to write more in-depth or

longer

articles

can write for the GRl's com and art mentary magazine, publish ed once in a while.

Great

at

which makes

1,500 hours of out-of-the-classroom

experience

Swamp Gazette,

Kimberly

B. Potter

Will

Spring

Ever Arrive?

y^^:^ just

the road. Instead of the usual melting time, though, it took only 2 or 3 days to melt this

This

snow

"If you don't like the weather in New England at the present time, wait 5 minutes and it'll change." phrase has been aptly applied for many years, but never than in reference to this past winter at GRl. The winter started off innocently

sprinkling of temperatures, ice, and general

enough, cold

with the usual

plows

were on

away, because the

snowed, the

things spring

to

day after it warming

out

was

40. It seemed like here to stay. got used to spring, we

over

was

Just

sun

as we

bad weather. Toward the middle of a turn for December

December, though, it took the

worse.

The

snowstorm that reminded us all that was here dumped a number of inches of "The White Stuff" on us. As usual, it took a virtual eternity to melt away. The remainder of the winter pro gressed rather normally, without much of a problem. Then came March. Gsually at this time of the year we begin to think about spring cleaning, laying out, and the

winter

beautiful

summer

thoughts. Mother

sun.

Despite our dropped a

Nature

11/2 foot blanket of snow over GRl. Enter all the gruesome details of winter. Classes after noon were

cancelled, parking bans were put in to effect statewide, and the snow-

The December snowstorm that

remincied winter

us

was

all that

here.

were blessed with a sneak preview of the summer ahead. Just days after the March snowstorm, the temperature soared to near 80, and not a cloud could be seen. Of course, as we have come to ex pect from New England, the good weather was short-lived. Let's wait and see what summer has in store.

Robert

Jeffrey

^^^During Spring Weekend and everyone pulled out their Ellery Pond.

the temperatures

blankets and head

ed to

^^Once the mud dried up and the grass turned some quad was packed with students

green, the I

-^The entire campus turned white in the middle of March

as

predicted

flurries turned into

an

unexpected

able lo do homework.

It

Might Just Get You

Off the Hook Has there ever been a time when you needed to come up with a good exciise for missing a test, not handing in your homework on time, or you just didn't feel like going to class? Well never fear. We have just the ingredients to cook up the perfect excuse. What you are about to read is a list of the best excuses compiled

throughout 1982,

which

Professor SOand 1 had

a

family

were

actually

SO, you're

not

used

by

our

peers.

to believe it

going

but

.

.

.

crisis and I had to go home.

I waited in line for 2 hours to get James

Taylor tickets.

brother tried to commit suicide and 1 had to go home to visit him at the men tal ward every Tues. and Thurs. (Gsed to get out of a course after drop/add was

My

over.) I had to leave

early

to go away for the weekend.

My grandmother died! My

night and 1 had to take her to the concussion, which took time away from my studies.

roommate fell down the stairs last

to see if she had

a

1 shut my alarm off in my

hospital

sleep. only

time I

I called my professor and told him I had too many tests and reports due in and that 1 couldn't handle the pressure and was freaking out!

a row

I had to make up an could have taken it.

exam

for

chemistry

and your class

period

was

the

My grandfather died! Someone borrowed my notebook and

never

returned it,

so

I couldn't

study for

my test.

My

brother left the house and

1 had

My

car

trouble

on

forgot

to wake me up.

the way to school.

roommate left the house with the

have

an

keys

to my

I have to miss every Thurs. class because I because 1 feel it is my duty.

I had The

an

car

in her

pracket

and 1 didn't

extra set with me.

eye doctor's

electricity

sing

at the church with old

people

appointment.

went off in our house

during

the middle of the

night

which set

our

clocks back 2 hours.

My I

gas gauge is broken in my car, and 1 didn't realize how much 1 had in my of gas half way to school.

tank;

ran out

My housemate's dog has fleas and somehow he got into my bed while 1 was sleeping. 1 woke up the next morning very itchy and once 1 saw that dog on my bed 1 realized I had fleas and I had to go to the doctor's that morning. I

slept

late.

1 went to Ceasar's last

night

and met this

girl

named Sandra

NEED 1 SAY

MORE?!

PP^

tj passed RoJo's

on

my way to class and fell victim to the

scintillating

aroma

of

Hthe bake shop. It I

was

above 60 F and the

sun was

out.

smoked my homework.

inadvertantly

My grandparents

died!

I broke up with my girlfriend last night. I was I just couldn't concentrate on my studies. I received my

Pennsylvania.

so

disconsolated and

depressed

that

license yesterday, so I decided to do a cross country flight to On the way home we ran into a snow storm and we couldn't fly

pilot

back. I had to drive my aunt and uncle to the

airport.

1 had to

babysit for my sister because her husband for the removal of his gallstones. I

was

I

thought

I

just didn't feel

sick with the flu and I the

assignment like

was

was

going

was

admitted into the

hospital

unable to get out of bed.

due next Thurs. instead of Tues.

to class.

broke down and 1 had to hitch to the nearest gas station which ended up to be 5 miles down the road in the opposite direction.

My

car

hit by a car and I had to take Fefe to the Canine Inn she broke both of her hind legs.

My dog got 1

was

at the

cat was

I had I

an

AGAIN!

pregnant and I had

interview with three

thought

class

was

to deliver the kittens.

top firms. (Senior)

cancelled!

It was my 20th birthday and my friends threw a and 1 had the worst hangover the next morning.

Lightning

because

Cigar until 4 a.m. the night before.

My grandmother died; My

hospital

hit my house and threw off all the

surprise party

for

me

that

night

electricity.

My roommate had an attack at 1:30 in the morning and we had to rush her to the hospital and we didn't get out of there until 3:00 a.m., and I was too tired to go. I had

an

away basketball game.

During a test if you feel hope that you will faint. It

was a

holy day

of

you don't know what's

obligation

going

on, hold your breath and

and I had to go to church.

I missed my exam because my plane was 4 hrs. delayed from Spring break and 1 didn't get home until 5 a.m. and I couldn't take the test the next morning. I

was

too tired!!

studying in the library all morning for the test and I fell up I realized I missed your class. 1

was

asleep,

when I woke

My grandfather died; AGAIN!! Christine Byrne

'-if^^i'^-^ff^'tntama

University Library: More Than

a

Collection of Books

Fill out

Registrar loses your Drop-

a

financial aid

yy> CX

u

.y E

ro

<u

o

ti

3 o

3 _: o = >,Xl

w

>-

start.

Drags.

THE COLLEGE GAME

fv^ '

'

To play this game, you must be a full-time undergraduate student. You start with a few thousand dollars and a financial aid application. Place your

ro

-5

2

your Aid. Go to withdrawal office.

Pick up 3 Bummer

Qo back to

Start Here

Miss Deadline lose

Add Form.

application

dollar

sign at financial aid. Every time you roll the dice,

you that number of spaces, and follow the directions on that space. Money cards worth $1000 each are to be picked up whenever you are directed to do so. move

T3 QJ

o

i >

^ c

2i

a

'^

'^

^

ro

.y

> CQ CX

-

w

o

b

y..

2

> T3

o TD

are

to

be

picked

tn

pharmacy student). The first one to go around the board enough times, owe at

C

2

i

Q

least $20,000 and have no money cards gets the diploma and wins. 'QH^

C C

<o

3

^ E

.y

3

CX

Kimberly

B. Potter

i: CX DQ

has

your wrong Social

Security number. Pick up 2 Bummer

Drags.

College Game

cards

draw in order to get rid of it. This way, you can keep track of how much money you owe by how many Bum mer Drag Cards you have. To win, you must go around the board 4 complete times (5 if you're a

ro

Registrar

72

Drag

up as directed. Every time you pick up a Bummer Drag Card, you must put one money card back for each one you

5

a.

u

.x

o

Bummer

-a

Pay

term Bill

go to Bursar Pick up 5

Bummer

Drags.

Get

a

job.

Pick up 4 dollar

cards.

You flunk

Get

a

Work

Study

Job, but you don't have Work

Study.

Go back to start.

Basic grant loses your

psychology

application.

withdrawal

Back to Start.

office. Give it

113. Goto

up now!

to

Star.

lost

mail.

Your

aplicton Bank

in

Go the

back gets Loan

$'; You can't afford

Your award

Bank Loan

heat. Go back to

letter

check

start and

Bummer

pick up 3 Drags.

comes.

Pick up 5 dollar cards.

^ ^

comes

in. Pick up 5 dollar cards.

Ap ly any Can't for Fod. L o a n . Star. Go af ord back Term to

a

to

Short

Bursa'.

buy

Go

back to

your

Bursa

registaon. canels

AJIM CHAPIN:

One

of

the

many lecturers during Political Awareness Week, Jim Chapin spoke about economic and social alternatives to Reagan's Plans. He also discussed the programs and policies of the Reagan Administration, and their effects on society. Jim Chapin is a former professor at Rutgers University, a member of DSOC, and has taken over the role of his brother, Harry Chapin, in fighting World

Hunger. WEDDINGTON: ? SARAH The topic of concern which was offered through her lecture was leadership. Sarah Weddington presented to the audience the

for leadership in every facet of life. Also included was role of the government officials, especially women, in the up coming decade. Ms. Wed dington was a high level aide to President Carter during his concern

administration.

Another's Point of View

AEILEEN STEVENS: A guest at the IFC/Panhel leadership conference, Eileen

speaker

Stevens main

travels to

country

speak

around

the

to Greeks. Her

concern was

to express to

the Greeks the dangers of haz ing. She is not at all against the Greek system, but wants to make the students aware of the effects that dangerous initiation

practices of

a son

may cause. A mother that was killed during

hazing, she is organization

the founder of an which seeks to make the Greek system safe.

-<BILL

RODGERS:

GRl was have one of the greatest marathon runners of our time. Bill Rodgers spoke about running from personal

proud

to

experiences, and conducted a clinic on all aspects of running. He has accrued a record of win ning the Boston Marathon four times.

KING: Dr. Baptist pastor in His main Indiana. Evansville, concern deals with the relations between races. He conducted the seminar in order to bring blacks and whites together to confront their racial attitudes

?DR.

King

CHARLES

is

a

and changes to encourage reconcile any racial tension. Dr. of the Grban King was founder Crisis Center in Atlanta, and is

presently serving

as

president.

TGLORIA STEINEM: One of the Women's Rights Activists, Gloria Steinem was a popular

during Political Awareness Week. Passage of the Equal Rights Amendment was her main topic since Rhode Island was one of the states that

speaker

hadn't passed it yet. Gloria Steinem also spoke on the role of women in past and present societies, and how the state

legislators women's

are

handling

rights.

A

76

Lectures

Learning Experience:

^BELLA ABZUG: One of the speakers of the year, Bella

last

on the policies and programs of the Reagan Administration. A famed women's activist, her topic| dealt with women's rights and| the Equal Rights Amendment.; She is a former O.S. Con-| gresswoman from New York.

Abzug spoke

^TCHRIS EDWARDS: With popularity of religious cults,

the

the former member of Moonies discussed all facets of

a

cult life. Chris Edwards felt it important to inform students about the recruitment process, along with the reason for joining cults. After nine months member

of

the Chris

as

a

Moonies i

Edwards Organization, managed to escape from the-; cult.

Lectures

77

Majors

that get

Security For most incoming freshman and transfer students, one of the biggest

decisions to make is What am 1 going to major in? There are many to and several consider, options students take advantage of this and

change But

their

major every

semester.

that students use is When students are Undecided, they don't have to com mit themselves to take certain re quired courses. Instead they just one

option

Clndecided.

keep taking a variety of courses until they are forced into declaring a ma jor and getting out of University Col lege. You could call this a standard major for those who really don't know why they're here, but they know they belong here. Another option open is the tradi tional

majors

English,

and

like

Education,

Psychology.

These

Students take

change

their

advantage major every

are

and

semester.

majors that people have been taking for years. They are safe with the parents, but not so popular when you start looking for a job. The third option, the one more and more people are going for, is the In Majors. These are majors in newly developing fields, like Computer Science, Engineering, and Business. These majors lead to professions that provide more job security for graduates since the high level of our technological know-how is enabling us to advance tremendously. The competition is tough to get into and the

remain in these curricula, but most feel it is well worth it at graduation. A few years from now there will no longer be such a great demand to be an engineer and most likely

another In the times.

Major

will

prevail

to meet

jobs:

Influences Student's Decision

I

Courses that get A's: SJearch for GPA boosters Another one of those decisions which students must make, but which is more ongoing than a major, Which courses do 1 take next is semester? Sure, you take the re that pertain to your But if you are in desperate need of easy "A" credits, you then Gut search for the well-known

quired

courses

major.

Courses. You begin asking upper classmen about courses which de mand minimal studying, but produce an "A" for such little time and effort. These are the courses that are sup posedly guaranteed cum-boosters. All you have to do is either take the exams or even just go to class and receive the good grade. Bad

you'll

minton, Ballet, or Sailing are just a few of the courses where attendance

usually grants

an

"A."

courses, such as AVS

But

some

201, Theater

100, and Flower Arranging are no longer the typical gut courses. Many students are quickly finding out that the once guaranteed "A" may be hard to find. In choosing a major, don't let the present trends influence your deci sion. Just because engineers are starting around $24,000, it won't be worth it if you're not cut out to be an

engineer. If your GPA needs a little boosting, be wary of those so-called gut

courses

to

fill

division

re

quirements. Some professors no longer want to be associated with teaching such easy courses, foaijj, Robert

Jeffery

Gut Courses

79

Registration: Survival of the Fittest Picture

this:

A

of

multitude

students from all

ty life

aspects of universi gathered together in a fren

are

zy of continuous motion. The air is hot, the noise level tremendous and facial expressions alternate among event students as the chaotic endures. For some this is the event

on

event

sporting social created

campus.

at

isn't

or

an

behavior

social not

Greek

a

Woodstock

Springsteen It

or

Caesar's,

biggest

No, it is

a

super

even

a

re

Bruce

starring

and the E Street Band. student

experiment of conducted

by

the

either. It is

psychology department the bi-annual assembly of students in Keaney Gymnasium for registration. Prior to registration most students encounter

the

process

registration. Pre-registration

of preconsists

""' ''"

t care

people.

about all of the hassles

the first time after the

as

summer.

Most studer

they

see

friends for

of students meticulously arranging their course schedules for the up coming semester and leaving their fate in the hands of Lady Luck as to whether or not they are granted the

they have so carefully Unfortunately, the majority of University students are rarely graced with such favor from the Registrar's Office. Often they find classes

chosen.

short

themselves

of

necessary

credits, fending for themselves, in the world of as

pandemonium

known

registration.

grinned and replied "It's like a club. 1 like it because I've met a lot of giris." However, his positive outlook was not shared by an over whelming number of registration vicchette

big

* ^

Freshman

1",

Elizabeth

Stabley

they preached about being on your own in college, but somehow they left out the part about registration." Carol Valentine, a sophomore, dubb ed registration "a zoo, total chaos, it's disillusioning and depressing." Senate

Student

President

Bill

Guglietta, who played a major part in getting the drop/add period extend ed, explained that popular courses like

Speech

acquire.

When asked what they thought of registration, students had varied opinions. Sophomore Peter Tur-

rv

tims.

commented, "Back in high school

there

are

He

the most difficult to

said, "For Speech 101

were

over

with

843

students

120 seats far as business courses were concerned he laughed, "waiting in the business lines you could probably die."

registered

available"

and

only

as

Registration

81

^Now what

ing

do?

to

McGrath

Sh

and

Lathanare

fused

sophomores

^?Did

block party

a

I

ever seem

fun?

Regi

nothing sion

but

and

fr

students.

Homans is

experiencing

registration for the first

??Patience is for Gordon he

tries

what

a

virtue

Holmquist as figure out

to

courses

he should

be taking.

'^1^v. MS^K^M

r

1

1L

Senior Jim Velino worked inside

and

Thursdays free,

Keaney during spring registration

who

1982

to

and

classified

eight categories:

students

into

"The Quitter"

who throws up his arms in disgust and stomps out of the gym, "The who stands around in Amazed" awe

repeating;

do?",

"The

"What

am I going to Easygoing Up

perclassman" customed

to

the

who is so ritual that

ac

he

conjures

get past

"The

Sneaker,"

up all sorts of stories the doors before his

specified time, "The Emotional who cries and whines mut Type" tering hopelessly, "The Dealer" who makes friends fast according to who is dropping the course he needs, and of course "The Beggar" who stands at the door pleading to get in eariy, offering everything

socializes between course selections, "The Intellectual" who bargains with the professors, trying to arrange his

short of his soul.

schedule in order to have Tuesdays

events.

Many perience

students compare their ex with registration to other

One young

man

said that it

like the New York Stock Ex

was

change. Audrey Gormley compared it's "animal house to an and crazy." A graduate student recalled his first encounter with registration saying that "the at mosphere and confusion haven't changed since the mid-seventies and because of cutbacks in federal spen it

unorganized

we can't provide more courses what a joke!" There seems to be no end in sight. There was, however, one bright spot in all of this. For one it holds very special memories. "I

ding

giri

met

my

boyfriend

of three years

It contains all the action,

love, and suspense of

an

afternoon soap opera.

line. By up I had learned his likes and dislikes and confirmed a dinner date with him." Registration is a melodrama. It now

waiting

the time

we

in the

chemistry

were

all the action, love, and suspense of an afternoon soap opera. There is the hero who refuses contains

to

give

to

all

in to the system and will go ends to attain his required

There is the lady in distress an available seat in any of her classes. There are the villains who sit behind the tables courses.

who cannot find

preying on young students, hoping they'll crack under pressure. There are also amiable helpers who offer help when there is really nothing they can do. Within the walls of registration one can find lovebirds, hear arguments between students, and feel the intense heat of total frustration. There is no need for a college student to prepare himself for, "the real world." All he has to do is spend an afternoon in Keaney

Gymnasium during registration he will experience a true test of

and sur

vival of the fittest. ISina Sue Adams

^LINE

the four letter word of the

day.

r

September 1978, finally the chance to get away from the con finements of home Freedom. A URI freshman with a dorm room, meal book, roommate, and a minifridge full of beer. Everything is a new In challenge dependence. Partying until dawn on Thursday night, struggling across the quad to BIO 101 at 8 a.m. Friday what could be bet ter? Twelve o'clock, phew! Classes are over, meet your bud dies back at the dorm and head for a scrumptious lunch at Ro Jo's?! What's on the agenda for the

hall

to

Pub

happy hour, a Hope, back to the "get ready," blast the

night? quick bite

at

stereo and open the beers. Cram

into the car and head the Willows to meet and with the upperclassmen. After a few months you begin

eight girls for

mingle

who are these peo Greeks? Wearing strange symbols on their sweaters, jackets, and hats what's it all about? Dorm life's to wonder

called

ple

great, but the excitement, events,

togetherness of Greek life intriguing.

and

is

year, the days of dining halls and four walls of ce ment blocks end. Moving on into

Sophomore

an

being a entirely new lifestyle Suddenly having sixty new and being a new mom,

Greek.

sisters,

able to go to breakfast in your PJ's! Formals, socials, chariots, and toga parties. Always someone there to lend a hand. Suddenly those strange symbols mean so very much. Friends are made which last a lifetime, so many memories. Junior year, time passes so quickly, soon the fantasy will end, you'll have to leave the Magic Kingdom and venture into the

V

Real World

but still there's time

explore. Days are filled with classes, meeting, studying, but always leaving time to chat and to

socialize. Greek life has broadened the horizons, so many oppor tunities to become involved and

try

new

things.

Senior year, the end of the URI is near. Traveling on, it's time to go out on your own.

experience

becomes too confining. Just a few miles down the road lies semi-autonomy. You rent a cottage with a friend or two, the closest thing to real independence you can find. The symboled sweaters go in the closet, out come Jean jackets, bandanas, and back packs. No longer are meals prepared for you or does fuel seem an endless supply you must pay the gas, electric, and telephone bills, you must shop for food. Thank God for can openers and Kraft macaroni and cheese.

Campus

Despite the hassles, you relish the chance to be able to walk out of your house, walk to the beach walk to Caesar's or the Willows, and not worry about driving back to campus after a wild keg party DTL. All of your friends, who re

main

on campus, constantly ask ing "When are you going to have It doesn't seem possible. party?" May has arrived your cap and a

gown

is

ordered,

senior

week

tickets

are bought, it's over. Looking back, the past four years have brought you from an anxious and questioning eighteen

year old to an anxious and

experienced

but still

questioning twenty-

year old. College is behind now life in the Real Worid you

one

begins! E. E. McManuus

Seniors

Opening

87

a/^^^-'^c

Opening "Seniors

Marketing

90

Seniors

Abbott

Textiles

Clothing

and Rel. Art.

Cynlhia

1 ^ 1

9

'iS-'

fi M Marketing

Zoology

G.

Aspry

tt-

-w

Donalda M. Azzinaro

Accounting

Azzinaro

Seniors

91

Snow?

^ain TomcrS/? ^^M

ll

SB B 1

-.:^.i|| L 9S ^^%wk.jjy| ^-'

isa

am ^^^^^ H

P

Agrlc. and Res. Tech.

92

Seniors 'Babich

Joanne L. Textile

Berger Marketing

Berger

"Seniors

93

Seniors

Moving In Berlanga

e

90, all moved

outl^

Beth C. Bodek

Catherin R. Bodell Natural Resources

Bouley Moving In Seniors '

95

96

Seniors

Moving In Bourret

Nelson S. Burbank

''""nn.ocT

Computer

^

Science

Accounting

B1s Wi ^

m

IS&I

Laura B. Burns

hill

^JL

S

1 K ^>^

\

I1

^^ 1 Caizzi

Moving

In

Seniors

97

Freshman Orientation, a bundle of nerves confused by linen lines, roommates, new friends, university col

lege, dining hall food and often a workshop leader you could kill for. Throughout the confus

ing

day

we

were

con

fronted by many of these new and not so wonderful traumas, all to go unno ticed as we watched our leader. Dining hall food was a treat we all dreaded in September while our leader was incentive enough for us to come back. We can all be thankful that we didn't have to wear the freshman beanies or face the hazing from up

perclassmen

common less than 20 years ago. At the end of orientation all of our classes were

chosen, all forms had been filled

out

and

tours had been

A

E.

Capalbo

Joanne D,

Capet

feeling

of

campus

completed. unity with

peers and excitement for September to arrive. Jim Velino

Seniors

Orientation

Calcagni

Cascione

Orientation

Seniors

99

IOO

SeniorsOassella

Pam

Clary

jt

^'

Gary B. Coffey Political Science

Sharon A. Clinton Natural Resources

f }

"

in

Ibfl %

Stephen A. Coffey

Pharmacy

i%

m^

Lorri Cohen

w u Collins

Seniors

101

102

Seniors

Collin

1

ff

^^^^1 Elizabeth G. Ci

f' % %

'ff

mm Craddock

Seniors

103

Miller and Quarters,

...

Do

they

Donald E. Cressman Ind Engineering

Political Scien.

_^^M^

fs

J,

1

ma

1 ^m

^^ 104

Seniors

Craddock

^'%"kZT'"

Hrslory

^^H'

\#

-v-

Ma^mgrmenUnlTys

'"""SycfK*..)'"'""

WM^^^gf/gggM

^^P^ l,^^/ :** ]

"''"

>

.

['IZm

^Hr^^^^^l

B^0 Christopher

Davis

Jeffrey

W. Dav!

DeCristoforo

Seniors

1 05

106

Seniors

Going Out Deeb

'^^"u

M

Desjarlais

^k l^iLOt

Jenn fer DiClemente

^M

I"

Leslie A. DiMictielle

Stephen

W. DiMuccio

Civ and Environ.

natural Resources

Eng.

^m^io^^M ^^H^ '^^^^1

mm MiM

lr^'*''^i^l

IH iM Friday Night?

^'3!^P1

Lori E Dinerman

Mutn.ion

Darrell M.Diniz Business Administration

^S ^^V iS bH

:;il ^

^ .1-

LM

Caiherini: A.DiRain

DiRaimo

Going

Out

Seniors

107

f Mary

Jane

e

DiSpirito

E,

Doheny

f James C. Donohue

^.uonorjue Engineenng

# Kathy Donovan '

BfiHB ySBm Gerald T. Doran

Computer

^^^9

^^^^^1

Political Science

108

Seniors

Going

Out

DiSpirito

Science

#.

f-

LHHi HHl J^ Michael S.

Pamela J. Mech.

Duffy

Engineering

.

f

M him^

Melissa A. Dreibelbls

Doyle

Jerry 1. Duhamel Agri. and Res. Tech.

WMM ^9'm\ -mlmm K^H m^M ^4mtmmM

^ ^r

John Dunne

$ Civ. and Env.

Lisa A. Durland

Michael Durniak Jr.

Pharmacy

Accounting

#x \

% n

t

Jay Dwyer

-# 1

^H

.J# f

T

Eng.

Eiffert

Going Out Seniors

1 09

BP^SiM ^^^^^^^Hft

1

H

H

^B^HSk*^^"^:^9

Stephanie Essex Political Science

'

^^^^^H^-'

1 10

Seniors

"Eley

'"^"'

'

'

'^'HBV^^feA

m

'mf^^^^^^^ .^^HE^F

ffl

^

V

f-^

Linda Etter

t;

James M. Falcone

Anthony

Mariteting

Ja

n

Mech.

V. Fandetti

Engineering

#

n

'""pharmacy'""

^

Tif ;p

Michael J. Fanning Finance

f

Nursing

f'

^ mm LuisM. Fernandes

Fierro

Going Out Seniors

111

Interviewing Do s Getting When

keep

an

the

right look

you're getting ready for an interview eye out for the following faux pas!

shoe

an

interview

check the total

< DOM'T go to view.

& Don 'ts

for

an

interview

picture and checking

the full

be prepared: carry extra nylons, and scissors to trim excess threads.

Always polish

< DON'T exaggerate small details. Excessiveness with accessories clutters the total look. Don't ignore the bot-

tomline

1 12

Seniors

Interviewing

Finke

skirt must

cover

knees.

Furio

Interviewing Seniors

113

114

Seniors

Fusaro

Elizabeth Gerencser

Qlrvan

Seniors

115

1 16

Seniors

Giuttari

Guglietta Seniors

1 17

1 18

Seniors "Guilbert

Pol. Form, in Orb. Env.

^ ^m Robert

^

1 *

t\ t

Harringti

Robert G.

Healey

Healey-Seniors

119

120

Seniors -Hearne

Jane F.

Horiagon iMech.

W

Engineering

l;^W

^

f \ Harold M. Horvat

Raymond T. Horogo English

Paula A. Houle

^1 Donald J Mat u ral Resources

wMn Robert A Howes

Indus.

Engineering

Human Dev.

James B, Hunter

Another

day, another class.

Hutchings*

Seniors

121

Anita Job Career

Planning

and Placement

221 Roosevelt Hall

Kingston, RI 02881 (401)792-2311 Career

To

Objective:

background

obtain

an

entry

and

level

management position using my educational

personal experience

to

secure a

position

in any

aspect of

business. of Rhode Island, Administration

Rhode Island

1982 B.S. Business

Education:

University

Related

Administrative Assistant (i.e. Secretary) Wakefield Shop, Wakefield, Rhode Island 1981-82. Coordinated and prepared daily schedule for senior ad ministrator. Supervised and maintained office atmosphere.

Experience:

Kingston,

Inventory Clerk (i.e. stocked shelves) Job Lot, Wakefield, Rhode Island 1980-81. Responsible for all units ordered. Arranged, controlled, installed, reorganized goods. Advanced to the position of senior stockperson.

maintained and

Governess (i.e. babysitter) Rosecliff, Newport, Rhode Island supervised youngsters that visited during formal occasions. Structured daily programs.

Professional

Memberships:

Activities in College:

Advertising Club, Spring 1982; American JVlarketing Association, Spring 1982; Finance Club, Spring 1982; Insurance Club, Spring 1982; Investment Club, Spring 1982; Management Club, Spring 1982, Management Science Club, Spring 1982. Little

Brother/Little Sister, Student Entertainment Committee Student In Organization, Student Lecture Series, Union Board, Weekenders, Center, Young Business Women of America, Rhode Island Public Interest Research Group.

terest

Womens Crisis

Island only), Sailing, Musical Instruments, (recorder). Skiing

Traveling (Rhode

Photography (one step instamatic), (Yagoo), Swimming, Sewing, Biking,

Cooking. I. Wanda Work Memorial Union Information Desk (401) 792-2056 Bis Ness Ballentine Hall (401) 792-2003 Joe Graduate Alumni Affairs, Davis Hall (401) 792-2242

n

f

^

^.

f:

t

M

Steven C. Jensen

Jones

Seniors

123

124

Seniors

Jordan

DUB Kleinman

Seniors

125

Ovil and Envir

126

Seniors

Klenkel

Engi

Ij>sl

'Tiijiu^ci-iammfng. _.

Lar^f ord

Sentors

1 27

v.-

%.r Lauren

Y

aniz

Management

Science

-ff'

A W^

?^

Ramon Ledoux

Civil and Envir,

128

Seniors

Lantz

Eng,

Cynthia

C.

Levesqui Political Science

-^^^^r^* (V^^H^^HVv JB^^B^^^

Barbara E, Lew it I

Lonczak

Seniors

129

Hi

boys

girls. I'm Mr. Rogers neighborhood.

and

and welcome to my

Today,

I'd tike you to meet

my friends. now

of

some

They're very happy right they're going through a

because

event In their lives.

big

Can you say Good. The

graduation?

they're so happy is they've survived the trauma

reason

because

of senior year.

Can you say welcome to the real world? Good.

Many seniors went through the emotionally trying times of inter views. Some even landed jobs through these interviews. Can you say thank God they're over? Good. But

prefer

some

to

prolong their by going

entrance into the real world to

grad

school.

Can you say

getting

a

they'd

be better off

job?

Good. I have heard many stories of the trauma of senior year and would like to

relate

to you.

some

favorite

My told one

me

from

comes

Business Administration

a

major. He

about all the fun he had in

of his classes.

Can you say

Management 410?

Good. Another

good

one

she

from

comes

friend of mine about how

a

nervous

her first interview.

was on

Can you say coronary arrest?

Good. Another story I heard

One

graduation.

realized that this

was

student

was

about

finally

the end of his

education and he would have to go out and work for a living.

Can you say culture shock? Good.

college for?

But after all what is Can you say

party?

Good. Well

time 1

boys and girls,

some

of

hope you

not, you

take

can

more

us

this is the last

will meet.

all make it out there. If

always

courses.

come

Can

back and you

say

good luck? Good. John Richard

Anihony

Macro

Jennifer Maculiewicz

Psychology

B

a

"-"">"'='

Deborah

Maque

0

Marble

Seniors

131

132

Seniors

Marchetti

McFadden

Seniors

1 33

Michael W. Medei

134

Seniors

McGarty

PI^IESA Joann M. Mitchell

Mitchell -Seniors

135

136

Seniors

Old Buildings

Mizner

B^1 Nagel -Old Buildings .Seniors

137

138

Seniors -Old

Buildings -Nangle

Ouimet

Old

Buildings

Seniors

1 39

i 40

Seniors

Old Buildings

Pacheco

.^ t' rv^ Kl a

Sarah B.

Pennington

Geography and

Mar. Aff.

Lori J, Penso

Accounting

Christine E. Perry Textiles

Michael Petrarcha

m1^B^BB Pirrello

Old

Buildings Seniors

141

Mari( Princevalie

,T 142

Seniors

Pistacchio

>1

'^ I

*

Christoper Quinn Management

Mark G. Rafanelli Biomedical Elec. Engr.

Scott P. Rabldeau Natural Resources

Colleen A.

Rafferty Accounting

Peter C Rainone Natural Resources

Barry B. Ralston Malural Resources

Cynthia

A, Ramadei

Pharmacy

Carlotta Ramono ^

Rapp" Seniors

143

Ellen C. Ratner

Peter Rathburn

Reminiscence of Freshman year.

144

Seniors

Rasmanis

# Twas the

night before Chri

Stephen

#.

A. Read

Bf

?

Resnick

Seniors

145

1 46

Seniors

Reyes

Sadlier" Seniors

147

Dear Mom, I'm behind a few credits so I've decided to go to school during the summer up. 1 promise to hard and pass the courses so 1 can graduate on time. Most likely I'll be

to catch

study

In Wakefield part Don't worry about

working time. me.

Beach In the afternoon.

morning. Biking Into

town.

Dear Mom, Tom also decided to live on campus this summer. He decided to buy a boat and make money quahogglng all summer. 1 bought books today and my started some homework. It's kind of boring around here. It's not at all like the

Lots of

volleyball,

parties,

Dark

community cooking.

and

Dear Mom,

Finishing up

course

my

and 1 think I did pretty well. I found someone on the hall who took the course already, so he helped me study. I'll be moving back home for a

now

weeks next

few

Can you me? Last

days

shadows

on

are

come

Sunday. and

get

the beach and the Boxes

getting longer.

reappear and clothes get packed. Rooms are emptied and good

byes are said. September feelings in August. Time to say good-bye

semesters.

regular

food and cooking In the hot plates. Lettuce Is cheap and creamy cucumber salad dressing is addictive. Days

Buying

spent

Hall

friends.

tans and frisbee elbow.

Moving In. New friends, old ac quaintances. Guys in Butterfield. Gids In Bressler. Classes In the

rooms

slow pace.

Easy living,

to the beach.

on

hitching

Narragansett

to

Weekends beach. spent at Willows. Hotel living without the ladles. cleaning Dear Mom, I passed my first

day seem

.

.

.

to

Dear Mom, I'm back at school

ing

to

stretch

again, try

summer

into

campus for a while, but now millions of people are moving In. 1 wish I couid go back to summer liv

fall. It

ing

was our

at URI.

exam to

barely. I can't study anymore.

Audrey Hill Bryant

Tom

There is too much to do around here In the sum mer.

My

tan Is

really shap

1 gotta go We're all going to the Fleet. the of Blessing

ing up though. now.

Geography

and Mar. Aff.

1

'J/^gB^

hmibh ^^HFi9HH

IM

$ A$ .* V r

^mtf

*

Terri E, Schulman

Abby L. Schwartz Accounting

veronica Schwar.

%

Bi; Psychology

Sciacchetano" Summer Life "Seniors

149

150

Seniors

Sciotti

Snyder Seniors

151

152

Seniors

Soletsky

Oh, what

1 54

Seniors

Sullivan

a

beautiful morning

Tudino

Seniors

1 55

The moment we've all Ugh dreaded. Good Intentions at the of a fresh new semester soon start comes to a screaching halt. Long awaited hours in the library, union .

.

.

study lounge, side just for a in hand. Any break

a

trip

book

arrived.

for a quick a chat, quick Campus Cones is greatly ap

excuse

to

Cookies

Then back for some in tense cramming. There comes a nerve-racking moment a few

preciated.

hours before the exam when one has a gut feeling that he should have gone to more classes, done the readings, taken better notes and visited the

156

Seniors- Finals "Turchetta

professors

Items in your short-term memory. the moment we've all

Finally tensely

comfortably

minute with

more

The clock ticks on and becomes more frantic memorize those last few

studying trying to

out

for coffee,

snooze, or

and

or

often.

been

waiting

for

has

last The drudge to the classroom is both a joyful and miserable experience. It will be the last time

dealing

with that

material, but yet it is

not

course

fully

over

with.

Before the exam begins, sweaty palms and a blanking memory are well remembered. But, one must think in a few hours It will all be over and oh, what a relief that is.

Webster 'Finals Seniors

157

f

Wa

Kevin J We

TnT"

n^ W^

f

158

Seniors

Finals

Webster

Cynthia

L. Welmore

Scott J,

Ed,

Mech.

Physical

4 9

Whatmough Engineering

# ^

WiN,a,C. Wilcox

'^""iLtZl"'""

Tammy

Accounting

C.Williams

Tracy M.Williams

Mariteting

Computer

Science

H[ 19 B Pi PB F^ n^ ^py H ^ Geography

and Mar. Aff.

Wilson

Finals

Seniors

159

Elec

Engineering

Ind,

Engineering

WM PI ^^^aL ^..* ^^^a

wB^^M kM

a^^ &fl 1 60

Seniors

Finals

Wilson

Zuba

Finals

Seniors

161

162

Seniors

Senior Week

Senior Week

Seniors

163

164

Seniors

Medieval Din

Boston

Seniors

165

A

cooler,

Cruise

ticket

signed was

all

and

waiver

that

was

Bi nei

Wednesday night in Galilee. 900 senii together once again, this time Hawaiian Cruise. We toured the shorej of Jamestown and Newport four hours. Dressed

appropria'

rival with Hawaiian shirts and leis bundled

other's

ai

in

sweater^^^ coats

and

ying

^^,^jl^tep'i?^gStone recover

:;

from the

tinued 'their

pick-up

we

faced the Clambake

Stables. Some used this time to

night before

while others

con

week-long party. After a great lunch volleyball and baseball began and

games of

others dozed in the

<

Clambake Seniors

167

The first Den into linens

a

were

served.

Seniors

Champagne

brought out

Champagne

celebrated

168

early day activity transformed the Ray classy dining atmosphere. The <?hina

as we

Brunch

and

an

toasts

abundance of food to

graduation

relaxed and enjoyed

our

meat

was

wer^j

Commencement Ball

Seniors

169

Senior

Directory

Bagguet Bagllnt.

f

ClpollB. William J.: 3 Appfe

I

^Wy<:((off.NJ 07481

170

Senior

Directory

^^ ^-^^k

Senior

ames

Directory

M,; 224 Ridgebury Road. Ridgerieli

lty,I

Eky. Stephen

,

J

Azin; 37 Lower College I

;ylaB.:

4

Cypress Lane,

DiQlacinto. Luigia

Senior

Direclory

171

Senior Flgarsky. Philip; 15

Directory

Hotlli

.hjrdRo.id,

Rocky Hill, CTO

^slynAvenuP. Provi, LeighwnBlvd.Curr

g>,N ipbJ

ney C; 73 : 758

Bustiy

^ ill Rood.

Kingston Av

Granby. CT 06005

=309, Oakland. C A 94611

cph; 91 Legion Wa y, Cranston. Rl 02910 I, An aL.; 14 JohnStrw 1 Extension, Westerly. Rl 021

O.Jo

o'jo 3orshfleld. MA 02050

Senior Directory

born A.; 36

Evergr

^.r/cmrcToTf"

Senior

Directory

i. Mystic. CT 063S5

.;C/OBEatDnl Spring:

(alander. Jonathan V.; Seaside

Kelley. Colleen M.:

Kelly.

D^v^ox

ILedgev

Maureen E. 9Courtw

Kelly. Bndet 53 WesivJew Kelly. SahT.: 159 Brown S Kelly, Stephen P.; 46 Plea san Kelty, Ttaolhy M.; rneikle A KeUy.

irby.

Trevor. M.: I

Chester A.;

2Seasca

SSHBian

jr*in. Karteen A.t 150

R.

Eustisffienue.Nei?port. Rl

i

Senior Directory

1 73

Senior

Directory

ui\t,t^fUi, HarragBtitbtt, f edeilarRoad. MysricCl

Margaret

98 Oc

^ ^^<

Mlehelftti, Paula A.; Poppas

mondP.;35[nm

K

174

Senior Directory

331

.

WcitKlnastoniRJ 02892

k 8.; 1 10 Sharon

St.. Provtdw>ee.ia

0

Senior

Directory

Rego, Lynn M.; 30 Sparfo* lane. Sorm n

o.pt.r.J.itM.:22

r,dtr.M.,,F.;CI.,rk wartz,

Abby L.; 10

S

Valley Dnv,-,

Plants

oII,.o<1A "'"muMi.ttl

Spirito, Andrea;

SH:i?

Splrlto. Steven C; 47 Ledgewc Spin. Howard J.; 36 Long Bow

son.

II. DavMT.; 104 Fore. iDi ry. n.rctoF.:5Winlp

MountK

Sl.. Wob.n.

5CD.

>

N

NJ 07630

1CS49

^sG^lwich.Rl

309 Yoakum F

Sposato. Palrlck C; 30B Cent Bprague, Lawrence E.: Darby St. jBcqoea, Cynthia A.; 64 0

Senior

Directory

175

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F"

^

"'CSi^k-,

ORGANIZATIONS

Hi

Senate: Where

Changes Begin The Student Senate has say about what goes are

not

merely

where

place happen.

a

lot to

at GRl.

They figurehead, but a changes begin and on

a

The Student Senate allows students to take an active roll in the process of GRl. The Senate also allows students the op portunity to work with matters such

decision-making tuition,

as

budget

allocation,

academic concern, organize forums and work as a liaison between facul ty and student. Within several own

the Senate, there are committees, each with its

concentrations

and

interests.

The Senate is also

funding

over

responsible for 60 organizations at GRl. 1982 student

194

Student Senate

Body President

Bill

Guglietta

A Selective Guide to the a of R.I. Rampages is the handbook distributed The book is

official on a

student basis.

yearly

informative guide ex plaining what GR! offers to each stu dent and an aid introducing general an

aspects of the Gniversity. Freshmen and transfer students will

given a copy of Rampages during the summer orientation program, while the rest of the student body can pick be

up

a

copy in the fall.

Except for Rules and Regulations, Rampages is completely written and edited by undergraduates and is published by the Student Senate in cooperation with the Office of Student Life. As a guide to life at GRl, the goal of Rampages is to help students make the most of their years at GRl.

Polly

Polly

Barnes and Gil Poulin, 1982 editors of the

Barnes

Rampages

Student Servicers Kingston Student Services is ex actly that: an organization that serves the students of Kingston. KSS is responsible for the Hostel, the Book Co-op, sound and lighting for concerts, plays, parties, the Record Co-op, and concessions at movies

or

social functions.

Rampages

KSS

195

Healtliy

Munchies

The Alternative Food Co-op is located in the basement of Roosevelt Hall. It is a student-run organization that sells health foods; including grains, flours, cheese, dried fruit, produce, natural sweetners, herbs, teas, spices and nuts. The members of the Co-op attend an orientation meeting about the organiza tion and spend time working there. The Co-op also sponsors health workshops, nutrition information and

cooking

classes.

C.H.E.A.R.S. Services

Campus Community C.H.E.A.R.S. located on the fourth floor of Roosevelt Hall, is an outlet for information on education of alcohol use for the entire campus. This non-profit organization has a staff of 30 volunteers, an alcohol

educator,

a

counselor,

a

secretary,

and

a part-time director. C.H.E.A.R.S. is funded by the Na tional Institute of Alcohol Abuse Awareness. It provides workshops,

referrals, films, a drop in center, guest lectures, individual and group

counseling,

196

Food Co op C.H.E.A.R.S,

and

a

hotline.

^t'^rk^ u. f^^ ^^'^,,

ill'i4

i

A

i .^

r^'V

8F S^SS

1

V

World World

Tlie

P^

L

through

W 1

Committee, activities, helps to

Hunger

numerous

students on hunger. It also raises money for Oxfam America which world countries. third helps On November 19th 1981 the commit tee urged students to fast for world Students gave their dinner harvest. meal-tickets for that evening and the pro $2700 were donated to Ox about ceeds,

fam America. The World Hunger Committee also donated to the refugee relief in El

i

The Best Bread and

Fight Hunger

educate

^

frw r

_/_

Students

Salvador.

Soup

You'll Ever Have SOUPKITCHEN: a place to have the best homemade soup with everything in but the kitchen sink! Enjoy fresh baked breads with a variety of spreads All for just a donation.

it

Many students spend Saturday lun ches at the Catholic Center. After one bowl of veggie-noodle soup, you almost have to go back for seconds. Even when Father Chew puts too many peppercorns in the soup, you manage to cool off your tongue with a drink and risk not tsiting another peppercorn. And the delicious aroma of fresh baked bread

always

floats out of the kitchen. Socializing with friends, meeting new people, along with playing a few games of ping-pong are also a part of Soupkitchen. Used as a break from studying, it's also one of the cheapest lunches to be found on campus. Donations are taken and the profits are given to Oxfam America.

T.J.

Debbie Cressu and Laurie Mello check

out the

W

Pat

Paglione

Md^ Fay plays a

little

ping-pong

after

a

greiil meal.

World

Hunger Soupkitchen

197

Association

serves

the GRl Commuter The

GRl

provides lunches,

Commuter's

many

commuter.

Among and

these

softball

Association

for

services

are

the

URI

parties,

games

for

commuters.

Also, the association has bus

routes

and schedule

listings as well as lockers and lounges. Most of all, the staff is made up of commuters and understand the needs of commuters. The staff can be very

helpful

because of their

commuters.

International House

Expands

CJRI Culture

There are approximately 350 in temational students in the University of Rhode Island from more than 25 different countries enrolled in almost every department of the university. The main objective of the organization is to present to the URI community with a wide intercultural perspective. It also offers them the opportunity through cultural events, films and guest speakers to get in touch and explore a variety of values in other cultures. The International Week logo says It all: "A world together is better."

experience

as

RIPIRG: Effective Consumer Advocates Since 1977, Rhode Island students built an organization through they can channel their commit

have

which

ment, energy and classroom learning to address social problems and take hold of the future. That organization is the Rhode Island Public Interest Group

(RIPIRG). Using tactics first developed by Ralph Mader, the organization wins im portant victories for students and

con

by combining investigative research, public education, and public interest advocacy. Issues and projects on which RIPIRG works are set by the Board of Directors, composed of URI students. The Board hires a profes sumers

sional staff to work with student in terns and volunteers to develop public interest research, educational and ad vocacy projects. RlPIRG's professional been

effectively

numerous

approach employed

issues, such

as

Bill, tenants' rights, and

has on

the Bottle auto

repair

fraud.

Kenneth Ward

The Good 5C Cigar "Just what this country really needs" ^^

Having the editor of the Cigar a piece about our campus daily in the yearbook is akin to having a mother write a letter write

about her child; she knows the good and the bad, but she only wants to write about the

good.

In fairness to all, I'll try to men first, it is important

tion both. But

understand The Cigar.

to

the

operation

of

Deadlines. That's it. That's all you have to understand. Coming out four times each week means oppressive deadlines. Sunday through Wednesday for stories and Monday through Thursday to

get those stories ready for the next

day's

issue.

Deadlines

mean cold pizza at midnight sleeping on the advertising desk. They mean go ing to bed at 5:00 in the morning and waking up for a test at 8:00 that same morning. Deadlines

and

mean

last

minute

headaches

because the stories you counted on didn't come through. So you re-write a story you read two years ago about the pressing pro blem of dogs in the union.

of satisfaction. They mean that there is a Cigar in the dining halls and outside the buildings when you wake up. A Cigar to curse, praise, throw But

they

also

mean

a

sense

away, save, hate, love, ignore treasure. But it's always there.

or

That's what keeps the handful of people who are the crux of the Cigar going. It's a saying around the office. No matter how hard it gets, or how many problems have to be overcome, or how tired or frustated we are, there is always a paper the next day. And some are better than others. Some days everything

Lin Escalera works late

goes right. The lead

story is important to the entire campus and is wr' .en so that it shines, we takt an editorial position we are all proud of, the layout and pictures are in novative and attractive and we finish early. I can count the number of days all of that goes right on two, maybe three fingers. At about the same frequency, are the bad days. The wax machine in our office breaks down and spits hot wax around the production room, the lead story doesn't get typeset, the

pictures

have

off, letters

people's heads

to the editor '

my sanity ar hours late to t

cut

question

the paper is three le

printers.

982 Editor in Chief /^it

Bob

Taylor types

his copy into the

computer.

And

as

newspaper

women, the dozen

or

so

men

and

of

that

us

The

Cigar (now a money-making enterprise due to our business department), get a chance to live in run

the

newspaper world years before

graduate. Through that,

we

any class

can

learn more than and can com

we

teach

us

ment on what we see while still hav to deal with it. We deal with reporters who threaten sources "if you don't tell me I'll write about your ." and sources who threaten reporters "if you use my name I'll kick your

ing

.

.

.

.

.

.

Joanne Muller,

a

1982 News Editor, pastes up

an

edition of the

Cigar

.

.

We deal with people who don't pay advertising bills and who de mand money for services we use. We get complaints about the posi tions we take and the stories we write and we are called everything from anti-URl to "commie" by peo ple who disagree with us. We run a newspaper. We try our hardest but we don't always suc ceed. The mistakes we make teach us while probably hurting us more than anyone. Because we really care.

A

predecessor of mine told me working at the Cigar is a course crisis management. We jump from one crisis to another and somehow we manage. The Cigar is an important part of us and we love being an important

that in

part

of

always

the win

campus. You can't when run a you

newspaper, but we try. And we'll be there the next Sports Editor,

John Carr

grabs a quick

bite while

writing

a

story.

day.

Mitch Zuckoff

The Oliver Watson House Has Watched CJRI Grow The Oliver Watson House is the oldest building on URI's Kingston campus. Located across from Phi Gamma Delta fraternity, the Watson House was a typical two-story Rhode Island farmhouse built around 1790. When restored, the building was painted bright white and the original roof was replaced with dark gray shingles. The house had one or more windows in every room. A weather well and well-sweep to the right of the house was restored while a gray granite stone wall and a white picket fence enclosed three sides of the lawn. The chimney in the center of the building provided six fireplaces for the seven room house. The building contained

a keeping room or what might call a kitchen, a parlor, a horning room where births took place and four bedrooms. Among its many antiques the

we

house held an 1834 math workbook and a loom that belonged to a famous South County weaver and Quaker Billy Rose. The loom was believed to have been 170 years old. The state bought the Watson House along with 140 acres of

Tour Guides Present CJRI to Mewcomers The

Campus

Tour

Guides

are

selected, trained and supervised by the Admissions Office. In the fall twenty students are chosen from over 100 applicants. The selected students represent students from each

undergraduate

of state, dor down the line and students involved in different in

college, in and out mitory, Greek, and

terest groups on campus.

The main is to

goal

of the Tour Guides

present the campus efficiently

prospective freshmen. They con duct detailed tours of URI twice a to

day, Monday through Saturday.

202

Watson House "Tour Guides

farmland for $5,000 in 1888 to build an

agricultural Throughout

the landmark.

After restoration, the house

school.

the development of URI, the house had many uses. It was first the farm manager's home,

then a women's dormitory, the home of Lambda Chi fraternity, a men's dormitory and a nursery school. When it was announced in 1962 that the house would be torn down due to lack of funds, alumni, faculty, students and friends of the universi

ty raised enough money

to restore

was a

structurally sound museum of the 1740-1840 period and provided a valuable place of study for students of textiles, architecture and history. During the 81-82 academic year, Linda and Martin Benevenuti lived in the Watson House. Martin worked as

Counselor at the Student Financial taught in the Reading Center in Chaffee Hall. a

Aid Office and Linda

Kimberly

B. Potter

LB/LS Gives Time and Love Through

the Little

Brother/Little

Sister program, URI students have the chance to develop good relation

ships

with

children

underprivileged

of the South County Area. The students spend a few hours a week with their "little" and bring

love, friendship and guidance into their lives. The

ingful

is

experience

mean

for both the child and student.

LB/LS provides a van as a means of transportation for the children to come to campus. The organization also provides social events to bring the group together as a whole.

Senior

'Big

Brother' Plans to

Keep

When Jeff he

Troy was a freshman, joined Little Brother/Little Sister. joined LB/LS because I wanted

"I a

little

brother to do

When 1 first met

shy

and he

ran

things

him, he

was

with.

really

to hide behind his

mother. Now I can't get him to shut up! We get along really well."

Jeff said that having a little brother is a challenge because you may not have the same interests. "He doesn't like to do the things 1 like to do. 1 like sports and he doesn't. We don't like the same television shows, either. 1 really learned

look

to

and

see

what

he

wants to do."

Jeff once

sees a

his "little," Peter Keller, Peter is from

week.

Wakefield. Jeff said that

got

to know each other

began

they

better, he

"We take long walks through the explore them like little kids like to do. Whenever 1 have to work on my car, I ask him if he wants to work on it with me. woods and

go to the Union and took 1 am on crew and 1 took him to a lot of crew meets, also. "Once, 1 even took him home to meet my family. 1 know his family pretty well and he wanted to meet mine." Jeff said that he would like to keep in touch with Pete now that he is graduating. "I'll be at URI this summer so we

Sometimes,

we

play pinball. Last summer, 1 him to Rocky Point for a day.

can see

each other then. It's been

long, after four say good bye."

years, you

so

just can't

to understand what would in

terest Pete.

Peter Keller and Jeff

once

in Touch

Kimberly

B. Potter

Troy

LB/LS -Big

Brother

203

Panhel

Represents Campus Sororities The Panhellenic Association is of URI sorority women that represent the campus' eight na affiliated sororities. The tionally

comprised

members work

together to promote good relations between all URI sorori

ty

women.

purpose of "Panhel" is to and oversee judicial and financial matters of the sororities. Panhel also organizes national ac tivities and philanthropic projects. The

govern

Ann Montanaro. Greek Advisor

IFC: Governs, Acts as Chief Mediator is

The Interfraternity Council of URI responsible for coordinating the 16

on campus. The IFC also functions as the chief mediator bet and the Fraternities ween

Fraternities

administration. The IFC is also responsible for governing the campus fraternities. IFC makes and enforces the rules and regulations of the URI fraternities. IFC also sponsors many programs and services during the year. Greek Week, a leadership conference, the Freshman Record, and a monthly newsletter are part of IFC's

greek

services.

204

Panhei

IFC

Charities Benefit From Greek Did you ever drive by Upper Col lege Road and see two people sitting top of a pole on Chi Phi frater nity's front lawn? Have you ever seen a group of guys bouncing basketballs to Providence? Maybe you've heard that all sorority presidents were kidnapped? Perhaps around St. Paddy's Day you've seen someone from Thete Chi parading around as Paddy Murphy? How

also

about those common sales in the Memorial Union, such as Delta

som

Zeta's Goldfish sale? Have you ever wondered why these things are done

Bounce-a-thon to Providence to

on

and what Theta Chi'is collect

donationIS for Rl Leukemia

Fund,

:

j>i

Bm i

1^

^

.^.^^

'

-

1

\

Alpha Chi Omegas

Originality

they're

all about? Believe it

not, it's all done for charity. These are just a few of the many original ideas that fraternities and sororities come up with to raise for local and national money charities. The individual Greek Chapter house usually include a

or

"philanthropic project"

as a yearly good cause. Some of these projects are relatively while others are quite common, unique. Other than the fact that philan thropic projects can be fun, they are

function,

to

support

a

usually part of the house's obligation to its National affiliation. Philanthropies are an example of how the Greek system on campuses around the country promote na tional and community services. Traditional endeavors sponsored

by

URI

Greek

houses include

Phi

Gamma Delta's Tun to Brown for Cystic Fibrosis; Lambda Chi, Alpha's Sorority Presidents' Kidnapping (ran consists of canned

local the

charities); American

Phi

Cancer

Chi's

foods for Psi's

Kappa

help Society;

interSigma Derby Week, sorority event including games, relays, and contests to benefit the Jimmy Fund; Chi Phi's Pole Sit, members take turns sitting for 120 hours as a sponsored fund drive for and Theta Muscular Dystrophy; Chi's annual Paddy Murphy Week. an

Some houses decided to be dif and they held such fun events as Delta Zeta's Jailhouse dur ing Spring Weekend 1981, and

ferent,

Alpha

Delta Pi's

Candy

Grams.

Ellen Greenwood

sel

Greek

Philanthrophy

205

SEC Presents URI With Entertainment The Student Entertainment Com (SEC) uses Student Senate funding to present rock and jazz con certs, plays, ballroom shows, and mittee

dances to the URI community. SEC also brings URI the musical entertain ment for

Spring Weekend. Students interested in the enter field get the chance to work at shows and get a behind-thescenes view of what goes into put tainment

ting

a

show

together.

SIO Promotes ORI Student Concerns The Student Interest Organization a lobbying group for the students of URI. It is composed of concerned students who work actively to repre sent all students' concerns and in terests before the General Assembly. All advocates must undergo a 10is

week, comprehensive training pro

during the fall semester. They taught to master the art of per public speaking and other political techniques. This includes learning to become familiar with up coming issues on campus and at the General Assembly. The legislative session begins in early January and is in session for ninety days. At this time of the year, SIO advocates disperse among the gram are

suasive

various

branches

of

government

(including the Board of Governors for Higher Education and the Gover nor's office) and throughout the URI campus work to initiate legislation that will best interests and

206

SEC'SIO

promote the students' concerns.

Speak-Easy Counsels and Informs on Sexuality s a

whole

state

of beitig. it InvolMf

a

ptrson's pAvslcar

Speak-Easy is a peer sexuality in formation and counseling center, open Monday through Friday 11 to 4. It is a comfortable and confidential place to talk with trained peers

make-up

the tA*ush(,/eelinss and social txpectaliom encompaisins o p/ivslool . er "/emalciiess. Senialitji Is nol mrlv nil physical respaiucs it is a compIi network of mollmul "

rise

pcr*on's

sexual Mif.

about any aspect of sexuality. Students trained in special section

of the Nursing Departments' class on human sexuality staff the Speak-Easy. They also answer the

Line, conduct workshops the campus and teach educational sessions. Speak-Easy is located on the fourth floor of Hot

throughout

Roosevelt Hall and is there to pro support and open, noninformation.

vide

judgemental

SLS Experiences Year of Change

a

The Student Lecture Series,

ings informative speakers to campus.

experienced

a

br

provocative

This year, SLS year of new ideas and

change. The SLS workshop day started off the year by acquainting old and new members and by teaching the pro cedures of planning and running a lecture. It was an informative and in

teresting day. Political

Awareness

Week

presented a diversity of speakers, perhaps could be cited as the highlight of the year. Students, com munity and administrators all played and

essential part in its success. Gloria Steinam, Bill "Meet the Press" Monroe, Sara Weddington and many other speakers participated in the week. The idea of presenting a number of speakers in a limited an

amount of time

and

we

hope

to

was

new

for SLS

try this idea again.

Speak-EasySLS

207

Catholic Students Active

Campus

on

The Catholic Student Association seeks to foster

Christian Commu

a

nity on campus by co-ordinating and programming spiritual, cultural and social activities through the Catholic Center.

Membership is open to any URI student interested in fostering Chris tian ideals. This year's highlights Halloween and Christmas open houses at the Catholic Center and several speakers on young adult in

were

volvement in

ministry.

Father Chew Father

Catholic

Randy Chaplain

Chew

has

the

at

been

a

University of

Rhode Island for the past six years. A well-known face to many on campus. Randy gives of his time to students in

need of

guidance, help, or friendship. A typical day for Randy consists of counseling in the morning, saying 12 o'clock noon mass, working out at Nautilus, along with teaching religious courses. Being in charge of the Catholic tive

on

Little

and

politically Randy gives

campus, than

himself

of

advisor

Center,

Brother/Little Sister, more

at

most

ac

of the

Gniversity. Randy also spends much time in preparing his liturgies for the Sunday night 8 o'clock masses. His innovative and unique liturgies have helped many on

campus to believe and live a faith in contemporary world. Not many

our

would believe it if the

Sunday night

they

were

mass was

told that

always

so

crowded that students had to stand in the back and side aisles, but it is true. A quote from Kahlil Qibran could

Randy's service to the URI community. "Then said the rich man. describe

Speak

to

answered

yourself

208

of

us ...

that you

Catholic Student Assoc.

Giving.

And

It is when you

truly give." Mary Beth

Father Chew

he

give of Affleck

A Friend to

Everyone

Altar Becomes Halloween comes once a year, but the memories last year-round for the students who attend Christ the King Church. Who would ever expect a church to celebrate Halloween? Not many.

amazed,

The new students are while returning students

can't wait for it.

Every to

year

on

the closest

Sunday

Halloween, the eight o'clock Sun

day night day in a special

mass

celebrates the holi way. It all started six having just the con

years ago with

costumes. Then about to act out the

gregation wearing the idea

came

gospel with puppets. Now evolving from that idea is the Halloween Liturgy.

This consists of

with students

acting

live play out the Gospel. a

For this once-a-year mass, the altar becomes a stage for the characters

Mass

and narrates.

This year's mass was held on November 1, 1981. The Good Seed was chosen as the Gospel. All the characters were dressed in costumes and acted out such parts as the path, the rock, the thorns, the good soil, and the flowers. Although the

Gospel humor

serious,

was

used

was

in

good

some

it.

When the

seed fell

upon the rock, the theme from Rocky was played and

good Jeff

Troy ran Many will

que

mass.

A

out dressed as

a

remember such

majority

boxer. a

of the

uni con

gregation still gets dressed up in a variety of costumes. The mass is quite unusual for a bunch of college students, but it's just another way of

bringing everyone ing a great time.

closer while hav

out the

play gospel story, while Father Chew stands off to the side

to

Stage for Halloween

T. J.

Paglione

Carol Doak

miss

hung

piggy symbolized

ihe

the Allurement of Life.

symbolized

the

s

Club

Experiences Cliallenge

Nature's

Members of the Outing Club ex perience backpacking, ice and rock climbing, canoeing, and cross country skiing, to name just a few.

From

the

wilderness

Mt.

in

Washington to the wild rapids of the Mooseup River, Outing Club to a chance get demonstrate their outdoor skills and The ever abilities. leadership challenging Quincy Quarries

members

presents each climber

citing experiences top."

of

new

and

"getting

ex

to the

Their annual task through the Great Gulf Wilderness in October of fers the amateur hiker/backpacker adventures that exist in the woods of New England.

210

Outing Club

Horsemen's Club Learns Overall

The URI Horsemen's Club gives students the opportunity to spend some of their extra time learning and participating in overall horseman ship. Horsemanship ranges from

(fjo-; y'k/'% .

WSL

1^^''

f ^II

Horsemanship

'

^

.^'^

v:

iK^^K^fll

^N

riding

to horse care.

The Horsemen's Club meets every weekend where ten horses are sta bled under the supervision of the and Animal Veterinary Science

Department.

p,.>'^"

ni^^eans

Horsemen's Club

211

Sailing

Club Is

Serious but Fun Learning

how to sail is treated

as a

serious, but fun discipline at the URI Sailing Club, located on Salt Pond in Wakefield. A

variety of lessons are through the Physical Educa Department ranging from begin

offered tion

ning to advanced levels. Beginners learn the basics of sail ing in the Club's fleet of 10 "Tech Dinghies." Intermediate classes sail the 4 new 'Flying Juniors' complete with

spinnakers. For those interested high performance sailing, the Ad vanced class offers instruction in the club's 'Flying Dutchmen.' Norm Windus and Michael Esposito are the sailing instructors whose exper tise adds to the excitement and fun of each lesson. The URI sailing club is also open in

for recreational sailing. Experienced sailors who pass their "skippers" test often take leisurely sails to the lower pond and explore the small islands. The club also rents its six windsurfers out to those with some experience (some prefer to call it windswimming). Free movies, slide shows, and an occasional regatta are also presented to club members.

212

Sailing Club

Uhuru Sasa Promotes

Necessity of Equality The Uhuru Sasa Society was established because of outrage and dissatisfaction with the status quo of negative treatment of Black in Americans, particular, and has treatment This of think we in how resulted ourselves and how the overall world of us. thinks population Uhuru Sasa members do not necessarily have to be of African descent, but concerned individuals who want to join in the struggle against racism and the consequence of this sort of human ignorance. We are concerned with promoting the necessity of equality for all peoples. We believe our organization is not just a "set-a-way" from the realities

Africans.

of URI's white campus, but a means by when brotherhood and love can be

promoted. "There

are,

of

course, many before our be obtained, but goal equality we have great expectations for our organization, its members and the cause it stands for.

obstacles to of

Gospel singers presented by

Uhuru Sasa

during

Black

History

Week.

overcome can

Great It's

it's

fun,

Swamp

insanity

and it's satis

fying. You

make enemies and you make friends. You struggle against

dumping in our own back yard; Charlestown, RI. We even reported on the national implications waste

against the powers that but you fight the good fight. Through all the hassles and

of nuclear weapon escalation and the severe cutbacks in financial aid.

craziness

administration's deceit

deadline and be

.

.

.

through

all the blood,

sweat and tears, it's worth it. Not on

the

Recent articles featured the

blems

facing

Reagan

over the pro El Salvador and the

of seeing print, but to know that you are doing something just a little bit unique: you're publishing The Great Swamp Gazette. The Great Swamp Gazette, reci pient for the second consecutive

elimination of the

year of the Society of Professional Journalists award for "the best all-

ly

around student

toons and music reviews. We open

ly

your

fleeting gratification

name

in

magazine" for the Northeast, prides itself in being URI's commentary

news,

magazine

produced

and

art

the time to

thoroughly investigate

stories and to take

issues. And a

pleasure. Primarily

Gazette

we

a

has

a

as

reported which

the

magazine. The investigated stories

news

national on

on

have time to make it

which affect students well

stand

on a

level.

professor

who

local

We

the Alan Wells

as

have

case

in

promised full-tenure was, through school politics, denied tenure and given the boot by URI administrators. Then we featured the problems of nuclear

The Great

a

Swamp Gazette

was

highly successful

program due to the ad ministration's "rebalancing plan." In

dance

other words,

no matter

how great

small, The Gazette will issues of

concern

cover

or

any

to the URI student.

But The Gazette isn't

just political

oriented

an

it is also

poetry, photo essasy, ourselves to the

art

outlet for

satire,

community for

car

sup

port, contribution and commentary.

for

and

by

students, alternative to rehashed, fluff, mediocre journalism. We have

214

Gazette: Best in the Northeast

Jon Cooke

SVS: Educational

Facility

and Outlet

The Student Video Center is

educational facility outlet for creativity, and video

well

as

awareness.

public

as

an an

service

The SVC of

fers undergraduate students portable color video equipment, complete editing facilities, television produc tion and the opportunity for on-theair

experience for those broadcasting.

television

STS Provides GRl's Sound and

Lights

Student Technical Services is a Memorial Union student-run

organization that provides quality sound and lighting equipment for the campus community. STS has pro vided concert sound and lighting for many of the SEC, Union Board and Weekenders events throughout the years. STS has technicians available to show movies, operate sound and

lighting equipment

or

just plain stage

labor.

STS also has small systems to rent for parties and lectures. Video movies can be borrowed to show in your own room. A wide variety of equipment ranging from a portable cassette deck to a thousand-watt and sound lighting system are available through Student Technical Services.

interested in

A Perfect Place for After

searching

for weeks and cut

ting through all the red tape, the old cow

barns

was

approved

as

the

haunted house location. This was

already really building

The

creepy. needed

new

place

to

be

cleaned, repairetd and rewired before

beginning.

It took the total efforts of

about 50 people during an already tough midterm period. Final construction crews worked until 2AM

on the nights preceeding. Most of the costumes and props were donated and weren't finished till opening day. This was the first

event

of

it's

kind

that

tried

to

organize three completely different groups of students on a single pro ject, the Union Board, Lamda Chi and Coddington. Different aspects such

casting

costuming,

as safety, make-up and

sound effects had to be coordinated

and sustained for the three nights. By the end of the event, all the participants were totally drained. The only reconcilation was knowing that the 900 people that went through the house were thoroughly terrified. It was later decided that the local charity that could best use the funds would be the Johnny Cake Center of Peacedale.

The

center

donated

costumes and props for the house. went to money supply

The

meals for 300 local families that would otherwise have

Thanksgiving nothing.

Lou Sciacchetaro

216

Haunted House

a

Haunted House

OB Plans Many Activities

The Memorial Union Board of Direc tors encourages,

integrates

and

expands

the cultural and recreational activities of URI.

Through the constant revision of structure, policy and programs, G.B. works to meet the increasing demands needs of an expanding campus. Within the board, several different coun cils deal with the different duties and and

responsibilities

of CJ.B.

responsible for many beginning with the Registration Day Concert and ending with the U.B.'s Union Board is

activities

Barbecue at the Beach. Other U.B. tivities Haunted

include

the

House,

ac

Dating

Game,

of

Spring

parts

Weekend and many more. As a student board, U.B. is also

com

improve the entire URI popula Community. The board, lastly, is an extended voice

mitted to

tion and educational

of

the

overall

student, concerned with the well-being and educational

growtli.

Dating

Game Contestants Can Make You Blush The Union Board held its 4th An nual Dating Game Show in February. As usual, the contestants were URI students who turned into stars for a night. Lou Schiaccetano, the MC, was even seen blushing a few times at many of the questions and answers of the contestants. Some included, "Yes, anytime", "a It's easier to take burlap sack "A sensuous off", orange", cream with a cherry on "whipped top", and of course the most

popular, "!*$%&". The winning couples were treated to dinners at Casey's, The Rusty Scupper, The Carriage Inn, The Coast Guard others.

House

and

many

Union Board

Dating game

21'7

Dance The Dance

University of Rhode Island Company, comprised of

students and is

Company

community residents,

to the artistic perfor of dance. As an extension of the regular dance curriculum in the Physical Education Department, the offers its members company choreographic opportunities and training in the technical aspects of production. Artists-in-residence pro grams provide additional options for

devoted

mance

students to

study on campus with leading professionals in the field. Auditions are held in early Oc tober. Admission to the company is determined by an adjudication board. An

Apprentice Dance Troupe is open to all interested students or university/community individuals who wish to improve skill and expertise in dance. Although the

(ADT)

company specializes in the styles of modern and jazz, choreographic works in modem ballet, folk dance and African have been incorporated into the

company's repertoire. Spring Concert,

The annual

the

climax of the year for the Company, is nurtured by a series of mini-

performances that lead to this culminating experience. Participa tion in the Health

Festival, Interna

tional Night, Coffee Hours and various Arts Series events provide typical examples. The Company prepares one piece for the American Dance Festival each year. Performances off campus are usual ly prepared for showing in Rhode Island Public Schools or to non-profit organizations providing services to

College

special populations.

218

DanceCompany

Devoted to Artistic Performance

Women's Center Aids CJRI Crisis Victims The Women's Crisis Center is a student-run advocacy and educa tional organization which provides medical

and

psychological support

legal

information,

referral and emotional

to victims of sexual harrass

ment assault and rape.

The services are available to the campus community on a walk-in basis. The crisis Center is open from 7 p.m. to 1 a.m. every night and is located in Burnside Hall A Tower.

Tae Kwon Do Builds

Mind and

Body

Tae Kwon Do is an ancient Korean combat art of self-defense. This martial art form emphasizes self discipline and fitness of both mind and body. Tae Kwon Do literally means the art of smashing with the hand and the foot. Most of the techniques used involve kicking because the strength of the leg is greater than that of the arm. Practic

ing Tae Kwon Do builds up physical which im mental endurance,

and

self

proves

confidence

and

mental

awareness.

The members of the URI Tae Kwon Do Club meet once a week for two hours and

are

instructed

by competent England Tae begins and warm up period. practice blocks, kicks

instructors from the New

^^B IB mm W^

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Kwon Do Federation. A class with a stretch Then students

punches in defensive and offen sive techniques. Controlled fighting (free sparing) is practiced to teach the

and

students

how

and

when

to

use

the

techniques they have learned, paying particular attention to self-control. Members of the club may advance by testing their skills with the

in rank

Eastern Tae Kwon Do Federation. It is

possible

to become

a

black belt within

4 years at URI. Since the club started in 1976

have advanced

numerous

they high ranking

many of which achieved belts and have demonstrated

students,

brown skill and competence in self-defense. This year the first person to achieve black belt in the club was Lori Henderson.

Women's Crisis CentefTae Kwon Do

219

Most GRl Students "Live for the Weekend" Weekenders is

devoted

tion

a

student

organiza making the

to

weekends

but out of the

anything ordinary. This year's roster of

events includ ed concerts with B. Willie Smith and a

tribute to the "Doors."

Sailing from

expeditions

journeyed

Love Boat party in the M.U. to a gigantic sundae on the Banana Boat and then a real-life a

Ballroom,

excursion to Block Island.

Other adventures

were

discover

ing Boston's Science museum, ex ploring Mystic's Sea-life Aquarium and witnessing the excitement of Broadway's Sugar Babies. In the tradition of Newport's high society. Weekenders also held a semi-formal dance at the Rosecliff Mansion "Fleur de la Mer." The highlights of this event included cocktails at the Sheraton Islander, the swinging sounds of "Eight to the

Bar," endless hors d'oeuvres and "freeze

frames"

by

the

Victorian

photographer.

Tlie "Love Boat" In the fall of '82, the Weekenders sponsored an indoor cruise on the

'Love

Boat.'

Students

tropical music by 'High drank tropical drinks and

enjoyed Times,'

hors d'oeuvres. Students got into the festivities by dressing in brightly col ored Hawaiian clothes. ate

Dave Greenblatt and Mike

Gail Jackson and Jay O'Connor iiaving a good

1

Dyer

f

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3 iB^Br'^ LU

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Weekenders

Love Boat

IT

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"Fleur de la Mer" For the second year in a row, the Weekenders sponsored a dance at Rosecliff: an elegant mansion on Newport's prestigious Bellvue Av Students swung to the music to the Bar' and admired the

enue.

of

'Eight

charm and

beauty

chandeliers and the

of the glittering grande stairway.

One-Ton Sundae Four-thousand and two-hundred of all the flavours of ice you could want. Sound Good? It did to hundreds of students on the Saturday of Spring Weekend '82. The Weekenders bought the huge

scoops cream

amount of ice cream from at

a

discount and

filled

Friendly's a

Boston

Whaler with it.

Rosecliff

Banana Boat

221

WRIU Gives Students Rhode Island's largest public radio station, is an effective outlet for URI students interested in many aspects of broadcasting. Students can obtain valuable ex

WRIU,

perience

in

music,

production,

broadcasting, journalism, advertis ing, engineering, public affairs and administration. Over the past year, approximately 200 students have made themselves an important part of WRIU.

Experience

in

Broadcasting

ROTC: Part of URI for Over 80 Years The Army Reserve Officer Train ing Corps Program offers students the opportunity to experience a lifestyle that is academically enriching and physically challenging. Army ROTC has been an integral part of the University since 1894, and has contributed officers

the

to

more

service

than 1800 of our

country. The URI ROTC

Program

is

con

on an informal basis with par to in ticular attention devoted dividual desires and career objec tives of the cadets. Through prac tical training in management, leader

ducted

ship

and group

gram

dynamics,

the pro both

prepares students for and civilian careers.

military

Students enrolled in the program opportunity to apply for

have the

and

two

three

full-tuition

year

scholarships. Additionally they attend such

courses as

may

airborne, air

assault, ranger and cold weather vival school. my

Preparation Flight Program is also

Captain

sur

for the Ar available.

Scott Larson

Assistant

Professor

of

Military

Science

ROTC Member Does Not Mind

Being

In the spring of 1982, a little over 400 students participated in ROTC. One hundred of them were in the ad vanced progam and eight of the ad vanced stuidents were women. Lisa Westerberg is one of those eight women.

"When I was in high school, 1 didn't know if 1 was going to go into the army or go to college. When I found out that URI had ROTC, 1 de cided to go to URI and I joined ROTC at the end of my freshman year. Westerberg, a nursing major, has participated in ROTC for two years and became a second lieutenant in

One of Few May of her junior year. She has achieved Dean's List for two years. Westerberg said that ROTC does take a lot of time, but she enjoys it. "1 like

everything

about it. I

do

things I never got a chance gain confidence, and learn

get to to do, more

about

myself." Westerberg

worked on the Batallion Staff in Recruitment and She Publicity. plans to continue in the army after graduation in 1983. She also said she doesn't mind be ing one of only eight women. "The are really equals."

guys as

nice and

they treat us Kimberly B. Potter

ROTC

Lisa

Westerberg

223

Career Assistants Counsel Student

Career

Assistants

undergraduates with their

are

trained

who assist students

aspirations. "CA's" variety of workshops that

career

present a help students in resume writing, in terviewing techniques and summer job-search strategies. They also criti and for students resumes que counsel them on a daily basis. administrative with these Along duties, CA's coordinate special pro grams each semester. In the fall, the

office of Career Services hosted a Career Fashion Show. During the spring semester, CA's developed a Career Symposium Series for both the College of Arts and Sciences and the College of Business. Also in the spring Career Services organized Career Day and Senior Career Day.

Hillel Serves GRl

Jewish

Community The B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation Lower College Road serves as the central meeting place for the organized campus Jewish communi on

The group is run by many students each with varying interests. As a group, Hillel strives to provide social, educational, cultural, and religious programs to meet the

ty.

needs of the Jewish community, both students and Faculty, at URI. Social programs during 1981-82 cream an ice included party, hayride, ski trip, pizza party, bowling roller and skating party. party, Educational programs include the Beate Klarsfeld, Danny Siegel, and Emil Fackenheim lectures, a Lunch Program, and the informal classes of the Jewish Free University. Cultural programs included the Giora Feld man, and Lydia Saxton concerts. Religious programs included High Holiday, Friday night and Purim ser vices. In addition, Hillel sponsored a kosher dining plan.

224

Career Assistants Hillel

Leaders Learn The

Freshman

Along

Orientation

leaders welcome 2200 members of the class of 1985 to URI the summer of '81 during The leaders provided several pro that future freshmen a gave grams

Workshop

.

taste

of

college life,

chance to make

new

as

well

as

a

friends, explore

and the campus plan course schedules. For the second year, the program

was

With Freshmen continued

through

leaders

orientation

assistants in

as

short lecture series

sponsored part of continuing a

the fall. The

worked

University College

peer and as a

orientation.

The orientation program opportunity for growth and

was

an

develop

as well as the freshmen. It was a unique chance to learn facts about URI that full-time students often overlook.

ment for the leaders

Bresnahan: '82 Ombudsman Serving as the budsman has been a

student

om

challenging and gratifying experience. This job has the afforded me opportunity to in teract with a myriad of students, staff, and faculty members. The challenge of mediating in dividual grievances, problems, and complaints has been greatly facilitated due to the special relation ship which has developed between the faculty ombudsman and myself. Marvin Rife has brought many years of endless wisdom to this position. His uncanny ability to deal with all types of people has benefited the

campus community in numerous ways and has also enhanced my ability to resolve many conflicts

which students have

brought

to our

attention. this experience has reaf firmed my belief that, despite the size and complexity of our Universi ty, the staff, faculty, and administra tion will bend over backwards to

Finally,

mitigate student problems whenever possible. The position of Student Ombudsman is an integral part of the University system and I feel for tunate to have been able to assist

the students who have utilized this

office

for

the

resolution

of

their

problems.

Brian R. Bresnahan Student Ombudsman

F.OW.L.

Ombudsman

225

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226

Activities

Activities

227

228

Activities

Activities

229

Theater: After the

Curtain Goes

Up

The

Importance of

Being

230

Theater Productions

Earnest

Kris

Kringle

and Carols A

Cornucopia

of Christmas Confections

Theater Productions

231

A ?The trombone

players, Jeff Cohn.

Rob Barat,

Ruth Mueller, and Dave DiCenso, practice football season.

?Soloist,

??The

Ted

during

the

Whalen, practices his part for the

orchestra

ion

??During a football game, trumpet players add to the spirit of

during

That

a

Ram

the crowd.

Fall

Band

Variety

of

Ways

for Musical Involvement

?Three different views of the members of the chorus

practicing

for

an

upcoming

Spring

Despite Delays

Warm Weather and Good Music After a long, cold winter we anx iously awaited the commencement

table as the New England weather, the weekend brought us a variety of

of Spring. Even the snowstorm in the midst of April could not dampen our spirits! There were those of us

fun and entertainment. It began with a carnival,

who donned

and the antics of the

south would

the entire front lawn of the Memorial Union and then some. People took

hoping

that

the

to

return

con

trip

ly, the warmth of the sunshine began to beat through and with it came Spring Weekend. As unpredic

?The weekend

began Spring Carnival sponsored by the Onion with the

Board. One of the games was to climb the ladder and

ring the falling.

without

Spring

en

vince us all that warm weather was on the horizon. Others traveled

trying

find favorable conditions suitable enough to show off their seasonal tans. Alas! Finally, yes final

234

an

tourage of clowns, balloons galore,

amazing Fan tasy Jugglers. This event, sponsored by the Union Board, encompassed

shorts

Weekend

bell

chances at the wheels of fortune and participated in such amenities as

Samari, Head Slicer, and Mud Wrestling. Some very exhilarating

experiences.

p?;?!

All Contributed to

.

spring

Weekend

235

A Successful 1982

Spring

?It

236

Spring

was

Weekend

hard to

Weekend

The following day proved to be a real treat for the ice-cream con noisseur. The piece de la resistance

Weekenders' Banana Boat. The of assorted ice-cream flavors topped with marshmallow and chocolate syrups, pounds of bananas, nuts, whipped cream, and last but not least, gallons of cherries! 4,200 scoops of ice-cream were con tained in the URI Sailing Club's Boston Whaler. At the end of the day, only the consistence of a milkshake remained. That didn't stop the die-hard ice-cream fanatic was

one ton was

who

readily scooped out the Eventually the groups of

left

overs.

peo the melt-down and "flocked" to the outer shores of campus for the music festival. The site was Keaney Gymnasium

ple left

and

the

-lAThe

soccer

weather and

Bluegrass

revolutionary

sound

from

a

U.S./British

beat when the

Entertainment Committee brought Flock of Seagulls, NRBQ, and Squeeze to join the musical Student

weekend. Music con tinued the next day at the outdoor Bluegrass Festival. It didn't take much to grab your partner and roster of the

"doze-do"

to

the

music

of

John

Herald, Bill Hornell and the Virgi nians, the Neon Valley Boys, and Fiasco Brothers.

Accompanying

troupe of southern entertainers

this was

Pat Cannon who showed everyone all the steps to dance along. The end of this weekend left us with an aurora of a new season and

brightened attitude pending examinations.'

a

toward

our

Linda McFarland

was

field

good

mus

Festival.

Spring Weekend

237

236

spring

Weekend

'^students catch bands

the

at

some

rays while

listening

to

of

the

the

Bluegrass Festival,

?Flock of Seagulls bass player, along with the group

the

set

mood

of

the

crowd

rest

for

SQUEEZE

??Some students around all

day,

so

weren't

content

with

they began juggling

or

sitting playing

frisbee away from the crowds, ? ?Lead

cing

and

guitarist for SQUEEZE got the crowd clapping throughout the entire gym.

? ??NRBQ other groups

performed music different Rhythm and Blues.

dan

from the

Spring Weekend

239

George Thorogood brings hard rock to sold-out crowd

Concerts

240

Concerts

Vary

From PUNK to ROCK

Concerts

241

James

Taylor sets mood at

Valentine's

Day

Concert

242

Concerts

B. Willie Smith

gets students

Swing for

in

new

year

Concerts

243

i

FIANI

AWIT

GTMNA9IUM

ATHLETICS

I

WRAM Booters

Have

Successful

a

Season ?Top

scorer

Judy

Ferns

away from the opposing

t

TTwo Harvard defenders Rowe who manages to get ? TLori Ritcher thr<

s

a

are

pas:

the ball into

play.

The 1981 Women's Soccer team coached by Karen White a senior. Ms. White, who was a member of the 1981 team, injured both knees during season play. She was asked to coach the 1981 team, and coach she did. The WRams posted a 10 and 2 final record, and also placed first in the RllAW was

showed its prowess by winning 2-1. This led them to compete in the tour nament and some fine playing by Tracey Brooks and Judy Fernstein, as well as co-captains Sheri Mathews and Andrea Rowe helped to capture the top spot. It was the WRams' third season as a club sport.

tournament.

The

deciding game was against College, and our team

Providence

Karen White Sheri Mathews

.

'

1

BLlWi MH

t^^^K^^^^I^^I

Men's Soccer Has

RyB ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^K.

Disappointing Season ^Mo,

r.i"^

y^lJ^T^^^^H

J

Dominick

haven't

stopped

from the other

Langano

in time,

team.

and

Simon

they're waiting

Ostrov

for the ball

In their 1981 season, GRl soccer had a taste of both glory

players

and defeat.

They started out the strong by winning 6 out of their first 8 games, but they soon faltered. In the last 1 1 games their record was 4-6-1. This gave Rhody season

record of 10,8, and 1. The slump was caused by a lack of offensive firepower. The average number of goals for the first 10 games was 3.1, but for the last 11 the average was only 1.8. There was some good perfor mance on the part of the offense, though. David Caetano and Geza Henni, both seniors, led the offen sive play. Rui Caetano, a forward, led the Rams in scoring with 12 goals for the season. Henni, a mid fielder, was second in scoring with 10 goals. There was also some im pressive defensive play by the Rams. In 19 games, the opposing teams averaged only 1.1 goals per Both the offense and game. defense played together to force back the Huskies of GConn, end ing the game in a scoreless tie. The Rams are looking for a season

another tough season in 1 982, and their ultimate goal is to win the NCAA championship. Steve Macomber

248

Soccer

^^?Mark Cookson plays it ^?This shot

on

goal

is taken

smart

by passing

by Rui Caetano

the ball out of the traffic.

who

was

top

scorer on

?Before the oncoming player away

as

Barry Knapp

? ?The ball after

the teair

tries to go for the ball, Geza Henni Jr. kicks it watches from behind.

being

"headed"

by Jaime Huriel,

scores a

goal.

TTfl'

Young

Team Places in RIIAW

The women's tennis team had a suc cessful season under the coaching of Charlie Connery. Their season record was 5 and 3, including an impressive 9-0 win over Bridgewater State, their first victory. They were also victorious over Southeastern Connecticut State

College wins

and Springfield rounded off

were

Mount

College. Their by a forfeit by

Holyoke College.

Leading the team in first singles was senior Heather Mahan. In the second singles spot was Beth Shetzley. In the third and fourth spots were freshmen and Kim Edwards Mary Byrne. Michele Maynard, Gina Venditto, and Erika Waldman shared the fifth and sixth singles sports. The leaders in doubles were Kathy Lynch and Bonnie Powers in the first spot. Heather Tamer and JoAnn Muller in second doubles, and third

by Sue Martini, Mary Beckwith, Maggie McGonagle, and Karen shared

Sheridan. Mr. Connery is proud of the girls' third place in the RllAW and their suc their toughest opponent. over cess Springfield College, and he hopes they will go to the RllAW

again

next year.

Katie Bitter

? Freatiman Kim Edwards

?Mary Byrnes digs

for

T^Tlie 1981-82 team.

"

-

'-"-

\

i

^aa^

i

a

ctiarges the

ball just

out

net in tie

of her reacti.

Net Result: An Undefeated

Season

A-<A

strong foreliand by Steve Phillip

Island defeated their i

<lt\e 198l-B2team.

The word that best describes the fall season for the men's tennis team is awesome. The netmen finished the season with an impressive 8-0

record, including three shutouts. The Rams beat such teams

as

the

Gniversity of Massachusetts, the Gniversity of New Hampshire, and the Gniversity of Connecticut, a Big East team. Their most impressive victory, though, was over the Ter riers of Boston Gniversity. GRl defeated the Terriers 6-3 including five out of six singles victories. In head coach Alan Marcus' opinion, it was the team's toughest match, and

it as

the first time in his five years coach that the Rams have con-

was

qered BG. The netmen also finished third in the Eastern Eight Tournament which they hosted. The Moun taineers of the Gniversity of West Virginia finished first with an im pressive 33 points. George Washington took second with 25 points. Rutgers finished fourth, and G Mass fifth. Duquesne, Pittsburgh,

junior Gary Davidson. The leaders of the other five singles were team captain Dan McCormick, Frank Galego, Steve Phillips, David was

and Marc Porter. The doubles combinations of Davidson and Wright, Galego and Phillips, and McCormick and Porter proved to be

Wright,

and St. Bonaventures rounded out

impressive many times, even against the toughest opponents. Tennis 251 The coach was exceptionally pleas ed with the player's performances.

the field at sixth, seventh, and

In his words,

respectively. Leading the

team in first

eighth

singles

"They

all

played great! Katie Bitter

Rams Run to 7-1 The

enjoyed

men's its best

Cross-Country team season yet, pulling a

7-1 dual meet record. Mark Rerick, Doug Hill, Greg Hale, and John were the team's best per formers. Some great performances were also seen from Dave Brown, Shawn Gardner, Eric Grisiwald, Mark Searvey, Joe Swift, and Mike Malukevich. Most of our young runners will be returning, and we hope to have as good a season as the last.

Magill

Bill Falk

^Rhode Island's Mark

252

Crosscountry

Searvey contempla'

Talent Women

+

Hard Work

Spikers Find

Before most URI students return for

Formula for Success

floor with their hands

the fall semester, the members of the WRam volleyball team have spent the

their

last two weeks of

morning

training Time

for

drags

the on

101/2 hours each

ing

and

training.

cludes the

use

summer

vacation in

upcoming season. they spend up to day with intense drill

as

Part of the time in

of the school's wrestl

learn tough defensive help extinguish the feat of the impact of the body hitting the hard wood floor. The girls also use the dance studio to help develop correct posture and technique.

ing

room

to

skills and to

In addition to skill refinement, much time is spent on conditioning. As you walk down the halls of Tootell

Gym during one of these afternoon sessions, you frequently hear sounds that resemble a hospital maternity ward. Maternity ward?!! Yes, the team earn ed this title as a result of the challenge with "the board," a 2' by 4' piece of wood which they had to move across

Winning Season

=

legs

Another

stairs

on

pushing

common was

the board and

from

behind.

sound at 1 1 :00 in the

the echo of the stadium

the team members

perform of the day, "Mount Many athletes have ex perienced the exhilirating feeling of reaching the top bleacher, the summit

their

as

final

task

Stadium."

at the end

of many futile attempts in and hopping

volving running, jumping, on one

foot to the top.

being one of the sports requires a lot of travel, volleyball is one of the few sports that requires year-round practice. The Divi sion 1 competitive season is in the Fall, and Spring brings the OSVBA season. The

GSVBA

naments

in

season

and

out

involves of

the

tour

New

England area, which lead to the regional tournament. Trying to adjust to a new coach this year was probably one of the most dif ficult problems to overcome. The ex

adjusting

coaches within

one

year

to

three

produced

new

lot

a

anxiety and uncertainty for the players. The troubled times were quickly overcome, and they produced of

a

closeness that the team could not

have otherwise

experienced.

The team

accrued 28 wins, 18 losses, and was tied three times in the fall season. Nine of these losses

points, which girls played. This

In addition to

which

of

perience

season

has been

perience

for all the

and

the

off

players

by a mere two just how well the

were

shows

court.

were on

a learning players, both Eight of the

ex on

10

the Academic Dean's

Carrie Davis, Patricia Doolittle, and Susan Goodwin will graduate in List. the be

spring, and Sherry Silven leaving the team to join training program.

will also the URI

athletic

Patricia Doolittle Leslie Morales

p the ball"

as

Jo

Volleyball

253

Miracle For women, the AIAW National Championship Tournament is the of

opitome

achievement.

To

reach that level of

competition is something special. It was achiev ed this year through much hard work and perseverence by all the It seemed like

runners.

that the entire show

to

goes

a

miracle

squad qualified

Pocatello,

to

go

how

magnificent job

to

which

Idaho, much

of

2nd in East

Squad"

change in altitude gave them another challenge, but they overcame this one as well, going on to place Oth in the nation. The girls placed second in the New England Championship, which is the first major step to the Nationals. They also placed second in the regionals, qualifying Sue Hillery, Chrissy Kelly, Lisa Kothe, Karen Murphy, Madelyn Noe, Shiela Wall, and Terri Walsh

to

go

to

Some other the WRams

significant

Championship,

second in the

tional.

They

had

a

5-1.

Idaho.

a

Anderson did. The team tionals at

the

qualified for the na by running a superior race Eastern Championships, them

placing

Princeton. but for

a

women

felt

make

it

behind

tough.

was

few brief moments the as

if

they

of

out

and

would

Rhode

the traffic

Beating battle,

second

Qualifying

was

when

never

Island. a

they

tough almost

missed their 747, they thought it was all over. Adjusting to the

change

in

altitude

gave

them

? The 1981 Team

Field

Hockey Has Rough Time

#

%^Xf$fp

1

254

Cross

Country

Field

Hockey

lunges

for the ball

during

a

match.

Rutgers

In

vitational, first in the Olde New England Tournament, and first in the Rl Invita

Lauren

coach

achievements for Rl State

first in the

were

dual meet record of

Linksmen Excel

G.R.I.'s

1981

Fall

golf

season

started

promptly on the first day of classes with the arrival of a new golf coach, Bruce Carson. Mr. Carson, a former G.R.I, golfer took over the head professional Job at Point Judith Golf Club, the schools home course. His be

coaching techniques proved quite an asset to the team's to

In tournament competition the linksmen also posted an impressive record. They won the New Hamp shire Invitational, competing against all the New England State Colleges.

They finished third in the 47th New England Intercollegiate Fall Golf Championship consisting of approx imately 45 teams. They finished

success.

fourth in the 24-team Bob Toski In

Headed by senior captian, Patrick Horgan, John Frizzell (Srn) David Behan (Soph.) and Robert Murphy (Jrn.) holding respectively the se cond, third, and fourth positions on the team, G.R.I, quickly posted a 6

tercollegiate Golf Tournament, with Pat Horgan winning the individual honors. And finally, in the Eastern Eight Conference Championship, leading after the first round of play, the team slipped to a still very respectable third place finish in their

and 1 record in local matches. Brian Murphy (fr.) Jerry Conforti (Jrn.) and Levine (Srn.), all excellent

last 1981 Fall

season

event.

Glen

golfers, provided great depth.

the team with its Bob

Murphy

i

? Pat

Horgan

the Bob Tosci

up his

putt

as

Pat

Horgan

shows the form that placed him first Intercollegiate Golf Tournament.

in

TheGp this

1981

the

During team

to

was,

On

superb.

football say

season

the

least,

defense

they were a tenacious and aggressive unit. Offen racked sively, they up points like a well-oiled scoring machine. Now, this team isn't the NFL San Fransisco 49ers. And it isn't the NCAA champion Clemson

champion

Tigers. Rather, this sub-varsity football

team was the GRl team.

This year the Rams, coached by Hal Kopp, had a 4 and 0 record for the season. The undefeated season marked the first time ever that a GRl

sub-varsity

football

team

has

won

every game. GRl opened its season on October 9 at Kingston, when they defeated

Academy. They then next two weeks on the road. On October 16, they defeated Brown and then took Holy Cross on October 30. Their best game of the

Bridgeton

spent the

season

they

AMick

was

November 6 when

on

beat Milford

Ferrigno

^These defensive players their

jobs

Gerry

Academy.

are

doing

with guys like Art Bell and

Gladstone

playing.

A^The offensive line with Charlie Diskis

quarterbacking

season as

their record

had

was

a

great

40.

?^To catcli the ball, Paul Masser, goes up in the air.

256

Sub

Varsity

No one player really stuck out in the defense for the Rams. Instead the defense was a well-balanced unit in which everyone played a key role. Offensively, however, it was a dif ferent story. The center of attention was fullback Jeff Johnson. Johnson was the leading ball carrier, scorer, and all around work horse for the offense. The outlook for next year is uncer tain. Whether or not the Rams are suc cessful depends on how many players make the varsity squad next year. Jeff Johnson is the strongest candidate to play for the varsity team. In other

words,

it will be

a case

of wait-and-see.

Stephen

Macomber

Sub

Varsity

257

Happy Days Are Here Again The Rams

are

dangered species

floundering the

Rams

no

longer

an

en

at GRl. After two

seasons

rebound

at 1-9-1 and to

2-9,

register

a

record of 6-5 in 1981. In the Yankee Conference, GRl finished

promising

4-1, sharing the Conference Cham with GMass. Rams surprised everyone, especially Penthouse magazine, who in the September issue named

pionship The

Rhody one of the Nation's 20 worst college football teams! Penthouse obviously didn't know the bare facts surrounding the Gniversity of Rhode Island football team, one of which being that GRl refused to surrender to the pressures of the past. The Spring season in

dicated that the talent was indeed there, and it was just a matter of players and coaches communicating and working hard together. The con dition of the players who reported to camp in August was evidence of the hard work and the mental prepara tion for the upcoming season that took place over the summer. Most obvious was their willingness and determination to come back against the odds. The Rams' debut was against a powerful Boise State team in Idaho. Despite a 33-8 set-back, it was ap parent that they were a much im proved team. The loss provided in centive and experience for a team that was hungry for a win. The Victory over Maine was oh, so sweet. It had been a long time since fans had seen Rhode Island on top of the score board at Meade Field. The Rams bleached the Black Bears 21-10. The next week, Rhody dropped a bomb on the Merchant Marines with a 2312 win and the enthusiasm and excitement spread. Soon the football team was no longer an embarrass ment, but a reason to be proud. They continued to win, opening fire at the GMass Minutemen 16-10, and delighting a Homecoming crowd with an impressive 33-0 victory over Northeastern.

'i

^ -^APaul looks for

'4Coach Griffin tells

a

??Dennis Talbot and

j%'

good Joke. Larry McPhillips

?Bernie Moran awaits the ball

^(i.N.H. defensive players

are

on a

in action

against

Maine.

punt.

dragged along for

a

ride

as

Joe Brooks

struggles for

a

Football

259

^Ram defenders

Tony Romaniello, Tony Deluca, and a large Family Day crowd.

Mark Brockwell line u|

against New Hampshire before

T^ John Ellis' ankle

TTTheI981 team.

J?iS^;ii3i3i5i'i5iSialpiiBiE4.^-ir4Pi^^8S 260

Football

Rams Turn it Around in '81 BG handed The 1981.82

graduating

s

its second loss

Rhody

in five games by the narrow score of 27-21. The Rams then traveled to

Delaware to face the Blue Hens. It

was a

for the Rams who short end of

a

always tough long ride home

came

35-15

up with the

score.

Still, it was a confident team which clawed the Wild Catse of New Hampshire 14-12 the next week. For the first time. Intrastate rival Brown broke tradition and traveled down to Kingston to meet the Rams. This was perhaps the most disap pointing loss. Rhody couldn't generate enough offense and fell 108. However, they bounced back and chewed up the Huskies of GConn 34-29, securing the co-championship of the Yankee Conference. The final game of the regular season was against Florida A&M at Tallahassee. The Rams

came home burned 41-6, but were looking eager to the Division 1-A ly playoffs. In post-season play, Rhody drew

the powerful Idaho state Bengals in the first round. They were scratched

51-0. Nevertheless, the

feelings

were

good. of the team boosted spirit. Attendance was barely 4,000 at the start of the season. At the last home game against GConn, nearly 11,000 fans were on hand to cheer the Rams to victory. With some new blood in the coaching staff and a new Athletic The school

success

Director, along with

an

enormous

amount of hard on

the

coaches,

work and sacrifice of the players and the GRl football program

part

has done a complete turnaround. Most definitely, they are headed in the right direction.

Hollis Chapman Julie Tierney ^^Sophomore running back Dave a game against Holy Cross.

rteill t

field in

U.N-H., Hollis

Football

261

262

Yankee Conference

Yankee Conf A

.

Long Time

Co-Champs Coming

GRl went further in 1981 than anyone could have predicted. Hard work and dedication on the part of coaches and players alike enabled them to gain a play-off berth and more impor

tantly,

to

gain respect.

The win of the G-Conn game gave GRl the title of Yankee

Conference

Co-champions.

the Conference was the first step of the goals set by team. the They were set in the beginning of the year. The achievement of these pre-set goals was the best feeling ever.

Winning

Hollis

ChapmaiY

t

Yankee Conference

263

New A.D. Revitalizes John Chuckran's office is located in the left-hand corner of Keaney

Gymnasium, parallel

to

the bubble

you come in the main doors. The office is small and modest, not the as

lavish setup you would expect an athletic director of a major university to have. That's how Chuckran is, though. He's not flashy; he gets the job done his way. The Penn State Alumnus signed on with the Gniversity last August to replace Maurice Zarchen, who resigned in February of last year after 19 years in the position. It was not the best of times for the athletic department, but Chuckran came in with the intent of giving the Gniversi a new image. "1 was well aware that Mr. Zarchen had resigned and that there were some improprieties, allegations and so forth," he said. "I didn't get overly concerned with that. 1 was concerned with taking the program to the heights I wanted. My first priority was to try to establish a new image for the department which

ty

would

give

the

Gniversity

a new

im

age around the state." The football team helped him out in this respect. "We've made some

264

John Chuckri

in our strides program," Chuckran said. "The football pro had come off some disastrous gram years. There was some discussion of dropping it. Our main thrust was to bring the program back." So what happens? Four months into the job, Chuckran and the athletic depart ment have the Yankee Conference champions on their hands. The team goes to the Division IA playoffs. In with the big boys. Idaho State brings the team back to reality, but for the first time ever, the Rams make the playoffs. "To be successful, you first have to set realistic goals," he said. "With the football team, our aim was to have a winning record and win the conference. If you can dominate the conference, you can build up

big

repect." Chuckran has also been pleased with the quality of the women's pro gram. "The women's program was well established when I got here," he said. "It is recognized considerably

throughout

the New

England

area as

"

rate program. Chuckran feels that the athletic program can give the Gniversity visibility. "This Gniversity has a lot

a

top

of

Programs good aspects," he

said. "I feel that

Gniversity will benefit from a wellrounded athletic program which is conducted with integrity and the

the

sights

set on an outstanding pro gram. A successful athletic program can get the Gniversity 's name

known around the country." One area he is especially

pleased

with is student support. "I've been very encouraged with the atten dance and support the students have rendered," he said. "I've had discus sions with students on where they think the department can go and what input they can have. I've been pleased with tlie involvement in in tramurals and club

sports. We're try

ing to create an atmosphere where students will see this as an important outlet which can contribute to their education." The main thing accord ing to Chuckran is that he wants the students to enjoy the program "if

they

are a

player

or a

spectator."

Despite the successes the pro gram has had, there is always room for improvement. Chuckran sees the possibility of improving the facilities and maybe adding some sports in the future.

"With the recent cuts,

to Benefit such

the

wrestling program, I don't see immediately if we are go ing to add any new varsity sports. We'll be working with Art Tuveson to expand the recreation program, which has been well received by the as

students." "There has been

some

interest in

polo, women's soc volleyball as possible varsity sports. The determining fac tor of this will come from a study done to see if there is enough in terest. If you start up a wrestling pro wrestling,

water

cer, and men's

gram, and allocate it, and only three

show up, bath."

you're

money for four students going to take a some

or

Students the fact that Rhode conducts an extensive pro athletics. This type of representation doesn't come to you, you have to earn it." Chuckran is candid when discuss ing GRl's reputation now. "Before you can take on the big guys, you have to take things step by step. Win conference. Establish your yourself. Then try to play with the big guys. We are not in a position now where we are attractive to the big schools such as GCLA, Ken tucky, Indiana, or North Carolina in Basketball. We may be very soon, but for now we have to concentrate

ple

to

recognize

Island gram

in

make the GRl program one that is well known in New England. "1 have some visions of expanding the pro

beating teams such as Duquesne, Holy Cross and St. Bonaventure. We have to get a reputation in New England and the East. Then we can step up to the big guys."

gram and making GRl a viable part of New England sports. I want peo

Ed Collins

Right

now,

on

Chuckran

wants

to

Halftime Action

? '4The Ramettes line up in formation.

?The

spirit

of

the

(JRl

Ram

keeps

the

crowd

motivated,

-^''That Ram Band"

curves

to the tune.

Halftime

267

Coach After

graduating

English:

from

ORl

in

1972, current Ram head basketball coach, Claude English decided to give the NBA a try. He played with

an

English's

Tom

years,

he

Carmody. served

as

For an

nine assis

Car

1980-81 season, English was named the Interim Head Coach. Kraft would return, but only in a limited capacity. When Kraft announced his retire ment at the end of the season, English was named head coach on May 8, 1981. The announcement came as no surprise. In taking over for Kraft as interim coach, English had led the Rams to a 21-8 season which was highlighted by the winning of the Eastern Eight regular season cham pionship in the team's first year in the conference. English was named co-coach of the year in the Eastern Eight (along with Duquesne's Mike Rice). Official ly, Kraft remained the coach of

English

first with

official record of 0-0. This past season was not as en as the last one. In his first

to serve as an assistant to his old

When Kraft suffered a mild heart attack after the first game of the

Claude

English may be the coach-of-the-year to be honored

joyable

coach,

Dedication and

so

the Portland Trailbiazers for a year. After that, he returned here to GRl

tant/associate coach, first to mody, and then to Jack Kraft.

268

record,

"official" head coach, Rams went 10-17, a far cry from the year before. It was a difficult year for English. For some, the term slump may app ly to the 1981-82 Rams. English doesn't think so. "I don't know if it was a real slump," he said. "We were in every year

as

English feels that working with his players this past season was the most enjoyable part of his job. "We

were

blessed

with

some

young men," he said. "Gnder the situation they were in, when you lose a lot, bad attitudes

outstanding

can come out.

People

don't listen to

do what you want them to do. With all the close losses we had, the players could have tucked their

or

heads between their tails, but they didn't. The guys communicated well with the coaching staff. We had a

ballgame. Fundamentally, we played well during the season. If you turn the three, four point and overtime games, you're looking at a

good rapport. The players knew they couid talk to us." With some changes made to the Eastern Eight, the loss of Pittsburgh

16-17 win season." English said that too many

and the addition of Penn State, St. Joseph's, and Temple, English feels that the Eastern Eight is in "the best

around

people

get caught up in the number of wins a

team has.

"A lot of people get w's and Is. From a

caught up on performance our standpoint, players kept plug ging. They could have given up, but they didn't. They played with a lot of enthusiasm. I felt there were only a few times when we weren't ready to play, like the Duquesne game. We could have won that game, but still didn't come to play."

we

shape since its existence." English feels the conference the upswing.

is

on

"The conference is on its way up. I'm excited about St. Joe's, Temple and Penn State who have great basketball traditions. St. Joe's has an excellent team. I'm looking for ward to bigger and better things from the league in the future." The influence of Kraft has been a

a

Dream learning

great

experience

for

English. "1 can't

measure

I

knowledge

the amount of

gained

from

coach

Kraft," he said. "He is one of the alltime great coaches in the NCAA. 1

gained

awful lot from him. 1 want

an

to use this

knowledge

to

help

con

tinue the success of the basketball program here at GRl." On May 8, 1981, a dream came true for

English. always

of dreams had for a number of reasons. I put in a lot of time here. 1 saw the program take off. 1 felt a big "I've

here

coaching

and

part of

the

someday

to be able to carry on the

program

hoped

tradition."

English's office, you coach-of-the-year award the wall right next to the

As you leave see

ills

hanging

on

door. The Rams may have had an off-year last season, but under English's direction, look for them to bounce back.

If the Rams do bounce back next English may have to make wall space for future awards

season, more

that will be coming his way. Don't bet against it. Ed Collins

Claude

English-Basketball

269

Gsually

after

Despite Honored Players,

a

basketball team with another the 1981-82 Ram .

long string Rhody with

.

.

of bad breaks that a sour

With Claude

left

taste in its mouth.

English as mentor of '81-'82 squad finished

the Rams, the dismal 10-17

a

place

top-notch season, a is ready to follow Gsually. However, hoop season was a

and

in the Eastern

took

Eight

seventh

with

record. No matter how bad their

4-10

season

did have some fine moments. They could not have done it without the help of four players, Roland Houston, Pappy was,

though,

Rams

of the Week in the Eastern Houston spent his last season the Rams co-captain and acquired his own cheering section.

player Eight. as

Pappy ten

in

Owens finished in the top with a 15.4 average named to the second team

scoring

and was All-Conference

as a

junior.

Mark Gpshaw finished in the top ten in five different categories in the Eastern Eight. He was third in scor

Whiting.

ing (16-9), fifth in rebounding (8.7) and fourth in steals (43). Marc, a junior, was named to the All-

As a senior, Roland Houston finish ed the top in five different categories.

Conference team, 1st team, the AllTournament team in the All-College

Owens,

270

the

a

the top spot in field goal percentage (55%), second in blocking shots (27). Houston was also named

including

Basketball

Marc

Gpshaw,

and

Kevin

tournament, (1st team), second team All-New and

England by the Gnited Press, Eigiit player of the

Eastern week.

Kevin Whiting, the other Rhody co-captain, finished tenth in scoring (13.8) and fourth in field goal percen

tage (51%). The senior was named to the second team in the All-College in Tournament Oklahoma City.

Whiting,

who

stands

only

6'2",

sneaked for an average of three re bounds a game and 30 steals, while blocking 13 shots. No one on the GRl campus would have believed the Rams would have season like they did and the first

a

two games

did not show the

pointment that would

come.

disap

Rams Finish Seventh ^^Steve tSisbet and Roland Houston both go after rebound

during

^?While shaw leans

a

game with

concentrating on the basket. on his West Virginia opponent.

-l-^TIn the air for

possible

a

a

Duquesne.

s

Marc

Up

Pappy Owens. seems

to

get the

TBefore the controversial Rutgers game. Chris

Cummings plays

Shody opened paign

with two

victory

over

Stonehill

squeaker While was

the 1981-82

quick wins,

College over

the

out west

playoffs, preparing

the

an

cam

86-72

the Fiore Brothers of and

95-89

a

Brown.

Rhody football team playing in the national Ram hoopsters were

to host the Monarchs of

Old Dominion. The 4,700 fans at Keaney were ready to cheer every Ram hoop, while waiting for the voice of Ted Doherty to announce that the foot ball squad was crushing Idaho State. There would be little reason to cheer that

night.

After

65-56 loss to the the the Rams dropped a

Monarchs,

heart-breaker in

Oregon,

a one

point

loss, 95-94, evening their record for the season to 2-2. After coming back to Little Rhody for finals, the Rams traveled out to

Oklahoma for the

All-College

tourna

ment.

With two

Rams

were

in

hard defense

straight wins, the

the

Championship

against Lamar. Despite 22 points by Gpshaw and 9 long-range shots and 18 points by Whiting, the Rams dropped a 63-51 decision to take second place. game

The Rams traveled home for what supposed to be a breather

was

against Widener College. The only Ram scoring in double-digit figures,

Gpshaw popped

for

a career

high

of

33, and the Rams squeezed out a 6762 victory, leaving their record at 5-3. overtime loss to West Virginia, eventual Eastern Eight seemed to be the straw Champs, that broke the Ram's back. An 8272 loss to Duquesne evened the Rams' record at 5-5. An overtime A two

point

loss to seven

Rams

George Washington and a point loss to Rutgers left the struggling.

These last four losses could all

against

West

Virginia.

have been forgotten with a victory over the Friars of PC. The four games could be written off as bad luck. Ram fans came out in hordes. Friar fans were few and far between, but when the night was over it was the Friar fans who could be heard throughout the Civic Center. The Friars found that little bit extra to beat the Rams, 49-47 in overtime. The Rams would then drop two more in a row, one to West Virginia, another two-pointer (59-57), and one to John

Bagiey

and the Boston Col

lege Eagles, which was also a twopoint heartbreaker, 46-44. With their record standing at 5-10, Rhody hosted George Washington and avenged an earlier five point loss with a five point victory, 59-54. But

more bad luck would come the way of the Rams. There was another seven point loss to Rutgers and a three point loss at the hands of the

Pittsburgh Panthers, 66-63. Basketball

271

Ram fans found one last thing to cheer about, a 91-60 blow out over St. Bonaventure at the Civic Center. Roland Houston poured in a career high of 22 points in that game, but

tragedy severely would

struck

be

as

sprained lost

for

Marc

Gpshaw

his ankle the next

and two

Playing against Holy Cross, Pappy pick up for Gpshaw, popping points, but the Rams still

tried to for 24

short

and

found their record floundering at 7-13. Owens again made a fine effort with 26 points against GMass, and this time it payed off as the Rams took a 70-60 win from the up

healthy once again, muscled for points as Rhody destroyed Brown

now

18

games.

came

Minutemen. Two more losses followed, an 8167 pounding by Pittsburgh and a 6659 loss to St. Bonaventure. They won the next two games, though, against Brown and GMass. Houston hit for 21 and Gpshaw,

91-63

before

3,400

faithful

tators. He hit another 18

spec

points

two

later at the Civic Center in a 64-62 barnburner against GMass. Two nights following the GMass win, the Rams hosted Duquesne.

nights

an 18 point, 14 rebound per formance by Houston and a 16 point Kevin Whiting, the Rams

Despite

showing by

dropped

their

last

regular

game 73-66. The Rams

were now

their second

season

season

preparing for

that would start

in

Rutgers and end, hopefully, in another city down south. However, the Rams would start and end their second season in Piscataway, NJ, with a 67-63 loss to the Scarlet

Knights. The 1981-82

season

can

ten off as a case of the bad

be writ

breaks,

but with a fresh crop of hoopsters, the 1982-83 team can make this year just another case of past history.

'81 -'82

Best Ever!

Gymnasts

-ITIie 1981-82 1

-^TSophomor

This

year's WRam gymnastics had the most successful season in GRl history. Qualifying as a team for the EAIAW Regional Divi sion 1 Championships, they pulled team

off an impressive 135.35 team score, which placed them fifth in the East. The team's score of average 135.2125 jumped 12 points from last year's average, and the team hit its high point total of the season when it scored 137.25

against

Northeastern

Gniversity. With full team spirit, all individual and team records were broken dur ing the course of the season. In dividual records

were

Janelyn Wilson, uneven-parallel

with

attained a

bars,

da Burns

flys

horse

the

in

Brenover

the

vaulting

a 9.0 on side horse and an 8.85 on the balance beam, and Elaine Sacks, with a 9.05 on the floor exercise and an

with

Coyne, vaulting

outstanding 34.75

in the all-around. Elaine Sacks' fine performance at the Regional meet qualified her for the AIAW Nationals in Memphis, Tenn. This was the first time in GRl

history

that

a woman

gymnast

was

sent to the Nationals.

With only senior co-captains Tam my Williams and Julie Glick being

lost to

graduation, Rhode Island

return

a

pete

very strong team to

will

com

next year.

by:

9.0 on tfie Michelle

Brenda Burns Jeanne Smalley

Gymnastics

273

Wescott's Men Are ''So Jazzed"

The Rhode Island Swimmers returned in September of 1981 and were greeted with newly renovated pools. This, and a lot of Rhody the Rams '81-'82 season, led

psyche, jazzed awesome

tains Dave

to

by

an

cap

Cote, Doug Cote, and

Tom Dwyer. The year was filled with many ex citing individual performances. Fine efforts were turned in by freshman Scott Boudreau in the 200 hundred yard breaststroke, Dave Venerus in the diving, and veteran John Taffe in the 100 breast stroke. In the most memorable race of the season, Taffe won the finals of the New England Championships in his specialty, and was voted "Most Jazzed Gnit" by

the team for his victory. Rhody relied on Taffe's victory and good team depth to place eighth in a field of thirty-three schools in the New Englands, which were held at GRl's own Tootell Center. A thrilling three point win over the Gniversity of Massachusetts was the highlight of the Rams dual meet season.

The success of this season's team realized through the innovative and dedicated coaching of Mick Wescott, Jeff Rosen, and Art Scolari, and through a new solidarity among the swimmers. was

Doug Cote

?ADoug, the other half of the Cole tandem, shows perfect form in the butterfly. ?Steve Durham and "Most Jazzed Unit," John

Taffee.

show

Englands.

the

look

they sported

at

the New

James Shine for WRam Swimmers

Humphrey,

-l-IThe

performer for the 'Sl'82 swimming and diving Gwen

Swimming in the Division pionships, the team placed an

A cham 7th with

overall record of 5-6. Nine records

broken by six winners. Among these new record holders were Lori MacDonald in the breaststroke events, Gwen Humphrey in the div ing events. Sue James, and the 400 medley relay team of Wendy Johnson, Lori MacDonald, and Cin dy Armour. Senior Gwen Humphrey was were

The women's swim team, under head coach Mick Wescott, had a great year during its first "normal" season season

budget

since was

cut ax.

1979. The 1979-80 threatened by the After retaining the

team, we returned to empty pools for the first half of the 1980 season. Since then, the team has grown and

With the help of a super freshman squad and the assis tant coaching of Jeff Rosen and Art Scolari, Rhody took on one of its

strengthened.

toughest schedules

in

history.

voted

by team members as the Outstanding Swimmer and Diver for the year. Gwen was a finalist in the 1 -meter and 3-meter diving in the New England Championships, and she qualified for the AIAW Nationals for the second year in a row.

Sue

a sophomore, also for the Nationals for her se-

Humphrey.

cond year, and she was also the high point award winner of the team in the New England Championships. She was a finalist in 4 individual events, the 200 butterfly, 400 IM, 500 free, and 1650 free. The meet

highlighted by James' second place finisfi in the 1650 with a time

was

of 18:02.

Some memorable events of the were the "Swiminar IV," which was held at GRi, intersession, which year

the team spent at the College Swim ming Coaches Forum in Ft. Lauder dale, Florida, double sessions, and the end of the year banquet, spon sored by the "Fast Lane Club." This year's team captain was Maureen

Murray.

James,

qualified

Mary

Jean Miniati

Top

Rodgers scored 28 points

Jon

twelve games and

in

gained 798 yards

this year.

He

longest gain 5.8

averaged

was

yards

per

40

yards.

as

a

also

returns

18.5 yards. Rodgers became

his

average

player

is

now

Ill

rusher with 798

Jon

to be awarded

named

was

ference

Yankee

Con

Player-of-the-Week. Rodgers was also named

to

the second-team of the Yankee Con

formance

ference all-stars at the

on

the

given by

was

Football Writers

previous Saturday. the New England for his performance

Despite missing five games with two broken bones, Naomi Graves averaged 18.9 points and 8.9 rebounds per game as she led the WRams to their second regional basketball championship ap

running

position of

back.

ft

England first-team selection for four straight years.

pearance since she came to Kingston as freshman in 1978. Graves' 1.834 points and 964 re bounds are career records in both scor ing and rebounding in Rhode Island

She holds seven all-time WRam basketball records. Graves was named to three alltournament teams and was chosen to attend the 1980 Olympic Trials. Graves was the first recipient of the Winifred Keaney Award presented to the top senior female athlete for overall

women's

achievement

a

She

history. an all-region

was

the

during

person's

t and all-Mew

Although lAarc Gpshaw missed two complete games and parts of two others during the Rams' 1981-82 basketball cam paign, Upshaw still managed to lead the Rams scoring attack tallying 16.9 points

the third leading scorer in the Eight Athletic Conference. Upshaw was fifth in both rebounding and field goal percentage in the EEAC. He was fourth in steals and eighth in

per game.

blocked shots with 18 in the EEAC.

Upshaw 44 this

He

also led the Rams in steals with

past

was

leading

re-

bounder with 8.7 rebounds per game. Upshaw became the 31st URI player to reach the cherished He has 1,013 year.

TopAlhleles

He

1,000 point plateau.

points going

into his senior

was

Eastern

For his

outstanding play he was named all-league and first-team all-college tournament in Oklahoma City. to

season.

the team's second

it 1 xK^i

the fifth all-

with the Golden Helmet for best per

It

276

in

with 424 carries.

single-season

He the first Rhode

all-time

all-time

third

the

Rodgers

third

1,802 yards. He

yards.

was

Island football

became

Jon time

kickoff

the

rusher with

rushing attempts

pass

receiver.

On

became

He

leading

Rodgers averaged 4.2 yards carry. His

Athletes of 1981-82 against Connecticut.

the first-team

He

New

was

named to the second-team all-

England

by

United

Press

Internationa!.

Upshaw

was

also named

Week for the week of

Player-of-the-

January 11.1 982.

1

What Have

They

Achieved? helped URI's track team to place finish in the NCAA Indoor Championships at the Pontiac Silverdome by placing third in the 880 with a time of Butch Brown 1 Ith

an

1:50.95. Brown mile an

ran

relay

leg for URI's

the anchor

two-

of 1:46.54 in

team with a time

indoor meet at Boston

University. to improve throughout qualified for the NCAA In Championships.

Brown continued the

season

door

and

He finished second in his semi-final heat which put him into the finals. In the finals, he finished third in the tion to

Mark Strawderman is a two-time Alttrack standout and the

American

greatest pole-vaulter in Eastern history. Strawderman holds every vaulting record in the East. He finished second in the 1982 Indoor Track Championships at the

Silverdome in Pontiac, Michigan

with a personal best and all-Eastern record of ]7'9Va" the highest mark ever achieved by an Easterner. He has cleared 17'6" twice and was also at 17'4t/2" which is higher than

earn

Among

his

na

him the title of All-American.

crowns

are

the

prestigious

IC4A's (3 times), both indoor and out door, Penn Relays (2 times), Princeton

Relays, and is a four-time New England vault champion in both Indoor and out competition. He was named the New England

door

recently

Athleteof-the-Year in 1981 and every meet and facility in the East, a goal no other athlete in history has achieved. Strawderman was also the recipient of the Albert Le Boeuf Award presented to the top senior male athlete for overall achievement during the person's

third

career.

,

anyone from the East has He narrowly missed first

ever vaulted. place at the contested NCAA's. He finished in the nation at the 1981

Track

holds

nearly

record

championships. Strawderman has won every major pole vaulting title available in tlie East.

John Carr

Greg

Eiffert has been sailing for over 1 1 He came to URI because of its has been a member all

now.

years

sailing

team and

four years. Over the past year, Greg had two very successful semesters of sailing. In the fall, to go to the New Englands. placed second out of sixteen com petitors. The top three in New England

Greg qualified Here he then

went

couver,

on

British

to

the Nationals. At Van

Columbia,

third in the country. In the sailed to second place in handed New England Races.

Greg placed spring, Greg the

double-

Top

Athletes

277

WRams Have

In retrospect, it

can

definitely

be

said that the 1981-82 ORl Women's Basketball season resembled a rollercoaster ride more than anything else. Due to inconsistent play and a went very tough schedule, URI

through many hills and valleys throughout the season. At times, (JRl looked like a finely-tuned machine. Then again, at other times, they looked like a machine that needed a fine tuning. GRl, which was coached by Nancy Langham, opened up its 1981-82 campaign by winning 5 out of its first 6 games. The happiness of this

strong start, however, the Graves.

by

early In

season a

was

tempered

loss of Naomi against the

game

on of Connecticut November 28, the GRl star senior for ward fractured both wrists and her right elbow after going up for a re bound. She returned to action on January 7. Following the strong start, the WRams spent the rest of December and all of January in a slump. In 10 games, GRl went 4 and 6. During February, however, GRl rebounded by going 6 and 6 in the last 12 games of the regular season.

Gniversity

278

Basketball

Gps

and Downs

The WRams finished the season a 15 and 14 record, which was to get them selected for post-season action. In the first with

good enough round

of

the

Eastern

AIAW

Regionals, however, St. John's Gniversity knocked the WRams out of the playoff picture. They defeated GRl by an 80 to 68 score. During the 1981-82 season, GRl was led by co-captain Naomi Graves. The senior forward led the WRams in both

scoring

rebounding. She

and

19.8 points a game while snaring down 8.9 rebounds a game. Carol Smith and Helene Roher scored

were

also

Smith,

a

major cogs in GRl's line-up. forward guard, scored 12.9

game, which was second on the team. She also led the team with

points

a

75 assists and 109 steals.

Meanwhile,

is a forward and center, scored 9.8 points a game while grab bing 8.1 boards per game. The scor ing was third on the team while the rebounding average placed second.

Roher, who

control

against

Montclair

? Going up for 2 is Carol Smith.

^Heather Mahan is

shooting

for

a

hoop against

(JMass.

Other important contributors in the WRam's line-up included guards Heather Mahan and Maureen Hogan and forwards Darlene Homonko and Barbara Miltner. It is uncertain whether or not GRl will be successful next year. The key lies with the recruiting efforts of Coach Nancy Langham. Recruits must be brought in to make up for the loss of both Graves and Mahan. In addition, recruits are needed to give GRl more scoring punch, more

height

up

front, and

a

more

consis

tent defense.

In other

words, if GRl has a good recruiting year, they could be suc cessful next year. On the other hand, if the WRams aren't suc cessful, they could be in for another rollercoaster ride. Steve Macomber

Basketball

279

Key Players The

1982

edition

Ram

Ice

Hockey was no exception to a ning tradition at GRl. The team

end

ed the

of

win

with a 7-5-2 record. finished strong in the stretch, going undefeated in its last 5

The

season

Rams

and

contests

outscoring

ponents 35 goals Veteran

its

op

to 12.

seniors

Steve

Jensen,

Jim McCarthy, and Rick Orton formed the nucleus of

Micky McCabe, the club.

Along with guidance and leadership, these players supplied a strong scoring punch. The defense was anchored by Dave

Tom Colucci Colson, Cooper, Frank Giampietro Steve Salvati, and goaltender Scott MacBeth. These players were

Mike

strumental in attacks.

thwarting opponents steady performers

Other

who contributed to the team's

sue

were Bill Low, Mark Mazur, Steve McGill, and Bob McLeod. This year's hockey team had to travel to West Warwick to use the cess

athletic facility there. Thanks to a relentless physical attack and many

great individual efforts, the team had a

fun season, and the fans had many contests to watch.

exciting

Jim

McCarthy

jlf

?Steve Jensen

scores

and

Hadfield and Bob McLeod get

roughs up the goalie ready to celebrate.

Melt Ice

in

Ruggers Improve

The Rhode Island

led

Ruggers

Spring

a

boisterous fall season, engaging in many games and aftergame drinking bouts. The fall

birth

of

so

new

vets"

season

Rugby

marked the

club.

The

longer tricky competition, the team pressed its bumper crop freshmen and sophomores into

"cagey enough of

a

were

no

to outsmart the

Captain

Bob Gilmore witnessed

considerable

play during came

size, but they made up for it in drive and

action.

season.

April 16th night game against Providence College. The GRl team was more determined than ever to and with the win, powerful comeback of Lenny Martineau and "Red Man," GRl romped over P.C, 19-4. The team lacked experience and an

The

during

improvement

a

in overall

the short '82 spring of the season their first home game.

highlight

impressive hitting. Captains Bob Mangle led the hit ting attack, along with the senior corps of Faragalli, Lamb, Degiulio, Rose, Sceery, Tambo, and Gilmore and Bob

Petruzzelli.

Gary Faragalli

? "New Wave Dave" tries to snag the ball

during

a

Talent Comes Although

Through

the .500 mark eluded

the Ram baseball squad once again, the 1982 campaign was not a total loss. At least 10 different Ram AilTime seasonal records fell to Ram

bats, gloves and pitching

arms.

Senior shortstop Joe Pirrello upped his own assist record by grabbing 79 assists. Senior Chip Howard also broke his own record by waiting out 27 base on balls. Tim Kindregan, senior first baseman, broke three records. His 22 RBI's made Tom Healy just a memory to Ram coach John Norris. Kindregan's 23 runs scored and five home runs have also made memories of Steve Qaluska and Ron LeDoux. Steve Godin, perhaps the Rams' steadiest performer, ended his sophomore year batting over .360. His forty hits knocked Healy out of the record books again. Besides Godin, the Rams had three others bat over .300. Joe Pirrello, Jim Miller and Joe Shaker all hit over the magic .300 level. On the mound for the Rams, senior righthander Charlie Bourgery threw his way into the books by toss ing 60 plus innings. Bourgery appeared in 13 games for Rhody which is also a new record. Junior righty Ron Barber took the win in five of his six deci sions to tie two Rhode Island records. Barber finished 5-1 and picked up two saves along the way to head up the Ram pitching staff. So all in all, the Ram season was not a total loss. It even could have been salvaged if it was not for some bad bounces and two late ^ason losses at the hands of Eastern Eight opponent, Rutgers, in beautiful

Piscataway, The

New

season

Jersey.

started the

same

way

it has for the past 80 odd years, tfie crack of the bat against the ball, the

sound of

thumping gloves Keaney parking lot, until the Ball" is heard. "Play

in

the

scream

of

The 1982 crusade started with bus

a

trip to Murray, Kentucky, The opened up against St. Louis Gniversity. Rams

282

Baseball

But Season Below .500

..ii

Ji,j&i:.-.^.^

'.

-

-

-..-

Bourgery went the distance in a 4opening win. Kindregan hit a 2-run, Rhody roundtripper in that victory.

T

3

season

From

the

there

Rams

lost

five

games in a row. Two losses came against SMG and three at the hands

of

State.

Murray

The Rams got one back from Mur State though. Rhody bats ray 1 1 hits smacked out including

by co-capt. Tony Carlucci and a game winner by Steve Godin. Barber went the distance in that 7-5 win. A 4-3, Tom Messier victory over Delta State, and a 6-3 loss to the homeruns

of Tennessee at Martin left the Rams with a 3-6 record to think about on their trip home. The only problem the Rams were really

Gniversity

experiencing

with the

was

The Rams made 29

errors

in

gloves. only 9

games.

Gpon their arrival back home, Rhody was ushered off to the SMG Invitational Tournament. Kindregan led

against Sienna singles and three chipped in with and a triple with

1 1 hit attack

an

College

with three

Joe Pirrello

RBI's.

hits, a double RBI's, while Joe Shaker had

two two

two

including a two run triple off the again went the distance in the 8-4 Ram victory. In the next game against GNH, the Rams wasted hits

wall. Barber

nine hits in

a

7-4 loss to the Wildcats.

Godin racked GMass

pitchers for banged

three hits and Dave Starrett

out two hits and two RBI's in

an 8-4 before the second game was called. After the GMass game, the New England weather caught up with Rhody and screwed up the Rams' schedule. With more than a week's break, the Rams came back and dropped back-to-back games, one to RIC (3-0) and one to New York Tech (7-3). A doubleheader split with GNH and Rutgers left the Rams with an unlucky 7-11 record.

victory

^

^ pKl BB?^

AA-4Thc

int4:iisity

of the game ib

A-4-^The lonely centerfielder,

;.

"?

^^Taking

a

swing

at the

ball is

eapluied by

the

squad

Greg Adams, finally gets Chip

Howard. It

was

at

a

home game

his hands

ruled

a

the ball.

on

strike.

.

A-4Co-capt. Tony Carlucci

^

-4Getting

A ASecond baseman Jeff

ABob

can't

get it in time for the play. The

Ump

called it "safe" for the N.Y. Tech tearr

the ball in the outfield is Steve Godin. Joe Pirrello and Joe Ouellette

Harper gets

the bail for

Blakeley, pitcher, shows his form

to

a

double

play

while

Chip

are

ready for

his throw.

Howard hustles in the outfield.

the home crowd.

Baseball

283

Then Holy Cross came to Bill Beck Field and left with two big wins. In the first game, the Rams got a three hit, three RBI game from hot hitting Steve Godin and a two hit performance from Jim Miller despite losing 7-6. In the nightcap, the Rams managed only four hits, two of them by Greg Adams, in a 7-0 defeat. Sporting a 7-14 record, the Rams headed toward the Storrs campus to take on arch rival GConn. Bourgery threw a three-hit shutout and was helped out by Godin (3 for 4), Pirrello (2 for 4, 1 RBI) and Dave Starrett (1 for 4, 2 RBI's) in the 3-0 win. A 6-1 victory over Central Connec ticut, which showed Tom Messier scatter nine hits over nine innings and striking out 12 men, brought the Rams to 9-14. Northeastern ventured into the wind capital of Rhode Island, namely Bill Beck Field, and got pelted for 10 runs in the first game. Kindregan, Carlucci and Joe Harper had two hits apiece. Kindregan stroked a solo homerun, while Harper's two hits were a double and a triple. In the second senior game, righthander Bob Blakeley pitched an impressive four-hit shutout in the Rams 1-0 squeaker. The Rams, then at 11-14, needed to split or win both doubleheaders against GMass and Rutgers. In the first GMass game, the Rams col lected six hits but couldn't get a man across the plate in a 2-0 loss. But a 10-hit assault, paced by Chip Howard (3 for 5), kept the Rams' Eastern 8 hopes alive with a 9-1 victory. In a must win situation, the Rams traveled to New Jersey for two games against the Scarlet Knights. The first game took ten innings to decide with the Knights picking up a 9-8 victory despite a 3-hit, 4-RBl showing by Joe Shaker.

.

AAAThe team goes out to

?Rounding out first

congratulate a

Kindregan,

waiting

for

is Joe Ouellette.

^This stance at home plate belongs ^ATim

Pictured here, he's

memt}er after his homerun.

to

first tiaseman. is

Dave Starrett.

ready

for the out but his opponent beat it

Now instead of a must win situa was a do or die situation. The Rams' bats were stymied. Scarlet

tion, it

scattered five hits and shut out the Rams 5-0 and killed any chance for the Rams to get into

Knight pitchers

the Eastern 8 The Rams

playoffs. dropped a

to the Friars before

6-3 decision

embarking

on a

five game winning streak but it was too little too late. The second game against P.C. proved to be the break the Rams needed to get going. Ram bats exploded for 1 1 hits and a Miller blasted runs. Jim 10 homerun and Godin plus Jim Kelly chipped in two hits apiece. The Rams upped their record to a 5-0 win over Harvard doubleheader sweep over scores of 7-4 and 5-2. Rhody had one last chance to make their season a successful in the Rhode Island State season

16-18 with

and

a

Brown with

Championships. Their first game was against and the Rams col lected 16 hits and 1 1 runs, as Barber and Messier combined for an eight

Bryant College

hitter while

allowing only

one

run.

Steve Godin went 3 for 4 with four RBI's including a three run homerun. Ram Co-Capt. Mike Medeiros went 3 for 3 with a solo homerun. After being rained out, the Rams had to play their semi-final game on the campus of Rhode Island College. RIC ended the Rams' season with a 7-3 victory. The Rams ended their season at 17-19 and will get most of their pitching staff back for the 1983 season. The team will surely miss the bats of Joe Pirrello, Tim Kin

dregan and Chip Howard along with the glove of Joe Ouellette and the leadership of Mike Medieros. David Rocco

Baseball

285

WRams Return From Oklahoma as It

Eighth-Ranked Team in Country

year that will go down in GRl WRam history. A test of team was a

work. A dream that 19

people

Other

than

come

will

true.

the

members from last

A year

forget.

never

return

of

1 1

year's nationally

ranked team and their devout belief in each other's ability, the WRam's road to the AIAW National Cham pionships in Norman, Oklahoma could

by

a

never

have been

reputable

First, the

guaranteed

travel bureau.

adjust to the loss of their premier pitcher and leader Carol Morris, who graduated after creating the successful softball team had to

tradition at GRl. Whether freshman Lori Whidden on the mound

could fill Morris' shoes was

a

Nancy

major

concern

Langham

for Coaches JoAnn

and

Robinson.

Senior pitching ace Nancy Grigor faced some curve balls herself at the season's start. She underwent surgery on January 5 to remove a cyst in her throwing hand. With opening day of practice coming time limited. Catcher Debbie Moberger was the next one on the injured list. Suffering from tendonitis and condo malasia in her shoulder, the Junior starter had doubts over whether she would suit up again. Eligibility turmoil and an injured ankle almost sidelined Co-captain Chris Dinoto. The Senior rightfielder found out she could only play two days before practice started. Spring training in South Carolina tested the determination of the Rhody squad. From selling fudge to

January 26, Grigor's recovering was

homemade rainbows, the WRams batted odds in reaching the first of many goals set for the season. Even nature helped to put the GRl club in an early season mess. With and rain dumped on the softball fields, games and tournaments had to be rescheduled or cancelled. Still entertaining thoughts of a 1982 Regional appearance and snow

286

Softball

possibly

five.

grade immediately and impressively, winning 12 games in 17 outings, and posting 74 strikeouts. Her final ERA

back from her injury is a testimony to her grittiness. After series of tests and treatments, Moberger jumpedback into her catching stance and did the job for the WRams. Batting .235 with 12 RBI's, Moberger led the team in the field with a perfect

a trip to the Nationals, the WRams had their work cut out for them. They had to dig deep, play well, and convince themselves that it could be done. It was a lot to ask. Whidden thankfully made the

was

1.67.

Debbie

That

Moberger

battled

fielding average.

Grigor leaped from the recovery room to the pitching mound and picked up where she left off as one of the leading pitchers in the east. Drive and desire earned her a final record of 14-8, 52 strikeouts, and a

1.60 ERA. Chris Dinoto wasted

no

taking advantage of

opportunity

her

time in

on the GRl playing field. Bum-ankle and all, Dinoto was the team's

leading hitter with a .356 batting average. She collected 38 RBI's and also led the team in homeruns with

A softball team is weakest

player.

weaknesses

as

strong

There

as

were

its no

the WRams balanced Everyone, regardless of age, on

squad. position, or experience, contributed mightily to the WRam's cause. Cocaptain Jenn Manning's dedication and leadership on and off the field were an inspiration to the rest of the squad. She also batted .314 and knocked in 14 runs. Shortstop, Sue Marino's bat and glove every bit resembled that of her Yankee idol. Kim Sloat found the magic back in

her swing, severely bruising the egos of rival pitchers with a .264 batting average and 14 RBI's, Freshman vacuum Debbie Periera, handsomely filled her position at first base and led the team in comic relief. Freshman Whidden performed like a gray beard. Centerfielder Lisa Mur phy, four-year clean-up batter whose bullet arm has been matched by none, leaves GRl with an impressive .328 batting average and a walloping 25 RBI's.

Major two-game sweeps against C. W. Post, Central Connecticut, Tem ple, and GConn won GRl a berth in the Eastern Regionals in Allentown, Pa. Life started looking pretty good for the women in blue. Things finally started going their way. They cap tured the R.I. State championship for the fifth straight year, and grabbed the *1 ranking in New England for

keeps. There was no stopping GRI. The only thing left was to win the Eastern Regional Championships. The WRams went for it. The WRams

got it. After losing their first game of the double-elimination tourney to West Virginia, who was the first-ranked team, Rhody bounced back and shut-out rival Rutgers 1-0 to knock last year's champions out of the tournament. Penn State was next, as a possessed WRam team convinced them who was the better club. A 4-2 victory put the WRams into the semi-finals against West Virginia. In order to win the tournament, Rhode Island had to take two games from WVG. A gutsy and flawless performance by the WRam squad that lasted until 1:30 am put them in the winners cir cle for good. Shutting out the Moun taineers in two straight games, 4-0, 3-0, the Rhode Island softball team was on their way to Oklahoma, the lone

team to represent Division I College Softball. Without a doubt, the women from Rhode Island left their mark in Nor Oklahoma. They snatched man, their first game against the Gniversi ty of Oklahoma and became the first

Eastern

eastern softball team to win

a game the national tournament. The WRams lost their next two contests against the Gniversity of Michigan and Western Illinois, thus finally ending their 1982 campaign. The WRams did it though.

at

By rising together above discouraging odds, and believing in themselves and in each other, the WRams earned nation-wide respect. With a final record of 27-14-1, they ended their season as the eighthranked team in the country. Very im pressive. Yet their individual com mitment to GRl softball, and more importantly to each other, made the 1982 season more extraordinary and memorable than any record could show. Janet Simmons ADeidre Rowles after she scored

a r

:ongratulates Jenny Manning st

^Shortstop Sue Marino from the Temple pitcher.

Temple University.

waits for the

right

ball

Senior

pitching

4^get8 ready

.

ace

.

Nancy Grigor

'4to release the softball Tand follows the

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

pitch through

for

a

strike.

lii''!^Vpl^M9BM^ffi

^g|#^_*^i^lag^^i^^lf^ <4Lori low

as

Whidden

gets

she prepares for

grounder.

a

Rhody

Lacrosse

"Attacks" Its

Way to Victories

Led by player-coaches Bryan Shaughnessy and Mark Nisbet, the

Gniversity

of Rhode Island Lacrosse

Club

was a team with experience depth. Shaughnessy, Nisbet, Rusty Nisbet (brother of Mark), comprised the first midfield line which was loaded with both speed and scoring talent. Other quality

and and

midfielders

were

seniors

David

and Tom Gaipa, juniors Baker and Jack Serpa, and sophomore John Mahoney. The strength of this year's ex plosive Ram's team was the attack. Jeb Handy, Terry Pendergrast, Reg gie Barrows, and freshman sensation Robert Trocchi, comprised one of the finest attacks of any Ram team. The defense was a model of con sistency, led by experienced defensemen Bill Walter Cook, Nester, and Frank Ross. All three of these defensemen were known for

Grandpre Tim

hard hitting and great stick work. The tandem of junior goalies, Andrew Lerner and Boyd Smith, was brilliant and did an excellent job directing the defense. The Rams opened the season against cross state rival Providence College. Rhode Island manhandled their

College. One season

of was

the the

of

highlights weekend

trip

the to

Boston, where the Rams crushed Northeastern 20-4. Almost everyone on the team scored in this game. Their next Boston game, against a fine Dean Junior College team, was the first real test of the season. The Rhody attack overpowered Dean and crushed them 15-8. The attack was led by the incredible perfor mance of Bob Trocchi, who had ten

goals and two assists recipient of the year's ball. The

Rams next

and was the second game

faced

the Friars, 12-5. The brilliant defense of Bill Cook sparked the team to this victory, and as a result Cook was awarded the game ball. In the sec

Boston Gniversity team at home. The Terriers jumped out to an early lead and fought off a late comeback

ond game of the coasted to a 14-1

by Rhode Island. The Rams play particularly well in this

season

win

the Rams

over

Bryant

a

strong

and

lost 9-7. This was their first defeat and ended their chance of an unbeaten season. Even though GRl lacrosse is only a club team, it showed a lot of talent and teamwork playing against op ponents that were varsity inter collegiate squads. Brian Shaugh nessy and Mark Nisbet did a great job in organizing and coaching the team, and are largely responsible for the team's success.

did not contest

Josh Fenton

With It

WRams

-IA. ?. M.

players

move

..

in for the kill.

.

.

reach to

.

.

give chase.

<T.

.

.

pull

in

a

pass.

control the action.

It was a very inexperienced Rhode Island women's lacrosse team that traveled to Virginia early this spring to compete against some of the best Divi sion 111 teams in the nation. The Rhody team that traveled south was

made up of several young players and several who have never players played varsity lacrosse before. This inexperience did

hamper the WRams, however, as defeated such Division III powers Old Dominion, Lynchburg, and William and Mary. This lack of experience, coupled with the loss of injured star goalie not

they as

did prove to be costly the WRams as they returned north Division I competition. Rhode Island finished with a league record of 2 wins, 4 losses, and 1 tie. In the WRams' finest game, they defeated Providence College by an

Tracy Andrews, to

to face

Their zone defense, which had been strong all year, shut down the P.C. attack and yielded only a pair of goals in the 1 0-2 victory. Coach Allison Walsh saw a marked improvement in her team over the course of the year. Walsh expects the

eight goal margin.

team

to

players

be stronger in continue to

1983,

as

develop

her and

improve. Peter Miniati

Lacrosse

291

Sailing

Team Takes Pride in

When the sun comes out and the bad weather passes, you won't find too many GRI sailors in their classes.

The GRI in

Sailing Team takes pride representing Rhode Island, "The

Ocean State." In the past, the GRI Sailing Team has been ranked among the top ten teams in the na tion, producing more than its share of All-Americans. The team is a member of the New England Inter

collegiate Sailing Association (NEISA) and does most of its sailing here in the Northeast region. The fall season starts immediately when school begins and lasts until MidNovember. When the ice melts in Mid-March the

spring sailing

season

and it lasts until the end of the semester in May. The team has its own fleet of twelve 420s in which they practice and host regattas. The GRl Sailing Team is presently self-coached and organized. Without the cooperation and enthusiasm of each member of the team, the GRl sailing team would not be where it is today. The team has gone through drastic changes due to its loss of var sity status and the reduction of financial support resulting from

begins

budget

cuts

in

the

Gniversity.

However, the sailors of GRI have handled these

They're

changes successfully. working harder, sailing

faster, and generating

psyche

than

more

team

ever.

Peter Cusick

I

Representing

The Ocean State

^^AThe teams Friis

are heading Trophy competition.

out to the

-^-^Reaching along the Cheryl Beck, The sailing Championships.

team is

^Again, the

in the N.E.

team

racing

^AGreg Eiffert, in A A Just

boat

starting point

on

Mystic

Lake

during

Thames River in boat "3!

*

10 is

Dinghy Championships.

heading down

after the start, the Larks

AThis is the start of the Friis

competing

are

Trophy

the first

close haul

in

the

is Chris Snow and crew. al the 1982 New England Dinghy

leg of

during

Medford, Mass.

the

the Friis

race.

Trophy.

Men's Track Runs The 1981-82 Gniversity of Rhode Island Indoor and Outdoor Track under the direction of teams, coaches Bill Falk and Charlie McGin nis, achieved national recognition. The teams attained national atten tion in a climate of tough competi tion and financial restrictions. In the last three years, the GRl men's teams have made spring trips to Florida, California, and Alabama. These trips have been entirely selffinanced by sales, raffles, and dona tions sought from friends and alum ni. GRl competed successfully against major powers in New England, who have more scholar ships in cross-country alone than GRl has for the cross-country, indoor, and outdoor track programs

Away

With National

combined. In terms of achievement, 20 in dividuals qualified for the 1981-82 New England Indoor Championship, where GRI finished in third place. In

dividual champions were Joe Patrone in the high jump. Butch Brown in the 800 meter run, and the 3200 meter relay team of Mike Ringuette, Jim Burton, Bob Frost, and Butch Brown. These three champions also established new school records during the season. Freshman Greg Hale recorded best school times for the 5000 meter and 2 mile runs. The 1600 meter relay team of John Hamilton, Gilman Brown, Rob Petrie, and Tom Harr ington established a new indoor standard.

Rankings

The crowning achievement in

came

Michigan during the NCAA Indoor Championship when GRI finished eleventh in the nation. This was ahead of all New England and Eastern teams except the already many time national cham pion, Villanova. In the process, tricaptain Mark Strawderman finished second in the nation in the pole vault and Butch Brown finished third in the country in the 880 yard run. Mark Corsetti finished as the fifth American in the 35 pound weight throw. For their efforts, all three were named to the All-American track and field team. Detroit,

Mark Rerick

As Women

Slip

in New

England's

Track and Field

295

^Rhode Island star Kristen O'Connell WRam victory in the 1500 meters in

a

a

brings meet

home

against

Connecticut.

ATThe 1981-82 indoor Tracl< Team. ? An official ioolts a

powerful

on as

Maureen

Hogan

unleashes

throw.

A transitional year would be the way to describe the 1981-82

best

season

Coach

for

GRl

Lauren

Women's Anderson's

Track. Indoor

and Outdoor Track teams entered the year with fewer athletes on the team than in past years as six run ners were lost through graduation. Coach Anderson hoped that the number

of high caliber athletes returning along with a crop of good freshmen

distance

runners

would

compensate for this lack of depth. Rfiode Island entered the year as defending New England outdoor

champion and runner up in the New England indoor championships. 1981-82 saw the WRams slip to a disappointing 10th place finish out doors and fifth place finish indoors. Despite these disappointments, it was still a solid season for Rhode track

Island Women's Track. Led by captains Elena

Gervino

and Jean O'Connor, both the indoor and outdoor teams finished with

dual meet records of 2 wins and 1 loss. Distance runners Terry Walsh,

Chris

Kelly, Sheila Wall, and Susan Hillery, all freshmen, scored con

296

Track and Field

well for the team, as did Lisa Kothe, and O'Connell. O'Connell was outstanding all year for the WRams. Her accomplishments included a se cond place finish in the New Englands, a fifth place finish in the Eastern Regionals, and school record times in the 1500 meters, 3000 meters, and the 2 mile. To top it off, she represented GRI in the Na tional Championships held in Cedar Falls, Iowa. Other outstanding individual per

sistently Elena

Kristen

Gervino,

formances were turned in by Lisa Kothe, who placed 5th in the 800 meters at the EAIAW Regionals, Mary McBride, the new school record holder in the pentathlon, and Terry Walsh, who bettered the school record in the 5000 meters.

High points for the WRam team their 19th place finish at the EAIAW Indoor Regional Champion ships, and their first ever appearance at the famed Penn Relays. were

Peter Miniati

Harmony

in Motion What is crew? Crew is the oldest

intercollegiate

sport in America, older than baseball, football, or basketball. Crew bears the distinction of having been designated the official "prep py" sport by The Official Preppy Handbook. Crew is the ultimate no stars, no heroes. team sport Crew is harmony in motion. What does crew mean? Crew means feeling at home with the serenity of a sunrise. Crew means

power

eight working as one to sixty foot craft silently

a

the water. Crew means numb and lungs on fire, and knowing that the race is only half over. Crew

across

legs

means

humility

means dedication. Crew in victory and graciousness means a way of life.

in defeat. Crew

Crew is a full-time sport at GRl. The team races in both the spring and fall, and trains on land during the winter. Although a club sport at GRl, the team rows against varsity teams from over

a

hundred

colleges

and universities in the G.S. and Canada. 1981-82 was a banner season for GRI crew. The team main tained a .700 winning percentage and qualified crews for the finals of the national championships. Bob Gillette

iity heavyweight

four

4AThe 1982 team. Crew the

Classic

in

Brighanttne.

New

setting for this novice heavyweight

Seniors Star in The water a

Gniversity of Rhode Island polo team treated their fans to

season

The

H2O Polo

of action and excitement.

Rams,

seniors

led

John

by high scoring Sundburg and Doug

Cote, and goalie Mark Fisher, fought their way to an 8-6-1 record. The Rams opened their season with three quick victories, including a 25-6 romp over Bridgewater State. They continued on their hot streak by placing second in the GRI Invitational Tournament, beating the powerful

Trinity College

team by eleven goals in the process. In the Rams' next tournament, the GMASS Invitational, Rhody again

off against Trinity. Rhode Island could only manage an 8-8 tie this time, however, and had to settle for a tie for third place in the

squared

tourney. The opening match of England Championships

the New

brought

Rhode Island face to face with their rival. Trinity, for the third time this season. This match proved to be their toughest of the year, a brutal affair that wasn't decided until the last shot. Trinity, the eventual New England champion, scored on a penalty shot in the last minute of play to defeat the Rams 9-8. Rhody bounced back from this disap pointing loss and downed Coast Guard by an 11-9 score. Rhode Island eventually took third in the New Englands. John Sundburg, Dave and Doug Cote, and Peter Vetter were the stars for the Rams in the New England and as a result they awarded post-season honors. the tournament M.V. P., Sundburg, was also named first team all-New England. The Cote brothers joined Peter Vetter on the all-New England second team.

Championships, were

Although they will be losing many talented seniors through graduation, the outlook for the 1982-83 Rhode Island water polo team is good. Vet Fisher, Dave Sullivan, John Taffe, and Charlie Flynn return to ter,

form the nucleus of what should be

298

Water Polo

a

# powerful team. good freshman

The addition of

some

recruits to this group

should make next

competitive year's squad.

yyy^^

and

year's exciting

team as

as

this

Peter Miniati

AAATeam

nigh

scorer.

Doug Cule, generates the

"'="='= '' "" *'""=

AARhody players

take

invitational Tournament.

a

breather

during

the URI

Rebuilding Brings Results

Gndaunted by frustration and

a

first

year

setbacks.

of Art

Tuveson

this year turned a rinkydink intramural and recreation pro gram into a high-class establishment, complete with a vast repertoire of programs and facilities to trim and toughen even the most untrimmable and

untoughenable people.

Once housed in a dwarfed-sized shoe box, the office has moved upstairs in Tootell, and two vast rooms house mass quantities of equipment. Saying there's plenty is the understatement of the month. Credit is due in two places money and brains. With $34,000 go ing to the programs via the student activities tax, the Director of Recrea tion and Intramural sports (Tuveson) can give the students what they

have never seen before a beautifully renovated weight room, 22 men's sports, 21 women's sports and 6 Co-Rec sports. With an ID card, you can do just about anything you want, and the will supply you with the necessary tools to perform your desired activity, except perhaps rodeo equipment. The turnaround happened from day one of the school year. With the help of some dedicated students,

department

Tuveson circulated a Rec brochure to the resident halls and Greek

houses; the brochure listed all the available apparatuses, activities and levels of competition in those ac tivities. The levels are as follows: Level

3

for

fun. Level 2 for

in

termediates, and Level 1 if you're

ahead to the Olympics. All were more than 9,000 of these guide pamphlets distributed around campus. And the results? More than 80 students work in the Co-Rec department. Many more students are getting involved in club

looking

told, there

sports. And yes, there are lines of people waiting to get passes and

equipment. Where once Tuveson was in his office 24 hours a day, today you'll be lucky to hear him answer his own

phone

once.

Producing results,

Tuveson has shown, and motivation

Tuveson is

definitely

as

takes

action

two

things

not short on.

Bryan

Ethier

Art Tuveson

299

Intramurals

300

Intramurals

It's

Anybody's Game

Intramurals

301

1981-82 IntrMnural Extra Point Place Phi Kappa Psi

Kicking

Wrestling 126 FilipPascale,

Field Goal Kicking Graham Sellar, Butterfield

Men's Level 1 FIJ1< Men's Level II Phi Kappa Psi B Men's Level III Sigma Nu Women's Sigma Kappa

J

Golf Team Sigma Phi Epsilon Indiv. -^^ Steve Garabedin, Phi Epsifon

Vf

Sigma Kappa

Innertube Basketball FIJI

Volleyball Men's Power Phi Kappa Psi Men's Jungleball TEP A Women's Hutchinson Stingettes Co-Rec Spastic's Spikers Grad Co-Rec Bay Bombers

Basketball Men's Level I Gnits 11 Men's Level II The Gamblers Men's Level 111 Phi Kappa Psi

Rejects Women's

Six Packers

Innertube Water Polo Men's TEP Women's Mixed Nuts Afloat Co-Rec FIJI Water Snakes Indoor Soccer Men's Academia

Sigma

Cross Country Race Men's Team Bressler Harriers omen's Team GRI Crew A Men's Indiv, Mike Douglas, Phi Kappa Psi Women's Indiv. Sherrie O'Con nor,

FIJI

134 AlanMsjlrnan, Fayerwethe"' 142 Eric 1 50 Kevi#v\i||er, Peck 167 Tim Arnold, Adams 177 Robert Davis, Hutchinson 190 Keith Greco, Theta Chi Gnl. Steve DeCarlo, Theta Chi

Spl^SAE

Flag Football

Wiffleball Phi Psi Sox

Champions

Women's

Swift Kicks

Softball Men's Level I Aldrich Big Guys Men's Level II Women Without Bones Women's Turf Tremblers Co-Rec Maxwell's House Badminton Hashemi-Haeri Mostafa Singles Men's Doubles Andy Cook, FIJI Carl Mason, FIJI Co-Rec Doubles Mark Oliver, Butterfield Kendra Haggerty, Bressler Tennis Doubles Men's

Steve Scholz, FIJI Steve Babine, FIJI Women's Donna Tuholski,

Hopkins Wendy Gocha, Hopkins Free Throw Lambda Chi

Alpha

The 1982

EXECUTIVE STAFF

Trish

306

Executive Staff

Gingras

and Jodi Fournier

Joanne Carducci

Executive Staff

307

Literary Contributors

Photography Staff

Nina Sue Adams

Bob Benvenuti Bruce Birkenmeier

Rodger Conway

Sheri Mathews Jim

Barnes

Polly

Michael Blanding Richard Booth Ronnie Bucci Mark Castro

McCarthy

Katie Bitter

Linda McFarland

Brian Breshnahan

Beth McManus

Tom

Jim Miller

Bryant

Peter Cusick Tom Danho

Brenda Burns

M. J. Miniati

Jeffrey Davis Greg Derozier Ray DeFrancesco

Karen Canaan

Dawn Mirone

Debbie Canto

Leslie Morales

John Carr

Bob

Hollis

Karen

Murphy

Ed Collins

Sandy

Newett

Jon Cooke

Mark Rerick

Ed DeJesus John DeWaele

Suzanne French Sheri Galperin

Greg Ganguzza Terry Garrity

Chapman

MikeGoriarian Matt

Haag Herring

Martin

Murphy

Doug Cote

John Richards

Peter Cusick

David Rocco

Patricia Doolittle

Lou Sciacchetano

Paul lannucci

Patricia

Kelley

Laureen Lantz

Judy

Lawrence

Ernie

Myette

Bryan

Jim Miller

Janet Simmons

Ethier

Bill Falk

Jeanne

Josh Fenton

Julie

Bob Gillette

Jim Velino

Ellen Greenwood

Kenneth Ward

Audrey Hill

Karen White

M. J. Miniati

Larry Nelson David Santos Patrick Taylor Erik Tinkhauser

Kathy

Walsh

Captain Scott

Smalley

Tierney

Mitch Zuckoff

Lar5(

Steve Macomber

Acknowledgments The Good 5C

Information Desk staff

Cigar

Bruce Hamilton, Advisor

Jane Thierfield

Karen Devitt,

Taylor Representative John DeWaele, Brown Studios Photog rapher Irene Nelson and the scheduling office

Me!

Jim Norman and

U.S.

Sports

Information

Murphy Library Special Collections Bob Izzo

Jane

Brawley Army

Student Activities Office

U.P.l.

Mrs.

Theater

Nye

Department

I,

Typeslyle The

used

cover was a

The book

was

was

Korir

printed

on

nissionofthe ]982Renais

Staff

Acknowledgments

All headlines

were

set in 24

processed photograph

on a

point

to

48 point type size. Body

white durolith

cover.

Photograph

R.l.

set in 12

point solid. Captio

i

lead in boldface, set in 8

point.

w

I 0 lb. enamel paper.

The 1982 Renaissance

308

la.

four colo ;

'-'

1 982

ance

by

the

editor.

University

of Rhode Island

yearbook

staff. No part of this

yearbook

ay be

copied

or

reproduced

in any way without the per-

There

are some things that will change in a yearbook. There always be Green Hall's clock tower dominating the book. It's one of the most aesthetic buildings on

never

will

campus and was chosen to be on the cover for that reason. The original idea was to use a generic-type cover, but In the end a traditional cover

appeared. The 1982 Renaissance staff made changes wherever possible. We add ed to the bulk of the book by in

troducing headlines, and

captioned

feature stories

photographs.

this may not be well the onset, it was a risk decided to take.

Although cepted at

pulled

to

meet

supplied

the refreshments. Their

tion also added

something

new

sec

with

variety of feature stories about dif ferent activities sponsored by the a

organizations. Sports editors, Lauri Pietruszka and Pete Miniati put together an insection

depth

it like it

was

on

athletics.

They

told

in the headlines and

showed it like it was in the photos. Laurie was also "flexible" with her and

added

to

the

great

camera

photography in the book. Pete came through in the end with his creative captions, and articles about the

Student Life and Academics took on a new format. Feature stories reflected the year and captured times that all students had to ex perience throughout the year. These sections created many cfiallenges in coming up with ideas, and then get ting someone to write copy. It was a challenge because some ideas were so obvious, you would never think about covering them in a yearbook. In order to do the Senior secton, two new positions were added to the staff so more time could be put into these pages. Filling these positions were Ann Mayer and Beth Stein man. Working together, they both created a different section. Beth would deserve an award for the most improved photographer on the staff. She wouldn't allow anything to get in her way of doing something new and different. Ann was the creative half of the duo. If we only knew how well she wrote in the beginning, she would have been doing more of it. dedication Their throughout the year, and until the middle of June reflected in the outstanding job did. The Organizations section re quires patience and perseverance. Every club wants to be in the book, was

they

seems to respond to never a photo. Kim Potter had patience and Chris Byrne persued many hours in getting all the organizations scheduled. Not many

but

were

we

counts.

schedule

nighter's

ac

The University's public image played a large part in creating this yearbook. Specific positive aspects of the Gniversity opened the year book in order to prove the public wrong about the image. But the im pressions the students have is what

the

late

deadlines, but whenever we stayed late, Kim kept us going with her jokes and sense of humor as Chris

teams.

As

was

proven in this book it isn't

impossible to cover the year with both pictures and copy. Copy editors Bob Jeffrey and Trish Hussey proved this as they edited many ar ticles all year. Bob was dedicated to his job and the staff. Trish was a hard worker who put up with a lot, but always had a smile on her face. Jim Miller and Joanne Carducci started out as photography editors, but lack of time caused Jim to give up the job. Joanne continued on in organizing the photographs, while Lee Greenwald picked up in schedul ing of photographers. The outstan ding work of both can be seen on

Lee Greenwald

Co-editor, 1982 Renaissance

every page. What looked like an easy job on the staff really wasn't as Jodi Four nier and Trish Gingras witnessed for themselves as Business Managers. Joining the staff for the second half of the year offered many hassles.

Budget

problems,

if

anything, together as fought for a larger budget necessary for the quality book we try to publish. The only reward that each staff caused the staff to

come

one as we

member could get from the time into publishing this book is the intrinsic reward of accomplishing their task. It takes a year before the final product is received, but the wait is well worth it. Luckily, we all made it through the year and

they put

learned a lot We know we

more

from each other.

captured the year that was an important part of every stu dent. The yearbook is your way remembering it all ten years from now.

Terri

Terri

Paglione

Co-editor, 1982 Renaissance

Paglione Editor's Mole

309

The second semester of the 198182 school year was filled with ups and downs for URI and the communi ty of people who called the Universi

ty their home. When break

the

was over

five-week and school

Christmas was back

in swing, some were tan, some were some got jobs and some didn't return. But everyone who did come back had one thing in com mon. We were faced with a review of

well-rested,

GRl that made the

University

look

brought him here with very few peo ple knowing about it. They did their job well and he agreed to redistribute the now-famous questionnaires from which he will gather his information for the next edition of "A Selective Guide to Colleges." But more important than that, the Guide ended up serving a greater purpose. While it seemed like we were being attacked again by out siders a strange thing happened. For the first time in recent memory, URI held

a poor place to get an education. It started with calls for a lawsuit and then a plan to get Edward Fiske,

was

education editor of the New York to come to GRI to see what

review that rang true, but who gave "them" the right to say it in such a

like

Times,

together by

a

common

things

about the

bond.

Sure,

there

were

and

we were

sarcastic

place

weaknesses instead of

doing here and what kind of he was writing about. A small group got together and

manner

our

point

out

triumphs?

^wm$^m^. ...

^'A

H^^^r^%cw

k>T4ll ^ y-i.^

^

Reactions were different and by means universal but the feeling rose from the dormitory custo dians all the way to President Frank Newman, with most of us in be tween, was that "they" didn't know what URI was really like. Maybe there was a positive result to it all. Thoughts of the true value of a URI education held us together during the trials and tribulations of the rest of the semester. The only way to know this place is to be here, and to be here is to be part of something no

that

special. Another px^tential problem facing URI also came from outside the boundaries of the campus. Federal aid subsidies were being threatened and that meant undergrads and grad

students had to do something to fight the impending cuts. So what better way than a Finan cial Aid Rally where students from Rhode Island, led by the URI delega tion, could go to Providence to face lawmakers and tell them what was on our minds. Although the ultimate success of the rally will not be known for a while, when the entire Congressional delegation and dozens of state legislators pledge their support for our concerns, something must have gone right. We didn't

just sit back and let happen around us. URI students led the fight against fund ing, not only in Rhode Island, but with a message to Washington.

things

And rallies held this semester didn't just concern outside interests. Fears that the hugely-successful dance program might cease to exist prompted marches and rallies to

open the eyes of the administration, the college of Human Sciences and Services and the rest of the

University. Clad in brightly-colored tights, Danskins and leg warmers, the dancers marched from Keaney to the Quad. Armed with thousands of signatures on petitions, they stood in the rain carrying signs and chanting "We want to Dance." And dance they did, while the theme from the movie "Fame" blared on a tape recorder. The dancers made it known to those who saw them and all who heard of their protests how much they love the art of dance. As the semester drew to a close, it seemed like their efforts paid off. Word from the administration and the college that might have cut the two part-time instructors was the chances were "slim" that URI would be without a dance program when fall rolls around.

The dance protests stemmed from a larger issue that surfaced in the spring. was The University undergoing a "rebalancing" of priorities that will steer the direction of the school for the next decade. Terms like "computer literacy," and "increased technical support," were thrown around. The trends of the country are going to affect all of the graduates of GRI. So the ad ministration put together a plan to shift over $2.5 million over the next three years to areas that will cater to the future. The future is now. Everyone is hopeful that GRI will be a part of it. Fun was, as usual, a part of the semester with events like Paddy Murphy Day and Greek Week keep ing the whole campus busy. (By the way, the winners of Greek Week were Delta Zeta, Sigma Chi and Zeta

!9tjt#-:

ii^^::^-

Beta

Tau.)

But the Greek community wasn't the only group having fun. Offcampus parties and road trips down to the beach and the bars that catered to us were a constant reminder of the enjoyable times in college life. Dorm Olympics were another diversion for campus-dwellers. With events that ranged from ping-pong to sack races, the second annual event was a needed break from the rigor of studying and dorm-life in

general. Elections.

posters

Every

seem to

spring

the

materialize and dot

the campus with pictures of smiling faces and glowing promises of a bet ter

place

to go to school.

It was a hard-fought battle that proved all three women candidates president worthy of the support

for

from the campus. But as always, there had to be winners and losers. Sue Worrell and Maggii McGonagle won with a convincin tally of votes. And for the first tim in GRl's history, both the president and the vice president of the student

body

were women.

The cold

spell

that

accompanied luckily avoided for spring spring carnival, the concert, the banana barge and the bluegrass festival, accompanied by temperatures in the high 70's made for the perfect weekend. The concert was delayed but no the

elections

was

when it was weekend. The

time

minded the chance to catch the first rays of the season. When was the last time you can remember hun dreds of URI people partying, drink one

ing

and

Keaney

laughing in the Ellery Pond?

and

sun

near

'::^mf

y^^^&iyyi:;^.

m" <.-

s.|. ^

that the year has You can't really

Concerts that include Squeeze, of Seagulls and NRBQ are waiting for. Another concert the Student Entertainment Commit tee brought was a Valentine's Day treat with James Taylor. Over 4,500 people singing in unison. Quite a

now

success.

Davis Hall will always look like a castle in the moonlight. The dining halls will always be a place to joke

[Flock 'worth

Finals

came

and went and

finding poorly we did important when

out how well or how

didn't

seem to

be

as

grades weren't sent out important thing

But the

semester

things

was

over.

to do. Senior

tion and the

for

month. that the Only three a

was

week, Gradua

summer.

Then back to school for those left behind and those going on to further their educations. And for the rest it was time to begin a job or search for one.

The spring of '82. There is something strange about leaving URI

close.

come

leave

to a

this

place. Although you may never return physically and if you do the campus may be different, URI will always be with

us,

change. But definitely be URI,

places

URI

people

will

to know that "it" will

always

be with

us.

That "it" is

an

intangible. Each

of us carries something different away from here. But there is also a collective memory that we all share. It is a memory of a beautiful school set In a rural countryside near ideal

one

about. The Quad will range in our minds from the green of summer to the white of winter with a patch of mud between the two. Each one of us has our own list of places that will never

With all the

go to and all the things that will hap pen in our lifetimes, it is comforting

on

that list will

A commercial from the late '60's is appropriate for that thought. An altered version could go something like this; "you can take me out of URI, but you can't take URI out of

beaches. It is a memory of friends and lovers. Of places, people and

things. Of joy and sorrow, URI will always be a place where memories were bom and where our minds will wander back for return visits in the future. But the most im

portant thing is that we will always be a part of it and it will always be a part of us. Mitchell Zuckoff


YEARBOOK_1982