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signs' directions and walk paths and roadways of the buildings scan many de cades, reflecting the tastes and ideas of the eras in which they were built. Follow the

ihe

physical surroundings

familiar direction white

of URl this

the installation of the

was

year

signs.

you to wherever you

signs point

want to go. without

telling you exactly

where you are at the moment. They re flect much of what Ihe school itself you in

the

sidewalks lie shoriculs. well-trod smooth roads

footpaths,

or

fresh

of grass. But alas, the signs

point

plots

never

library nearby.

fraternity

houses

Ave. contra.st

angular

The blockish

on Upper College sharply with the more

houses

on

Frat Circle. Yet

buildings are all con nected by something, just as Keaney Gym and the newer Tootell complex are connected by their glass hallway. brings you to the remains of the fire-crumbled green houses. URl made headlines with that tragedy;

They

but you must be there on the hour lo hear the carillons ring out. remmdmg one of Ihe Big Ben chimes. Through

nation, college campuses echo with the sound of these belK in their version, in all keys, octaves and

coupled with the tragic College fire, a major scru safety codes

when

Providence

tiny of campus fire and resultcd-

out the

own

tempos- URI's

they

are

are

dislinctive.

[hough

chronically oul-of-tune.

-

U R I has

Down the hill, behind Chafee Hall, While Hall, the newest addition to the campus,

enjoys

its

seemingly private

a-

you walk and notice the re mains of lamps scattered on the side as

walk, tattered tissue paper waving in treetops and the familiar brown bottles in the gutters. You might just check your car in the Cow Barns parking lot.

The to

A trek up the hilt

tell you what you The signs will find when you reach your destina can point you to Davis Hall tion. not

major universities.

round

glassy,

in these directions. also do

most

had its share of vandalism. Look

Davis Halls clash with the

somehow the two

Like

The stone, castle-like Rodman and modern

direction.

is about: pointing giving you some background, but not revealing which path to lake. Even the a

along

campus. The

now-

The blue and

signs really tell you little; you have pick out the details by yourself. They

lell yoL where to go, and what major route to take. Maps from a thousand other universities will do the must

fill in the rest.

same.

You

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ill Silili

rainy day between classes, the Quad is overrun by hundreds of strangely shaped, multicolored figures crossing in all directions. It's nearly impossible to tell any two individuals

On any

in

apart

slickers

shapes to

the

constant

and

boots.

flow

The

of

rain

colors

and

raindrops and seem number of people passing

reflect in

double the

by.

frequently by another

the

question

school. Certainly it's not comparable to a midwestern or west coast univer

Still, there

small. There to

earn

to

lose

can

are

hardly

just

it that title.

yourself

in

view

it

as

many people It's not difficult

too

the

crowds that

or

after your name on any official docu ment will be your own student number. And

one

an

sorority, and earn the title of "Greek.' Play one varsity sport, and you'll soon be considered a jock. Naturally, the line you fill out

fraternity

a

asked after

but

an

likely

most

lo

be

must be some degree of in dividuality. Names and faces are familiar. People are recognized, al though you've barely

:fain

;

halls

dining

or at

halls.

stone

colors,

system, organize it. help it grow and give it substance. Individuals take part

jacket that no one else has. instantly it's the most popular garment to be seen. Even your own individual parking space gels invaded

frisbee

in

a

on

concert, toss.

multicolored

varsity

a

play

or an

impromptu

Faces emerge out of the rainjackets as the sky

clears: and individuals greet other

a

Individuals make up the Greek

team.

by

ring,

customized to fit and be

name

a

part

only you. But, like all others, the ring will be engraved with the words "University of Rhode Island" the

of

individual's

identification

with

the

whole.

as

they

pass.

one

at

an

make

up all three campuses.

plan it, destroy

run

it, celebrate

the

University.

They build it, it, occasionally

it, and always rebuild it. Most of all, individuals breath life

into

basketball games. In

Crank up the stereo on a warm spring day, and the sound gets lost in the rest of the high-volume music on campus. the

metals,

and engravings to choose from. guaranteed to be your personal

Individuals

dividuals make headlines

Buy

assortment of

It's

introduction is. "What's

major?"

your

pass by.

and

You may order your class ring from of a number of companies, with

one

styles Join

So many people. It's hard to believe that URl is considered by many a small

sity;

vehicle. It gets

easy to be a part of the herd almost involuntarily. so

and

stagnant

characterize mass

of

an

buildings.

otherwise

The hardest part of URf to describe is the living. Only one's own experiences can

the

be written; to try to characterize lifestyles of others isn't fair. Few

have

experienced

all the

lifestyles avail

able. Few have to. Once your is found, it

seems

around and

To determine one's

trying experience. are

both

an

own

unnecessary

niche

to move

change.

together in various rooms of the Union. living down-the-line share

Those

rooms, rent,

lifestyle

is

a

To realize that you a part in a

individual and

titles and

only

names.

Individuals

gain

from the

address but

a part of our identification. From fraternities an

rows

of

on

or

bols and letters to be

spirit

sisters, but sym worn

inside in

and outside on clothing. Com receive a colored parking sticker

the inside; but from a small cubicle

the outside it becomes

like the other two dozen in the

their

mobility, and band

tie-ups that nobody

notices your entry; a bit more evi

identity.

The

wheel won't turn when the cog is missing a tooth. Each individual is

important

in

making

up the whole.

corridor. Your Greek letters merge of

It's a

a

part of an entire alphabet

shapes. so

easy to assimilate and become

part of the whole instead of main your individuality. It's simple lie back and know that classes still

taining to

parties are still held, Greeks still compete in Greek Week activities, con certs are rates

still

go up,

presented and tuition

even

without your presence.

muters

to accentuale

con

five minutes late because of traffic

dence to that commuter

go on,

families of brothers

believe that when

but the moment lends

of it's kind

The

Sing figure. You may you slip into class

room

and become

gain

it's absence

ductor before the chorus in Greek is the most noticable

by mid-afternoon. Your dorm looks to you like the only one

just

become the whole. We

When every room on one dorm is lit but one, that room's occupant becomes

conspicuous by

vehicles

easy; it makes one fidget uncomfortably to be either one or the other.

We

many

You may be the first in the parking lot by morning, but your car will be lost among the countless

own

to

campus-dwellers.

world that contradicts itself by stressing both individuality and conformity is not

dorms not

household chores and

addresses often unknown

But the individual retains

importance.

The

place cannot exist without the people. The people make up the living. And the living lends character to the place. You know your own living, and recognize the lifestyles of others. And the knowing and the recognizing be come

part of one's memories of the

time spent at URL

w=

rrrrrr'j'wairTrsis;

iTp^

Ajr

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u

.

"Don't

ich the

than usual

tonight. 1 saw them make the meatloaf. so don'l even attempt it. The broccoli's raw and the mashed potatoes aren't mashed. It's definitely a

PB and J

night."

The belief that it pays to know people in high places cannot be seen more

clearly than in the case of URI's dining halls. Knowing the person works behind the counter is the

own

who

surest

and

simplest life-saving technique on campus. Their discreetly adininislered advice has prevented many a case of indigestion and heartburn. Still, life is

not

pork chops

and

and

cranberry

all

peaches and cream. applesauce, and turkey

and staff who work

at

the

dining halls.

for those who work behind

particularly the

for the students

sauce

hot table.

Frequently abused by fellow students, they must try lo main tain

calm exterior. This is difficult

a

in the every

of students who

case

night

come

in

and whine. "What's that?".

those who have

be

continually re minded of the weekend orange juice limitations, and those who glean atten tion by dumping or throwing food. to

Still, the dining services try lo provide good service; and in spite of our com plaints, it must be admitted they do a good job. Pre-packed bag dinners for halloween

were

and their

use

the

though

innovated

this year,

successfully prevented fiiihts

i

"Mil

V

3cle;

I

Occ

upl

special dinm holiday seasons. And ihc provision of fruit juices and soups to the fiu-stricken dorms saved to

ill

students

mjn\

trips

the halls for sick trays

Decorated tables and tinsel decor not

be the

height

for

prepared

of

dining

multitudes

o(

ma\

ind lood students

may not be the home cooking one is used (o; bu! thcv are eximplcs of the amount

served

of prcpiration lor iht mciK this loo ofun criticized

by

segment of dorm life.

M,H.

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It's been

long, tough semester, over, although the

a

last, it's almost

suing finals don't There's

brighter. spirit here; ihe the cards

much Christmas in the suite and

tree

the wall have

on

Ai en

make it look much not

come

down

per order of the fire marshal, and the b irc ground and unlVo/cn slream

below

Williams

Roger

makes the Yule

But from the

seem

Dining

Hall

that much

more

bel

bridge

ne

the

from t

b ind of musicians, A do/ens

brings

out onto

carol

simple

ihcir balconies

night. Sudden together, laughing, sing-

ind mto the cold winlcr

ly people

arc

As the

1-dwellc

The dorm inhabitants need

brotherhood

no

fies of

to

bring

sisterhood

or

floor party a fns bcL loss bi-tween balconies a snowball

lliLm

Sharing

is

uninhibited

materials and

texts

sound ol to

\

lojLlhcr

J

all who piss b\

hung of the

l<.

i

bilcon\

to

Lnjo\

is

\

jue

sig

window

out

winning

Idc

xpcriencLs md thought are km IrceK 7h

otcs

tcreoon

111

roon

s

congratulating spreads the enthusiasr tenants The impulse t

share wuh the rest ol the campus always ther t\en from IhL oulsidc ihi. dorms look lIosc knil

I

sides of the mg to the meet to

Watch

ightcd room pace Ihe buildings ilwuys poinl lounge where people

mam

buy lood

waleh TV and talk

the

through

Ihec

shding glass doors

andn

tiple;

The features of the doi accentuale

tikes

plai

night

hn

the amount

.athri

alia

niqu.

(ojten ill lo

the doi

the

a

The life of

a

ingly routine.

dorm resident is

reassur

There is

place

always

a

to

go between classes and at night; a place that is completely yours. People are

always

present. Calendars in the dorm

lobbies

announce

sales, ski

parties,

dorm activities-bake

trips, forma! dances, keg rcsidenls' birthdays. safely is always right down

even

Health and

the street ("You can't mean the in firmary?? I'd rather die!") Food is

always available. 3 times a day. Every dorm resident buys a mealbook; and many hours

are

each of the

at

spent

dining halls, lingering over coffee and eating{well. trying to) thedail> mc;iK. The

activity slows down somewhal ing the evening as people study work for the next day's classes,

traffic around the

i

'

lower end of

campus is diminished, and things g fairly quiet. But. the action nc

completely stops. There are alw people walking back from the libr or pub. Someone, somewhere is stu ing, no matter what the time. i

the

I

gels

)

be

I

would be easy. Study ng. \ hi line beats from the tcrc 3 d

hammering through the best way to gel

During the fall

our

w

CO

of Residential Life

calling for quieter the dorm

area,

de

sem ssuec

s

ijuii

c

Sirici

r

on

no

directors and residen

helped alleviate the studying in the dorn s pears

be

to

an

pr bl

fr qu

art. diffic

It

ifnot sometimes down righl elu

Granted, dorm life The

not

for everyone. of hall

those who

unnerves

prefer

a

permanent atmosphere. Some the freedom and mobility fouiul

prefer in commuting becau

is

year-by-year flucuation

residents more

:

and

living down-lhe-lini,-

the

I

thei

,

They

togell

lily, tics

and lo

ihe

of the hill

strengthen buildings together.

19

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by Gary Metzger

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Down-the-line Oh traffic o

bad

was

again,

cook dinner this week

'hone bill's in

-

-

but I'm

it's

I'll have

to

good

in. Thank God it's

finally to

have

not

somebody else doing

il

my

turn

tonight,

draw cash for that when I lake of the

rent.

making that funny noise again so much wear and tear from Iriving to campus every day! Bui dinner's on. people are here, and I can elax by the fire, watch some television, and forget URl even exists." fhe car's

-

Down-the-line

living

is

something special. and

It's

having

your

i

arpool, a home and responsibilities that make you feci like you've already graduated and are out on your own. An automatic washer and

dryer,

a

basement,

a

color TV and

a

mailbox

-

all

left the realm of the Office of Residential Life and is Most down-the-liners

really

close

arc

friendships

to

juniors

or

be able to

campus life. They are still always participate in many activities on

marking one who has totally independent.

seniors who have formed

pull

away from the

many bills on time, housecleaning, tra' your own food, paying and from classes and still finding time for schoolwork arc shar so

weighed by the pleasures of complete independence, freedom and from the University. The down-the-liner is a complete individual own life "far from the maddening crowd." V.F

determine his

enough

University

i

and

&ikf

Photos bv (]arv

Met/ger

"A s-

d i'''^' fcf;H

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I1

.tTL. .'>

'IS.

ll"t

-

Recently, living in "Yeah, both

1 asked a

sure

-

a

remembering

iiled

friend if she'd gotten anything

a

oul

of

two years. She laughed and said. lot of fun." We both laughed. 1 guess we were

sorority for

L

the socials,

parties

lid, "I suppose you

.

just for

a

and games. Then she

dogmas around campus. I think that what keeps each together is the friendship which grows out of living together and sharing acquaintances and experiences. Greek

house life

really

has

brotherhood is

\

change."

its

1

very

tittle

just another

lo

do

name

with for

secret

tions, philanthropic projects and helping clean. Even if soon

Whether she

was

serious

or

not, 1 liked that

rituals: and

friendship.

Of course, Greek life is not an idyllic existence. It entails a great deal of responsibility, like house meetings, rush func

s

answer

despite

its simplicity, because I think it expresses the real reason why so many people choose Greek life, slay with it and spread

you're

discover that

not a

even

if it gets you out of your

other

people.

keep the house responsibility, you duty" can be fun (and yourself! and out with

great lover of a "house

doing

room

to

^bV^^^^^^^I

*'

Fd be

if I said everyone in the house

lying

were

my

friend, bu

I think I can safely say I like every one of them. They're al ways good for a ride home from the Willows if you're stuck ,lusl about every one of ihem has a good "I-can't-believe

whLii-hiippL-ncii-io.mc-lasl-nit^hi" las! liWl-

\

loi ol ihcm hrcik

Ml of ihcin

IcsMuniil ihicvL-s two

a.m.

sior> at Saturday's break kitchens better than pro

iiiio

awfully good to talk to a morning when the previous nigh you'd expected. Not a one of them has eve at breakfast. Who could dislike them? orange juice

on

wasn't

quite

spilled

my

a

,irc

Saturday

what

solitary walk. Some of your vinyl sofas. One has stolen a attempting to drink the whole thing. The keg was emptied hours ago. All the girls have fled. One has challenged another to a fourth ping-pong game, double-or-nothing. (He already owes him four drinks. Everyone knows he'll never pay. Nt.body cares.) You're laughing. You're at case \\n\ know cvcr>oTK' Iktc knows

or

sledding,

brothers carton

a

are

You've jusi

come

'

1 giics. il\

iwo

o'elnck

in fioni iIk' Willow^

nr

S^ilurday morning

ihc lub, ihc Bon Vu

place

or a

across

old

you and likes you. You're LDiilnriahl.^ .Mtli Mu.rsoif You're beginning to get a prett\ lIcif piciiirc- ni \oiirsi,-M. Mmr goals

and abilities What's (ircck liJL-

friend's

sprawled

of milk from the kitchen and is

and

tenths of what N.K.N.

vour

college

inncriTiost is all

drcinis

Kn'i

ili.ii ninc-

about* Thai's Greek

life.

-

iu.ul

i3s:

mi

Tfs theme

displ aying

partie

the tale

nls"o

que to each house, the s

ente rla

ling

I

nd

nfortablc. "Ifs

a

respon sibi

pan cular cha ,c-conked stuff!

their

andards. The IFC and Panhcilanic Council .set

Ifs

in 1

addition

to

national

chapter

rules.

Each

keep up its reputation. National representamake

sure

we

are

living by

our

nationai and

projecl our

own

athle

com

or

special

house pal

elpthe people

week

Out

Go ng Show and

-laim April lifestyles of the

numly.

or to

Each

lion and works han

organiz

oney

r

week in and

ty

ity

e:

as our

Greeks

own.

of that

torch-bear ng our

We

before

to help project.

run.

Sing higl light bring

the

en

he

)ur

he

who have the

when

ing. Many the

push

rest

of

c jr

of the

the syster

r

they

opportunity through

cannot

gel

boarders continue

college

I, not

a

to

room

just

our

us

through

to 1

"It's

Ho

their stereo down, and

live at the house

cooperation lying people logethei they'll do it. No together and make living ea

We work

other houses. ^

join particular house.

careers, or

y\ .

s.

;ams.

They

are

active in both

classification

rsity

commu

as parking commitlt disputes. They work it

committees, such r

better for all.

our Hell Week and hazing They originate from people

ry. but condemn us as 'frat rying it for themselves.

campus. Greeks are band mci work on campus, write for the Cigi

ment on

"It's individuals

pulling to bring the housi pulling to bring the system together, and t c system pulling to bring the whole campus together. 1 lai's the Greek

>

^E2Piy 1 '

vf.

^a

Commuters Few full-time students

claim the comforts of real home-

can

cooked meals, ironed clothes each to return to

home

each

night.

and

a

Such is the life of

a

ity

by day,

while

Few

town

can

attending being free

after himself,

He is

having

a

real

family

by night,

commuter.

URl. He is

he likes.

and

day

claim to make the Union their

25 miles away their home

house duties. Often

complete

a

seen

as

housing a

individuil

into and go Irom

to come

tied by

not

eonlraets

wanderer

or

looking

e impus mealbooks

traveler

is or

he knows

the

feeling of routinely driving lo and Irom eimpus bag lunch and bookbag in hand, able lo leave campus not onh weekends

help of -

is able

the to

Commute

become

an

a

other travelers and finds

Between classes, the

ing

and

traveler

being to a

be found in the library oi lounges-laughing, talking, eating, read turning from an individua

commuter can

in the Memorial Union

with other commuters,

part of

a

unified group.

-

V.R.

mr m

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Rhody reigns in

ECAC, NCAA tourneys Dave Lavallei

.

I 1

.

Two weeks later Ihe Rams smashed

Wake Forest. 89-77. and the

After the

success-

Rams had defeated Provi

College. 7.1-(,4. in the second meeting of the season on February 21. people began talking of lournadence

ments. Once

playoff bid.

the Rams got their FX'AC basketball became the

really mattered around For a while, people really give a lot of thought to tuition hikes, budget proposals, or whether the campus policemen ought to carry only thing Kingston.

that

didn't

ed

The

that

appen. The lo show

ee

people of d arri\ed

New

On

I-ngland

I

March 2, 1]

Ra

Manv

would

Slags

A'ho

Photos

by Gary Met/gei

displayed

the

offen-

March 4 would be the

"The minute

Island and New

and steal, 1 sensed something was up," said URl Coach Jack Krafi, "I could

day when Rhode England basketball

be decided. Most of

superiority would the major papers all

catalyst in the with

career,

points rebounding Wright turned

and led in

Senior Slan he

as

in :x

poured

\car,

contest

11.

dropped

21

points through

seemed

have

to

I'rovi-

picking

were

dence. What the writers

at

those p;ipcrs ihal was

straight

felt

they

guess

could do it,"

they

forgolicn,

since Feb. 4. when the Rams lost lo the Friars. 79-5S. the Rams had won nine

got the blocked shot

we

The Rams

certainly did do il. They had players with double-figures, Wil

four

liams led the

games.

with 19,

pack

had

Wright

17. junior John Nelson. 12, and ChatOn

For

the

URl

special parade

before

absent

a

cameras,

most

the Ram

during

were

part

Rhody urging

and

New

was even

prancing

the

were

season.

created and there Ram

new

court

television

which for the

cameras

signs

fans the game was a a chance to

They got

treat.

on

the

Rhody faithful

that

LIRI

Saturday. victories

straight

and

il

made

10

Provi

edged

dence for the title, hS-62. In the past PC was the team wiili the composure. but in

final

the

which showed

URl

how to

il

minutes

two

was

12.150 fans

the

play effective, game-winning

basketball. In that game Jiggy Williamson proba turned in the most affective game of

his

Even

the Ram fans

though

about

only

filled

quarter of the Civic Center.

a

let everyone know which the best around. The chant.

they certainly team was

"Let's Go

Rhody"

career

only

poinl guard

as

had four

Williams

Dwight reasons

major

would

work and

by Sly

A

ihL-

fans

beautiful,

would

PC

on

two

were

for the \ictor\.

"We knew that there

screams,

URl. He

and "Here We Go

Rhody" seemed to ebb and How with Rhody surge. A crisp pass by senior iri-c:ipiain .ligg> Williamson each

drive

at

but his six assists

points,

and tremendous defensive work

guard

send

to

frcn/ied

arching

the

fans

bomb into

were

no

short

cuts." said Williamson. "We knew that to

attain this

of this

we

state

we were

going

to

have to

did. Wc showed the that

we are

people

the best."

The demise of the Friars seven

URI's

minutes

shot-blocking

began

with

go in the game. center, Irv Chat-

to

man,

decided thai PC had become a

free

inside

the

lane.

So

when

too

Bob

Misevicius decided to drive the lane. couldn't have been The

planned

any

bener.

rivals would go against each other for ihe ECAC crown and an two state

automatic biii

lo

the NC-\-\

lourna-

Chatman slammed the ball away. Wil liamson picked it up, fed il to senior Stan

Wright,

who laid it

in,

Wright

then stole the ball and the Rams up 54-49.

for

proved

who

key

from 25 feel. He,

coming

with the strong inside games of

along

the Friar defense.

pull apart

The Ram

players

seconds

The Rams had

down

counting

were

their hands raised

with

in the air.

high

the

from Ihe field, with most of

lho.sc shots

the

be

to

the Friar defense. He went six

seven

il

Finally

won.

was

over.

People spilled

onto

the court. Interviews and Ihe basket-

cutting began, every Rhody fan was beaming. Thai Ram Pep liand played the 1:RI fight song and somehow it had to bring jusl a lilile bit of a spinesensation to anyone who had for this. Providence fans

tingling waited

watched in

and envy. Il

awe

URI's

was

night.

a

about

Nelson

opened

lo

bly

12.

man,

v\ent

"We

ire

you just

the best

can i

The spirit

be

of

expressed by The Rams

the

nets

in

New I

it it

s

ngland

and

nd C hatmin

the

evening w is best the awards eeremonies

their iwards with

accepted

around their neeks and with

their

fingers

were

number

pointing oul that they one Willi iimon and

Wright were grinning from Percy Divis the URl I hive been happier

and

car

to ear

sixth

man

couldn

"This feels hard time are a

so

convincing people

good basketball

go home

head

to

high.

somed since

Davis, The

We have had

good.

a

that

Now I

a

we can

Warwick and carry my This I

program had blos have been here." said

senior.

dressing

crowded

team.

room was

around

reporters could

the

not

the reporters did not thing mattered. The best around and

they

chaiilic.

players

talk

to

matter.

Rams were

People so

thai

them. But

Onlv

one

were

the

gumi!

lo

the

NCAAs. "The game

was befitting of a New England Championship. Wc did every well. We shot better ihan they control basketball." played Kraft explained.

thing

did and

Both

teams

well. URl shot 59

played

while

percent,

the

Friars

shot

44

pockets,

the

percent." With that effort in their Rams

for

prepared

trip

a

Charlotte,

to

North Carolina to meet Duke Univer

sity

March

on

12 in

the

1st round

NCAA

playoffs. Duke was the ACC Champion and was regarded as the team which had a tremendous running

Duke had

a record of 2.V6 going into Rhody had a sparkling 24-6 winningest season in history.

the game. record, its

the game, the

Throughout

Rams did

exactly what they had planned lo do. They slowed down the Blue Devils' running game and went after the re bounds. Neither

by

led the other

team ever

than five

more

game which

It

points.

was not

tight

was a

decided until the

final 14 seconds. Duke

led

shot.

The

set

called

up for their last

moved

Rams

Charlotte

Krafi

when

63-62

time. The Rams

in

and

moved

they went was

last

the

to

tap-in

rolled

was

basket.

rolled

up and it tossed and

it

They shot

.A

Another One

wide.

but the ball

attempted,

and

of bounds

out

off.

went

the

silent.

became

Coliseum

The clock resumed its countdown.

clock

the

"This game of basketball is hard lo predict. Wc did exactly what we wanted We were able to control. We handled the boards and slowed down to-

their game, but it wasn't enough," said quiet Krafi afier the game.

a

Slan Wright played in every game in The

had finally ended, but the seem endless.

season

accomplishments Williams

was

-

Duke

and

game

England

Player

-

of

named

was

time

-

-

points

-

England

-

-

mark of 396-108

in

a

a

game

school's

first

Sporting

The

New

he

scorer

an

became with 1.531

exceptional

URI's

points

He had 346 total assists.

I2th

was

the

only

those four years.

over

ECAC

championship.

News ranked the Rams

1 9th

in the nation. Duke later went

the NCAA finals, but the Rams one of the few teams who were

were

successful Devil

at

running

slowing

down the

Blue

game.

17-year was

very

said Krafi.

Williamson had

He

on to

"I

as

career.

-

of the Year by UPI and also became the 23rd coach to notch 300 victories in a career. He had an all-

Coach

four-year

senior to have started in all 108 games. He had 1 ,346 points and averaged 1 1 .8

was -

by UPI,

the- Year

Krafi

voted the Most Valuable

the

in

Player

selected New

his

season.

all-time

in four years.

bit

more

great

proud I hope

respect and I

team

of the young men," this game brings a

to

URl. We have

only hope

ihai il

a

con-

finucs in the future." Krafi said after the Duke game.

Of icicles and .

.

the first words that

are

mind

The blizzard of '78

.

Val Rush

By What

when

,

.

4 missed

buried

,

,

.

days of classes

cars

,

.

.

come to

mentions

someone

winter of '78? blizzard ...

snowdragons

white

the

Bermuda

.

,

,

snow

Florida

,

,

,

.

white

The infamous week of will

not

quickly

February 6-13 forgotten. Although

be

the world outside the campus gates was a declared disaster area, at URl the first flakes blanketed both the campus and the idea of any academic studies. The

college

was

for

others

was

transformed into what

some a

winter resort and for

cold trap.

a

shoveling

jackets and chem safety goggles, hiked through the mounting snowbanks to Evans to stock up on supplies: still others defied the state-imposed driving ban to re plenish dwindling liquor cabinets. Backroom Gigs in the Union Lounge provided free hot chocolate and enter bundled in survival

the snowfall followed the

Surprisingly,

weatherman's scenario

exactly, begin Monday morning and forcing to cancel by midafternoon. Stu romped in the falling fiakes, throwing snowballs, sliding down slip pery roads; and either trudged back to ning

on

classes dents

darkness fell, hit the road before driving

the dorms and houses or

tried

to

as

As the

storm

ICICLE

calmed down

As

went

into effect

College"

"Center

for

as

a

bit. the

the "Suit

became

rapidly

the

Students,"

Snowbound

the snowfall

continued, the Pub

filled with wine-drinking students tak ing advantage of the Happy Hour, cer tain that

Tuesday's

cancelled for

another

classes would be

sure.

grow weary with the unusual nonroutine. Homework was getting caught up on, backgammon and cards were be ginning to wear thin, and students were

Pub

contest

some

sponsored

ICICLE,

Prizes

of the best ice

statues, which included

a

Hobbit and

home, a lounging mermaid and a snowy-white dragon. Others were given the chance by an unwilling Dining Services to go "traying' down the Elephant Walk. Flocks of people.

each afternoon and

opened early

closed late each evening in an effort lo keep people entertained. OPERA

so

by

off campus,

still stranded, either wherever they did not want to be. The on or

them into one's eyes and face. Giant snow sculptures were built around the

for

oul

and

were

ICICLE announced activities as

the

following day's

announced

day's agenda Marathon

as

cancelled. Wednes

included dual

Man

classes

at

showings of

Edwards

Audi-

cars

house

and

uncovering from

paths

snowbanks became familiar Roads had

up to

opened

under

to

some

many.

degree.

and those who couldn't stand the Arctic campus any longer left as soon as ihey could get the car started. OPERA

ICICLE continued

TION

those who remained more snow

sculptures

on on

to

and free

including

free

numerous

Tootell and Ke

at

hours

pool

tion times and

a

the

G\ms

open

reefed

student laeult\ basket

delivered

were

vices. The

in

ithlelie

inev

ball game. With the help of Guard helicopter, lab and

supplies

amuse

cimpus with the Quad a

of Lord Of The Ihc-

showing Union,

students and

as soon

given

of classes would be lost

Wednesday's classes cancelled, faculty alike began to

With

TION

Union students in a OPERATION

day

that

the storm.

enough, Tuesday saw more snow falling and no classes, the first official storm day of the blizzard. Those who weren't suffering from the fiu at the time played like children in the snow drifts until the wind picked up, swirling the dusty flakes in circles and driving Sure

were

those who realized

to

dorm

activities

Memorial Union Board provided the first of many reliefs, OPERATION case

tainment

to

conditions worsened.

lab

istry

lo

a

National

phjrmdc\

Health Ser

Dining Ser\ices did

their

best to handle the increased flow of

students, eventually offering weekend meals to those

the

As

with

weekend

cleared, and

were

students fields

escaping

after

the

cancelled classes.

five

day

approached Friday saw

meal

roads

many the campus snow fourth full day of

By Monday,

classes

had resumed, and students faced the hassels of walking on sheets of ice while

By Thursday,

the excitement of

many classes students realized

missing dying down, as those missed days

was

would have to be made up at some point in the semester. Indoor games were

and

becoming

even

an

entertainment chore,

the Civil Defense

Emergency

Broadcast System alerts were growing simply dull. Students left snowball fights and tobogganing outside and gazed out frosted windows, almost wishing for spring. The tasks of

enroute to class. Monday also presented the administration with the problem of readjusting the spring semester schedule. The Faculty Senate

voted

to

extend

classes

one

week

further

in May to compensate for February's losses. Even in mid-May,

the

remnants

of the blizzard of '78

remained as

the

within the classroom, just icy sculptures on the Quad had April. Nature had given

lasted until

Rhode Island

one storm

thai she would

^^JJt^

I

11;

Photos by Gary Metzger

Blaze

smoke filled the air

Gray, heavy the

in the

Quad

October

destroys greenhouse

Val Rush

By

early morning

15, 1977, Only

over

hours of

few

a

early

risers

walking about campus saw the event that made headlines in papers all Rhode Island. The URl Plant and

over

Soil Science

greenhouses were on

By the time the 75 Kingston Kingston fire department had the fire under control one

hour

fire.

and South volunteers

ifter nearh

the eist end of the

building

md the

had been

badly gutted greatly from

wesi

end suffered dan

plant offici

chambers

turf labs and many years worth ol re professors and graduate stu

search of dents

were

Waller I

demolished

in

the blaze

chairman of the Plant

armie

Sod and Science

department, estimated of nearly one million replacement dollars. Two students, juniors David Masterson and Michael Kuchar, living in the greenhouse complex at the time, lost nearly everything they owned lo the cost

a

Fire officials blamed the blaze

According

Health and

to

on

a

the

within

circuit

short

complex. Safety officer

Frank McGovern, University officials

so

and

for

the fire protection complex was not inadequate, and had

the

within

operating been

that

aware

were

system

was

nearly

two

years.

Clean-up of the damaged building gan

nearly

as

cooled. The

soon

two

as

be

the ashes had

students

were

housed

in faculty apartments for the remainder of the semester. The debris was cleared away, and construction on the re coverable

spring

west

Fine

time for use

of

special benefit MoonchUdren. playing at

Arts

raised money The

began in

stuctures, A

showing of the

end

semester classes to have

temporary

to

Center

at

the

time,

assist the fire victims.

greenhouse fire, coupled with the

tragic Providence College fire in which 1 1 students lost their lives, promoted a existing fire codes and precautionary measures throughout New England. Plans for upgrading fire safety regulations and devises are still in the making; however, not before much of the damage had occured. closer look at

Photos by Rick Booth

WRIU: By

Mike 0-D,.nncll.

buildinti Murphy's lau

lines

lo

such

of

long ^"^

process

.

.

asM-i.uu vl.iiion man

ager lor VVRIli, Lids

In

a

Val Rush

a

oiin

ma|or

vueccss

handle the

The station

will

mercial-free

once

IM i.iji..

pro|eci.

alua\s

,.,i,ers.

ainoun

be on

eorapieteh

com

the air. "There

tage and

be

to

the LIRI

new equipmcnl. will bring good broadcasting lo

ready

.

Why

pay more? like

in the '60's

being right

there

Such

the

was

opinion of one of the appeared on

400 students who

nearly

the State House steps in Providence on November 6th, 1977 lo protest the

increases in Board of

tuition

proposed by the The crowd, which

Regents,

consisted of

faculty members, students

and student leaders from URl. Rhode Island College and Rhode Island College, carried signs and placards carrying such slogans as,

Junior

"Students damn

are

high"

out,"

but

poor,

from

want

you

and "We're not

Leaders

dropping included

URl

Student Senate President Bob Craven and

Geary of

Dan

the URl

Young

Socialist Alliance. Love-22 also made appearance in student protest.

the

an

name

of the

The students met afier three weeks of

planning to protest the Board of Regent's proposed tuition hikes, which reached as high as 9,4 percent for instaters

and

12,4

percent

for out-of-

representatives suggested the increase be raised only to 7.4 percent. In meeting with Governer J. Joseph Garrahy. Craven said, "Students. especially those who came here today, feel that the quality of their education is going down, while the price is going if they (Board of Regents) don't up hear us now, they will in '78, Students do vote ," Garrahy invited Craven Sludent

...

,

,

and other student leaders to meet with him and attend later

budget meetings. exactly how much lobbyists will have had on the proposed hikes. Craven felt that the lobbying effort was "a major success," From the moment they stepped off the eight buses to the moment they returned, the students clapped, sang, cheered and waved signs and placards in protest of the increases. The student population showed that they are not as apathetic to politics as they have been accused of being. Mike Only

time will tell

infiuence

the

sludent

Craven, URl Graduate Student

Asso

ciation executice officer, summed the Photos

by Gary Metzger

relly our

way

up,

saying,

"We

best to affect we

are

change

know how,"

trying

lo

do

in the best

.1>\-

V^-^;:iV.

iS^'rs. W ^

^5^2

-diSaf^tat.

^\

.^>^

The great debate Through the place, the people and the living at URl runs a confinuous vein, reminding us of one of our primary reasons for attending the University. It is the topic of most of our discussions, the greatest object of most of our at tention, the focus for most of our goals during our college careers. The vein

level at

the great debate. In the middle ages at certain universities, the students controled the teachers; con-

their wages, their hours and their hiring, and determined whether troled

getting

the most for their

feeds and nourishes, blocks and opens, fiows and stagnates al times. The vein

they

is academics.

the student is the consumer,

were

money from their teachers. Even

today although

much of the power the older system allowed. The debate goes back and forth between student and teacher:

lacking We learn in

everything we do, according saying. This itself is, to some, ample justification for release from the books and participation in other activ ities. Even the poets urge the discovery of knowledge through sources other than through books. Books are ex pensive; just check oul the prices in the to an

old

bookstore, and you'll be convinced that texts are not

withir Tuifit

the

only learning

materials

;ach. I .

the rise,

as

always.

To-

pays nearly three times 978 as his counterpari of go did. And

this, amidst

both have

opinion on the alleged quality. Students

an

decline of education

over

the debates: that

URl for

we

Academics

wc are

higher education,

here

whatever

consider that education to consist of.

We must maintain certain standards; cumulative averages see to that. We

party and socialize

can

contents; but

keep

for

only

as

to our

hearts'

long as high.

we can

academic standards

We

spend an average of 17 hours a week in class. Out of a seven-day week, that is more

the

comparitively little time. Much time is spent outside of class doing

same

clinics, course

on

work

field

behind

at the library, in trips, interning, and of -

the

desk.

Academics

than just class and texts; it experience beyond what the instructor can give. means more

esled in the the

faculty

and the student;

member retaliates that the

student does to to

subject as

much work

as

get by. Recent statistics

SAT scores,

coupled

ments on

all sides, add

zations

surrounding study today.

academic

he needs

on

with the to

the

the

falling argu

generali field

of

is

The academic section of

I

the

life

subject to much debate and dis cussion both in and out of the class. Perhaps that

in

itself is

integral

an

part of the educative process realiza tion of the process itself. The vein of -

academics then of educatic

college

is

of the

can

university,

tie

together the

and create

well-rounded education.

an

V.R.

rest

entire,

h':^''

^ ^^m

% my^

V

\

Division what? Upon entering URl as a freshman, a student is immediately assigned and introduced to University College. As well as providing the student with an advisor and a longer pre-registration period, UC gives him the chance to take in

number of eleclives

a

a

program

called "General Education," While the pros and

of such

cons

students

required

are

most

are

of the

ihal

courses

divisional fulfillments. Introduction

MUS 101

broad,

of

view Classes

Music;

to

-

general history-

music

most

are

by fellow students

often recommended as

is,

fill divison A

to

possibly D)7" Here. then.

or

some

4.'i

of the

one

asked

questions

common

(or B.C

still

fulfill

lo

credits in three divisions. Around pre-registration time, "What did you take

are

program

discussion,

another

to

subject

a

a

music

and

well

over

run

choff

loni

Tiber of

the gn

/Although

h

on

lead

a

s

able

are

Kent

irge

playing

pipt Animal

illy

for

lough

Biolog>: "general' bio

a

directed but

-

majors

iOO

attracts over

famous

is

towards

worth

studenl. The course,

one

says

definitely

for

it."

which

pupils

Dr,

per semester. Frank Heppner's

coffin lectures, ENG

120

tion:

Literature and

-

of those

one

Composi where you

courses

discover that

although the grad studenl doesn't know as much as the professor. he grades e\i.ry bit is hard The class IS

centered around

a

mg and homework leii

lot of

orginized

one

SOC

Ge

lor

202 ill

nienl

the

GFO don

1

reall>

lO-i

large

Not only

but the teieher in

his

w\s

subject

own

makes the

w is

religion

interesting

course

s

nd

Geologic il Eirth Science s epithet Rocks for

let this elass

Jocks than

this division C luifill

edueition

ind that

iind this

t

Chalee ^1^

interested

really

writ

1

from chsscs of 30 to

in

malernl

society

class

if you want

)gct

student

seasons

runs

lectures

in

still

to

fool IS

people

\ou

usuillv

The material

intieipalcd

IS

Still

hirder mosi

find ihe slud\ of the earth inter \,R

The It's 4:00 A.M. There is little its sofi lullabies

movement as

the trees. All is

through

all-night fight

the wind whistles

quiet;

all is dark

,

.

went to

I

sleep,

slept right through

Anolhcr A

the

single light brightens

fioor of

thing dent

is

an

night.

It stares out from the third

otherwise blackened dorm

going

at some

on

that is in his

point

common to career.

the test I had been

cram-

,

building. Inside, some every college stu light is a sure sign "pulling an all-

nearly

the

cost

involved. "Do you know how complaint much coffee and No-Doze costs?" exclaimed another all-

only

take

was

nighter. "And you they get useless,"

can

noted her

so

many cold showers before

companion.

That lone

that the room's occupant is in the process of

nighter."

But isn't it

night?

"Not

lonely being up by yourself through the long really," one confessed crammer said, "After on while you were trying to study

all the noise that went Whether

cramming

catching

up

it

really

for

on some

typing neglected reading, an

exam,

up

the

a

paper

or

simply

all-nighter

is the

worth it?

earlier, the silence is welcomed. Besides, you need time

yourself

even

Even without

proaching. "No

many

lounges through Another

student

argued

that

pulling. "I tend to leave all By studying all night, I was

the

all-nighter

was

to

pass my lest,"

problem faced by a student afier an unsuccessful allnighter was talking his way out of a missed exam, "I was so studying all night that when 1 finally gave in and One

tired afier

calendar,

a

one

can

lell when finals

are

ap

midnight oil is burnt in longer each night. By the night single lights in rooms and study are well-iil late into the night and

few hours

a

test,

many

all

over campus ihe sunrise.

worth

my work until the last minute.

able

the

to

night."

As the finals near, the

rooms

before

if it is in the middle of the

The basic offense for the

"all-nighter" debate seems to be that study from dusk to dawn for majority of URl undergrads who 100% conscientious, the infamous all-nighler

a

conscientious studenl need not

a

coming

exam.

are

less than

slill

serves

But for the

its purpose,

KM

The lecture student: It's not

long walk from Aldrich up the hill lo Chafee, good spring day once ihe snowbanks have melted, it's a rather pleasant one at that. Walking past the dorms and a fraternity and through the parking lots, I toss greetings to those I know coming from the other direction. By the time and

a

on a

I reach Chafee 271, I feel like with

a

name

and

Moments after

feeling

a

personality

entering

the

real individual,

a

that others Chafee

of singularity subsides, I'm

class; and I choose

hall, amidst the

a seal

rows

directly

of empty

can

Caves,

usually

in the seats.

someone

recognize.

center

in

one

of the lecture

As others

enter

the

rapidly, from the inside area where edges. Many faces surround mc; some familiar after half a semester in the same class, others intirely new as of today, I can feel myself getting buried under the waves of people coming in for another hour leclLrc, auditorium,

the seats fill

I sit to the outside

brightens the overhead lights, sitting before him. He's taught this course for years: still, I wonder if he's ever noticed a drop or rise in enrollment? Any Hucuation would be hardly perceptable in his group. As the

professor

barely noticing

walks in, he

the

masses

He prepares to return the exams taken last week I can't quite make out his instructions under the feet and papers around "Walk

up

exams are

to

the class,

shuffiing

of

mc.

row-by-row, according in order of your social

to

your

last

inlilal; the

security number, dining

book number and the seat you occupy in class. If you have questions, refer them to your grad instructor next week in the recitation section

meal-

assigned

to

you

by student

number and

section number," 1 think that's what he said. As the

of papers diminishes, the professor scans the faces of the students before him. I wonder if he notices any differ

pile

from last semester's class. 1 wonder if

ences

however, the

the first

number?

a name or a

dents

out

of 150 stu

the class roster, he knows any one by first name, or recognize any one of them in ihe bookstore or crossing Quad, My recent feeling of singularity seems to have suddenly vanished completely at this point. I glance over al the senior sitting next to me. The group on

would the

identification doesn'l his in

merging a

seem to

bother him; he

seems unaware

of

of students to become a single body perhaps he's accustomed to it by now. jacket hints that perhaps he has found his

with

a

mass

lecture hall. Or

His swim team

indivuality

not

in the lecture hall, but somewhere else.

I realize 1 haven't said

anything for the past half hour. Neither professor. There's no room for dis sure I could raise by hand above surrounding me.

has anyone else besides the cussion here. I'm not even the number of heads The

professor signals the class's end by mumbling an objective, a good weekend." The seats empty in an exodus to as quickly as they had filled. Outside again, I greet friends and look forward to the coming weekend. I spend 17 hours a week in class as a number, 1 have "Have

wards the doors, three times

the rest of the week to be

a

name

and

a

person.

V,R.

Registration: the student nd

1 1

at war

tabic, squares his shoulders

long

All around him sounds the

ches his

a

bug]

Drop-Add

calls of other students

hi this for my major fighting for courses: "II have to have what do you mean, it doesn'l fill Division B? It's a science, for goddsake Why do I want a section change? Because I turn into a toad during 8:00 classes I need a teacher .

Registration is probab!> the first, foremost :ind most diflic battle between the undergraduate and Ihe University. .Arir a Drop-Add form, a course catalog a timetable and a

with

of

patience,

the student goes forth the

day

before classes

,

.

,

,

.

...

try to defeat the faculty and administration at it's own gai of acadamia. The squirmish is long and hard, and it is i

sit in the aisle

known how many truly survive the battle. Students camp < in long lines outside Keaney Gym. subsisting on tepid bi

The battle goes far into the afiernoon. F\en after their first

prepared to show their student inquiring border guard.

and Coke, to an\

ID's and lime

cai

never

ory

me

before ,

,

,

.

.

,

Ni>

I HAVE,

seals lo

left? 1 hal\ :ill

have ihis

right, '^'

HI

cnurse

battle, weary freshmen

writing hell

Onci

had

,

,

can be seen on the steps of the gvm, ihcir first letter home: "Dear Mom and Dad. war is ," Extension students stagger out. wallets in hand.

grieving at the demise of old friends, lost to by the distant dorms, frisbecs and sofiballs

the Bursar, Oul sail

through

the

air: the toys of those innocents who know nothing of the trials of the balUcfield, After

ong. hard

fighl. the wearied soldier,

.still

ed, wrinked Drop-Add form, heads back

ciutchin;

up the hif

jH T^ h *'

> 1

^1 H ^^^!

rnR B

n i ^p

The An "ideal" is not we are

and for that matter, in person,

place

or

perfect professor

easy thing I perfect. No rr

an

all less than

our

entire

e

by, perhaps

*here *e

we

will

bee;

go who

probably

v

n

situation.

students, however, probably the most longed for ideal is that of an idea! professor. we all are different, that perfect instructor would differ in personality for all But, there are some characteristics that can be considered univcnsally sought

As

Since of

us.

after in the "ideal

professor."

enthusiastic about his

husiasm. He

subject, but he does only asks that they respect il.

Understanding The ideal professor is caring, and realizes that wc do nol exist solely for his class. He accepts good excuses, and pardons his students' sins of neglect, .

.

,

K.M-

v^>

1\i iiim|i!' rr.

Alternative Food

The the is a

Alternative basement

Food

of

i

Co-op.

Roosevelt

Hal

student organization devoted t different sort of education, Fo

a

those who

arc among the more tha 400 active members, including man

non-students, the education has

l

do with

provide food that and higher quality available

than is gener;

in

the supermarket, including ordering, pi doni stocking the food

the work, and

ing. by members

each of whoi nth

of

Because

profit

its

nature as

co-operative, well

as

non

its orienta

tion toward natural health foods of

high nutritional quality, the Alterna Co-op does provide a real

tive Food

avail

to other

and viable alternative

sources. This is brought by the fact that the co-op has been growing and prospering since 1970, when it was begun by a hand ful of people.

able food out

lilable

tthc

II

op

fresh fruits and vegetables, bread, nuts, seeds, dricc

beans,

fruit

and flours,

juices, honey and

whoh othei

natural snacks. Many of the foods, though not all, are grown organi cally, without the use of chemical

pesticides

or

fertili/ers. As

there

no

additives

arc

The co-op

provides

or

rule

a

presrva-

many books and

information about nutrition, cook

ing,

and other

subjects.

It is

a

place

where students meet non-students, where the

university

rounding community.

meets

the

sur

Co-op

C.H.E.A.R.S.

CHE.A.R.S,. the Campus Healt Education Alcohol

vices, is

a

Resource Sei

volunteer team of student

trained and

supervised by

versity Health Services Department. The

program

are

not

stress

just

associated

the Un:

Educaiio

physical

with

problems

alcoholism

and

alcohol

but there abuse, emotional, social and financial siderations

as

are con

well.

C.H.E.A.R.S., guided by co-ordinator Diane Vincent, is students help ing students, by providing alcohol information, peer counseling and

referral. There is much

information

ti

shared with the campus commu and C.H.E.A.R.S- arranges reach

workshops

other

locations

request.

in the dorm on

campus

i

The Good 5<t

commitment

to

put together

newspaper and that is

a

daily

exactly

what

goes into every issue of the Good

5f

Cigar,

Cigar

The Good5( Cigar "Just what this country

of about

50, ihc Cigar is

ceptional

learning experience

an

ex

really needs!" ^^

for

each person involved. Editor in Chief

Anna Maria Vir;

The

took

Cigar

big step

a

switched

it

as

year

from

this

semiTues

weekly to daily publication, day through Friday,

Paul Lambert

Kathy Plaistcd Sara Spaulding Patrick Quinn Karin Sherbin

The switch has drained much energy from the staff. Late nights in the

office the

to

When the

lies

are

Cigar editors and banging away at type cloistered

their

in

writers

offices

in the Memorial Union.

serious

the

Reporting

which face URl. from backs

lakes

programs,

problei

budget

much

researi.

digging and hard work. The sports desk also had an and tiring year, including a

by the sports ed photographer to Chariot'

drive taken a

and back to ney

'aul

against

cover

the NC.-*

Duke.

Lambcri.

out

business

ger. also found himself lac n additional work load of bala.

budget, pproximalcly

lur

ndeavors.

ectiviiy :ampus,

in

which

increase

S90.000 this ye

always bringing Anna

Editor-in-Chief

ci

with acaden

problems

to

Manager Tuesday Editor Wednesday Editor Thursday Editor Friday Editor

Dave La allee

likelj

more

that

not

reporters

Christopher Blak Dave Gregorio

Production

oi the e.lm|>u^

in bed. it is

cozily

than

rest

were

strives the

'fo:

news

Maria

i

Manager

.Associate Editor

\\ L-diics-

Sunday through

norm

day.

deadlines

the

meet

Business

Ph.

Copy Editor Copy Editor ng Manager -aphy Editor ;

Edit

Dirigible

Sounds like

something

It must h

zeppelin!

a

to

do with the

Sky

Div

Club. How about the Art Depa ment?

It's

a

student

with state workers, Memorial Union

so

organizati it must bi

Organization.

Dirigible Composing does the typesetting for the Good 5ir Cigar and other publications on campus. It is located in Room

115 of the

Memorial Union, Within these four walls there is about $50,000 worth of offset typesetting equipment and two state

whose

workers, Patti and Jean.

worth

is

not

measurable.

duo work all day typ ing the Good 5c Cigar, from dis play ads to outlines, from news to

The

dynamic

classifieds. There who work

as

are

also students

proofreaders, photon night typesetters

machine operators,

read in the Cigar

,

FolUes Bazaar

all

and n

lat come

Io<

E

album with music,

art

and ideas

from URl, Follies Ba/aar

ncourages any interested siudents i

join.

n to

The final

-ee

product

is

passed

the students at

bllies Bazaar

a very low cost, Records also hosts

musical events

16 track stereo al

throughout

Normandy

in Warren Rl. The album

the

Sound

was

pro

by Chris Aliberto. with l'm;cuproducer Tom Carmod\ and producers John Nava/io

duced tive

:

Malcdo.

L.

Brusie

was

Freshman Orientation

Over the few

course

summers,

of each of the past

freshmen have visited

URl and

stayed over night here lo take advantage of a program de signed, in nearly every way. lo benefit them. The

Freshman

Orientafion

Pro

gram, staffed not a

just

by 16 students, strives provide freshmen with

to

fall schedule of classes,

help them through

lo

autonomy

tempered

realize their

self-directed wiih

but

to

poiemials personal responsi-

Each year the program is refined the the staff receives just a

and

little better instruction

so

that it is

annually expanding and improving, not just quantitively. but qualila-

freshmen the is

coming through during

dog days

one

of

July,

the

experience

that remains with them for-

Workshop

Leaders

Gay Students Coahtion

The purpose of ihe URl Ga\ Sti dents' Coalition is to develop

sociopolitical sensitivity of gay

This is

people.

the

to

this

takes

the

CAY

p^'"

STUDENTS COALITION

i|^;..,..

Ibomopbobia- ^^^I ^^^^H

BO HA rertit

A

nmATiiuAi.

Am

DiNUKK

OV

in

participation

Providence's Parade

and

rallies.

Other

form

'

i j

<

^^^1

dividual

t

annual

various ious

Pride

Gay

projects, include

level,

Rights the in

on

in-service

training sessions with potential Speakeasy peer counselors and par ticipation in URI's annual Health Fair,

Probably

the most memorable pro Ihc GSC this year

ject sponsored by Nafional

Gay Blue Jeans Da>. obtaining SI 00 from the stu for advertising pur poses, the campus began to bu/z with the talk of the upcoming NGBJD. The theme of the day was was

After

denl

Senate

"If you are gay or support gay rights then wear blue jeans on April

14. 1978."

Only

on

wore

1 4.

campus as

277, of the blue

compared

weeks

before. The

garded

as a

success.

jeans

with event

^^^^^^H

ai

ng pre

and

^^^^^H

ncce

largeK

complished by dispelling the man myths surrounding gay pcopli Often

IP-

people April

on

47'-; was

tw o re

\a lllllll

1 ^

II 1 1

^

w'mi 1 l1.-

Club

Geology

The 30

Geology active

Club

its

acquaints

members

with

environ

mental

of

and

geology surrounding

areas.

is

inform students of controversial

to

Rhode

Its purpose

geological problems

in this

The club

visits

organizes

esting geological features

provides

information

exhibits,

and

Island

area.

lo anc

via

m

guest lecture: interest demands on pariiculai

jects.

Field

semester eastern

to

trips are planned places in the r

United States,

Mei

lally : president assisted

held in the Hal was

by McCreery.

t

This

Lucille

vice

Dickenson.

president

Andrea

secretary and David

C.

Pickharl

Murray

Jay was

served

Great

Far from il.

Swamp

It

was

Gazette, referred

to

Great

by

som

Other newspaper. We cal magazine, but that's just ;

of

Some cleqr

packaging.

Wc took

big

on

like armed

issues,

campus police, nuclear energy, and the bureaucracy here We found in

teresting characters poking around corners of the campus, and managed to

give

excitement

some

to

the

Student Senate all the while.

still

growing

too.

Forming the Gazette fame can

or

didn't

bring

fortune lo the staff.

still walk

noticed, Bui

through

crowd

a

We un

have the satisfaction

we

of knowing we're and

doing a good thing people appreciate it.

All

my

thanks goes to the staff: assistant editor:

Gail

Kauranen,

Bill

O'Brien,

managing

editor;

Linda Clorite, copy editor; Sharon McAleer, photo editor; Cindy Hor-

oviiz,

production ary

1

editor;

Emily

i

sing It couldn't them,

-in-Chief

Gazette

and have Ron

happened Dubois,

tKinkiug

out of

the imich and

mire

Horsemen's Club

The

Hiir^tmtr

Club

s

mlertsled

e\enonc

abilil\ Club members ble lor the

eleven as

well

ek

r,.

riding

are

responsi and elejnma of the

ejre

horses

the

at

L niiersit\

the barn and t lek

as

In return

room

club members enjos the

of the horses for weekend

use

miis

horses

in

of the exlenl ol iheir

gardless

riding

and It til rides

Construetion

ol

the

I Rl

Subles

wtsaeeomplished during

the inler

of

house

igv 7

students 25'

Scic The its

The

(The

order

in

h

Pie

ti

sed

rses

i

lie

II

r

n

1

the \S(_ ^

Ih

Dcpii I Rl

Horsemen

s

Club

owns

taek ind equipment throuj,h Student Senate funds Meetings own

nouneed b\ the

Olh

use

of posters

this

ind

SU7

president finds Ouinn president Robert Boulan er Susan Bccklej secret rs

Carrier vice

treasurer

Kathv Nelson ind Karvn program chairmen

( orselli

Inter-Fraternity

the ,

Inter-Fra-

Council. (IIC).

f

Fibrosis, and

others

Jimmy 1-und.

and

the

and the

.American Cancer .Socielv.

through

afniialion with

for if its members do

nol

a

fraternity.

take

care

of

their house

they will lose it. Unlike university housing, overseen by the Housing Office, wc alter and immaintain them. The

opportunity

to

Council

International Club

The

than two hundred

foreign from forty speak more than fifty different languages. All are joined together in an entirely more

students

URl

al

come

different countries and

ent

culture and life here

Cultural

shock

in

sels

pecially

on

from their

the

own.

the

campus, a

and these

always

differs

Adjustments

be made to become

must

part of the

adjustments

easy to face.

I Club attempts

The In

is

URl.

when

students realize the exlenl

foreign

It

at

hoped

that

in

the

future.

American and International students will be able

to

closely, for only

work much

more

then will everyone

benefit from the shared

experience.

Photos

by

Karen

McDougall

Investment Club

The

Investment

Club

learning experience about the internal stock

market.

composed

It

lo

offers

a

a

the studenl

workings is

of the

partnership

of upper classmen who

are

business

majors The purpose of partnership is in in\est ihe assets of the partnership soIeK m the

educate

and

capital

appreciation

consisted of board and

with

the

mteni

The

ol

club

five member executive

a

twenty-five

members. Dr.

G. Dash and Dr. B. Sanderson served

in

an

were

advisory capacity. Meetings held

of the club's

to

discuss the progress

portfolio,

and

on

several

occasions guest speakers lectured to the club concerning the workings and related

activity

of the

capital

markets. The club also visited the

New

York

Stock

Evchange-

various investment houses.

and

Jewish Activities Council

.ed Ihe i

held

itudci

AC During first semcslc sponsored such events as High Holyday Services, a Fall Cocktail Party. a hay ride, several Sunday Brunches

and

an

The

Israeli Dinner and discussion.

firsi

semester

rounded

was

off

by sponsoring daily candle lighting ceremonies during the eight days of Hannukah, The spring semester began with another mixer and visits by several outstanding Rabbi These included: guests. Shlomo Carlebach. Joseph Ciclbcrman and Zaiman Schachter, Irving

author

Howe,

Fnihcrs and of

Living

spoke The

at

of

World

Lucy Sleinitz.

of Our author

aflcr the Holocaust also JAC

semester

sponsored ended with

functions. a

cocktail

party in honor of 30 years of Israeli

Indepcndancc. Throughout the year. JAC -ponsored Friday night services a as services in Westerly and various discussion groups. As a service to students. JAC offered Passover meals during April which were en joyed by all that attended. 19771978

was a

year that

back

on

being

as

a

can

be looked

success.

Kingston Women's Liberation

Women's

Kingsto n a

Liberation

Stude nt Senate fu ded

tion of local and who

un

actively

ar

wo

is

organiza-

versiiy

women

towards

rking

eradica ng sexisn Through feminist speakers, fil ns. workshops. and

nars.KWL seeks

sem

and

ere ale

issues

and

addition

KWL stri

.

informa ion

the

KWL

spo sored

rilms.

referrals

mg

Women to

ir

s

tplem

Y< rk

as

the Willie

numbe

a

of sand nd

ppcr.

an d

lobby

of

ntalio

S udies

s

Nev

rt.

uek

pot

for

to

977-78 acad mic year and presented

-one

a

In

provide

to

es

ueh

Tyson

URl,

at

and

During

educale

of women's

awarene s

struggle s

to

Progr

the

Trips

m.

Bosl

hibit New

England

Women's

Studies

Conference in Storrs, Connecticut

sponsored by KWL. KWL presented several speakers jointly with other campus organizations author/poet Marge Piercy, feminist artist Miriam Schapiro, and feminist speech communications specialist were

also

Kri

Chei

i

One

of

the

progressive URl during

most

events

the

important to

spring

an

occur

2

semester wa

the establishment of the Women' Resource

Project Ho

College

in

the

Hom Low

Road.

Photos

by

Karen

McDougall

Little Brother-Little Sister

The

Little

Brother-Little

Sister

provides a URl student opportunity lo be a friend underpriveledged youngster from the surrounding community. The focus of the organization is 3 develop a program

with the lo

an

betw

the

brothers

ar

children

a

gain insight a

new

unique opportunity and understanding Through the work

world.

dedicated

student

program has proven

volunlcers. to

be

a

i

<

oi

valuab

The Executive Board Members foi 1977-1978

were:

Pam Karras.

presi

dent; Beite Smith, vice president Sieve

Silverman,

treasurer;

Sara

Spaulding, secretary; Susan Fisher. publicity chairperson; Jon Sol is. Pat transportation chairperson; Procaccini. social chairperson: and Lori

lacuele

and

Scott

Massoni,

membership chairpersons.

Photos

by

John

Phillip

Club

Meteorology

The

Mei

include

daily

preparing

weal hi

forecasts for Kingston, inviting loc. weathermen to present lectures :

meetings, )sphe,

showing films related .

obst

i

^ing 1

participating in a National Weather Forecasting Contest. Trips are arranged lo visit of weather centers New England activity. local weather, and

i s

1

Any studenl who is interested

I

in

encouraged to Meteorology Club.

science is

atmospheric participate in

the

which is affiliated with the Ameri can

Meteorological Society.

i

i&m

r

jS

^^^^^1^^f^^^m V

//'

^?^]^^sp

m

,

m

**'^^^^^^1

ii^^jl^^

iSi Phoios

by (l^iry

Mc

Panhellenic Association

Just

as

the

fifty

slates

in

our

country

form the United Slates of America. the

surorilics

eight

form the

on

of Rhode Island

Lniversit>

Panhellenic

Association.

like

sorority,

this c.impus

each

liach has

state,

its

governing bodv

which operates for the welfare of all of its members.

own

Setting up standards to live by. performing philanthropic projects and participating in social endeavors tend to promote a feeling thai binds each house separately. But as all )

gates

lo

do

nd del

J

Panhcl. This

organi/aiion's

immediate

harmony

purpose is lo promote and lo uphold the ideals of

their constitution.

What

Panhellenic

mainly

an

informal

open

an

that

thoughts all

can

be

scholarship standards further development of hel is

a

women

on

structure

of

is of

shared

b\

cover

ihe

and

the

the

enlire

this campus. Pancomposed of the

delegates, and

betterment

LRI for

exchange

houses. These ideas

Greek system

the

strives

the

for the overall women

in

Plant and Soil Science Club

The is

Plant and Soil Science Club

all siudents having an plants, soil, landscaping. They meet every other Wednesday in Wood ward Hall to hold business meetings and to present guest speakers and

opened

to

interest in

and

the

environment.

films.

Every

year the club sponsors three

fund raising

projects, an apple sale September, coffee sales at URFs Extension Pruning Workshops in February and a green carnation sale for St. Patrick's Day. The Club is also involved in keeping members of informed job opportunities, scholarships, sending a soil team to the annual soil judging contests, and in planning and planting the vegetable garden for the Summer Flower Show, Also, this year they had their own display at the Midland Mall Garden Week. The highlight of the year was a banquet at the Bay Voyage Inn in Jamestown for club members, faculty, and friends. in

The officers for the 1977-78 PLS

Club

were

Dennis

Paul

Tremblay, president;

Ryan, vice-president;

Joni

Berkshire, secretary; John Caltan, treasurer; and

Andy McHea, public

Portuguese Club

The is

Portuguese Club "O Li organization open to

an

dents, especially those inter the

cultures

of

the

are

to

ted i

Portugi

speaking Its

objectives

aware more

ities

organized by

To attain these has

make

people

of those cultures and to gel student involvement in activ

become

the club.

objectives

invoKed

the club

with

Portu"-

and hold

regular

Highlights

of

the

1 rf ^&k. 1^

tings activities

the Clubs partieipation

in

were

Interna

tional Week, film and slide presenta-

typical Portuguese

restaurant.

W^*^ Photos

by

Karen

McDougall

Pre-optometry

among to

pre-professional

Club

sludenis and

share ideas and information with

fellow pre-optometry siudents. The purpo.se of the club is members

the

explore

optometry,

lo

to

help

field

discuss

other

of pre-

professional career opportunities, and also to help underclassmen pre pare for Optometry schools. The club in a

its

film, "0,D,"s

first year viewed .

,

.

viMon

care

the specialists'", prepared by with a current A,0,A,, spoke optometrist as well as an optometry

student,

and

visitied

England College

The

of

Pre-Optomciry

the

New

Optometry

Club

in

meets once

every month. President of the ciub is Reed Edelman,

Photos

by Karen McDoug,

Sailing

foul

the

Despite

Club

weather

countered throughout both ters

this

the

year,

Club has

lot

a

to

URl

en

semes

Sailing

be thankful for.

The clubhouse, which is located Salt

Pond

Road

in

on

Wakefield, is

sporting porch and ramp. By next fall, the fleet of 20-ycar old Beverly Dinghies will have been replaced by a licet of ten brand new Tech Dinghies, a

new

The

sailing lessons which are offered through the Physical Education De were

partment both

fully this

semesters

lessons

are

to

open

subscribed

to

year. These anyone in the

students

The were

250

different

included on

undergraduate

cnterlaincd

many

a

night

this

members year

activities. sail and

wiih

These

keg party

Gardner's Island, the One-of-a-

kind regatta, and movies presented club meetings. The club was

al

headed

Gibson. Currier,

this

year

Kevin Terric

by officers Jeff Robert Doyle.

Nunes.

and

Pam

RIPIRG

URI-RIPIRG

of

Rhode

Research is

pose tions

of

and

the

University

Public

Interest

RIPIRG's

articulate

the

through

is

Island

Group, to

and

media,

pur

pursue institu

the

government, the courts means the concerns

other

interest. The

public

include

consumer

source

planning,

areas

of

concern

protection, protection

re

of

quality, health care government accountability and other matters of concern to the welfare of the people of Rhode Island, is a non-partisan, non corporation, funded and by students. The controll ing body is a student elected Board All policy decisions of Directors. are made by the Board, who deter mine project priorities, financial and affing

RIPIRG

profit

controlled

The

Board direc lions

out

by

of

staff

a

carried

are

professionals.

students and volu nteers.

RIPIRG cational

major

siudents with

provide

unique, exciting

a

experi

nd

all

of the

are- con-

dircciion

staff, but student

peTfnrm r

has

great

channels of

re

polen ial

its

inlcrdis-

nvolvcd

RIPIRG's struct

nf

much if in'>ihod

e-seareh

Major projects ciplinarvevaluatic n

a

edu-

RIPIRG's

projects

ducted under ih not

necessary

nce,

educationa

this aspect ol and program for opening

comm unication

between

students and fac

stitutions. and th

comm u

nit V.

In the past year, RIPI RG has under

projects covering a as Energy Day. Bottle Bill. Bail Bond. Legislator Watch, Lobbying. Ralph Nader. Consumer Hotline, and the Pick Up and Return Service for telephones. taken

variety

many

of issues, such

Week. Sun

Skin Divers' Club

Since ils concep

riy

years of scuba di

ing.

Club has been

ae

stimulate intcresl at

the Univ

of Rhode Is: and Skin

sity

Ihe

lively

Div rs"

ving

str

to

the sport here

n

University,

Club activities range from

pons

ing speakers rela film presentations

ps.

ed

th e

to

field

tr

)r-

rt.

sp .

nd

eae

iv-

club dives. The club offers ities such the

frigid

two

as

weekend

end

is

boat

diving Fort

clubs

uniq

carlv ice div. sions, O

excu

M

kISS.

or

in Bo ton Harbor, a

var

ety of d Jamcsto

Getty,

from

othe

New

The officers for the Divers' Club

are

in

wa

Glouc sler.

to

another at off

few

a

the

Rhode 1 land

ve

: s

nd es

w

th

:ngl:

nd

n

l<)77-7K Skin

.Icff Blonar.

presi

dent; Paul Pegnato, vice-president: Anne

Oekenhusen,

treasurer; Carol

Club

Skydivers'

The URl

Skydi. ers'

up of

some

so one

might

was

Ellington,

Club is

n

dar ng people thin k. The club,

established i

Conn client.

adc hich

1970, skydiv

s

al

This

Ihe

highly qualified

jump

United Stales P

rachuting

ation trains the

mpers before

hev

take that first 2800 foot step ot

Ihe

j

zone

-As

OCI-

plane. According to Bill Bcaudreau. pe ipic reasons Is skydive for varin s

but the

ability

say 1 did if

'

see

o

just be abl to coax

IS

pe

lo

iplc

into their first ju mp. The sheer fun of t makes a

sport that's har d

to

skydi ing

beal.

Speak-Easy

The

trend

awareness

toward

increased

an

concerning sexuality

that

has evolved in recent years has been accompanied by the need for com

prehensive information about sex uality and related health issues. Speak-Easy, the peer sexuality in formation and counseling center al URl.

was

URl

Health

founded in 197.1 bv the Services

fill

to

this

need.

Throughout the past five years, Speak-Easy has offered regularly scheduled birth control .sessions, paraprofessional counsel ing, outreach programs for the iity such as rape, V D. .sex roles and attitudes, homosexuality, abortion and birth control-

topics,

.

Speak-Easy is an all gram, supervised by

voli

Hazel

Templi

URFs health educator. Counselor all students,

are

trained in

a

Pichette and Chris Pritchard,

Speak-Easy in providir

has been q

uality education. cated

on

veil Hall.

The

the fourth fit

thret

Student Video Center

The Student Video Center is localcc in

room

331 of the Memorial Union

This .student-founded and

run

lek-

vision

facility is responsible for th. training and loan of portable vide. equipment to the student bod>. All il lakes is

and

your

you're

URl studenl 1,1),

center

is

lo

the way

on

video

own

Besides and

a

half hour of lime

a

and

be trained to

makinj

production.

portable equipped editing

equipment, wiih

audio

full

tacilities.

the

video The

has been responsible fur showing programs in the main lounge of the Union on a weekly basis. It has also taped many of the concerts and speakers presented at center

UR!

over

or

the

course

of the year.

interested in

learning video media-track audio taping is in

Anyone

vited to

come up and share your ideas and interests.

Student Entertainment Committee

The Student

Entertainment

provides quality

e

Com-

enlertain-

the URl students and

to

sur

rounding community by presenting Besides the ts, SEC puts on which

"Homegrown Series", feautres

new

talent from the New

England

area,

SEC al.so co-sponsors

many events with other student

such

ganizations,

as

or

Union Board,

Uhuru SaSa, and Weekenders. SEC is

an

exclu:

'e

student

organiz

;ach member to b of the talent selectit Board prepares vailable agency for the gem their approval.

listings

Persons interested in all

production

concert

can

phases of

find commit

express their individual talents. From basic ticket sales to tees

to

making or

her

sure

star

the

on

performer

ihc

sponsible for

has his

backstage

members of the committee the entire

door.

arc

re

performancc-

i-ited

Student Lecture Series

The Student Lecture Series, SLS. is a student-funded and studentrun organization that provides speakers for the campus community.

Throughout

the

course

of the school

SLS presents lectures by locally and nationally known figures. They try to choose speakers who appeal to the interests of the student body, and generally are successful year,

in their endeavor.

Some of the SLS this year

speakers presented by were Margaret Mead,

Edward Albee. Robert Pollard, Jules

Feiffer.

Henry

Amazing

Kyemba

student

and

the

Kreskin,

SLS will continue to

body

of

URl

provide the top quality

lecturers with the support and in volvement of the student body.

Student Senate

After the last motion the last vote

ity?" And the

was

made and

taken, somebody

was

asked. "But did

we

have credibil

answer? You bet

we

did! Remember the tuition rally on the front steps of the State House in Providence? Remember the 400 stu dents

carrying signs and chanting High" and "Roll 'Em

"Too Damn Back"?

Remember office and

walking into the Senate seeing a tall, lanky fellow

with his feet he

are

his desk? Chances

on

was

on

the

"Hello. Govei

phone saying, ahy?

lob Cr;

of the Great

Swamp Gazette,

the establishment of as

new

pansion vices,

a r

in

anc

clubs such

the Weekenders, There

was

Kingston Student

ex

Ser

Studenl Budget Task Force. nele.

regis

voting booths,

forum

a

on

tonal women's conference,

the a

na-

letter

campaign for parents' support, and a recommendation for a new part-time student were

activities

decisions

to

tax.

And

be made

on

there salar

ies for studenl leaders, the budget, the parking problem, student bi

monthly pay periods, the infirmary, University calendar.

and the

There

were probably a few too m: ny resignations, a couple silly question5 and one or two pointless debates,

but 1977-78

Credibility

at

was

a

last.

year of results

=^ir^^ rflUITIONI

RALLY

^0 TUITION HIKES!

I I

TUITION RALU

Surf Club

The Surf Club is

an

organization

for the benefit of the many surfers who attend the University. It offers

information

where and when

to

as

waves are best and also provides transportation when necessary. Fre quently on weekday nights slides

the

and

movies of Rhode

Island surf

spots like Monahans. Poinl Judith. and Matunuck who

have

are

surfed

shown. Members in

California.

Mexico, and Puerto Rico also give

presentations or

twice

a

to

year

a

the students. Once

full length feature

film, sponsored by the members, is offered

to

the

Their aim is

to

local

community.

support the sport

of surfing on campus and any interested students.

to

assist

Tai Chi Club

people stand mo the bright lights straight hanging by their sides

Silence. Fifteen

beneath

tionless

of the Dance Studio

backs,

arms

lifeless like as

,

,

.

-

-

concentration. Then,

.

human wave, all

a

one

.

.

begin to move slowly, steadily, solid

.

ly flowing. For twenty five its way

sthei

r

the fioor

across

legs, feet filling

arms,

postures like another to

in

,

where it a

,

wave

began

.

,

arms sw

.

hands

subsides,

relaxed

,

,

,

It is known Chinese health

I i

gently

final circular motion

wave

,

nptie the

-

.

,

well I

pouring

water

which

.

;epoul ,

drifi

,

the

down

stillness. as

Tai Chi, the ancieni

exercise

through

which

a

promolcs slow, dance-like

sequence of postures based on the teachings of Taoist philosophy. URFs Tai

Monday

Chi

Club has

evenings

for

met

the

on

past

three years to practice the art under Mr, Charles the direction of

Arcieri. who teaches the Classical

Yang style As

a

club

adopted name

of

a

of Tai Chi.

project Balinese

Wayan

members have

orphan by through

Sarma

the the

Foster Parents Plan,

Phoios

by

Sue

Carpentei

Union Board

The

Memorial

Union

of

Board

Directors, MUBOD, has been de scribed as, "a nebulous

being

that

inhabits the third noor of the Union ,

.

.," and although this is possibly its

true,

responsibilities

much

go

further. it

Basically,

is

divided

into

two

councils:

Programming and Opera Operations deal directly with policy makings that occur in the Union. They allocate space to various organizations, work tions.

decisions and

with the Ram's Den, Pub and Build

ing

Generally,

Operations.

make

students have

sure

what's

happening Programming is i that

Un:

publicity.

sthe

r

iighi

enjoyable

s

,uch Bud

they say in

divided

.

program many

a

in their Union, the side of the

;

for

Ihe

Free Films in the

Olympics,

Ballroom. Dances. Trips. Contem porary Speakers, Art Exhibits. Backroom Gigs. Operation Icicle, and

the

Spring

Weekend

Gong

Show and Cabaret Theatre,

Although

it is divided into two

cils. MUBOD basis any

to

meets

a

on

discuss and decide

major

issues in

Union, This

coun

regular jointly

around the

or

meeting is also reserved to keep up to date Every member of Board has full voting regards to many Union

for all members

with each other.

the

Union

privileges in happenings;

whether il is to discuss

and approve the Memorial Union budget or selecting new furniture for the Ram's Den, But like all studdent organizations, the Union Board needs student in put, so apply for one of its commit tees

and get involved the Union while

helping

,

,

.

you'll be having a

Weekenders

The trees

change from

green to

;

heralded the birth of

;

concept here mass

from

al

URL Tocomb

weekly exodus of sti campus, a new organi/

Weekenders,

establishei

was

vide

the

vith

unity

Co-sponsoring

a

ulafir

number of

gigs

with

the Union Board and SEC. Week enders reached the

import of Long Island.

"tasty" peak

a

with

the "Good Rats" from

A touch of class

URl in

came to

a

tasting presented by Ron Mar golin. Slides of France and wine that flowed brought pleasant conversa wine

tion.

All

who

attended

appreciate that there's than getting drunk.

can

more to

now

wine

ranged from lectures from outstanding personalities as Margaret Mead and Stan Waterman to bus trips lo the plays Activities

such Dr.

"For Colored Girls" and "Dancin"' in Boston. A bus

provided

trip

Newport

to

much needed relief for stu

dents with

pre-finals jitters

in

May.

Watch Weekenders in the up com The ing years for fresh idi is growing, taking on new responsibilities. Weekenders repre sents

an

enthusiastic

group

of

people from a student body that has only begun lo realize that they alone have the power a

to

make this campus

place they enjoy calling

home.

SEC-SLS: The year in review a speaker or musical group comes to the URl campus, the people who sponsor the event arc lost in the shuffie and excitement. The spon.sors don't much seem to mind, as long as the turnout is good and the crowds are enihusiastic.

Often when

Still, if you're

ing

and

ever wondering who does the planning, schedul publicizing of various events, look to the offices and

staffs of the Student Lecture Scries and the Student F.nter-

The second semester schedule before "We

According

to

advisor

Denni

and

chairperson

Barbara Jacobs, the Student Lecture Series had out

'

year," A wide variety of speakers made for nearly sold-out performances.

and

"We chose

really

didn't know what to expect from this perform was a first for us the first weekend lecture we'd

ance." "This

had. We on

lent

was a bit more daring. SLS's speaker was anthropologist Margaret Mead, who spoke a capacity crowd in Edwards,

first

-

really pleased with the number Saturday afternoon." said Gonsalves.

a

were

and other events, yet

portant

per The first half of the year

September's speaker cartoons

came

was

to life in

for the SLS.

our

cartoonist Jules Feiffer. Feiffer's

are

went

on

to a

departments

slowly

was

performance of Feiffer'.'i the URl Theater Department. playwright Edward Albee, who

crowd in Edwards Auditorium. Albee

good-sized spent two days working

spoke also

the schedule

rather

in

workshops

for the fall semester

was

with the Theatre and

and discussions. The final

Robert Pollart in

Westinghouse Corporation

average of about 800

an

seats

performance, which isn't al all bad. Mead was probably biggest drawing; about 1300 seats were filled. The people interested and

want to

be there."

theater

a

Children, co-sponsored by Next

still drew in the crowds."

we

Gonsalves added. "We filled

to say; we ti

that showed up

Ugandian Health Minister Henry Kyemba was February's speaker. Following Kyemba were Black Panther founder Bobby Scale, who was part of Black Culture Week. UFO specialist J, Alan Hynk, Viet Nam speakers Jerry Elamer and Carol Bragg, and mind-reader and ESP specialist "The Amazing" Kreskin. Most of those performances were also very well-attended," said Jacobs. "We were competing with the basketball games

on

a

English speaker

debate with the

nuclear energy.

SLS has

a

12-member staff, who work very

scheduling, planning and publicity a.spects "It's

ance.

a

"But

mostly,

ever wc

they

for the whole

ence

interested to

are

we're here for the students,

believe

It's

want to see.

community."

closely of the

with the

perform

for staff members" said

learning experience

Jacobs. SLS welcomes all who

join,"

bringing

in whom

educational

an

experi

said Gonsalves.

SLS often co-sponsors events with other campus organiza tions. "We often work closely with the Young Socialists

Alliance, RIPIRG and or

to

others; but

some

we

try

to co-sponsor

help any organization that asks. All of our events are free undergrads it's entirely for the students," said Jacobs.

SLS is

already working

cxi

e

year's

this

"Our

past,

goal

this year

many of

our

was

to

spring

present

performers

schedule. Jacobs said,

Next year will be good. I think more than

ur own. i

-

variety of

a

music. In this

have been much the

same-

there

variety in what they did. This year, we moved more away from some of the mellower music and got more into rock and jazz." was

little

SEC

underwent

major evaluations

this

year

by

it's

50-

member stafL "We've decided that quantity is not as impor quality." said Gorski. "We don'l want to do the same

tant as

acts

over

and

over

again

-

wc

like

a

lot of

variety

and like

to

SEC's first

performance

was a

Tom Rush concert,

URl favorite. October brought

Andy

Pratt and Nils

start of

a

a perennial performance by

sold-out

Loftgren. November's

something different

-

a

rock

concert was

concert

by

the

Sea Level,

a near-capacity crowd. The fall highly-attended performance by Art Garfunkel in Keaney Gym. Interspersed in these concerts were smaller concerts by the Homegrown Series, featuring more local artists; these loo drew good-sized audiences.

which attracted about 800. semester

finished with

a

Staff

spring

ans

to the campus.

semester

brought

an even

February's

wider

variety

of musici

Paul Winter Consort

was

a

hit for many, featuring a type of music rarely heard on college campuses. Black Culture Week presented Roy Ayers in a jazz concert. The spring semester closed with an extravagant

Spring Weekend festival, featuring jazz musician Herbie Mann and the annual Bluegrass Festival. Although

the

Spring

Weekend

performances

criticized, Gorski felt the Weekend

was

a

were

success.

they

IcLirn what it is like

lo

work with pro

fessional agents which can be a real trip in itself!" Gorski said. The whole process nf finding a group, signing a con tract and arranging for the performance takes about one and -

a

half

nical

crew

lot

a

months total. The students then work at the

two

to

show itself

selling tickets, working security, assisting attending l6 the performers ihem.sclves,

and to

the Studenl Technical Services

Gorski added. dous

help

in

"They are very supportive making the show go off."

and

crew are a

as

tech "We

well,"

tremen

SEC would like

to gel more students involved in the campus entertainment business. "If anyone has anything to offer, any opinion lo express, we're happy to lake il. Wc like people

involved before the show goes off negative feedback after the show isn't much help. We need to know what the students -

highly

"It went

well. There were so many organizations working in co operation. We had a wider variety of music than we have had in the past." Although the Bluegrass concert was moved into over 2,000 Keaney Gym, "the reaction was tremendous people showed up. The atmosphere, competition and music over

-

were

o

management; and

owe

The

me

expand

terrific."

SEC's 50-mcmber staff does most of the planning and publi city for the sponsored performances. "Our executive board (which consists of president Lucy Fcrnandes, vice-presidents Chip Felderman, John Viau and John Simmons, and 1 1 other members) chose from a list of performers, and bids go out to place these musicians. It's an excellent educational experience.

No definite

plai : for next year have been made yet, but the working. "We'd like to get Keaney Gym more maybe twice a year," said Gorski. In the past, the committee has brought magicians, comedians and other open ing acts to the campus. "We've had a few of those." said staff

often

IS

still

-

Gorski, "but we'd like more." "We

were

happy

in

cellent shows. Our

capacity crowds, Overall,

we

had

decisions this year. Wc had some ex unknown performers did nol get they did gel were enthused. excellent year."

our

more

but the crowds an

Sororities rush for new members pportu I R

he

plore

om

spirited

lifcs vie ol Ihe Grec ks

on ampus. Ifs th the members of

ihe

eight

1 the sa me tin- e. to begin pus. and. lasli ng frie ndships. ishethe r or not the

dcci

made t

join

)

of the

one

hou h. traditi

Forn

in 1

nally aking place gatherings.

ics of

fall

e

inlo mal

d

a

form; 1 pan cs allowing to know the members

ihcr ushces to get of e ch ho

Reg

slratio en

kicks o Tthc program as up for p articip ition in the

sign

rush Rou d

Ro Jin

is th

given iher ushees

They men

are

o i

gel

a

sore

s

to

.\rie

a

rush

Roun d Robin.

ill spun ored lend she

decides

,

sted

1

in

on.

a

swer

c

can

of the

the

as

elect

parties

Creek

1

s

svs-

choose

ich she would like

w

one

ques-

she

joinin

es

hous

to

ho acts

ritv.

gu de anc attemp lions as the y arise.

a

allows

Of each house.

sic

ntrodu :ed

nitially

her of the

step. The

:,r: hich

at

to

a

be

iber.

The

big mo iient arr ,es wh en a bid to pledge a si rority is slippce under the rush

The

r

hous

\ojo

song

and

1

L

Rush isane ellent Ihc but roril

ctivit

he is

iris "r ash-

the sis

lo

the

pledges

in

e leers.

es

.

ble

of

to

me to

C reek

carii.ib.iul

ifc

leery

le arn ab oul the

so-

syste 1. and is iblelo explorc the poss ble ad vantages in ste re for her as a memb -r of the Circe system at LRI

Rain can't

dampen Greek spirit It

raining.

was

ginning

to

seep

The guy who football \ en

The

dampness was be through my tennis hat. supposed to kick the

was

be found; and

I

did find hirr

wc

hadn't

a

football

borrowed

Tieone

I

the

discovered

we

a s

with.

practice

1

ball, bul il

ccer

s

the Greek Week coordinators

Finally,

and other contestants showed up. and we jogged off to another field. Some lent

one

us

down and

football and

a

practiced

knelt

we

few limes. My

a

knees got wet, but the rain turned into that.

We

through

ran

couple

a

and everyone else got

teams

of

wet as

as

I did.

People started to argue about the rules. They postponed the event and sent us home. Everyone was mad.

the

but

of

The have been

seems lo

afierr

I

superimposed by a Standing in

scries of other memories.

short-sleeves beneath the

sun

on

the

for the firsl time Ihis spring, as girls scurried by on tricycles, legs the sound of baseball bats flying slugging sofiballs, and the balls getting

Quad the

,

,

,

Hall

lost around Davis

,

,

the de

,

the lugs-of-war the beer-chugging guys heaving the big, silver beer kegs, and the girls throwing the smaller the hushed excite "pony" kegs the exhilaration ment of Greek Sing the thrill of victory of competition which really the ig )n\ of defeat

termination of

,

enthusiasm of

,

.

...

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

lunn\

more

C uh\

s

ihin

irmslur

forihe wheelbari

agonizing

when short

Greek

is

Sing

member

probably

the event 1

best, because it's

re

event

an

that the whole house worked

together

since February. IFs a time when all the houses get together, dress up (or down), chant verses, display their per sonalities, and fill Keaney gym with an on

by being a participant. It's hard lo forget the enchanting melody of "Mac the Knife" or the endearing sentimentaliiy of "Camp Granada" (al though I've tried). The excitement comes to a feverish pilch as the judges

"Fourth ma

place, sorority division Sig Kappa; third place Alpha Delta Delia Delta Delta; place place Alpha Xi Delta!

Pi; second first

"Fourth

place, fraternity division Phi Sigma Kap place Phi Kappa Psi; first place

Chi Phi; third pa: second

Phi Gamma Delta!"

place

The

layhe.

,

go

.

.And the losers? Well, they disgust, wonder why they practiced since January, know they'll win next year and resolve to start practicing in November. Then everyone goes out. has

a few beers (courtesy of the win ners), forgets Greek Sing and has a

time

good

together.

Because

that's

what Greek life is all about. It's get

ting together outside, partying to gether, laughing together and getting to

know

Week Wh

one

another

is ihe ukimate ,

and

s

better,

Greek

display of fra-

iiist

-

"t

,

SSI

-.

.

Ki-s-

K>

:3n :ai^f--

*T^>-

URl music department values creativity, perfection and hard work! One the

noticable

and

of

amount

heard

from all

Music

is

part of

Quad,

URl

that

can

from

is be

people,

unthought-of

Guitarists in

the

the

on

win

in dorm

speakers

whistlers

few examples of partment's endeavors music

on

arts

than

the

campus.

second

a

URl

hours

rates

much

glance. Many

and

perfecting

creating,

on

countless

devote

campus

to

Music

this year.

members

two

De

Many also

were

one-act

Old

The

operas, and the

Maid

Thief, and Stravinski's

The Soldier's

performed as part of the interfestival. Risky Business.

the

more

in

Menotti's

Music

however, music

To many,

ensemble

included

Tale

hallways

the

a

second glance from most

earn a

individuals

all

of the campus.

casual, lives.

stereo

barely

of

music

corners

a

our

and

dows

feature

all times,

at

performing musical works. Most of these performers, both instrumental vocal, are not music majors. They represent nearly every college within the university. All share com

does not end with

appreciation

classics.

Motyeka and

Art

Dr,

his Jazz Ensemble, the Concert Choir,

by Ward Ambusambra. Band, the 20's Singers and

led

Band

land

balance with

offerings

That Ram the Dixie

the

out

musical

contemporary

more

and

factors; the love of

mon

the drive to

play

the

campus

music

that

display

to

before

that music

sing

or

of their abilities, and the

to the best

desire

good music,

and

surrounding

of work that

paring

for

In many ways, a

Choir

opportunities for Performing groups range University Chorus and Concert to a group of 20"s singers,

from

the

many from

are

musical

tastes.

Orchestra

to

a

Dixieland

Band and from Wind Ensemble to Jazz Band.

Recitals

by faculty

also

a

mem

bers, music students and guests

arc

presented.

groups' concerts consist of musical pieces from all eras and styles, and

The

both

include some

well-known

works

varsity

to work

ing

as

hours,

with

working

team, each member

a

specific

a

before

thing the

the

audience, for his

a

whole

critics,

one-shot evaluation. make

to

part

the

toughest

Each member must be in know

and

part

skill, and finally bringing

shape the

and

whole

thing

work. Most

striking, however,

the

musician's

dedication

"sport",

which

is

to

his

closely parallels

that

of the athlete.

and

pieces. Handel's performed by Ward AmUniversity Chorus and Joseph Ceo's Symphony Or lesser-known

The

music

practice Fine

Dr.

sort

Pictures at

practicing and working

for

under their coach, the director, learn

Messiah,

Moussorski's

great

musical ensemble is

a

team

drills

busambra's chestra,

the

goes into pre

public concerts. Some daily for rehearsal time. weekly for a few hours.

groups meet Others meet

running

Music

reveals

often

Department

like

There

the

with

Involvement

amount

an

Exhibition, played by Gene Pollart's Symphonic Wind Ensemble, and Haydn's London Symphony performed by Ceo's Symphony Orchestra are but

that

rooms

comes

out

of

the

and recital halls of the

Arts Center may not be the that everyone wishes to listen to. But the large turnout of students at

band, orchestra, and recitals

and for

the

URL

refiect

music

of

chorus concerts

the the

appreciation fine

arts

at

li^-^j

^^

":^

%>.^'^'^^i "

^^^^i*-

kiM^i^toA|.

^ # 1

;.i

L

j.'jiP

'-

/ n

E'

/

Theatre

department

presents unique blend of entertainment The as

opera opened as predictably seasoned fan would have

nd

any

The sounds of

expected. lights,

faded

and

thinned

for

paused

\IeCa

house-

the

moment,

a

Mark

tuning strings

with

then

burs

appeared

Whi feci

tdward

pert

to

see

perform

opera

d

URl

by

viewers "white

students.

.\llcn

look

a

Whal is

Department vcar.

was

in

varict)

wor

Varei\

was

of

.ill

the

toward

ing he

keyword; departments

The

with

tury

one-scl

The

to

F nsemble

Theater/Summer

turned

from

Edinb

the

open their 'll-'l^

rgh

seas >n

re-

ofien

ignored struggle of

the

with their

production of Bill Kirton" The Whore. ihc Virgin and ihc CI aning Lady. Summer Ensembl performed in the world premier of this play while in Edinburgh, an d performed Rl campus. the U.S. premier on the Coupled wiih Ihis pe Unmcd was the Ensemble-s version

o

ihe

19th

late

cen

productions of ihrce plays by George Bernard Shaw.

He

Lied

Her

lo

Dark Lady of Village Wooing.

and

from

went

the

to

the

Husband.

ihc

Sonnets.

Festival

The

m

and escape.

then

setting

contemporary

How

productions. The

to

is ih at this opera

predictable

reficets much of whal the LRI Theater this

the

al

Ghetto"

those within

the cartoons

of Jules Feiffer in moiio a. enacted in

The finale for the -n-'lS the

depanmcnt's

Business The

the

main

Department

was

with the Music otti's one-act. Old

season

involvement in

URl

feature

inter-arts

for

was

Risky

festival.

the

Theater

their co-production Department of Men opera The Thief and Stra

Iragic-comic

Maid and ihc

vinsky's musical fable.

The Soldiers

Tale.

FeiflcrS Children. The October

started with

a

iiore

produeiion,

Roberl Pairic k's

Children.

The

Michael

nu.mh

Weller's

serious

Kenned}

ended

's

with

Moon hildrcn. pcr-

Thini;

Happened

actors,

offered

satisfy even

and

tastes, and

variety

for

Whether the

play

more

season.

producers

enough variety most

directors

this

year

to

planning year's

are

nexi

be

a

modern

^

Q^f

-^

business

Risky

unites arts "It

could

all

be risky business to have arts working together, rather Judith Swifi. independently,"

the

than

-

1

assistant Professor of Theater,

Risky Business, of the

fcsii^al

week

two

a

which meluded 4S

arts

e\ents

and gave students and ihc commumu an opportunity to experience the arts

ended

favorably, according to Swift. "Risky Business was a good learning experience. We got a lot of people to

and

attend,

the

effort

The

Risky Business planning committee initially began plans for the festival in the Members spring of 1 977 represented the arts, music, theater. Honors Colloquium and student activities. Funding for the festnal came from various sources, including the fine arts departments, the Union Board and student

grants Events

into

scheduled

included

mime and

poetry

Various

actntties

also awarded.

were

acts,

short

festival

the

one-act

libiti

films

lectures, Each

night

with

several

cabaret

operas.

readings.

stor\

nble and

of the

built

masked

a

festival

into

ball filled

was

with

ending

events,

a

the

Fine

Arts

few

major

pro

Building lobby. The festival blems

brought

with

business

it.

Bonnie

Bosworth,

said.

manager,

anticipated large crowds, really didn't realize the

According seemed the

Swift,

to

we

on

normally

the

Cabaret

1 ^]iH 1 9P|Hi^A| m^^HB^^^^mm^

events.

"Those

it would take

saw

other

festival

they

wouldn't

stu

chance

a

events

that

see."

The

^

^^^

^^B

''*':^^S

have the best turnout of all

to

individual

dents who then

"We but

mammoth

of work involved."

amount

1

well

was

i^.

-^^THB

informal, classy atmosphere of the in door cafe and the acts were

a

great

reception after The

whole

break the

performed from

festival

was

rewarding

to the staff and

involved.

Bosworth

was

usual

shows.

taxing but performers

summed

Risky Business Inlerarls saying, "It made us feel Fine Arts Center

within

the

evenings

alive."

up

the

Festival, the -

ihe

PB,

W

Football

^^^S2ix

Photos

by

John DeWaele

Two

competitions actually a

battle

between

opponents; the other,

tlefield,

take

place

URl football game. One is the the Rams and their

during

is

on

by

played

the

same

"That

bat

and assistant Vince Matlera, and led by their bounding "salt-and-pepper" drum

majors Mike the

Ellis and Bruce Brown.

tri-corner-topped

companying

Band."

them

play

at

band

a

the

lovely Ram routines are always

are

ettes. whose dance

practices several hours a perfect their routines of intricate manuevers and dances. Daily rehearsals and Saturday morning prac tices help the band, drum majors and The

week

musicians

Ram

crowd favorite.

to

Ramettes

for

prepare

"game" against Under the dir

halftime

the

the other band.

I

of Ge

;

Polla

"That Ram

viewing

and

Band

updating

routines to

the fans entertained and

keep spirits high.

No matter how the football team does, the band always wins its games, keep

ing its title of "The G.O. England."

Pride

of New

March to the beat of "That Ram Band".

Rhody football College football's will

be the

Yankee Conference

that URl

Huskies rallied for

two

has turned themselves into strong con tenders for future championship titles.

the fourth quarter

to

never

same

now

Rhody's 1977 football squad brought pride back to Kingston, has set the pace for a winning tradition, and has done so in fine fashion. They will make the '77 season hard to forget in the years

21-12

September

on

Bomber" got off to

last

devastating victory

October?

and

how

back-to-back shutouts

UNH

over

about home

at

It wasn't

total loss, though. URI's tailback, Leroy

a

are

games

memories will the

linger

lans

players

but

histor\

now

cliffThose the

the minds of

in

and opponents for

"I

a

yards gained

was

Shaw

whitewash also marked the first Rhody

freshman

carries. That set most

shaky start in a by tossing three

155

yards in 22 Rhody record for

proud of

said

performance," was disap

my

son

since the 1959 ballclub,

"I'd say our defense was more dominani than it was against Holy Cross,"

opening day.

on

their

against

Holy Cross and Maine'' the hanger against Connectieut?

a

in the contest.

interceptions

Shaw, rambled for the

forget

ever

touchdowns in

go on and win. 10th. The "Mad

blue and white uniform

amazing For starters, who will Rams

of age

comes

commented Griffin

comparing

the two

later, "but 1

pointed that we lost big thrill for me to in the first game."

the game. It was a come in and start

The

awesome

held Maine to

during

blue and white defense

eight first downs homecoming game.

a mere

the annual

Senior Rick Moser chased the Bears in the

Early better

season

Bob

skipper.

the Rams' 2nd year a much

Griffin, predicted for his

season

in '77 (URl

team

One week's

rest

made all the difference

in the world in the "We'll be

vastly improved

last year

were

ball," he boasted prior kickoff

day A

few

of

what

lo

the

players

who

following game as Holy Cross' wish taking a 1 4-0 verdict. The were not welcomed certainly

the Rams cracked we

sides of the

opening

Northeistern

against the

over

both

on

bone offense,

Crusaders

guests in their first visit

ever to

Meade

I-ield That marked the firsl time

made

Cross had been shutout

Holy

their pre-

in

a

believer out of Griffin and his assistants included defensive giants Tom Mar hefka and Dick Bell offensive linemen Dave Bernard and Pete

the transfer

State,

Sinagra

quarterback

Steve

'"ihe

from

Tosches, But the list goes

and

Idaho

Bomber

M \6 on

and

on

was certainly pleased with our performance last year." beamed Grif fin, refiecting upon ihe past season, our main goal." he said, "a winning season." The Ram.s. who notched a 6-5 record this year, opened

another

149

in

the

sparked the defense

Marhefica

air

with 19 unassisted

11 game

campaign

in their

"We got our revenge," happily ex claimed a drenched Coach Griffin after the game, "We showed them what could do."

dampened

the

wc

The

victory also

marked over

the

spir

third setback of the took

Rhody's

only

season.

The

Engi

57 seconds lo break

!20-minute

home

shutout

However, the biggest tragedy of the afternoon Tom

when

came

wide-receiver

Spann. the Rams' All-Yankee a

dislocated shoulder

in the fourth quarter. Thai injury side lined him for the rest of the season. "We

certainly

missed

Griffin. "It forced

us to

hir spre

Ra

the Crusadei

history. .

devastating

offensive attack," he said.

URl took

Rain

But games five and six had

receiver, suffered

"I

at North up their 77th football season eastern. It was the start of their firsl

face in four weeks.

results for the Rams. First, they lost to Lehigh 42-16 at Meade Field for their neers

the offensive troops in that game included Shaw with 113 yards on the ground and Toshes tossed for

Leading

tackles

"We achieved

back lo Maine by scampering for 103 yards and three touchdowns in 28 carries. Surprisingly enough, the sun finally shone for an entire game. It was URFs firsl game played on a dry sur

an

about-face the

week, and ended up

al

following

the short end of

juries continued to mount the folAing week at Amherst, as UMass nked the ailing Rams, 37-6. Toshes iS out of the lineup that afternoon.

It constituted URFs

ference defeat all

Yankee Con

only

.season,

entire

played outstandingly. It win for everybody."

team

such

was

good

a

Rhody finally goi their heads above water starfing a four-game winning streak beginning at BU on October

The UNH win

16th,

Shaw led the

37th

Coach

birthday

"That

was

Griffin with

3 1 -22

a

victory

his over

win for us." Griffin

big

a

said, "because at

celebrated

down

we were

yards

running

UNH

over

season

all

URI's stunning upset the afternoon of October

was on

29th. The Rams'

glorious 21-20 victory probably marked their biggest game in their entire football history. 8,813 fans watched in amazement at King ston as Rhody held on in the fourth quarter

to

dethrone the then mumber

point

lead

down

to

early

14-14

a

tie

14 at

In

Griffin said. "Whenever

return

were

good

and whenever

wc won.

was

game-winning nine yard Dave Fragcorgia

scored

on a

pass from Tosches to in the third quarter. extra

favor

poinl going

made

it

Rick

Viall's

21-14 in

URI's

into the final quarter of

play.

play

Rhody knocked off Kings

Point. 27-3. and Connecticut. 14-7, in real seat-squirmer.

Johnny Rodgers chewed up 98 yards on the ground leading URFs running attack against the Merchant

will

coach

certainly

Ken

miss

Rick

Moser.

"But

we've

tainly

do better than 6-5 next

Griffen

Duval,

and

Brown,

improved

and

we'll

out

...

M.B,

picked

pass and raced 53 yards down the lefi sideline for the winning touch a

down with six minutes The Rams closed

remaining.

the '77 campaign Virginia Military Institute, The Keydets, who finished as the Southern and Virginia State Conference champs, won 20-7 in a grueling game.

with

loss to

a

Hampshire

came

with

back

a

out

the

was

hold

up to the on

their slim

to

When the final minutes campus

later, was

"We had

Rams defense to

mighty

point

horn sounded the

entire

lead. seven

strong

feeling

for

most

wc

at the outset of the

elated a

very

set a new

tackles. 105, and

tackles. 39. in

could

game."

mosl

a

new-

URL record

assisted

one season-

only

by the win, saying, good game; but the

the second time since that

year that the Rams had

four Dick

was

"I felt I had

Marhefka

Defensively.

Last year marked Rhody's third win ning sea.son since 1957, It also marked

said Griffin after the game, "We really felt we could do it." Tosches

performances, the "Mad completed nearly 56 percent

Kingston

in seventh heaven.

a

upset UNH

one

Bomber"

of his passes for 1.200 yards, seasonal record established at

same

put together

straight victories, Bell

was

named

to

the

All-

Yankee Conference defensive leam; the

only Ram

to

be

so

named.

cer

year."

Delaware, Mass., UNH.

the Huskies

against

John "Eli" Wallace. "Eli"

the Tom

prophesized.

So watch star

defensive

a

Freshman

The defensive

i^f

had."

we

The

type

In individual New

touchdown in the fourth quarter, but the extra-point attempt failed and it

we

was

services of Lee Holden, Jack Miravel,

the

to

halftime. The eventual touchdown

it

The momentum carried into the next

off The Rams cut the Wildcats'

has to be credited to

attributed

was

ranked Division II team.

one

amassing

success

Griffin.

averaging 437 yards offensively per game. The mighty Ram defense held them to only 217,

two games as

worthwhile

attack

28 carries. The Wildcats

on

The team's

"He gets the most out of his ball players," noted Marhefka.

entered the game

mentally

the time."

But the game that made the

way for the

good

celebrate.

team lo

1 1 1

was a

ar

y^ Soccer^V

/

N.

team makes

(

URl

>

history

The URl Soccer team had the greatest year in the school's history. For its best record ever, the Rams posted ten wins. four losses and

tie.

one

They finished

schedule undefeated and advanced

England team

The

NCAA

As

playoffs.

a

the Yankee Conference

to

the finals of the New

result of this fine

the

season

ranked 19th in the nafion.

was

started

season

on

note with the

sour

a

Rams

losing

lo

national powers Soulhern Illinois 3-0 and Brown University 2-0, They turned then to whip arch-rival Providence College 3-1

for their first win of the

season.

The booters started their Yankee Conference schedule

by out Maine 4-0, The Rams defeated Bridgeport in a non-league game, then defeated Conference rival Vermont 1-0, handing the Catamounts their only conference loss, shutting

A win at Massachusetts

Long

Island

University

Rams finished their

In the first round of Vermount

squad

sandwiched between

was

and

scoreless tie

a

regular season

playoffs,

at

with three

loss

a

to

Harvard. The shutout

straight

the Rams defeated

a

tough

for the second time this year.

The stage was set for the championship of the New England playoffs between nationally ranked, intra-stale rival Brown

University. The Rams means a

well but

played

were

defeated 3-1. It

was

by

no

Brown finished fourth in ihe country.

disgrace:

Only three players will graduate, midfielders Danny McRudden and Bill Doherty and defenseman Doug Tasheingian, The leading

were

scorers

who scored len

goals,

McRudden. named

lo

freshman standout Len Mercurio

and McRudden who had five

the All-New

orable mention All-Amcrican. go

Sling of

was

England

team

and

goals

and

an

hon

drafted later by the Chica

the North American Soccer

League.

Coach Geza Henni was named New England coach of the was selected to coach the East all stars in the Senior

year and Bowl.

Henni said he

was

"very safisfied

schedule" and said "the

only individually

but

team

as a

Henni summed up the year

exciting year,"

C.H.

with the outcome of the

showed great

improvement,

not

team,"

by saying

"it

was a

very

satisfying,

Photos

by Gary Metzger

wcm^wm

Photos

by Gary Metzj

Golf teams head for greener "We had

a

successful fall."

was

Coach Jim Irwin's

100

colleges from

five

fairways regions.

understatement of the URl His ten-man matches

The

over

golf team's performance. starting squad finished 3-0-1 in dual the fall season, and ranked highly in 1 pla:

golfers finished

second

only

to

UMass in Yankee

Conference play, then clinched fourth place in New

competition. They then defended their state championship title by handily defeating Providence College and I and finally placed fifih in the ECAC finals England

Intercollegiate

Irwin

praised performances

from

January graduate

Bruce Carson, seniors John Zimmerman and Scott

Marshall and

sophomore Gary Sykes,

Unfortunately, the women golfers were nol so suc during their fall season. The squad of three. by Joan Clegg, forfeited several matches and lost ground in two lournaments. The WRams' in experience and lack of team members may cause cessful

led

their

s,

L,Z,

Cross pleased

Country

racers

country coach Lauren Anderson was with her team's 0-1 record this fall, which

Women's

cro.ss

included nine forfeits and

competition

in

regionals.

get their wind

freshmen

Medieros. uate;

The

team

only consisted of

who will both

Dillon,

Carol Krolewski and

return

ne.xl

y<:ur

ak.ng

Peg

toughest league, and is largely made up of and sophomore runners. Seniors Joe Ray Elmer and Bob McCrystal will grad but stantouls Mike Gallogty and Bell Fella

nation's

will compete next year.

with

manager Suzanne Johnson New iccruils i.iul prc-scm track and field members will ,ikI next >c;n's loani-

The Rams defeated Holy Cross and Boston Univer sity during regular competition, and finished a

Bill Falk, men's cross-country coach, called the past "the most successful in recent seasons." fin

respecatble 23rd out of 35 teams in the prestigious New England meet. Fella feels that with the present roster's talent and new recruits the team can improve

autumn

ishing

with

a

2-8 record. The Rams

competed

in the

its record.

The fall of '77 marked

a major season for the V\ Rams tennis only did they improve the quality of their playing. they added a spring season to their regular collegiate

team. Not

but

The WRams finished the fall coach

Jerri

DiCamillo,

Brown.

Connecticut

UConn.

Outstanding

Kennedy and of Mary

team

culminated

University was led by

captured

a

9-4 record under her

team

as

University of Maine and members Marilyn Hartley. Kathy

team

singles play

and the doubles

Kummerand Chris Simeonc aided the WRams

in

season

with in

highlights

which the

for tenth

College

with

College.

Sue Rand in the

One of the fall Tournament,

.season

DiCamillo credited

place ihe

was

the

WRams tied

fiom

a

nelwomen's

New

with

England Springfield

field of 47, The I

-point

loss

season

Brown

to

Rhode Island's first state tournament,

URl

the doubles team of Kummcr and Simeonc, who state doubles championship.

the

For the men's tennis team, the "77 fall

season was a

lime for

and learning. The eight-man leam suffered under experienced play of UMass, Boston University and Led by Coach Al Marcus, the netmen defeated UConn and the Coast Guard Academy to post a

rebuilding the

more

Clark

University,

final 2-3 record. much of the team's

Coach Marcus based

"Most of

showing

on

our players have learned on their own," he mented. "But they've worked hard and have learned

We'll

graduation

season

com a

lot.

improve."

The Rail! netmen have to

in-

for the

lost one senior, Mark Braunstein, predicted a better spring "some tough teams," but is V.R, acquired experience.

only

this year. Marcus team

against

confident in the team's

advantages of a college located by the ocean is having the resourc competition. This year, both the men's and women's sailing Icair waves of the ocean themselves, reaching high and low poinl

One of the

for nautical

like the

performed during the

Sailors go overboard

ing

third in the New

by Coach Becky Wood, ended on a high wave, finisi England Women's Intercollegiate Sailing Associatio

Invitational and first in the NEWiSA Dinghy Invitational. The WRani competed against such powers as Boston College, Tufis and Princeton and wer described

as

"very consistant" by

Coach Wood, after

a season

of much incor

sistancy. Wood

praised

in season's

competition

autumn season.

The women's team, led

.

In

her

a

s

:am"s efforts,

that the

i

new

noting complimented her

;on

team

team

worked with

a

small

members with their perat high tide.

of bad weather, the team finished

The men's team suffered many of the same problems. Inconsistancy in the Fowle Rcgetta at Yale contrasted sharply with the fine 2nd place showing in the Shields out

Regetta only 5 days later. The leam finished a disappointing prestigious Shell Trophy Regetta held at Yale,

'hh

of 14 in the

summed up the season by saying. "Wc didn't have the do well, but we learned a lot," Hopefully, the men's team's tide will

Coach "Mac" forces come

to

in

Cuddy

again during

the spring,

V.R.

^ c 1-)

^^

2jjj i

The URl women's

volleyball team finished with a fantastic 40-12 record. co-captains Debbie Johanson and Shawna Southern, they champions and qualified for the national women's volleyball tournament. Sue Caswell. Missy Blaney and Jackie Elmer were also major contributors. Paced

were

by

senior

the Rhode Island

The WRams team

Volleyball

began the

year

by reeling off

Coach Art Carmichael said he

team

spikes

15

straight

wins.

They

won

Ihe 11

Central Connecticut State Tournament, finished second in the tough own Rhode Island In-

16 team Delaware Tournament and third in their

was extre

everyone put in. "We beat the better teai

fewer mistakes," were seeded eighth out of the 16 teams that quahfied for the Regional championships held at Osewgo State. They advanced to were seeded eighth out of the 8 remaining teams. The

The WRams

EAIAW

opponents

the second round and

underrated WRams defeated second ranked Southern Connecfieul State and

a showdown with top rated Maryland for supremacy in the played superbly but lost to the Terrapins in 4 games of the They still qualified for the national Association for InterAthletics for Women (AIAW) t

qualified

for

east. The WRams ,

s

Field hides the

true

team "into its own"

hockey

Sometimes the win-loss record of

story of the

season

a

varsity

case

which

posted

a

team

behind it. Such

for the WRams field hockey

is the

team,

Crooker said of her young, 22 member

last squad. Hampered by the loss of many of year's seniors, as well as by damp autumn weather. the stickw

hancing

:n

"learned

l

and

i

,>! ^j^

fr"

y

from

leam

members Leslie

Nelson was also selected for the North Eastern National team, the first URl player in five years to be so named.

Returning

team

members,

an

"excellent

potentially powerful" subvarsity squad

and

and pro

mising recruits make Crooker enthusiastic for

^9m ppl' \5i> ^^^^^^^K^^

mSB^S^s^^-'

praised pla>

Swiller. Tracey .Andrews, Dorrie Wail, Wend\ Snyder and North Eastern Tournament selection

Kathy Shivcly. Ouska Day and Kim Nelson.

record of 3-2-3.

Jean"Everyone learned quickly together," Coach nette

Crooker

I

Bubble trouble doesn't stop trackmen "The most successful was

season

in URl track

the way Coach Bill Falk described this

door track

season.

of the track bubble

posted

a

history" year's

in

Although marred by the collapse during a major storm, the Rams

6-1 dual meet record.

over

Brown and St, John's Universities. The

Rams' only defeat was at the hands of New power Northeastern University. Falk

England

praised the efforts and performances of the graduating seniors, pole vaulter Tim Begley,

team's 5

man

Joe Medieros, mid-distance

runner

and

\

McCrystal, long jumper Eliot Butcher and co-captain shot putter Steve Euslis. Other

students

1

New England champion pole vaulter Bill Hartley, junior sprinler Kerry McKay and mid-distance runners Ralph Windall. a sophowere

sophomore

and Yankee Conference

i

/

more, and freshman Rich Bloom.

"We show have

a

promise for next year," said Falk. "We strong returning team, and expect to add many

freshmen

|

\

Bob

co-captain

champion

In probably the most thrilling meet and the high light of the season, the Rams notched a narrow

victory

distance

\

next year,

committment

to

Wc want to conlinue with

excellence-"

V,R,

our

/

/ ^ ^T

BASKETBALL

Photos

by

John l)e\\ aelc and

Gary Metzger

Basketball '78: are number 1!'

'We All the elements of

basketball

a

team were

in the "77-'78

truly superb Ram finally displayed

season,

and the results

Fine leadership from Jiggy Williamson, awesome of rebounding from Sly Wil liams, outstanding playmaking by Stan Wright, along with an excellent all-around job by Irv Chatman and a host of others, helped the Rams pull through with their finest season of basketball in the school's history. The hoopsters amassed a classy 22-6 reg ular season record during the 197778 campaign, a year never to be for-

were

outstanding.

senior

Losses and

Clemson and

to

games led

believe that it another

rocky

skeptics

just the

was

in the

Brown

some

season

Slate

Michigan

victory against

a

ensuing

to

of

start

for URl,

fense and

"Our

nfidei

er's

the

;

confidence dividends

big

loss

in

pulled upping their

and the

key

themselves it

once

play payed

arrived.

After

Michigan State. The straight victories

to

Rams

galore were achieved by Rhody quintet last year, but no anticipated the surprising results at pre-season. Discipline and cohesiveness were the two big question marks

build

ally." Confidem

their

Milestones

didn't

off four

seasonal record to 6-2,

the

one

at

the outset of the

season.

The annual

The

Rhody quintet suffered a di.sheartening loss al Stanford. But Ihey came back one day later in their ncxl game and defealed the alw;iy,s-iough

killer schedule

San

be

Wright called

was also supposed to hindering factor. And finally, the biggest question was, 'Will Sly be academically eligible for the entire a

Francisco

part of

Somehow, the Rams managed ail those

come

another.

ning

the of

return

campaign

nine

way

lettermen,

or

begin

with five yeai

transfer

perfectly in all prising upset.

at

team

prior

URL to

the

out on

the

nothing

to

who clicked

players categories for

a

sur

Leading the offensive troops for URl the three Ws; Wright with 17 points. Williamson. 1.5. and Williams chipped in with 12 for a team that were

show 57.8% from the floor in the game.

of the

play

25 lo

were a

beating the Dons

the determined

new

under his beh vs

to

into that game and

1 shot of

West coast. All that meant

the

members. Jack Kraft, the head coach

start

going

else."

poinl underdogs

plus

in both veterans and

depth

to over

one

included

eligibility for an entire improved height and

Chatman's season,

problems,

elements at the

Key

of

l3'/i

were

Slan

victory "a pivotal proved that we

We

nyon The Rams

S7-S5,

Dons. the

our season.

up

do that. I'n

take

(

^

The time

of itself," he said.

finally

could start Kraft had all the to

be

just

of the team

a

bit

season.

had

just

wound up with

Photos

by

reasons

skeptical

in the world at

the outset

After all, the 1976-77 as a

much

potential

13-13 mark.

John DcWaele and Ga

but

came on

in

the

came

anew.

when the Rams

Their seasonal debut

November 25ih IPTAY

against Ohio

tournament.

Rhody

ousted their opponents, 81-69, led by Williamson's career high of 26 points in

a

single

game.

victory did not come easy, though. Randy Wilds fouled out over three minutes remaining

That

Rich's

prediction certainly held up be less than three weeks later. URl

Chatman and

cause

with well

battled PC in the

grudge match and

in the game. Relief from the bench

this time the roles

were

showed what

depth

the team held

as

the Rams

possessed

Rams

sent

home thousands of

fans from the Civic Center

win.

on to

reversed. The

The Rams gave excellent Rhode Island representation in ihe Rainbow Classic

21st

they

as

Friars and

on

lost

tough opening

a

lo

game

Texas Tech, 78-73. in overtime. In the games Rhody defeated BrigYoung. 92-87, and Ufayette. 64ending 1977 with a 9-4 record.

ensuing ham 60.

turning point in the season a Ram victory over then

The real

with

came

Wake Forest. 89-77.

nationally-ranked Mosl of the

victory

the

over

perennially-tough big key. "That

Demon Deacons

was a

also

that

proved

that the

players agreed

to us

we

It

was a

lairly

the

saw

40-24

humdrum affair which

Rams

That

January

Stonehill. 101-63,

over

leading

vielor\

halftime,

at

the Chief

over

tains marked the first

favorites

going

The

Friars'

inconsistent

the Civic Center in 103 games.

It

was a

great feeling watching the guys Kingston putting it to the Friars.

URl led 28-19

at

the half and look

seven

less

than

From

guard. John Nelson, had thoughts during that 2?-point

friendh

the

lo

South

ihe

visited

quintet

Providence Ci\ic Center for

"If

there could be

only

life could

stand

There

wc

I've

never

a

lead.

way where

inlo neutral, and lime

slip

could

on

Coach Kraft

over a mere

their 79-59 the

in PC's favor Friars turned

13 times enroute to

victory. They

Flu-weakened

fioor. 56.57.

to

also outshot

froin

Rams

the

32,4*:^.

But. Harold Rich,

a

still

for

beating

were

had

that PC

feeling

a

moment.

by

25

.

,

.

like that be-

Thc Rams finished up their 28-game regular season with an 86-63 victory at

might be the Rams early and dictate

front

victory coaching college

basketball. He ranks 23rd list of the

mosl

on

the active

winningest coaches

praised the enlire team including these thoughts on his captain. Jim "Jiggy" Williamson, who averaged 14

points

"His contributions

game.

per

Kraft,

just tremendous," noted

were

"Jiggy sacrificed his own abilities lo help the other players. He just did

outstanding job,"

who

the

gel

terms

game. It could be different."

out

in

of the

Kraft

sorely

also the

over

mis.sed include

praised

the

squad Percy

fans' support

past year, "They

Brown. The post season games came but that's a different siorv. Here some

of the

milesiones thai

accomplished during

the

ihe enlire

31-game campaign.

Rhody posted ils most wins ever in a 24: played a season high 31

games; and

sei

new

a

highest shooting 66%.

January

one

season

points

record for the

percentage

against

in

were

in-

Richmond

on

also marked ihe number leam

seasons at

helm

for the

Rams,

season

he

al

"senses

as

good

be

proud,"

as

anyone else and

we

should

Returning .starter Irv Chatman. who averaged eight points per game said. "There's nothing else to say. The sea son speaks for itself."

for Jack Krafi in

URl.

per game. Il

the

resurgence of pride and enthusiasm since we have become successful, \\ e're

one

25th.

offensive

his five

As Krafi enters his seventh

a

season,

game.

.lournal-Rulletin

in

Kraft

next,

The il

his 300th

gained

17ih year of

in his

Davis. Randy Wilds, and Stan Wnghi,

Rams

the ball

up to #18 list with

Rhody's all-fime scoring

108 of his games with the Rams as a starter during his four years in King-

who will be

are

Everything seemed lo be during that outing as the

points places him 1 2lh on URl scoring list (1.531

Other seniors from the 1977-78

^9

20-

these

Keaney

he irlbreaker

a

61

there

ever.

first

the nation,

game winning streak ended week liter when the one

Insl

Rams

Carolina

at

435

total). Stan Wright moved

that the basketball team reached the

The

its

Sly became the second player in URFs history to go over the 1 .000 point mark afier just two seasons (1,084 total). He led the Rams for the second straight year with a 19.4 points per game aver

an

century mark

notched

since 1966.

a

whopping 25-point lead, 60-35, with less than seven minutes remaining in

1972

lime since

leam

the aU-time

(33%) coupled with the Rams e.xcellenl shooting (52%) and crisp defense added up to just the eighth loss for Providence

from

the

season

Jiggy's

shooting

at

win

age,

into the game.

point

Junior

Wright.

The Rams went undefeated in

crushing victory

five

were

could beat the

boasted Slan

lough teams."

the

on

73-64.

won,

PC, ranked illh nalionalli.

They

rejoicing February

turned the tables

Regional Championship

ECAC

plus

was

averaging

77,1

the Rams' first

You're

right.

right.

-MB

Irv.

You're

absolutely

The WRams basketball record of 10-15 may look like the mark of a losing season; but that score pleased first-year coach

Nancy Langham.

The final record is

deceiving,

because

the WRams started three freshmen this year against a much improved schedule of some of the finer women's colleges.

Leading scorer for the WRams was freshman Chris Dinoio. averaged 12.3 points per game. She also held the team's a 23 poinl outburst against the University of

who

game high with Maine. The

only

freshman

other starter

player averaging in the double figures was Beth Phelps, al 10.3 points per game. Mary

Beehan, another freshman standout, scored age. Ncxl

came

Barbara Walton

6,7. Poppy Champlin Beehan

ing

was

down

an

also the

at

at

8.3.

a

leading

9.6 game

aver

Phyllis Douglas

4,6 and Kim Nelson

at

al

3.6,

rebounder for the WRams.

pull

8.4 game average, and claiming the game high against UConn. Barbara Walton followed with

of 20 rebunds

Season

highlights

included

a

second place

finish

in

the

Brown Christmas Invitational, in which Phelps and Walton named lo the all-tournament team. The WRams also

wre

gained

an

invitation to the Eastern

University of New winning note by defeating

first round to the the

season on a

Regionals. losing Hampshire. They

in the ended

L Conn in the

con

solation game.

Langham regarded the 77-78 season as "a buildingtype year." calling her players "a young, inexperienced leam who never really played together previously," She added that five or six games "could have gone either way." Coach

i^Prospects

according to Langham. should starting line-up will return and

for next year,

excellent. The whole

be re

cruits from Massachusetts, Conneclicut and New York are expected. Next year should be an exciting one indeed. -C.H,

'j

Swimmers pace to win The men's swim team's 77-78

season

was.

in ihc words of

coach Mike Wescott, "one of the finest ever." The team

chalked up

6-6 dual meet record, and finished 8lh oul of 32 teams competing in the New England championships. a

Coach Wescott credits young talent Un their pcrformances. Freshman standout Ray Palmer was undefeated in dual meet

competition, posting a 27-0 record. Freshmen Jim Catanooh and Rich Escalcra, .sophomores Al Snell and Bill Cunha, and Mike Hogan also were praised by Wescott as major

junior

influences in their

season.

The Ram swimmers will lose

only one senior, Dave Corning. placed 4th in the 100 yard backstroke and 5lh in the 200 yard backstroke, "Corning will be missed by the team, and will be awfully hard lo replace," said Wescott, He

Rhody defeated such teams as New Hampshire. Bridgewater. BU. and Trinity in dual meets, and lost lo perennial powers Maine (who won the New England Championship title). Southern Connecticut. UConn, and UVM, Wcscoit pointed out, however, that the season was directed toward champion ship competition, and that the dual matches are regarded as "warm-ups to the big meets." Wescott's young team will be strengthened next year by the addition of several talented freshmen. The new swimmers. combined with the veterans, will

strong showings in future The URl women's swim

parts in several ways. The cott, finished their a

16lh

place

berth

season

out

help

to

give

URl

a

chance of

meets.

parallels their male counter girls, also coached by Mike Wes

leam

this year with

a

5-4 record and

of 38 in Iheir New England

won

champion-

"This year placed the

was a special year for us," said Wescott. "We same in the New Englands: but now against the Ivy powers such as Brown and Yale, who previously did not compete in the championships. We also entered for the first time, swimmers in the Eastern championships^a big poinl

for us!" Like the men's leam. the WRams

were a

young team, with

no

swimming. Standouts were freshmen Andrea Conlin, Betty Shea. Kathy Walsh, Ellen Mantel and Ellen Hawes, sophomore Carolee Eldridge and junior Gail Desisto. "Wc have a lot of depth," Wescott said of his team, "we're seniors

The win-loss record does not tell the full story of the season. "Our competition is tough. They will challenge us to achieve an even

better record," Wescott said.

Recruiting efforts cott

for both

teams

is enthusiastic about the

prospects and

many

returning

show

coming

some

season

veterens.

-VR

promise.

Wes

with both

new

Tri eiptam Frank Pucino cliches

use

worn

superfluous

not one to

is

sports

statements

stitemenl 1

ih^t of

member

only

e in

elassy

a

Birton led the le

of Rhode Island

the span of less than three weeks the Rams had defeated two and lied one

be uttered

by

Garv

team

wrestling

Gary Barton had

of the top 11 few

one

of the best

two-year records in the country the

Rhody wrestlers,

Miami, When it

al

29-

all

about

worrying

was

took them to three

traveled with them

was

over

and

to

no one

they

its best year of

breathe)

to

the Lock Haven Invitational

won

that

Frank Pucino

MVP of

won

tourney while four others. Dan

Mannion, Joe Davidson, Lee Spiegel, and

Moe

Haislip

classes. Mike Will-

respective weight and

ner

Dom

first in their

look

Macchia

both

placed

second in that tournament.

making weight

anymore, the facts supported Pucinos statement. Barton took Rhode Island to

in the country, A

teams

after the Clarion State vic

days

tory (hardly enough lime

Tournament in Lock Haven. PA, URl

3-2, Barton conditioned and coached tournaments and

#11.

The Rams defeated Clarion 26-20. In

he

iri-captain Coach

ranked

was

or

when

to their best \eir

im

Clarion State who

phrases so

summed up the 1978 wrestling season It was with a hard cold unyielding

wrestling

On December 27th the Rams traveled lo

ever.

Miami, Florida

posted their best win-loss percentage in history, 14-1-2, .938 percent. They seized an unprecedented third straight New England Champion ship title and in doing so sent seven (the most in Ram history) wrestlers

to

wrestle in the

Bowl Cla;

Orange The Rams

to

the NCAA Tournameni, The team

climbed

high

as

and ended the

as

14th in the nation

sea.son

ranked third in

The

s

18th

a

win the

were

to

tie

i

Conn

of the top I at the time. one

the Rams:

given They earned

not

Southern

rated

England

'

These facts

went on lo

of their meets incl

over

Ne'

Tiber

east

they

rest

big

England

Syrs

hurt the Ran

From here

was

the

fine

l a

injuries

The

wrestlers

Rhody

November to March.

Frank Pucino and Lee

impres gained Davidson, Spiegel were

honored by

to

They started the season impressively in a quadrangular meet in mid-Novem ber. During that meet they tied Syra

able Mention, AIl-Ameriean

they

earned them.

beating

some ol

them

by

the best teams in the

nation while wrestling superbly from

cuse,

who

was

country, and

then rated #11 in the

they defeated #12

rated

Michigan. After

a

were an

sive leam, and several wrestlers

national

being

Pucino

Frank

scoring the

recognition.

the

New

Joe

named

was

most

the Honor

Wrestling

also honored

England

Tournament. Joe Davidson

was

MVP of that tournameni and i

ihrt

;

layoff, the]

named

for

points in Championship

career

named

was

also

outstanding wrestler at URl for straight year in a row. -GH

the second

-I

^

/ /

Gymnasts

vault to

Coach Jeri DiCamillo sa\s of her girls gymnisties team, "I'm ver> pleased She need nol sa\ in\

/ /

more;

the team's record ind

leeomplishments speak

1

for the entire

11

The young leam posted an 1 1 1 record lor Ihe 1977 78 season, and averaged 117.6 points m their best

season

four matches. The WRams also

\ \

placed 20th oul of Region I Eastern play, leaping over last year's ranking by 8 places. DiCamillo. who is assisted by Charles Connery, praised the team's depth as a major factor in iheir season. The talents of captain Nancy 58 in

\

\^

^^successful

Bclitsos,

Debbie

Sargeson,

Ann

wer

instrumental in

defeating their strong opponents

Early training.

Stratton and Chris Varadian which team

1

victory Debbie

Graber

s

m September, als performance, only one play

heightened

started

The teim will lose

next

the

year and

ecruiling efforts. for tougher op and hope to further improve their fine record. and to finish by gaining the regional championship ille, "We can do it," says DiCamillo. "Everyone c anlributes lo the should gain

Although

many from

r

next

whole." -V.R.

strong

year's schedule

ponenls, the WRams

are

r

call

optimis tic

A'iJ.a

Q

/H/

Fencers foiled The URl

fencing

rebuilding

at

loam

both the

spen[ their 1977-78 sea: and subvarsit\ lev.

varsity

The

again subv.usiti

placing

leam

had

a

more

succcssf

third in \e I upland and sending 11 sophomore Debbie Burisc

Katie Oliver and

individual

h Pal

di

Ruggiero.

is out

of

our

We hail

diiision

meels

Ihe

m

\e York.

varsiu

ed lenlh in New

Jane .Sehwenk and "a

ner.

leam

I-ngland .Slandnul, were sophopromising junior. .Susan Captain Lisa llornyak also had a good "

;

ehampionship

linals lor New

England.

Baseball

y^

^^

/team rounds bases\ "We

won

the

most

games in this

season

since 1949. Wc

came on

season, winning 9 of our last 13 played the largest schedule we have ever had, and we played one of the toughest Division One schedule of many New England schools. Our overall record was 13-17, but our was 12-11, I'm our most important record northern record quite pleased."

strong in the latter part of the games. We

-

-

This

was

the way John Norris, coach of the URl baseball team.

summed up the Ram's but

more

importantly

season.

The

team

posted a good record, playing ability,

made great strides in their

"Our pitching really came around this year," said assistant coach Larry Gallo. Seniors Rick Mundy, Phil DuPont, John Deuel. juniors Mike Tirella, Jeff Folkins and sophomore Jansen all did a good job on the mound. Folkins had the club's best ERA, lead ing with a 2.74 mark, "We

were

good defensively. I think we may have set a newdouble-plays. We made fewer errors than our

very

school record for

opponents, too," said Norris. He cited the play of cenlerfielder Mike Chadwick, "the finest all-around, offensively and de Steve Galuska, "a strong,

fensively,"

steady shortstop." second Healy as prime

baseman Kevin McAuliffe and freshman Tom factors in Power

defensive

play.

hitting was not one of the team's sirona points. "We did a good average. Our defensive pluv sLirpassed nur hitting ways," Brett Benza led the club uiiii a ,266 mark, Tom

not

hit

in

lot of

a

good

Imondi, Joel Stedford and Tom Healy

were

also strung hitters

for the Rams. The

season

Gym

started afier

and in the

a

parking

rest

of the schedule

training session in Keaney ten-day road trip to Virginia, a soggy ballpark. The completed with a 12-12 record. cold and wet

lots with

The team returned with was

a

a

1-5 record to

"We beat the best teams in New

England,"

said Norris. "We de

tough UConn. Fairfield. Holy Cross and Boston College- And they were the lops." The Rams lost twice lo Providence College in two heartbreakers, "They beat us both feated

times

a

by only

one

point."

losing only captain Mike Chadwick, pitchers John Deuel, Rick Mundy and Phil Dupont lo graduation this Our underclassmen year. "We have a young leam. though. We really came through, and they've gained much experience. they really stuck together," had a team with a good attitude The Rams

are

-

Norris is We'll be

optimislie about next more experienced. \\

people know we're around. England. And we're gelUng

year, "We've got a good nucleus. iih ihe type of schedule we play,

We beal ihc best teams in New-

better." -V,R.

^^rt^tfi-yi

H nl^c^^S i

Wi Photos

by Gary Metzger

215

Softball WRams post fine Winning

seaso IS

do not

con le

easily.

Poor

their

regular

First -year was

e

coach

WRams" fine most

play w th a 15-5 record, capchampion hip title and reaching

s cason

luring the sU regional play.

Nancy Langham attributes

the

many factors. First and fore pitching of freshman recruit Carol

season to

the

Morris, who has been instrumental in leading the team to two

their finish. Morris'

no-hitters and

being

accomplishments

1

training

conditions and many injuric s make winning tough. Bul the WRan s sofibalicrs came through, finishing

include

named Rhode Island Stale

Tournament MVP. Other standouts include senior

and

a

fine first

season

While ("the I

baseman."),

senior outfield Cecilia

Helenski ("a very versatile fielder,") and senior coPat Nolan ("a good leam leader,"). Carole

captain

Pen/a. Donna

Cipolta.

Val Casella, Laura Zimmer

man

and Amy Perillo have aided the

deal

as

team a

great

well,

"We hadn't been

on

a

diamond before

our

first

game." Langham said. "We found we had a lot of depth in our players backing us up. Wo had seven freshmen and a number of juniors and sophomores," Hopefully the WRams' firsl regional play won't be their last.

-

V.R.

WRams lacrosse When

a

young team

careful about coach

Maclin

starts

aboul her team, which

sophomore players

tunately,

their

on

the WRams

boasted a

liiis

io

he

Women's l.ieros\e lew

:i

12

through

|^rLl.lic^-^n^

freslinien and

14-membcr

came

record, which should dispel abilities of

se^ison, one

making predictions Thompson made

squad. with

a

For 4-4-1

any doubts about ihe

a youthful team. gained much experience in ihc past spring season. "Our attack is gelling used to working to gether." said first-year coach Thompson, "and the girls are gelling the precision aspccl down," The team will lose only one senior to graduation this year, cocaptain Jean Soltysiak.

The

team

gains experience In addition

lo

participated

in

regular

season

play,

Kranz, Kim Ne 10

both the

Other

team

the team

he Northeastern Coll .ge Women' in which Kati

Lacrosse Assoc ation Tournamen

.

ree

and Kathv Sh vely were se onal teams and le n itional

sla

douls

son

were

eo-c.

lectec leam

plain Trace

Kenna, Robin A ndcrson, Libbv Hoy. A

in

Mc

Ver lillio

and Gail Vermi lion. Next year should prove to be an e en belter vt arfo the WRams. The experience ga ned by the girl

through strong

a

tough spring schedule

season

ne xt

year.

-

V.R.

w

ill h

Ip the

1

to a

Track teams X have good year

/

/

^

The URl track

had

leam

short

a

but made the most of

season

it. finishing the spring with

a 2-1 dual meet record. Coached track and cross-country eoaeh Bill lalk. the leam as a good dual meet leam. and is starting to

by indoor

established itself

improve

on

its

^

\cr\

"We had

big

record,

meet

\oung

e.iuld have had

leam

team

-

youiii^ nueleus." said Falk, "No

a

luck starling, ihnugh," The team was of the indoor irack bubble, the absence of assislant coach Charlie McGinnis. poor weather and many

hampered by

the

worse

collapse

injuries. The

leam

will lose seniors Tim

Begley.

Euslis and captain Elliot Butcher. "No the seniors though, so our loss won'l be Falk said that "1978 mile

was a

good

Bob

McCrystal. Steve points were scored by

as

>ear for

severe."

selling

records." The

of

relay Kerry McKay. Ralph Windlc. Rich Bloom and StcveCiray seia new school record while competing in the Florida Slate relays: the spring relay leam of McKay, Butcher, Daryl Roberts and Herb Spenser broke the record in that event: and Andy Panaggio set a new record in the high jump. The leam team

finished fourlh in the Yankee Conference, 1 978 was a year for record-breaking lor the women's track team. Led by first-year coach Lauren Anderson and assisianl coach Cynthia Ciani and running on a new all-wealher irack. the WRams ammassed a 6-5 record and broke eight school recerds

"The kids

were

pleased with their own season." said Anderson. together as one and pushed each other lo do

"Everyone

worked

their best.

They're

leam

Every

very

Douglas

and

aware

member scored

Outstanding

season.

team

of

one

points

another,"

in Ihe WRams' successful

members included

co-captains

Patti

Lisa Hanstine, Carol Krolewski, Lisa Harnclt.

Suzanne Johnson and

Maggie Dougherty.

Eight leam members were sent lo the FAIAW^ regionals in Pennsylvania where "although we did not score any points, we we gained a lot of experi

did break three school records, and

ence."

according

to

The WRams lose

Anderson,

only

two seniors this year, distance

oul

our

rough

-

events,

runner

Joyce Ajootian, "We're' balancing it's very though. Our compclilion is good

Krolewski and shot putter bul we're

-

malching

them,"

V.R.

Phoios

by

John

Phillip

Club has

Rugby

clubs oi' Boston and Providence,

cily team

remains

a

club sport,

enough

look first

Although members h;

ment

an

S-2 fall record

i

nd

a

7-4

pnne record The le club, defealing

B-side sports the best eeord of many A-side opponents and troun cing B-side Their fall and C-side

played

spring above

ree a

>rds 500

were ave

teams

)-l and 8-1-1 ige and

The

provided

place

way

in ihe New York :

in the fall, and

tigious ing

long

come a

placed

as

runner-up in the pres

Harvard Sevens for the Ihird >ear in

Presidcnl of the

Tom

caplains

and

leam

are

Rugby Club is Frank Taglienle

will lose

ten

seniors

growing membership, V,R, lo regain, -

lo

a row,

Keeley. Fd

and

co-

Porter, The

graduation,

bul with

the number should nol be hard

Lacrosse Club is The opponents of Ihe U Rl Lacrosse club found ihi selves faced this year with an aggressive Ram offense and

a

wall-like defense. Coached by

Ed Rudnic. the

leam

6-2 record and

finished the

were

player-coach

spring

season

with

undefealed in Iheir division.

strong contender four well

goals '

a

gam e. S nger "a nchored

and Staulo also

This year

has

playe

and defeated

losing

"Wc try to Rudnic

play

Rudnic called his club "a fairlv young team."

expl lined

Ih

Denis

capt uring the firs

pla

Pesanleandc

V.r

a

s

past

club finis ed third riul

Lac

'played play

35-ma nsqo ad

ossc

in

our

e

tough

a

cal ber o[ 11

rank

n

A ssoc ation

de

varsiiv cl

highlit he Ne

ou

d all club

man

con

of Ihe

s

Ihcir div

England

p ivoffs. los

first round bul de call g 1-airf eld in Ihe

c

Crew team rebuilds The LRI

crew team

building ing to coach

season

teams

lost

underwent "a transitional and

alter "a

good fall

Bob Wise. Both the

members alter the

coach Ron Boemker. and

a

competed

in the

The fall teams

competed

in

and

accord women s

resignation of fall

team

members

new

'

season.

men

of almost eniirelv

spring.

major tournaments. the Head of the Charles Regalia and the Worcester Regatta. The spring team competed in the Presiden tial Regatta, the New York Open and the Dad Vail Championships, two

The club

presently is made up of 40 n. wers, but Wise anficipates a team of aboul 70 next v ar. One goal is to fill a junior varsity lightweight an d heavyweigiii boat for the coming season. The lean1 will lo.se onh one senior, president Tom Rowlelt, to graduation in the fall should in lore recruiting bring members, said Wise, on the Narrow R iver for nearly vear, "The people o n the team do nd thev do a though,' said Wise. good Job. They do an excellent job."

The leam

pracfices

the enlire school

al! the work,

"

..-^

<^s^-

Water Polo and badminton clubs Club spons

at

URl receive little attcnli

college community; yet they thrive and actively as many va sity sports. Two sue the water polo team and the badminton The

water

polo

tcai

.

coached

by player

Showman and advise dby MikeWcscou, r record ihis fall. The leam. which consist

placed fo ipionships and seve Championships. Th

nembers. New

England

Cha

Eastern Division II

compete^

hopes to have many new recruits from the swim leam added lo the squad. The Badminton Club is headed

during

I'elzer and Bob Ma

varsity

Havens and

the entire school year, is funded

by

ihc Intra

Departmenl. Membership in the club fiucuthere are prcsenlK eighi steady members to the team, which plays in the ( ni\ersiiy Tournameni mural

ales, bul

and in its

own

Additionally, the Open and hopes to be playing and hopes to

club lournamenls.

club sends members

lo

the Rhode Island

Closed Tournaments, Havens coach .Shocman. Ro

by Sue

Lisa lamonico, and is probably the only real co-ed leam on campus. The club, which plays once a week

other schools in future years, club gain in membership.

club posts

Volleyball

Although the men's volleyball club missed reaching their regional playoffs in the 1978 season, coach Art Carmichael

was

still "very satisfied" with his

club's 7-3 record,

tremendously improved. We're getting better players and playing better teams," The Rams placed second in the New England Collegiate Volleyball League division, but missed the playoffs, "We'll get them next year," Carmichael promised. "We're

satisfying

funding from ihe athletic department, players have some knowledge of volleyball when they begin on the team, but Carmichael noted that the knowledge of i limited. "They learn quickly, though. Most of the

iors

recognized

I

a

^

URl.

Mike Shullz and

year. No ,

The club is nol

season

but receives its

recruiting

Bill

prograrr

bul

hip

is

expected

to

increase.

Hockey club

Ice In ils third

hockey goals

\ear

team

in

club spori al LRI. the Ice an 11-8 record, totalling, 121

as

a

posted

one season.

The club nol

club teams, bul also groups

The

during

leam

some

its 5-month

is made of

ists-membership

a

oiher

Division One and Two

especially praised John

come

according

to

loyal coach

oul. but we're select-

The skaters will lose seniors John Cusicra. Steve

now

Herzog, Matt McGowan and Pete Corrigan

credidibility,"

uation- But that

Mil!

ihinks the

to

grad

for ihe sporl holes should not be difficult

enough people

the

play

of Ken

Kaozirara. Terr>

Downing.

Bob

Farrell and

co-

captain John Matuszak on offence and co-caplain Gordy Wallace on defense. "They worked effect ively as a unit they really pulled together." The team pracfices and plays in East Grcenwhich, which leaves relatively little ice time. "When you see the potential we have," said Hill, "it's really frus trating. Other teams thought wc were rag-tags; but -

season.

nucleus of "about 20

fiuciuates."

Conrad Hill, "About 70

only played

skates to win Hill

Carreilas.

come

oul

schools

are

calling

us

for games. We've

won

Senior Week

Graduation

'jr*.

:f^-:^\

Class of 1978 graduates before large crowd The

sun

rose

the

on

28th, 1978. bul

morning

of Mav

thick cloud

a

cover

it from

kepi

shining brightly on the campus, Ciraduation day had

LRI

slate

edue

university

has been put down I quahl\ of eduetimn

ill

il

she

n

m

said

The

lu^h

en

I

Rl

h

is

h

The

Quadrangle was alive with ac tivity as the last minute touches were being put on the plallorm near Davis Hall. The brighlly-eolored fiags rip pled in the sofi. warm breeze which the campus.

swept

across

It

aboul 11:00 when the firsl group

was

of parents began to filler into the of seats that lined the Quad. The Union

began

last

as

time

the

to

maze

bu/z with the

ex-

URl

Dress among the T-shirt

lo

undergraduaiesgradualcs-to-be ranformal

more

suit

or

Honorirs de

ree

ikrredupm

^ere

four pr

Rl,

I

Islind

o!

J I

,

the I

I

ni\ersii\

\/

I .hn

r.s

L

Thousands of parents and guests Hood ed the Quad, waiting eagerly for the

Rcgo Class j| I >12 reeened i D el r of Nalural Resources and ( hislt i lion for his work as i Rhode Isl nd

chimes

publiLservintand idminislr ilor

the

to

sound, signaling the

Precisely

ceremony.

al

start

two,

of

the

four lines of seniors made their way up the road parading before their cam

era-slinging friends

and

relatives,

Richardson

received

Human Affairs

a

I Ih

Doclor

n

of

Degree,

lo

the strains of the LRI Concert Band.

The as

sun

peeked

from behind ih^ cloutls

URl President I rank Newman wd-

Soloisl

Florence

M-

Freese. Class of

1978. accompiinied bv ihe band, sang The National

\nihcm

Ihen.

as

the

crowd rcmiiined standing, Sr, Elaine Donovan. l_ nuersilv Chaplain, de

livered

ihe

invocation,

to find peace selves and the world-

graduates

urging with

the

receive their

diploma c;ises m iheir in college commeneenienls. Di

dividual

plomas week

would follow

or so.

in the mail in

the

minder of the

delay being a final February bliz/ard.

a

re

them

Then, it been All

activities And

was over.

The last

name

had

called, the last rejoicing done. remained of the aficrnoon's

ihai

a

was

the traffic

few memories.

jam

on

Route

Photos

by Gary Mcuger

^'

WT^^-v^4

\JLP&^ t^Ff5

_tat\dcn'^^uuanna

?v

3z]at\ (jRr) .<q

sojoqj

Brii^i.

W

\l^h,.li

Paula M, Acciardo

Mary

F. Abele

Anne F, Ackenhusen

Lynn

A. Abramchuk

Edward K, Adams

Kenneth L- Abrams

Fern R. Adler

Joseph

J. Altieri

Jean S, Acciardo

Linda

Aguiar-DiOrio

JoAnne Anderek

Karen L.

Archey

Janice L. Ardente

Kathleen A

Arnold

^l& Walter S.

Atigian

Alan K. Audette

Carol C. Austin

Michael \

Arnold

Nita Avalani

Roni J. Ar(

Sandy Axelson

Carol A, Babbitt

William G. Bain

Robert J. Bacco

Lynn

A. Bairii

^^^^M ^K. -^M

Pamela .1. Baker

David M. Balsofiore

Paul P. Baluch

Gary S.

Bannon

Sarah A. Ballon

Stephen

Barber

Christine K.

Cheryl

^w

Baggesen

D. Baker

-^

Dorinda A. Balsley

William J.

Barcla;

@B Jody

B. Barwood

Elizabeth A. Deals

Elizabeth A. Basscll

I

Beauchene

Ralph*

Bithcll

Stephen

M. Baulisla

B.n

Bl^H^ Rogene

L. Beer

Timothv H

Beglev

R

, Susan M, Bessette

Krislinc M.

Bishop

.

M .^'M iS

Richard A.

Bilfing

Christopher

G, Blake

Bailey

B, Blanehet

Paula M. Bodah

^P Betsey

L.

Borg

Jeannine G, Boulay

Richard T. Bois

Paul

Bottiglieri

Catherine M,

Bourquc

K. M. Bonaccorsi

Pamela A

Bottis

9 Ronald J, Bowler

Kenneth B. Booth

Den

H.

Boulangcr

Bruce Bowman

William J. Borer, Jr.

Robert A,

Boulangi

Kevin Bow

irnadellc M. Brennan

Daniel Briand

Thomas J.

Bridges

David G.

Briggs

Charlotte A. Britlai

ns n 3sI John J.

Brough.

Jr.

Meredilh F. Brouillclte

Leslie A. Buchbindcr

Diane B

Brown

G. A. Buchmiller, Jr.

Leslie J

Brown

James S. Buehler

Michael S

Brucknci

Susan M.

Bugielski

Shcryl

A. Burch

Frederick W,

loscph

Burgess

P

Burghardt

William A. Burl

J

^/^

^

Janet L. Burton

?# 1

1

^

Noreen A. Callahan

John P. Callan

Joseph

S.

Campanelli

Thomas L. Canfield

Joseph

Cannavaro

Christine M, Carroll

Debbie Carroll

LynnCirroll

if B Robert G. Carter

Mclanie D. Cassiere

Sue A

Caswell

Karen L. Chadwick

Sue Cariicr

Diane A. Castle

Suzanne

Robin M

Cavanaugh

( harland

Robin Casei(me

Omar J, Casiro

ES Valerie A.

Pa

Cavanaugh

Joseph

J. Chabot

Rcnee

Charltray

I

Chel K.

Susan C. Clark

Steven M. Clarke

Nimcn D. Clcarv

Anthony

R. Clements

.7 ffr

Cynthia

L.

Coffey

Ste

Barbara A. Cohen

en

Colangelo

Debra Cole

David L. Coan

^M^

Jeffrey B. Cole

il

1(^ il r\Q^ K^ 1 ^1 1^ ^r- agi r^ im ^ ^^B

is

Lawrence H, Cole

Mark W. Coleman

Robert M. Coielta

Thomas N. Collins

William M Coloi

Donna V. Combra

Patti A-

Connery

Michael Conca

Barbara A. Connor

Janice A,

Congdon

Kathleen A. Connor

Judy

George

R, Conn

L, Connors IN

Kevin M.

Mary

Connelly

Jane Con.

Robert L. Corriea

Anne M. Cox

Belle R

Philip

Crocker

Duane J. Costa

Kathleen

Lisa F. Croft

Mary

A.Coughlin

Ann Cronan

Susanne G. Covell

Peter R. Cn

;

W

Sherrye

Darress

Janet M

DaSilva

Susan G. Dauksis

SIh'I

Davis

Gail L. Dearmin

Holly

M. DcCarIi

Diane \l

I

39 Donna M. DeCarlo

Joanne DeCrislofarc

Renee M. Desaulhicrs

Lisa M. DeSista

Lynne

L. DcValerio

Paul R. Desaulniers

Joan C. DesJardins

Susan J. de Wildl

Susan DeSaulo

A, M, Desloi

Mary Ellen DiBiase

Michael R. Dcschaine

Marie M. DeSenna

John W. Deuel

Robert D. Deulsch

Lucille M, Dickinson

Joseph DiClei

WME \nn DiPretoro

Rick DiSe.sa

Patricia M. Dolan

Linda S.

Donnelly

Doyle

Cindy

A, Distefano

Michael G. Dominov

Michael L. Douceite

M

H.

Dra]

John P. Di

Marjorie

Carol A,

A, Don;

Downey

Mary

Ellen Dis

B s p 13 ^Smi

John H.

Jane

Duffy

Dunlop

Michael L.

Duffy

Jean Dunn

Nanette F.

Philip

Duglin

F. DuPonl

Dorothy

Anthony

Duleba

V. Durante

Dana L. Duncan

Richard .1, Dw

rKalhleenA

,j

Fasuvood

Mark D. Elson

Stephen

D. Euslis

Donald P. Fmerson

Charles A, Faella

Linda

Robert R.

Epstein

Miriam A. Erick

Fagone

Concelta A, Failla

Samuel Eskenazi

Donald Falardeau

Thomas K. Farrell. Jr.

Patricia A. Fasulo

Michael D. Fascitclli

Deborah J. Fa.ss

A.

Daniel S. Feldman

Kerry

Kay

David M. Fellman

Gina R. Fensier

Robert J, Ferrando

Michael P. Ferrante

Polilkul Science

French

[Economics

Mech.

Nancv J

Ftrnn//!

Bc^erl^^

Fcrreira

Karen A

Ferr

Eng.

&

App.

;

Feui

Mcch.

1 Stephen

T, Ferrantc

Psychology

Krfsli L. Fen

V Craig

A. Field

Mar\ Jean Pontes

Jennifer C. Field

Barbara J, Foreman

Paul J. Field

Patricia E. Finn

Wendy

\f

f

Ellen J.

Forsyth

Robert A. French

Karen L. Foster

Brian L. Fresher

Heather A. Fountain

Kmcst Fournier

William B. Friedman

Janine M. Frisino

Kathleen E. Geary

Peter N. Freeh.

Michael F

I

r

Roberta L. Gcdde:

Susan M. Gelsomino

Diane M.

Cicmpp

Ann E. Gencarelli

Ronald P. Genereux

^^ -vlB ,^^ Judy

L. Gerber

Judith A. Geremia

S, Gimbel

Pierre C, (iha/al

Richard P.

Ginpras

Palricia A. Gill

Cynlhia

J

Girard

Darlcnc R.

^

George

i /

Thomas J.

Gilligan

Barbara L. Gl;

^

Steven G, Glickn

A'^iUP Patricia E. Godboul

Dcna A. Goluses

John

Coding

Sandra J. Goodwin

Lillias V. Goff

David J.

Gorgone

Marc E.

Goldenbcrg

Robert E.

Gormley

'^'"'>'

'^- Ooldfield

Karen .1.

Goyette

Mian B,

Greenberg

Linda

J

Mary Grogan

Greenberg

Greichen

Thomas V. Grzebien

sss Royal

C, Greene, Jr,

Louisa M.

Einar P,

Grieg

Gudjohnst

Eric M. Greenfield

Thomas P

Greig

Tod Gn

Sally

J,

Groezinger

Diane M. Hager

Thomas E,

Hagist

Lynda

Robert K.

A,

Haig

Harrington

James E. Hallcne

JoAnne M. Harris

C. M. Hallerbach

Penelope

L. Hal

iSfei'^w-Ufi Raymond

S. Hassell

Henry Hayford

Peter D. Heberl

SP Mark T. Haworlh

Christopher G. Hayes

Tom Hazard

Michele Heard

Robert Healon

Arlene R. Hebert

Michael A. Ilecker

Chris J. HelTcrnan

Cecelia A. Helenski

Michael A. Henaull

Gary

C. Halton

William P.

Hayes

Janine M. Hines

Harvey

M

HolTman

Stephen

M

llines

M. C. Hoffmeister

Dorecii I

Hirst

Jack L. Hollander

Douglas

Holly

R.

Hodgkins

A. Holmes

Beth C. Hoffman

Ann Marie Hood

Brian J.

Hopkins

Eli/abeth J. Jardinc

Stephen Hopkins

Ann R. Jeffri

Meryl

L.

Hopper

Eleanor Honon

Megan

Hubbard

Robin L. Jell

Leslie A. Johnson

B^WB Deborah I

Johi

Robert E. Johnson

I M. Johnson

Steven A. Johnson

Donna A. Johnson

Suzanne E. Johnson

S. M, Kalarian

Gale A. Johni

Jacalyn

L. Jo:

Diane L, Kalfaia

Thomas B.

Keeley

Tli.im.isll

keifer

Margaret

M.

Kelley

Joann T,

Kelly

John \V

arlin I

,

Killian

Gary

M. Kinnecom

Kelvin N. Kirkman

Nantcllc G. Kitchens

Sh.aron 1. Kivisto

Bob

Klidjian

^HSll E, Ko?ar

John J. Ka

Lynn Kozikowski

Pamela Koziowski

Alan L. Kr;

:^ April

H

Krauss

Maria B. Lacerda

Cynlhia

J

Krenicki

David LaFlamme

/

Richard kresler

Palricia A, Krislcn

ThomasO. Kri

Steven I), lander

James F. Landmann

Charlcne M

Landry

Hlfl Nola M, Lausier

Maureen A. Lavallcc

Cheryl

F, Lawlor

Susan A, Lawrence

Allen Lawk

Patricia M.

Ai-Ping

Leddy

Le

Piper J

Linkkila

Susan A,

Liverighi

Heidi J, Loble

Peter

Lodge

Linda L. Lohbuseh

Nancy

A. Loiselle

Richard A. Lubin

Donna A.

Dennis R.

Longo

Ludy

Diane E.

Douglas

Loughecd

B. Lurie

W. W. MacMillen

Roberl 1

Cheryl

I oicjov

A. Lussier

Mark S. Macule

David I. Low

Rita Lus!

Lorella M.

James

Mahoney

Lorinda A,

Mahoney

SWi Cynthia

A.

Marcille

John A.

Marginson

Michael R. Marino

Alan C, Marshall

Robert W. Marsha

M, McCusker

Charles J. McCrcer\

Lynne

Robert T. McGovern

Jean M. McGowan

Joyce

A, McDonald

Scott McLean

Marie A.

McFlroy

Thomas B. McNiff

Kathleen A,

Neil P.

McGarry

McNulty

^^J

Jayne

E, Medeiros

Joseph

A. Medeiros

Margaret

J, Meehan

Francine A, Mehins.

Kenneth J, Mello

IS 3P Michele A. Mello

Toni M. Messina

Kalhy

M

Miller

John D. Mcnna

Linda A.

Margaret

Meyer

A

Miller

Denise J.

Mcny

Debbi A. Miceli

Mary

Anne Miller

Karen E. Mcrlino

Gail Michaels

Pamela A. Mil

^ Paul R. Merola

Majorie Milligan

Laura R.

Monaghan

Janice L, Minck

Carey

F. MonalKin

John A, Miraval

Palricia L, Monahan

^v i.^f* if^ Eric D.

Moody

David H. Morrison

Nancy

Eileen E.

Morals

Morrissey

Constance M. M

Rose A. Mo

Richard M, Mollicone

Dayl

D.

Mongeon

Eileen E.

J. W.

Molloy

Montgomery

Rosemary

Morse

Denise Movan

Cynthia

J. Morton

Joan M. Mullen

Richard A. Moser

Jane L. Mosicr

Thomas R. Mo;

WEE Greg

Munson

Linn A. Murdoch

Victoria G. Namcika

John

Murney

Bruce P. Natale

Connie Neidich

mmw E- Newell

Palricia

A.

Nixon

Ronald D, Newman

Peter W. Noll

Frederick J

Newton

Michael Norcia

David B. Nickerson

Janith A. Norcolt

K. L. Nicdzwiadek

Philip

W.

Kerry

L.

Nydam

Joseph

X,

OBrien. Jr.

Mm Michael A- O'Donnell

Meredith A, OiXiv^d

Michelle OBrien

A/ John Offersei

Neil P. O'Brien

/ Peter Okero

K. C. O'C

n Gail S. Olson

Deirdrc

O'Maliey

Donna Palumbo

Barbara J. O'Neill

John M,

Panaggi

Franeine R

Onoralo

David H, Orabone

Jacob

Ostrowsky

ny Patriarca

Thomas Peck

Tony

Stasia J

Pelli

Penkoff

Joan M.

Rodney

Pellegrino

D. Pellzer

Stephanie

Penzell

Thomas W.

Pellegriii

Roberl C. Penh:

w Helen S.

Perry

i^ Michael N.

Perry

Denis W, Pesanle

Barbara Pet

Gary

V, Petrarca

John

Phillips,

Jr,

Deborah Ann Petrueci

Susan M. Petti

Sue Pieard

Ann M, Pieheilc

l^Atk rhomas A,

Pingitorc

Nicholas A. Pisani

Phillip

J. Pivirotto

John F,

Pettigrcw

David C. Pickul

Charles A. Plalz

Susan J, Petligrc

Joseph

D.

Pigott

Ronald E. Plel

Gifford W. Plume

Adina

Popovici

Kathleen M, Powers

Jill F. Pockar

Christine M, Porcaro

Ellen M, Price

Kimerly M. Polak

Joseph

Poliorak

David N. Pooi

Judith A, Poslon

Diane Poller

Linda L, Poulin

Price

William D, Pride

Christine A, Priichard

Nancy

Susan C.

Quinlan

Frank Rack

David Radcliffe

Anthony

J. Rafanelli

William P.

Rafferty

Pamela E. Read

William K. Reagan

Emidio M. Rebelo

Laurie S. Records

Ricd S. Redlich

wi?MWB Susan L. Redman

Patricia A.

Rcilly

William L. Reinert

Joseph

P. Reis

Linda Rhodes

Nicholas J. Rei

Edna R. Ric

Nancy

E, Richter

Deborah A. Ritch

Cynthia

J.

Riggs

Brian E, Ritchie

Ellen M.

Riley

Leanne Roark

Cheryl

A. Rinbrand

Patricia C. Roberson

Anthony J,

Risic:

Ann Rockwell

p^ Patricia A-

Rodrigui

IV ^^ i*^*i;

^^j

H

I

Jill Louise Roller

Mark

Rosenberg

Thomas G

Rol:i

Kimberly

Myra

A, Rose

L. Rosenblatt

Cynthia

J. Roth

Prcscolt W. Rose

Natalie Roskins

Deborah S. Roth

Bruce S. Rosen

Cynlhia

J. Roslund

John R. Rolondi

Jay

Craig

H. Ro:

F. Rossc

Mary

L. Rouelte

Ruggieri

Linda A.

Rys

Sharon Si. Sau

Lisa D. Russo

Palricia A. Saber

John Russo

Michael A. Saccucci

Dennis A.

Curtis R.

Ryan

Sadley

Mark T.

Ryai

James Sadowski

Steve

Sajka

Alan M. Salemi

William J.

Salhany

Alfred Q. .Salvati

Paula A. Salvi

^S^ Elizabeth A, Schake

Jill S. Schlcider

Miles J. Schlichle

I'-i.i H

-Schmonsces

Stcphany

Cheryl

L,

J, Schock

Scbastiancil

Gregory

J. Schneller

Marlene H, Schrier

Jean

Senape

Richard J, Schoon

Debra A. Serra

Ronald E. Schroeder

Marc L.

Sevigny

Mala M, Schu.

Theodore Scwitch

L

mm

Michael E. Sheridan

Rhoda B. Shh

.Maureen G. Slack

Jeffrey

Stephen

Smith

F- Smilh

i?^4 M

David J, Sleczkowski

1

Donna M. Solomon

Ncal 1. Slobin

Nancy

J. Smith

Jean M.

Soltysiak

k Steven A. Smeal

Richard V. Smith

Carlo W.

Spinelli

Elizabeth A. Smith

Robyn Smith

Steven 1 1.

Spir

Judith A. Stachura

Karen A.

Slelljes

Susan

Stafiej

Christine B.

Stephens

Jonathan L. Stanzler

Gary

W. Stevens

Jonathan R. Sleeves

Gale B. Slieb

Robert G. Stein

Deborah A. Stravato

Mary

Anne M. Sutton

Brian C. Tefft

Richard P. Telia

Steven M.

Tepper

Jacalyn

M. Terranova

Sharon N. Ter;

Wendv A. Thavcr

Debra A. Tomasik

Sue Ann

Tongue

Joseph

C

Torrealday

Kathleen G. Towncnd

Jane 1-. Theroux

Robin R.

Trayno

A.

David J. Untcrwald

^

Tworog

Daniel J. Urso

S- M, Vancouyghcm

Nejat L'Igcn

Joseph

R. Uscio

Elizabeth VanHof

T. M. Ullmann. Jr.

Gerald F. Vadnais

Diana Varadian

Jeanne E

Brian

Lnruh

VanCouyghen

Patricia L. Verhulsl

Pamela J.

Vierling

Debra L, Vuono

Kenneth L. Waldron

Nevres

Vigen

Sheila A. Vincent

Joseph

A. Vitalc

ill rsdS' wmm D.A. Wadbrook

Jackie M. Wales

Cynthia

Cynthia

L,

Wagner

A, Walker

John F. Wagner

Pamela Walker

Carol A. Vuono

Kenneth A. Wakcfiel

B Sharon B. Walla:

"ilSBB Michael P. While

Sharon E. White

Bruce K. Whitehead

Greg

S. Whitehead

M. M. Whitehouse

Richard G. Winkler

Daniel J, Wollman

H.L,

Wischnowsky

William

Wong

James F. Wishart

Elizabeth A, Wood

Gayle

J, Wolf

Frank J. Woods

Bryan

J, Wolfenden

Joyce Woodward

EM Michael S, Woolfall

Robert A.

/agrodny

Patricia M. Zompa

Ralph

E, Wordell

Debra

Debra J,

Zajo

Zy.

Edward N,

Anthony

M,

Wright

Zampini

Ho Matthias

Lucia M,

Yaupong

Zampini

Bernhard K, Yo

JoAnne G, Zanella

n Sj>\

M.^k

#

z^

I

!^

"#.' Mm

Renaissance Staff ^^^H "^^

Executive Staff A

Editor-in-Chief

McDougall

Douglas

T. Moore

Garv G.

Metzger

Business Manager Photography Editor Literary Editor Sporls Coordinator

Val Rush

Linda Zinser

Kalhy Lescinsky Mary Lou Turner

^

Activities Coordinator Activities Coordinator

General Staff

^^^'^

ca,h)

1.^;;,,

.M.eB

|^H|^

Literary Staff

^--2 Photography Staff Andrea

Bi)>d

lE9i

iBB.

Larry Ginsberg

Contributors

Brian

Campbell

Ei'H

BISS^S ::.. Kathy Lescinsky

and

Mary

Lou Tui

1

.,

iiw^vr

setting headlines could be counted

or on

cheering up a discouraged editor. lo pull through.

Doug

Gary Metzger. photo editor, organiifed 1 3 thousands of

photos

inlo

a

photographers foolproof system that provided

ana

lor

i^coverage of everything at URL Foolproof, that until deadline lime hit like a tornado. Gary weathered il"-'

complete

room

and emerged after hours (days?) in the dark photos needed to meet a dead decision-making ability, encouragement and help through everytime.

though,

storm,

with those last minute

line. His

pulled

us

Linda Zinser, the sports co-ordinalor, went far beyond the confines of her title. No mailer whal the job, Linda could be

counted

on

for

help.

Without her assistance, the last

pages of this book, w^hich were would never have made it to the

completed publishers

128

in the summer. on

time.

Literary editor Val Rush, and activities coordinators Kalhy Lescinsky and Mary Lou Turner also spent a great deal of working on the book. Renaissance 1978 is a reflection

time

of their efforts. Within the pages of Renaissance 1978, we have tried to stress that it is the individual who counts here at URL Each of us.

after developing our own personality to the fullest extent, is able to drift comfortably into the masses of humanity at URl. without

fearing the

loss of

our

individuality.

has succeeded in ils purpose, which was to represent the year at URl through the people, the lo you, the student body. A yearbook's place and the living this

Hopefully,

yearbook

value grows with lime, those

1978

you reflect back and remember al the university. Renaissance

rich and

as

rewarding university, but

learned

a

lot

such

has been

a

things

to

people. Unfortunately,

deadline time became

often took the lines

Renaissance 1978. with all of ils joy. problems, and headaches, has been the best experience of my

Working

on

laughs life. My deepest thanks go lo the staff, for without this yearbook would never have become a realitv

work in, and the Memorial Union Information desk merits more than a mere "thank-you" for controlling ihe senior

portrait sign-up

sheets.

Thanks also

extended

this book is

a

product

efforts and ideas. 1 would like dividuals whose efforts Renaissance 1978

was

their

to

do

anything

to

Ginny Nye,

Don Stedman, Bill a

host of others

Special appreciation and thanks go lo the staff of the Good 5(f Cigar, who came through for us in a pinch more than

thanks to lo Terry Powers, Ann Mc.AIIen, 1 ori Randall and all of my friends for their help and support. Also, my mom and dad. whose never-end

My personal

special, special thanks to ing encouragement kept

were

to

me

going throughout

the year.

Lastly, I'd like lo thank John DeWaele. of T. D, Brown Studio, and Barry Wolfe, of Josten's/American Yearbook Company for their guidance and help throughout the year.

help, To the class of 1978 in the future.

my

May all

special wishes

for happiness and of your dreams become realitv.

of many

peoples thoughts smgle out a few special in

the

foundation

upon

which

built.

Business manager Doug Moore did more than just pa\ the bills and keep track of expenses He could always be depend ed upon

are

Bowers, Bonnie Bosworth, Jim Norman and

success

Although

thanks go

during

pres

yearbook together is all about. Panic in fact, it as nalural as sleeping place of sleeping as the endless 64-page dead quickly approached. But despite my misgivings, every deadline was met on time, even if il meant working day and night, weekdays and weekends alike. at

us

Brindamour and

Not

one.

Pressure does strange sure is whal putting a

special

helped

memory book.

a

editor-in-chief of this

yearbook only have 1 learned much aboul in completing Rcnais.^ance 1978. 1 have aboul myself.

My experience the

as

special moments spent was designed to be just

to the many other people who have the year, I'm especially grateful lo Paul Ray Parker for pulling up with my unbusi They were there to answer all of our questions concerning contracts, money and university bureaucracy. guiding and advising us from start to finish. Irene Nelson should receive an award for juggling her scheduling book to squeeze in a room for the senior portrait photographer lo

Extra

nesslike mind.

that needed

1

1

be done W hclher

it

be

Editor-in-Chief Renaii-svince

I97S