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DEDICATION...

University striven

to

will raise

these

life has

achieve that us

set

forth for

spiritual

us

certain patterns of

and intellectual

growth

living. Through these

set

forth

above material conflicts. We dedicate ourselves,

objectives,

for

we are

measured

by

our

goals

as

well

as

by

therefore,

by

our

patterns

our mentors as

to

the

we

have

goals which

earnest

pursuit

of

achievements.

Page

1


UNIVERSITY of RHODE ISLAND

KINGSTON, RHODE ISLAND

Page

2


Page 3


1956 GRIST EDITORIAL STAFF Managing

Editor:

Photography

James

Editor:

Norman

Robert Avila

Kenneth Sullivan

Dorothy Manganelli Men's

Sports

Women's

Editor:

Sports

Editor:

John Long Marsha Satnick

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Levon Sarkisian

Circulation Editor:

Copy

Editor:

Men's Residence Editor:

Women's Residence Editor:

Activities Editor:

Peter Caleshi

Donald

Leo

Palagi

Turgeon

Phyllis DeBIasio Peter Kohlsaat

Features Editor:

BUSINESS Advertising Manager: Business

Managers:

STAFF Burton Rosen

John Lyons Sylvia Sundel


CONTENTS

Page

One

Page Six

Page

Seven

ADVISORS' MESSAGE

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Page Nine

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL

Page

Eleven

Page Sixty-six

Page Ninety-six

Page One hundred sixty

Page One hundred seventy

One hundred

PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE

Page Eight

Page Ten

Page

DEDICATION

ninety-four

Page Two hundred

one

Page Two hundred twenty-six

SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS

GRADUATING SENIORS

RESIDENCES

CLUBS AND ACTIVITIES

EVENTS AND CANDIDS

SPORTS

WOMEN'S SPORTS

STUDENT DIRECTORY

ADVERTISING

Page

5


President's To Members

the Class

of

Message house "bull sessions," in the relaxed

of 1936:

snack bar, in the Those of you who heard Robert Frost when he visited last December will recall that he referred

us

right

know"

to

as

reflecting

tion, particularly of "The sacred smart

to

enough

right to

a

philosophy

of

out

"the sacred

higher such

land-grant university know,"

to

find

the

to

educa

as

and w^hat you

are

are

deep enough

understand!"

Your four years in

nity the

to

exercise this

things

have

college to right

which make life

find

given out

meaningful,

you the opportu

and

to

athletic field, in dramatic

These

not

only

dents;

Page 6

things

only

in classroom and

in campus

activity

laboratory,

in

dormitory

but

even

and

are

on

the

a

mirrored in the pages

Here, permanently recorded,

are

college life, which, pieced together,

background

scene

before which you have

in the campus drama of the your copy will

personal

You have learned these

from your teachers, but also from your fellow

not

perhaps,

and satisfaction.

play

in campus walks and

incidents of

ment

happiness

of the Union

experience. adventures

enriching

of The Grist.

events

to

production,

team

talks, and in dozens of other w^ays. Here you have found valuable educational

understand

which prepare for

useful, successful careers, and which contribute

atmosphere

of music, in

ours.

he put it, "what you

as

harmony

serve

a

as

passing

and

helped

to

to

your

form the your role

For years

reminder of the

which have contributed

vt'orld." You could

year.

played

the varied

people

to come

and the

personal develop

prepare you "to be of service

not

take aw^ay w^ith you

a

more

stu

priate

memento

of your

college days.

more,

fraternity

Carl R. Woodward

to

the

appro


Advisors' To The Class

During the past four years you have been a student the University of Rhode Island. You began your work at the University in September 1952 with en thusiasm and high hopes for the future. We hope that at

you have

enjoyed

the campus, that your dreams of

milestone has

the four years of your life here

been reached in your

As you leave the

hope

on

they have been profitable and that college life have been realized. A

now

University of Rhode Island

you will take with you

not

which will enable

throughout The

we

up

through

of

comes

effectively

passed on to you their personal interpreted the recorded history built

has

and

the ages in whatever your selected

We

study. experience

live

to

your entire life.

faculty

experiences

you

hope

you will reflect

that has been your

with age and

experience

dation which you have

now

on

received.

course

the fortunate

privilege.

based

on a

are

the results of wisdom.

the You will remember many times in the future at the Univer pleasant experiences you have enjoyed in sity of Rhode Island. Do not close this chapter and maintain your life as completed. Remember throughout life the friendships you have established

here. Use

edge

the information and knowl

continuously

As the years accumulate you have received here. more

and

more

realize the

that has been yours. Our

the memories

only

useful life

you will

career.

of four years of gracious living but also the substance acquired by association with your fellow students and

faculty

Message a

of 1956

hope

unique experience

is that you have

appreciation of the value of a successful college in order to immediately begin your future. You

now

disperse

in many directions

some

career

following

path in life. Our sincere wishes for suc cess and happiness go with you. Return to your Uni versity whenever you have an opportunity in order that we may share your success and shine by reflected

your chosen

glory.

We

are

proud

of you.

Ave atque vale.

Wisdom

firm foun

Happiness

and

Parks, Margaret M. Class Advisors

and

W. George


BOARD of TRUSTEES AND

EXECUTIVE

COUNCIL

Members of the Board of Trustees of State Colleges meet on alter months at Kingston. They are (l.-r. ) Walter F. Farrell, Mrs. J. M.

nate

Ramos, Frederick C. Tanner, Dr. James P. Adams, chairman; Miss Caroline E.

Haverly,

Dr. Michael F. Walsh and Arthur F.

U. R. I. alumni member of the board.

Hanley, the


The Executive Council: (l-r) George A. Ballentine, Olga P. Brucher, William E. Plaisted, Mason H. T. Crawford, Harold W. Browning, Carl R. Woodward C. Weldin, Louise White, Evelyn B. Morris, Lawrence E. Bretsch, John F. Quinn.

Campbell, Stephen (Chairman) John ,

Page 9


JEAN

GENCARELLI

Business

Westerly

Class Officers

1956

SECRETARY

Alpha

Delta Pi

46 Somerset Ave.

Page 10

NANCY

JANE

BOWDEN

Home Economics

Riverside


rfm^^^^f^-m---

SENIORS

TREASURER Theta Chi

84 Second St.

RONALD A. CRUFF

Liberal Arts Pawtucket

SOCIAL CHAIRMAN

Alpha Epsilon

Pi

25 Lake Shore Drive

BURTON L. ROSEN Business Warwick

Page

H


^'

HOWARD E. ALCORN Phi Gamma Delta 68 Gibbs Avenue

M & A R. 1.

Newport,

ANNA V. AMORIGGI Nun Alpha Xi Delta 241 G. Waterman Rd., Johnston, 1

NANCY R. ALLISON Nursing Wakefield, R. I.

Delta Zeta

84 Pond Street

ERIC A. ANDERSON

rising

Phi Gamma Delta 1.^7 Elbert Street

Business Admin. Ramsey, N. J.

V^^.

FRESHMAN YEAR. The first week

the hurried

gea of faces, the the other

goodbyes

.

to our

.

.

parents,

upperclassmen smiling,

freshmen, bewildered.

Gettmg acquainted,

the

Union, die Library,


SYLVIA M. ANTONELLI

Alpha Chi Omega 304 Webster Ave.

WILLIAM Theta Chi

516 Fair St.

JOHN M. ARNOLD Accounting Sigma Alpha Epsilon 725 Third Ave. Woonsocket, R. 1.

ELMER P. ARMSTRONG

Sigma Chi

Bus. Ed. Cranston, R. I.

2271

Cranston St.

Liberal An

Cranston, R. :

J. ARNOLD, JR. Engineering Gaspee Plateau, R. L

Rodman, the Union, E.R., Quinn, the Union

'^^

the chicken barbecue and the frosh dance

...

.

.

.

the first of the Korean

they scoffed

at

beanies

were

the

vets

Vigies' deligh

"a.

Page 13


H. BARNES Agriculture Kappa Chepachet, R. L

JAMES Phi Sigma Box 264

PATRICIA A. BARNES Teacher Ed. Alpha Chi Omega New York, N. Y. 2123 Howe Ave.

MARILYN A. BARNES Delta Zeta Hattie Ave.

Home Economics Greenville, R. L

BRUNO BEER Tau

;^ Classes

&^

^p

^S ..A

began

back

to

Bus. Admin.

Epsilon Phi

Av. Aouxinol

.

.

.

Sao Paulo, Brazil

19

the book store, the pawn

the bookstore

Know anyone who's got

an

Orientation: the person ...

look

at

.

.

old

English book?

sitting

him;

shop,

.

next to

you


.J

/>^

MONDA L. BENEDICT

EUGENE J. BENBEN Chemistry Chicopee, Mass.

ERH

Beta Psi Alpha 301 Center St.

24 Branch St.

Liberal Arts Pawtucket, R. I.

d

PHILIP N. BERGER

Trailer Park, Trailer Park

Campus

Engineering Kingston,

R. I.

MARYLOU BERRY Teacher Ed. Alpha Xi Delta Pawtucket, R. 1. 74 Blodgett Ave.

'

he may The football

not

be here

season

began

next

.

.

.

semester!

who

can

^- /.

i^^

forget

those spontaneous rallies before the Brown game, with

Schultsy

on

the front page

and /the game:

Rhody 7,

.

.

.

Brown 6.

|Ph

Page

15


BARBARA E. Alpha Chi Omega 22 Carmine St.

BOORUJY Bus. Admin.

Chatham, N. J.

MARY E. BORDEN

CYNTHIA A. BORDEN Teacher Ed. Alpha Chi Omega Johnston, R. 1. 30 Olney St.

Alpha

Sec. St.

Chi Omega

COLIN M. BOYLE Rho Iota Kappa 194 Power Road

5AIA** H.<iS-jrv.

Agriculture Pawtucket, R. I.

S^'

^o'^

sWe

~^t'

won

a

for the first time in

holiday. Homecoming

How could

we

help

eighteen .

it with

.

.

we

DiSpirito,

i'ina, and Abbruzzi

Page 16

years

.

.

.

beat UConn.

...


VINCENT F. BRASSIL Bus. Admin. Sigma Chi

Chi Omega

250 Williams St.

16 Mary Avt

ANN V. BRICKLEY

Providence, R. 1.

Sec. St. E. Providence, R. I.

BEVERLY R. BROOMFIELD Liberal Arts Sigma Delta Tau 227 Gallatin St. Providence, R. I.

At

EVAN M. BROWN M Alpha Epsilon Pi Central Falls, 97 Clay St.

we were

awed the

The

by

& A R. I.

the celebration, the floats,

displays

.

.

.

the

mayorality campaign:

,:/^

parties.

Willie won,

but Chi-O's Warm- Wig put up

a

good fight.

-

B

*^K Page

17


JOHN Commuter

A. BUONO Chemistry Warwick, R. I.

MARJORIE Sigma Kappa 57 Highland Ave.

32 Country Oub Dr.

BURROWS Nursing Westerly, R. 1.

JAY

H. BURZON

Alpha Epsilon

ALBERT

M & A

Pi

366 Church Ave.

J.

Beta Psi Alpha 89 Imeca Ave.

L. I.

Woodmere,

CAPPALLI Lib. Arts

Providence, R. I.

C>nve5!V

Vd chosen

.

our

leaders for that first year

Jack Wojcik

George McGovern,

^t-

**^

Page

18

Prexy,

was

Ronnie Cruff, Treasurer

.

and

.

.

Nancy Nelson,

Cathy

Reid

too.


y

ARTHUR M. CAPPON Engineering Kingston, R. I.

WILLIAM CARCIERI, JR. Engineering Providence, R. I.

Hut A North Hut A North

Beta Psi Alpha 52 Merino Street

CAROL

Sigma Kappa 56 Spruce St.

J. CARLESI Nursing Westerly, R. I.

BRUCE M. GARNER Bus. Admin. Upper College Rd. 3619 Bedford Ave. Brooklyn, N. Y. 28

Winter a

.

.

.

snow

turned the campus into

Christmas card. That 9:30 coffee

was a must

...

the freshman

break:|

girls

watched from their windows.

Page 19


JEAN

F. CHAPPELL

Delta Zeta

89 Hillard Ave.

Page

20

Sec. St.

Greenwood, R. I.

CHARLES C. CHASE Chemistry Pawtucket, R. I.

Sigma Nu 40 Roscmere Rd.

CHARLOTTE F. CODY ERH 7 Elm St.

Home Economics

Foxboro, Mass.


ROBERT W. COOPER Accounting Newport, R. 1.

Sigma Chi 4 Pine St.

PAUL G. COREY

ROBERT T. CORBETT Theta Chi

Insurance

102 Oakland Ave.

Pawtucket,

R. L

Sigma Chi 148 Court

Square

Ind. Mgmt. Woonsocket, R. I.

RONALD T. COREY Ind. Mgmt. Wickford, R. I.

Sigma Chi Dean Avenue

'^Hrl.

The

Fraternity Sing and

Phi Mu

walked off with the cup the St.

John's

game

remember the

.

.

.

.

.

Abbey, Gee, what

memorie^t-

^^

Page

21


jn^ ^

^

-n^' 1^"^

GEORGE Bressler Hall 302 Central St.

J.

COUTURE

Agriculture Central Falls, R. I.

JOHN

HARRY D. CRANDALL Ind. Mgmt. Westerly, R. I.

G. CRANKSHAW

Phi Mu Delta 160 Sinclair Ave.

Commuter 104 High St.

Insuran

Providence, R. I.

WALTER V. GUSHING Phy: Pawtucket, R. I.

Theta Chi 34 Privet St. ^

V-V'

v0 A-

I

Ma**

C^^<-<"

'L

Need

we

say more? Christmas vacation

ffi|

came

mid-year Now

5S.

Page

22

and

exams

we

went

.

.

.

New Year's

reared their

knew what

ugly

cramming

heads. was.

.


B ROSEMARY T. DAMATO

EDMUND T. D'AMARIO 84 Narragansett Ave. Liberal Arts 17 Aborn St. Newport, R. I.

East Hall 15 Windsor Ave.

Home Economic;

Wilson, Conn

^

EDWARD L. DAMBRUCH Teacher Ed. Sigma Nu 225 Spring St. Cranston, R. 1.

EDWARD L. DANDREA Liberal Arts 1311 Kingstowne Rd. 123 Elmwood Ave. Providence, R. I.

^'"nto4''^n^

"Liliom" and

Quinn

.

.

Art Russo made

Little Theatre

came to

.

suave

speak

.

.

.

a

hit

at

Eleanor Roosevelt

in the midst of

a

blizzard

she revisited the dorm named after her.

i'i^S^i.

Page

23


JOSEPH

H. DAWSON

14 Upper College Road Engineering 20 Norman Ave. Cranston, R. 1.

ANTHONY Commuter

13 Joslin St.

J.

DeBERARDIS Engineering Providence, R. I.

JOSEPH DeCHRISTOFARO Beta Psi

Alpha

69 Messina St.

Engineering Providence, R. I.

GABRIEL L. DeTOMMASO Commuter

161 Canton St.

^^>' Page 24

Chemistry Providence, R. I.


ROBERT D. DiGENSO Beta Psi Alpha 131 Hudson St.

DONALD DiSPIRITO M Beta Psi Alpha 516 Providence St., Woonsocket,

Liberal Arts

Providence,

R. I.

WILLIAM F. DODSWORTH Engineering

Commuter

classes

.

.

.

and to

.

.

.

PIK and AEPi

some

get

to

grab

The beautiful gown

of

the

us even

Junior

the at

Liberal Arts

Delta Zeta

1678 Kingstown Rd. W.

Kingston, R. I.

"is&.'.S

927 Providence St. W. Warwick, R. I.

They watched

1

PATRICIA D. DODGE A R. I. &

largest

the Mil BalL

managed

Prom

.

.

.

living high.

""-.

>Pt, Page

25


WILLIAM B. DUMAIS Theta Chi

335 Avenue A

Unclassified

Woonsocket,

R. I.

DONALD A.

DONALD E. DUNNING Accounting Kingston, R. I.

Butterfield Hall 45 Newell St.

URI Trailer Park

DUQUETTE Engineering W. Warwick, R. I.

^^ WALTON H. EARLE Ind. Mgmt. Sigma Alpha Epsilon 17 Elder Ave. Riverside, R. I.

'^^fna-Vv ^^S^;..-^-' 1358-

^ISpring

^&

came,

"beach

at our

and

a new

saying

days". Anxiously

we

filled

schedules. Chem Lab from 3

The

fraternity

costume

our ears:

glanced to

5:00!!

dances and the formals.


CHARLES R. EMMERICH Engineering Tuckahoe, N. Y.

JOSEPH

Phi Kappa Theta US Siwanon Blvd.

Rho Iota

Kappa 36 Sheldon St.

R. ENOS

Accounting Providence, R. I.

ROBERT G. ERRICO Rho Iota Kappa 1 1 Benedict Ave.

Bus. Admin.

Tarrytown, N. Y.

LEO F. FAGAN Commuter

Engineering

27% ^"'ry

.

.

Temperatures

rose, and

we

scurried

to

^ -^^

Pm.

i

with books. We watched the Seniors

hurrying

about and

.

.

.

we

trying

to

fit

everything in,

wondered if we'd make it.

^'

Page

27


CHARLES I. FINKLESTEIN

VICTOR L. FINIZIO Commuter

9 Boy Scout Dr.

Liberal Arts

Westerly,

R. I.

Alpha Epsilon 348 Slater Ave.

Pi

Tau

M & A R. I.

WILLIAM D. FINLAY Engineering Kappa Epsilon

682 Hope St.

Providence,

Chi

Providence,

R. I.

ANNE FLETCHER Home Economics Omega Gaspee, R. I.

14 Westfield Rd.

.stoo,

^

Open House,

^3

...

and we

and the ROTC saluted Ruth

At last, exams,

finally they

left the campus

study,

were over

to

sun,

Rutledge

and sand,

and

the Seniors for their last

fling.


AFRED A. FORTIN, Commuter 25 Fortin Rd.

JR.

DEBORA R. FOSTER Nursing

Engineering Kingston, R. I.

RED 2

Phi

RICHARD F. FOWLER Agriculture Kappa Theta

1206 W. Main Rd., Middlctown, R. I.

East Greenwich, R. I.

RICHARD FRIEDEMANN Liberal Arts Sigma Nu 355 Geo. Arden Ave. Warwick, R. J.

SOPHOMORE YEAR

hand. Did

we

really

.

.

we

we

had the upper

look like that

We looked around and that

Now

missed

suddenly a

a

year

ago?^

realized

lot of faces.

Ji.

,

Page

29


,

FREDERICK W. GAUCH Ind. Mgmt. Phi Mu Delta 18 DeSoto St.

Providence

ALEXANDER R. GAVITT Sociology Westerly, R. I.

GILBERT G. GAUCH Tau Kappa Epsilon 57 Natick Ave.

Lambda Chi Alpha 43 Beach St.

M & A Warwick, R. I.

M. GIORDANI

JANET

Teacher Ed.

Delta Zeta

38 Plant St.

The Seniors

of

our

New

were

class

.

.

.

gone, but some

We made up the

The

Queen.

.ve>"v

Page 30

Aggie

London, Conn.

of

so "were

our

Vigilantes

fellow

.

.

Bawl and Ann

More activities.

.

soil

pledges..

revenge.

Bailey

as


FRANCIS X. GIRR Commuter 48 Vernon Ave.

LUCILLE H. GOLDEN

Liberal Arts

Newport,

Sigma

R. I.

Delta Tau

18 Zenith Dr.

FRED S. GOLDMAN

Liberal Arts

Alpha Epsilon

Worcester, Mass.

Pi

2174 Warwick Ave.

Agriculture Hoxsie, R. I.

HYMAN H. GOLDMAN Alpha Epsilon Pi Agrieulture 2174 Warwick Ave. Hoxsie, R. L

.

.

Blue

Key,

Dan

Senate

.

.

.

our new

leaders

Mahoney, Helen Amoriggi,

Ann Shaw, and Dot

things

were

Manganelli

were

Ron

i

Cruff^^g

.

shaping up.

"Jt.f Page 31


JACK

F. GREER

Accounting Alpha Epsilon 31 Deep Lane Wantagh, L. I., N. Y. Pi

JOHN

^

H. GRIFFIN Gen. Bus. Ad.

Theta Chi

1274 Smithfield Ave.,

SaylesviUe,

LEROY A. GRINNELL Engineering

Sigma Nu

Chatlcstown, R. I.

R. I.

Homecoming

was

early

but that didn't

this year

dampen

for the weekend. Chi O and

our

.

Page 32

G!>"'

.

we

lost,

spirits

Alpha

took top honors for the

"^

.

Tau

displays.


Sigma

ERNST E. HANKE Nu Agriculture Providence, R. I.

JAMES Hut

Hut

132 Lenox Ave.

J-North J-North

R. HANLEY Chemistry Kingston, R. I.

HYTHO HASEOTES Pre-Med. Alpha Chi Omega Bear Hil Rd. Valley Falls, R. L

CILARLES F. HASTINGS Commuter 101 Whittier Ave.

Agriculture Providence, R. I.

^""^'ii St"

^^t7e ?

"Fearless

Job-Dick" .

The

.

Alpha

.

took

over as

mayor

^

Retaliated and beat Brown again.

Delta Pi

was a

real

Theta Chi success

.

.

.

jam

here

session

to sta\

Mr^ ^

^ Page

33


RICHARD K. HAYES Commuter 59 Myrtle Ave.

Gen. T. Ed.

Cranston, R. I.

JOHN

EMERSON F. HEALD

L. HAYES

Liberal Arts Lambda Chi Alpha 166 Pawtucket Ave., Pawtucket, R. I.

Chemistry Newport, R. I.

Bressler 30 Vaughan Ave.

WALTER R. HEISINGER Accounting Narragansett, R. I. 440 Couftland Ave. Glenbrook, Conn.

Rushing

was

in full

things

were

swing again rough:

average necessary; worked

Winter

came

and the

sorority carols,

.

one-point

no

out

though.

pledge and

formals,

snow

balls.


^

i ARTHUR H. HELMUS 75 Whitehall Blvd.

L

GEORGE L. HELSENS Phi Kappa Theta Engineering 4 Conn. Ave. West Bartington, R. I.

Phi Mu Delta

Garden City,

JOHN Lambda Chi

45 Henry St.

C HENRY

Alpha

Engineering Cranston, R. I.

ROBERT H. HIGGINS Phi Kappa Theta 45 Osceola Ave.

We stood in silence no more

at

Engineering Warwick, R. I.

the

dangling legs

Keaney

dedication

Rodman's

over

,

balcony.

Second semester, and marks were

taking

their toll

.

.

.

still here.

Page

35


ROBERT K. HORTON Agriculture St. Albans, N. Y.

Theta Chi 202-15 114 Ave.

CHARLES H. HUNT

CHARLES F. HUGHES Liberal Arts Sigma Pi Ptov., R. I.

M & A Lambda Chi Alpha Providence, R. I. 181 Burnside St.

222 Rochambeau Ave.

JAMES J. JAWORSKI t:Bt ^-

tnlt^'^

Engineering

Sigma Pi 85 Jefferson St.

,.

^"^

rit>S V

Warwick, R. I.

tnS'"^.

pbiSiS^^oP^'l-

Hell Week, then initiation. Now

really

Nancy Nelson the

Page 36

we were

members. The Mil Ball and as

queen. The

boys listened.

The

our own

Sorority Sing

Rhody

Review.

.

.


RICHARD F. KANE

Sigma

Nu

SAMUEL KAPLAN Alpha Epsilon Pi Engineering 25 Almy St. Newport, R. I.

Ind. Mgmt. Cranston, R. I,

55 Frances Ave.

R

14 Garden

.

spring

was

we

June

here

City

Dr.

was

Arts

this time

made arrangements for the beach

Street

Liberal

Cranston, R.

^^^^^^

KAROL Engineering Cranston, R. L

again, but

J. KAROL

14 Garden City Dr.

^^

f JiM JOHN Commuter

EUGENE Commuter

days.

Miss U.R.I.

and everyone

agreed

on

the choice

.

.

.

-,;,

*^^. Page

37

I.


NORMAN Alpha

Beta Psi

51 Blaine St.

J.

KENNEDY Chemistry Cranston, R. L

JOHN Kingston,

JOAN KENT

F. KENNEY

R. I.

19 Kenilworth Way

Alpha Delta Pi 117 Roslyn Ave.

Agriculture Pawtucket, R. L

Tau

Sect. St.

Cranston, R. I.

EDWARD H. KERINS Engineering Kappa Epsilon Newport, R, I.

50 Second St.

Cog-e

A-

co(;V'^

Final

exams

.

harder

.

.

this time it

was a

saying goodbye

to

little

the Seniors.

We spent the last few weeks

living

on

hot

dogs from Moy's

and refreshments from the Surf.

vot*

Page 38


PAUL G. KINNECOM Sigma Kappa Engineering

Phi

9 Thurston St.

DANIEL R. KLEBER Phi Sigma Kappa 29 Robinson St.

Providence. R. I.

RICHARD W. KOLACZKOWSKI Rho Iota Kappa Chemistry 267 Second Ave. Woonsocket, R. I.

Agriculture Wakefield, R. L

ALFRED P. KOHNLE, JR. Sigma Nu Engineering 75 Potter St. Cranston, R. L

^^^^--,/ 'O^i

.

.

It

hard

was

the over

Week

to

beach,

chase the but

and this time

.

.

.

we

we

notes

around

managed.

some

of

gave the kids

us

a

...

It

was

made Senior

real send-off.

Page 39


%

ROBERT A. LANGUEDOC Engineering Narragansett, R. I. Cranston, R. I. 950 Cranston St.

GILBERT A. LAMB

RAYMOND V. KUSIAK Commuter Chemistry 14 Hazard St. West Warwick, R. I.

Theta Chi 12 Keith Ave.

Engineering Cranston, R. I.

JOAN

E. LAVARINI Liberal Arts

ERH RED 1

-^""^S^i

JUNIOR

Westerly, R. I.

YEAR. We looked around,

Carol and Edna had taken their toll. Trees at

,^^^^^^1 Ce"'' ^\5:^^^e6 .0^i?''0

Page 40

were

the Pier

down, and .

.

.the

girls

we were

amazed

had done

a

^

thorough job.


\ NPAUL S. LENNON Bressler Engineering 22 Mosher Dr. W. Barrington, R. I.

JOHN T. LEYDEN Theta Chi 178 Marlbrough St.

Agriculture E. Green., R. I.

EARL B. LINDQUIST, JR. Engineering Kappa SaylesviUe, R. I.

Rho Iota

40 Woodland St.

FRANCIS V. LINGAITIS Ind. Mgmt. Worcester, Mass.

Phi Gamma Delta 22 Hilton Ave.

Surf, .

.

and spent no'w,

.

our

We said hello

our

we

social life to

last few weeks

really

hated

to

was

ruined

the Freshmen at

the Old Union;

leave it.

*i> Page

41


JOHN

MARIL'nSf A. LUSSIER Nursing Alpha Chi Omega 51 Harrison Ave.

CATHERINE R. MacDUFF

C. LYONS

Home Economics

Commuter

Liberal Arts Lambda Chi Alpha 168 Narragansett Pky., Warwick, R. I.

Woonsocket, R. I.

Wakefield,

R. L

DANIEL F. MAHONEY,

JR.

40 School St.

Bus. Admin. I.

Theta Chi 87 High St.

'^

W^

-o

^

,.<'V^

Bristol, R.

,e

^l'

.

.

Ir

brought back

happy busy I

with

Spy

many memories of

times. We

meetings

was

.

.

Page 42

s^-

.

and

more

extracurriculars.

back and the were

"^^l^*v

were more

comments

unfavorable.


DOROTHY R. MANGANELLI Chi Omega Liberal Arts Norwood, R. I.

BARBARA Delta Zeta

29 Welfare Ave.

Wallum Lake Rd.

J. MANLY Nursing Pascoag, R. I.

GEORGE E. MANSFIELD Commuter 64 Rodman St.

Peace

M & A R. L

Dale,

NANCY V. MANSFIELD East Hall

Home Economics

659 Fall River Ave.

Ted Tedesco

was

ably

chosen assisted

Prexy, and

by

Judy Barker, Jim North, perennial

,Vif^^^rj

Seekonk, Mass.

Helen

he

was

Amoriggi.

and the

treasurer, Ronnie Cruff

.

.

*^l^55^.. Page 43


Bus. Admin.

Wickford,

JOHN

THOMAS A. MATHESON

DONALD R. MASON Commuter Box 2

R. I.

Phi Sigma Kappa 105 Sunny Cove Dr.

F. MATHEWS Bus. Admin.

Commuter 616 Thames St.

Liberal Arts

Greenwood,

R. I.

Newport, R. I.

MARCY R. MAZER Accounting Alpha Epsilon Pi 34 Matlison St.

Judy

Barker .

promised

to

was

.

.

Slide Rule Strut

Queen

This year the football

be great. Brown

then, who

Ct"

Fall River, Mass.

was

won,

watching

the

season

but,

game?


RICHARD L. McDERMOTT Physics Warwick, R. I.

MARILYN McFADDEN

Phi Mu Delta 4 Kendall Lane

ERH 20

Gen. T. Ed.

Warren, R. I.

GILBERT McGAIR Rho Iota Kappa 137 Superior St.

Engineering Providence, R. I.

MARY E. McGRATH Zoology St. Jamestown, R. I.

Friendship

Homecoming rolled

around. AEPi and

Sigma received and S.D.T. the

ERH 192 Laurel Lane

topped

display

the float honors. Phi

Sig

the houses in

contest

.

.

.

lots of color.

Page 45


j-^

LEONARD 41 Upper College 55 Deoham Rd.

J. METZ Engineering Warwick, R. I.

ANN G. MORAN Nursing Alpha Delta Pi Central Falls, R. I. 60 Kendall St.

ARLENE MOAN Bus. Ed. Sigma Kappa Hope, R. I.

North Rd.

JOSEPH M. NACCI Physics Narragansett, R. I. Providence, R. I.

^^c,

632 River Ave.

tVus'

The

got the hook.

Mayorality campaign Abbruzzi

was

great

.

.

.

Sorority rushing, and one-point

need was

we

back

say more.'

again.

We welcomed the Memorial Union.

Page 46


k ROBERT A. NEWLANDER Sigma Nu Engineering 209 8di Ave. Woonsocket, R. I.

RICHARD Phi Mu Delta 80 Charles St.

J.

NORDBERG

JAMES

W. NORMAN

Phi Kappa Theta RED

M & A Mass.

Mansfield,

Engineering Wakefield, R. I.

m -

1 \^ #:.

^

."#

JAMES

W. NORTH

Gen. Bus. Ad.

Phi Mu Delta 227 Reed St.

Stratford, Conn.

Ao

P^^lEr

"'"^ilL^Sni,

"o^rr.

ci!^-

But

we

couldn't

of all the the old

.

see

places, but

Basketball,

much because

people. we

and the

We still missed

found Donnelly 's

Gym seemed empty.

M^^/.

"^>>^

"^-^^^e <. /

Page 47


JOHN

B. ODONNELL

Phi Mu Delta

53 Magnolia St.

Liberal Arts

Rumford, R. I.

MARY

RICHARD OLIVER ( hcmistrj

Sigma Nu 108 Julia Si

C

rinston

R

J. O'ROURKE

Physics Hope, R. I.

30 Campus Ave. Lane

Coyle

I

RICHARD A. PAILES Liberal Arts

Trailer Park Box 312

Kingston, R.

I.

ox^*'

?B^-^^r

iS^'^'-' .

.

Phi Delt

was

Second No

still

presenting

semester was

Fiji dance, but there

hit

were

.

many left

Then, social restrictions

Page 48

:

really full

.

.

.

.

.


MARIA M. PASSANNANTI Delta Zeta 226

Kimberly

Gen T Ed N. Y. 63, N. Y.

PI.

LELAND E. PHILLIPS Engineering Apt. 4E Prov., R. I.

Commuter

22 Whelan Rd.

and

Fraternity

sorority

elections. Not much

time 'til the final year

hadn't

.

.

changed .

much

.

.

Burt Rosen, the

.

now.

The

Activities

Sorority Sing

Rhody Review.

Sigma

WILLIAM E. PAUL Pi Engineering

47 Groton St.

Providence,

R. L

NATALIE J. PETERSON Gen. T. Ed. Alpha Chi Omega 159 Garden City Dr. Cranston, R. I.


WILLIAM H. POLIS Liberal Arts Sigma Pi Lincoln Park, R. I.

210 Mass. Ave.

DAVID L. POLLACK M Alpha Epsilon Pi 366 Northrup St. Cranston,

JOEL D. PREBLAD Accounting Narragansett, R. I. Providence, R. I. Niagara St.

& A

251

R. I.

GEORGE C. REESE Engineering Newport, R. I.

Bressler

8 Hoffman PI.

<to^'^;W-^'

K.

,

.

Sachems

were

were

and beach

to

days again;

same

Page 50

tapped

elected

.

.

.

still

and

a

few

Juniors

Who's Who

.

.

.

Finals

it wasn't the no

Moy's

hot

dogs.


\1

ifCS^

DONALD A. RILEY Phi Mu Delta 1 Young Ave.

JOAN Chi

.

.

The Surf We

was

managed

Goodbyes

were

Kappa Phi^Sigma 14 Bedlow Ave. '

'

"

"

Liberal Arts

*

Newport,

R. I.

ROBERT E. ROWAN Theta Chi 13 Manchester St.

Engineering Warwick, R. I.

L. RUBERY Home Economics

Omega

327 Hillard Ave.

.

ROBERT M. ROCHEFORT

Accounting Providence, R. I.

Greenwood,

back, but to

R. I.

the beach

was

gone.

crash Senior Week with

hard

to

Next year it'd be

ease.

make. our turn.

''^olf^i^O

Page

51


Jft

t\ GEORGE I. SAHAGIAN Rho Iota Kappa Engineering 202 California Ave. Providence, R. I.

RAYMOND A. SALZILLO Commuter Engineering

PAUL ST. GEORGE

Sigma Chi 143 Chilton Ave.

Cranston,

16 Lookout Ave.

Elizabeth, N. J.

R. I.

LEVON SARKISIAN Rho Iota Kappa 810 Potters Ave.

Liberal Arts R. I.

Providence,

l-^^^ft^-

"^

SENIOR YEAR. are

a

deep

The freshmen

Finally! I

really only kids

breath and stand up

.

.

The campus is ours;

Page 52

.

we

take

straight now

.

.

.

it's up

to us.


MARCIA L. SAYLES

NOAH T. SAXE

Accounting Providence, R. I.

Alpha Epsilon Pi 154 Prospect St.

Delta Zeta 84 Mason Ave.

RICHARD E. SCHOFIELD M & A N. Prov., R. I.

Bressler 59 Belvidere Blvd.

Jack

Mazza

as

Prexy

Nancy Bowden, What

a team

for

.

.

.

iOUtI,

n

Jean Gencarelli,

Burt Rosen our

lA .J.o^./^C^,

.

.

.

and Cruff,

again.

last year.

JoAnn McKenna, Aggie

Bawl

Queen.

,

Home Ec(

Cranston, R. I.

BETTY A. SCHMIDT Bus. Admin. Alpha Chi Omega 34 Branch Rd. Norwood, R. I.


NORMAN H. SEFTON Agriculture Warwick, R. L

Rho Iota Kappa

31 Modena Dr.

GEORGE H.

FRANK A. SERRA Zoology Westerly, R. I.

Liberal Arts

7 West Street

JOSEPH Phi

Sigma Kappa

F. SHORT Ind. Mgmt.

Pawtucket, R. I.

V^'

We had which

a

career

lot to

Uncle Sam The Grist staff

Page 54

Jamestown, R. I.

51 Clifford St.

;^ot''^^^--,-,V'

SHEEHAN, JR.

Commuter

Commuter 32 School St.

.

was

on our

minds now;

choose. Some had

.

.

for

a

while,

to

choose

anyway.

working feverishly.

Deadlines!


ERNEST R. SIMAS Commuter 95 Wakefield St.

M & A W.

Warwick,

R. I.

ALICE M. SINNOTT Alpha Chi Omega Home Economics 41 Hillside Ave. W. Warwick, R. I.

CHARLES C. SIRR Agriculture Alpha Strawberry Field Rd. Warwick, R. I.

Lambda Chi 800

ALLEN C. SMITH Phi Mu Delta 74 South Rd.

Engineering

Kingston,

R. I.

'"^'^nce,"^'"'^

Ike

was

in the

hospital

.

.

.

we

that he'd win this

prayed fight

Football: DeSimone, Gibbons, and Hunt led the

too.

Apkarian,

team.

""*y Page

55


9^

ROBERT

M

J. STAIRS

North Rd.

Phys. Ed.

923 Prov. Rd.

Whitinsville, Mass.

11

MITZI Delta Zeta 9 Briar Lane

J. STEPHENS

ROSE

J. STAUFFER

Alpha Delta Stoney Lane,

Home Economics

Kingston, R. I.

Nursing

Pi RED #2 E.

Greenwich, R. I.

KENNETH W. SULLIVAN Ind. Mgmt. Lambda Chi Alpha Cranston, R. I. 1363 Narr. Blvd.

We beat Brown

...

Homecoming

Sigma

Chi and

a

good

Alpha

Freshman for

Page 56

excuse to

Theta

Chi

celebrate

Chi, Chi O, won

Mayor.

top honors

.


VIRGINIA M. SWEENEY

SYLVIA E. SUNDEL Sect. St. Sigma Kappa Highland Ave., Fall River, Mass.

PAUL J. SULLIVAN Liberal Arts Sigma Alpha Epsilon Bellow Falls, Vt. 12 School St.

ERH 24 Nelson St.

1600

Home Economics

Providence, R. I.

ANNE B. TABER Home Economics W. Kingston, R. I.

Delta Zeta

25 Liberty Lane

' N.

We beat

.

.

.

Springfield, UConn

another

The

team was

a reason to

their

victory!

Y

celebrate

Homecoming

More celebration'

undefeated

first time

in

history

_J: ''ft'. i^yr

Page

57


JOAN

G. TEMKIN

Alpha Xi Delta 546 Wayland Ave.

M & A

Providence, R. I.

LOUIS A. TEUTONICO Alpha Engineering Cranston, R. I.

CAROLYN A. THORNLEY Nursing Lonsdale, R. I.

Beta Psi

12 Fernwood Dr.

15 Arnold St.

NIMROD TORKOMIAN Engineering Pawtucket, R I.

Phi Mu Delta 1 14 Suffolk Ave.

They

won

the Yankee Conference

first time in the

28 chosen

Page 58

History

Refrigerator to

Bowl

Who's Who

they got

a

bid

to

More celebration! !

.

.

.

even a

few

Juniors.


^^ v/^

^ m^^

t

1 JEROME

E. TRAVERS

Theta Chi 172 Clarence Rd.

GRACE A. TUCKER Chi Omega Home Economi 133 Hilltop Drive Cranston, R.

M & A Scarsdale, N. Y.

JOSEPH Commuter

209 High St.

F. TURCO Liberal Arts Westerly, R. I.

LEO TURGEON Phi Kappa Theta 117 Dexter St.

successful.' A Christmas

.

.

good question

drawing

and fraternities .

Engineering Pawtucket, R. I.

near

joined

for

.

.

.

to

debate

Chi

.

.

oJ^^^

p

^

,

Sororities

caroling

then "down the line" .l

Page

59


-^ "

-rT*'

V

H.^

S^^

1

JOHN A. TYRELL, JR. Ind. Mgmt. Sigma Alpha Epsilon 55 Burnside St. Cranston, R. I.

MARIANNE UNDERWOOD ERH 20 Oak Ave.

Liberal Arts

Riverside,

R. 1.

RICHARD A. VAGNINI Physics Narragansett, R. I. 56

Bloomingdale

Pawt., R. I.

Ave.

NANCY A. VOLPE Chemistry Apponaug, R. I.

Alpha Chi Omega 24 Larchmont Rd.

Class of '56

January 1, 1956

.

.

.

is that us.' We took can't flunk

now

the infallible

^^t?^Page 60

.

ones

.

second

.

.

.

.

our

our exams

semester

Seniors

.

.

.

last basketball game-


DEBORAH F. WALKER Chi Omega 57 Sefton Dr.

GERALD J. WARSHAW Accounting Epsilon Phi Brooklyn, N. Y.

DONALD E. WALSH Ind. Mgmt. Sigma Alpha Epsilon 3073 Pawtucket Ave. Riverside, R. I.

Home Economics Edgewood, R. I.

Tau

239 Ocean Ave.

DAVID B. WATTS Liberal Arts Sigma Alpha Epsilon vichAve., Greenw^ood, R. I.

^t^^ V.

S"''. ss

llection .

.

.

of officers

somewhat of

interviews

.

.

costume

.

a

Spring dances

.

.

.

Juniors take

the

relief was

.

.

.

interviews

approaching

the last time

.

.

.

.

''a

.^

over

.

.

.

.

.

Page 61


NANCY WERNER Chi Omega 2 Howard St.

Liberal Arts

Milton, Mass.

KIMBER G. WHEELOCK Ind. Mgmt. Sigma Alpha Epsilon

STEPHEN J. WEXLER Bus. Admin Alpha Epsilon Pi 317 Morris Avenue Providence, R. I.

CHARLES E. WIESNER Sigma Nu Engineering 134 Flint Ave. Cranston, R. I.

t^-^^'Srrv -Sfal*"''"

Sigma

Chi

we

a

Derby

.

.

.

and the

girls

do their stuff

snatched the time "down the line"

long

time since

we

Beach

f^^'

Tiverton, R. 1.

7 Sakonnet Ave.

first heard that

days

.

.

.

parties

.

phrase .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.


MEREDITH H. WOOD Nursing SaylesviUe, R. I.

JOHN

FRANK WRIGHT, 60 Hilton St.

around

the

girls

.

.

Ind. Mgmt. Syracuse, N. Y.

AIVNIE F. WRIGHT Nursing Alpha Delta Pi Lafayette, R..I. Victory Highway

JR.

Almost time for Senior Week

dropped

WOJCIK

Phys. Ed. Pawtucket, R. I.

Commuter

had

D.

Phi Mu Delta 1416 Spring St.

38 Woodland St.

.

looked back

out.

we

...

.

.

.

looked

how many

Remember the old Union?

will remember that "front room"

Page 63


4^

^

AMELIE C. YEARGAIN ERH 11 First Place

Home Economics

Garden City, N. Y.

.

.

thc>

never

Oh What

flunk second

yeah?

are

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

We

planted

to

the

the Officers' Club

.

this is

going

>ou

Senior Week! !

Agriculture Greenwood, R. I.

Commuter 78 Villa Ave.

Providence, R. I.

75 Homer St.

YOUNG

JOHN J.

RICHARD L. YOSINOFF Accounting Alpha Epsilon Pi

.

the

.

semester

University

a

do

.

warm

.

seniors

.

.

.

.

and >ou'

beer and the hot

Socialites in

ivy

.

.

our own

Caps and

sun

right

Gowns

.

.

.

ELAINE HILKENE Home Economics Delta 13 Fieldstone Drive, Hartsdale. N. Y.

Graduation

Alpha Xi

.

.

.

Seniors Not

Page 64

Photographed


CHARLES E. COURCHAINE Commuter 35 Worthen St.

MARILYN G. SCHWAN Math

Swansea, Mass.

NORMAN M. MESSIER Commuter

147 Illinois St.

WILUAM

Liberal Arts Central Falls, R. I.

WILLIAM F. SERVANT

J. CURREN

Commuter 789 Park Ave.

Fottin House 4 Lyndon St.

Chemistry Cranston, R. I.

Physical Education Warren, R. I.

ROBERT W. POTTER Theta Chi 292 Ohio Ave.

MARILYN

J.

St. HMD

Eng Provideni

ROBERT E. SMITH

HORTON Commuter

Nursing Greenwood, R. I.

1104 Main Ave.

17 Tower St.

Engineering Westerly, R. L

THOMAS A. RANT Phi Kappa Theta 29 MacArthur Blvd.

RALPH

H.

General Teacher Ed.

Wakefield, R. 1.

MARSHALL I. TAYLOR

HULL

Tavern Hall N. Vassal boro,

Engineering d

Jamestown, R. I.

Physics Maine

RONALD M. SCHACK ilon Phi eside Dr.

CAROL G. McSWEENEY Commuter 32 Tucker Ave.

Home Economics Cranston, R. I.

Marketing

& Adver.

Lawrence, N. Y.

DONALD M. YARLAS

Alpha Epsilon Pi 141 Byfield St.

Engii Providenci

Page 65


Page 66

J


rf-

S. %

'"i,!

Page 67


I Row 1:

^

>^ilBBI\ fell

'^^^

Sayles, M.; Mosher, L.; Bowden, N.; Lamb, P.; Henry, J.

Row 2: Winfield A.;

Manganelli, D.; Frechette, D.; Risk, J.; Cronin, P.; Heller, S.; Boorujy,

B.

THE PAN-HELLENIC

ASSOCIATION Two members from each

sorority,

a

Junior

Senior, form the Pan Hellenic Organization

and

on

a

our

of the group campus. Also included in the membership is an advisor from each house, along with the Dean of

regarding sororities, especially rushing regulations, are formulated by Pan Hellenic. Consisting of all the sorority women of America, Pan Hellenic stands for "high scholarship, guarding of ideals good health, wholehearted cooperation with college and serving to the best of their ability, in the college community." Women. All laws

Page 68


M' (iifti^M:** _ i L- Mainland, M.; Gants, L.; Haskell, J.; Barnes, P.; Borden, C; Volpe, N.; Borden, t.;

Barnes, E.; Farrell, M.; Sardelli, A.; DeBartolo,

Boorujy, B.; Anderson, J.; Tuxbury, J.; Chaves, C; Antoneili, S.;

Row

Roit'

D.; Johnson, B.

}i Schmidt, E.; Walsh, P.; Haseotes, H.; Mosher, L.; Lowensohn, C; Richardson, A.; Brune, P.; Peterson, N.; Sullivan, J.; Anderson, C; Shepley, A.; Donahue, D.; Eraser, M.; Gilmartin, B.

Clegg, Ci Johnson, C; Nadeau, B.; DickD.; Styborski, M.; Parkhurst, C; Meier, C;

Row 2: ersoo,

ALPHA CHI OMEGA We'll

always remember

graduating

seniors

our

....

alumnae,

just

as

recall the toil and fun of their at

U.R.I.

of

our

....

,

at

first

Alpha

trophy

Chi

....

inter-house

joy of working together Revue ....

....

most

initiation

talks,

our

our

of all

tea,

days

our

Float

....

chapter our

at

hockey

....

the

room

Alpha

banquet,

prize

here

the excitement

....

for the Union?"

"Anyone

our

they will

meetings

Chi

our

the

Rhody

Omega

informal

Homecoming

....

all of it.

Page 69


Row I:

Mulcahy, T.; Goashgarian, M.; Cronin, P.; Kinne, S.; Conrick, J.; Capalbo, J.; Bowden, N.; Voelker, S.; Gencarelli, J.; Aissis, A.; Kent, J.; Rigby, N.

Sargent, E.; Saviano, J.; Kingsbury, C; Conley, J.; Brown, J.; Egerton, F.; Carnevale, R.; Mostecki, M.; Horting, B.; Jenson, D. Row 2:

Row J/ Boucher, D.; Lamborghini, L.; Burhoe, P.; White, G.; Teixeira, M. L; Reardon, E.; Wyckoff, G.; Hoyle, P.; Loxsom, J.

ALPHA DELTA PI

The five week "rush"

wonderful

pledge

class

session with Theta Chi

the thrill of

....

the annual

....

....

continual union

time the desire of everyone a great football parties

"those"

....

....

by

a

jam

topped

season

UConn weekend and the bowl game thrills and happiness that come with

....

the Exeter party with TEP decorating for the Black Diamond, snowflake mania ....

practice

....

for the

Derby

....

Review rehearsals and the finished on

stage

....

our

annual

fight

Rhody product

of the

mono

be page-turner in the Sorority Sing trying to acquire knowledge and a tan

tones to ....

at

the

week

same ....

time we

....

the

finality

will have these

of senior

moments to

remember.

Page

70


^b^ Row 1: Savarese, C; Gifford, C; Knox, J.; Adams, S.; Berry, M.; Risk, J.; Win field, A.; DeWolf, R.; Ryan, M.; Amor iggi, H.; DiMase, M.; James, B.

Row 2: Berube, A.; Orovan, M.; Sulli D.; Smith, E.; Duffy, J.; Lessard, E.; Bennett, A.; Naccarato, V.; Lord, M.; Petrarca, C. van,

Gartland, R.; Chmilewski, M.; Jursa, R.; Heitmann, R.; Petrarca, p.; Shunney, P.; Dilorio, A.; Essex, C; Temkin, J. Row 3: Mitson, P.;

ALPHA XI DELTA

The five weeks of derful

new

Homecoming float to

UConn

nights and

we sat

pictures

and carols

the

for

our

trip

parties, and

the

mid year

our

71

Christmas the

tree

Rhody

those fabulous sorority sing our seniors!, will always days and

be "moments

Page

Mom Coulter

exams

Review

beach

place

long

studying?

of Paris

our won

awaited

second

social hours, up

and

rushing

pledges

to

remember".


irf f

f

M

Rou' 7; O'Brien, J.; Brownridge, H. Labbee, J.; Cook, M.; Manganelli, D. Mrs. Walker; Rubery, J.; Walker, D. Johnson, M.; Smith, M.; Farnum, L.

Cunniagbam,

'*

T

2: :r,

an,

Schnitzer, C; McCann, K Barsamian, B.; Tucker, G,

E.;

ison,

M.; Wenderoth, A.; Turner, J, M.; Lamb, P.; Creamer, A.

^

'

T

ii

to

Thorp, S.; Maginnis, K. C; Loxley, B.; Brickley, A.; Seibert, P.; Attwill, P.; Werner, N.; Leino, M.; Shores, D.; McKenna, J.; St. Germain, A.; GraiRow }:

P.

CHI

OMEGA

We'll miss ....

Seniors when

our

they'll take

memories of their stay here How could

we

ever

dances, and socials their last

winning

one as

the

miss Chi

carry her

Chi

Omega.

those

parties,

at

with Chi

cup. And the

the kids

sing,

the

Seniors, knowing

....

and that

spirit and inspiration

thing they do.

....

Omega

....

our

Omega

pleasant

homecoming

students,

Yes, we'll miss

they'll

....

display

Rhody Revue,

forget

leave

they

with them such

they'll

into every


i

1

^ I1 1

I: Parker, J.; Barnes, M.; Dodge, P.; Collins, J.; Matteson, M.; Stauffer, M.; Mrs. Reynolds; Tolderlund, A.; Say les, M.; Giordani, J.; Henry, J.; O'Con-

Row

Row 2; Essex, L.; Heald, S.; Townsend,

C; Turano, J.; Huling, J.; Vitullo, N. Wolf, J.; Gray, G.; Larsen, E.; Higgins, N.; Smith, J.; Passannanti, M.; Desmar

ais, D.; Paglia, C; Volavka, D.; ton, M.

ii

3: Maxcy, M.; Anderson, E.; Hop kins, J.; MarciUe, J.; Berry, M.; Powell. N.; Kenyon, B.; Taber, A.; Barber, K,

Row

Sundquist, D.; Rhoades, J.,- Burns, J, Cohen, R.; Hindley, C; Steere, B.; Chappell, J.

DELTA ZETA

The Seniors

U.R.I,

and

they'll be

are

Delta

back

graduating Zelta.

....

leaving

....

But,

we

Homecoming,

know open

houses, Alumnae functions. The past years have been

ative. We've maintained

happy and

our

cre

high social,

extra-curricular, and scholastic standards ....

we've done well in many

Our

Argyle Orgy,

ternity dances, these

Page 73

are

our

things.

formals, the fra

the Union activities

among

our

....

fondest memories.

all


Edelstein, E.; Gursky, A.; Gold, J.; Shemin, L.; Golden, L.; Averbach, J.; Haut, L.; HeUer, S.; Satnick, M.; Smolen, C; Conner, M.; Flichtenfeld, S. Row 1;

Curhan, S.; Barish, R.; Sadick, Broomfield, B.; Silver, R.; Citrin, B.; Biderman, S.; Wysell, H.; Saklad, J.; Small, E.; Ernstin, S.

Row 2: S. A.;

SIGMA DELTA TAU

Seven seniors

graduate

....

memories of their four years Times have

sure

changed

at

since

into the house. Redecoration

wonderful

S.D.T

they moved

....

and land

scaping added. Pleasant

thoughts

Homecomings, most

and

of

Rhody Revues,

sings will

remain upper

in their minds.

Graduation is

at

hand and

a

new

and

bright

future lies ahead. The best of luck

to our

graduating

Sisters.

Page 74


Kou' J.Neal, J.;Ormiston, J.; Savastano, A.; McCarville, S.; Norberg, N.; Moan,

Row 2: Rossi, L.; Caswell, P.; Ansuini,

A.; Sundel, S.; Norton, G.; Picerne, C;

P.; Strong, J.; Firth, A.; DeSalvo, C.

S.; Gilgun, F.; Frechette, D.; DeBIasio,

Row y. Sowder, N.; Burnett, M.; Frost, E.; Davies, J.; Heath, C; Ray, L. J.; DeCesare, B.; Cuppels, C.

Barker, J.; Grills, M.; Townsend, F.

SIGMA KAPPA

Well, Seniors,

again, maybe

revoir

au

....

see

you

Homecoming, maybe

at

Open House, maybe

....

If not,

good

at

luck

and best wishes for the future. Remember here

us

here

at

at

Sigma

and think about your years

the house

the flooded

....

Dance, the formals Remember

Homecoming the

sings

remember

Page 75

the little white fence,

lawn, the "well",

the

football games

and Brown

and the

Sigma.

our

Barn

....

Rhody

....

Revue

....

remember ....

and


Row I: Collins, N.; DeBartolo. D.; Skol-

nick, L.; Spetrini, R.; Dawley. A.; Mrs. Quirk; DAmato, R.; Martin, A.; Wood, N.; McKensie, A.; D'Agostino, M.; Hunt ington, D. Row 2: Mills, R.; Peckham, J.; Brown,

D.; Sherman, C; Oster, C; Blasbalg, H.;

Finklestein, S.; Helm, P.; McClentic, L.; Priestly, J.; Tootell, V.; Tuto, J.; L'Heureux, L.; Fine, J.; Fine, J.; Cohen, M.;

Allegretto, R. Row }: Liner, A.; Zoubra, C; Wildprett, C; Parrott, J.; Wakefield, K.; Bogan, B.; Chisholm, S.; Chapman, C; Short, M.;

Daignault, D.; Griffith, D.; Casey, M.; Sloane, H.; Tate, J.; Hoffman, E. Row 4: Smith, S.; Glynn, C; Kaufman, D.; Helie, C; Basso, A.; Burbank, S.; Sullivan, J.; Dickerson, D.; Cinquegrana, D.; Harrington, S.; O'Connell, M.; Ten nis, D.

EAST HALL

East

Hall, the "Little dorm" we'll always

remember. The set,

our

ivy,

the

geologists,

Our Seniors

are

leaving

....

back when

Day "way ....

weekends Brown.

.

the confusion of

....

over a

congregations

Gee, they

were

future be

happy

Freak

rehearsals, the

Homecoming, UConn,

studying, though

hours, slaving

own

.", the Rhody

Remember all those

member the

the

.

they've been

their

happy here, remembering Revue

the TV

roomies

on

....

the

and Re

long

hot desk? Remember the front

happy days and

things?

bright

steps?

....

....

may the

too.

Page 76


Row 1:

Clegg, C; Waterman, P.; Rotelli, S.; Labush, R.; Hubschmitt, D.; Lerner, C; Underwood, M.; Basser, N.; Caroline, E.; Oringel, S.; Stamp, E.; Martin, E. Row 2: Rainone, R.; Kananack, R.; Sar delli, A.; Daglis, F.; Reynolds, J.; Gor ton, S.; Wrobel, M.; Lanzi, P.; Simon-

elli, M.; Kapff, C; Barbieri, M.; Nadeau, B.; Streitfeld, M.; Kaplan, A.; DeBartolo. M.; Baxter, B.; Nichds, J.; Ross, E. Row }: Salz, J.; Morin, L.; Donahue, D.; Johnson, S.; Wilbur, L.; Dijesser, A.; Lombardi, C; Brune, P.; Salzman, S.; Hurwitz, A.; Calitri, V.; Brady, M.;

Richardson, A.; Cardin, P.; Susskind, A. Row 4: Bush, J.; Lewis, P.; Sullivan, L.; Livingston, S.; Silverman, A.; Parkhurst, C; Styborski, M.; Goldstein, S.; Thomp son, A.; Wishart, C; Swinden, C; Yeargain, A.; Barnes, E.; Siiro, M.; Zimmer man,

H.

ELEANOR ROOSEVELT

Eleanor Roosevelt Hall is

brick

encasement

not

only

a

but is

independent non-sorority girls live, an

actual home. Here the

counter

ments,

college life:

new

new

girls

faces,

friends and many

here that Freshman common

mature

they lapse days

into

Page

77

new

new

set-backs.

building

into memories

"how young

sentiment of

en

adjust

that

womanhood, it is

we

of Senior-Graduate.

those

were" is the

all, especially

who compare it with their status

first

girls

It is within this red brick

many

huge

in which Freshmen and

those

newly acquired


INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL

Row iTweedell, W.; Corbett, R. V. Kehew, R. .Sec; Armstrong, E.

Pres.; Kerins,

E.

Pres.;

Row 2Mazer, M.;

Trimble, W.; Arnold, A.; Benoit, P.; Pickhall, R.; Polis, W.; Clegg, A.; Lechtman, M.: Barley, K.: Ruizzo, R.

Polygon, the governing body of fraternities, founded in 1911, formulated a new type of government on campus as for the first time the body elected its own officers. With this type of democracy more free thought was expressed by its members. The addition of Polygon members and unity to the body.

to

the

judiciary board

With the successful conclusion of the fraternity of a Polygon Formal, the Interfraternity Council ful and happy school year.

has added greater

strength

sing, rushing once more

season and the addition closes its doors on a success

Page

78


} 1>

Rou' I: Mazer. P.; Sands, G.; Greer, J. Treas.; Lechtman. M. Sec; Goldman, H. Member-atlarge; Strauss. A. Vice Pres.; Mazer, M. Pres.; Secular, L. Pledgemaster; Goldman, F House

Manager; Kamoroff, F.; Yarlas. D.;

R.; Cohen, S.; Carner, B.; Goldstein, H.; Saxe,

L.; Fermbach, L.; Greenstien, R.; Gordon, H.; Landesberg, M.; Yosinoff, R.; Altman, D.; Ziegler, M.; Bekelman, A.; Buglio. B.; Kor-

L.; Schreter, L.; Gilbert, A. Row 4: Karp, E.; Hyman, S.; Wellens, R.; Brown, L.; Morganstein, S.; Oster. R.; Brown, E,; Rosen, B.; Finklestein, C; Vilardofsky, A.; Markoff, E.; Sheffler, R.

rick, M. Row 3: Solomon, M.; Woolf, W.; Katzenslein, p.; Bloom, R.; Dubinsky, C; Wolfe. M.; Segal,

Perelman.

Row 2: Wexler, S.; Gluckman, L.; Wasserman.

ALPHA EPSILON PI Our 28th year RHO

...

25

Homecoming Progress Cup for his 21st

on

campus

.

.

pledges join

the

float takes

second

on

a

the mantel

season

.

.

.

rar

again

Homeco

nother ,

.

.

.

.

year for

big

after

I A C

good

try,

trophy and cooking

The Bose

Weekend

a

great

added

to

all sport

jackets

Poker gone, bui

lew

talion ruled

sn

for Fort Dix the Cabarets

and U.R.I.

by

i

net

.

.

for the

year

Ivy League

game is solitaire

from House .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

reunion

Ball

Second Bat-

plans

Rock 'n' Roll sweeps

made

through

Good Luck, Seniors, remember RHO


i

^

t-M Angell, T.; Ranone, M.; VanBaalen, J.; Deriso, F.; Vaccaro, F.; Mainelli, L.; DiMaio, A.; Mellone, J.; Seropian, A.; Mazza, J.; .Morelli. A.; Gentile, R. Row 2:

Row 1: Boragine. L.: Rufo, A.; Teutonico. L.

Kennedy. U.; Giornelli, R.; Meschino, L., Sec Russo, M., Pres.; Guida, O., Treas.; Cappalli, A, Soc. Chairman; Benben, E.; Quetta, S.; Di

Napoli,

Row 3: Krol, F.; Lombardi, E.; Santona: A.; DeChristofaro, J.; Novelli, R.; DeCens< Sammartino, R.; Holmes, A.; DelBonis

Carcieri, W.; DeSimone, E.; Calandra, E.

A.

BETA PSI ALPHA It has been another great year for Beta Psi. The intra is ours once again along with the

mural football

trophy bronco-busting trophy Open House Day. The House

football

team

was

well

in U.R.I,

awarded

by

the

Aggie

Club

on

Our Basin Street Bounce Some of

our

weekend

history.

on

the first undefeated

was

a

huge

success

have proven

to

as

usual.

be miniature

Basin Streets.

continually progressed since 1932, founding, and the future looks

The House has

represented

parties

year of

our

promising.

the


I

.1

,-*k

f -I'

t

il

"

Vi?C /"A

I: Geary, T.; Henningson, C; O'Brien, R.; TweedeU, W. Sec; Hayes, J. V. Pres.; Mrs. Jackson, House Mother; Edwards, G., Pres.; Bache, D. Treas.; LaChapelle, H.; Gavitt, A.; Palumbo, G.; Whiting, S.

Row

C; Gourley, R.; Stairs, R.; Sirr, C; Long, J.; Home, D.; Connor, E. Row 4: Salisbury, C; Montanaro, W.; Doeges, C; Emin, J.; Barden, J.; Ferri, J.; Bennett, W.; Sullivan, K.; Chambers, R.

J.; Lyons, J.; Peltier, R, DiRaimo, J.; MacQuatlie, W, Germain, A.; McLaughlin, J

Row 2: Habershaw,

Beichert, B.; Racchio, A.;

Satchell, F. Row 3: Mandarelli, R-; Rumowicz, E.; Hum

LAMBDA CHI Another successful year

echoing through

^'Hey house

at

the Pier has gone down the

Now and then that famous Cattle Call is heard

drain

Ma,

the house, "Ain't you got

There's

plaster

in my

soup"

duty!"^'Sandwiches, grinders, pie

no

"Aw c'mon and

suaverity" "Do your

and milk"

suave

Harry, anything but string beans" Chi contingent

AH this combined with Eta

fine crop of to

Sack

rats

ones; the Lambda

new

chapters' new look and a loyal Lambda Chi's

farmers has led all

believe that life

at

U.R.I, is

not

bad

at

all.

^^.

^m

#


Row 1: Alcorn, H.; Delorme, R.; Cosmo, G.;

Gustafson, R.; Rec. Sec; Norberg, R., Treas.; Mrs. Donle, House Mother; Hattub, M., Pres.; Giusti, L, Corr. Sec; Walde, L.; Boiani. P.; Couture, P.; Craddock, N.

Row 2:

Caniglia, H.; Turilli, E.; Swarm, H.; Morrow, G.; Hatch, J.; Davis, L.; Tremble, W.; Cahiil, J.; Davis, E.; Beck, A.; Hammarlund, R.; McCusker, J.; Cavaliere, J.; O'Brien, E.

RoH'5.Davey, J.; Diller, J.; Voorhees, H,; Pickthall, R.; Mairs, R.; Migneauk, J.; Lingaitis, F.; Regan, J.; Pearson, A.; Butler, P.; Mathews, J.; Flanagan, D.

PHI GAMMA DELTA med in for the

studying.

more

serious business of

All in all it's been

that will be remembered the years

to come.

by

a

worrying

and

great year all around,

every

Fiji and friend

in

;


Row 1: Todd, D.; Allen, R.; Hyde, G.; Helsens, G.; Buser, R., Rec. Sec; Higgins, R., V. Pres.; Turgeon, L., Pres.; Munk, W., Treas.; Fowler, R., Corr. Sec.; Racca, W.; Duquette, D.; Mar-

Row 2: Soderberg, N.; Stabile, E.; Savastano, O.; Norman, J.; Martins, A.; Varieur, F.;

Hahn, R.; Gabrey, J.; Duffy, J.; Gagielo, E.; Hull, R.; Ruizzo, R.

3: Rant, T.; Mulcahey, F.; Berryman, R.; Myers, C; Tuxbury, V.; Bernat, J.; Mitchell I.; Ramsden, E.; Urbanik, J.; Renkin, H.; Har rison, W.; McLaughlin, G. Row

PHI KAPPA THETA A memory for 1956

Good luck, Seniors! Welcome,

a long Pledges! A huge display Pledge Hori2ontal "H" ruling Frenchman

that

never

wore

off

pocket for ball games The gung-ho-indian

Page

83

The A

two

pinning

Du-du

Walk

our

The

The stomach

front teeth in

a

coat

here and there Scottish lassie


y^

v^^, Row 1: Smith, G.; Smith, A.; Fuller, R.; Woj cik, J., Steward; Downs, R., House Manager; Torkomian, N., Vice Pres.; Owen, J., Advisor; Saunders, A., Pres.; Wheeler, K., Treas.; Silva, R., See.; Sandy (mascot); Helraus, A., Soc. Ch.; O'Donnell, J. Row 2: Campbell, W.;

Buba, R.; James, O.; Warren, J.; Sangsier, E.; McDermott, R.; Abizaid, J.; Barry, B.; Shea, R.; Krause, K. Row 3: Anderson, R.; Fiddes, B.; Clegg, A.; Crankshaw, J.; North, J.; Seegar, C; Southworth, B.; Fall, W.; Lee, F.; Gould, W.; Johnson, C.

Tedesco, T.; Sangster, R.; Mosher, R.; Saisselin, P.; Homan, C; Aznavourian, G.; Bruno, J.; Barney, N.; Riley, D.; Nordberg, R.; Daubney, D.; Nacu, T.; Kent, G.; CunningRow 4:

PHI MU DELTA Fiesta, and dinner dances. Dab lightly with beach days,

time, and the Pledge dance. Now chill slightly those strife ridden decks. Throw in ies of down the line and .

by

.

any Phi Mu.

even

a

a

few musty

pinning

or

the greatest memory brew

two.

ever

in

memor

Then

savored


1

1 'IftM

flil'^ 'l-^lft^MM| \!^

I

i\

V V "^^ -r*fn*'y^M

Row 1: Sullivan,

C; Grejdus, J.; Hutnak, A.; Bell, R., Advisor; Schriver, C, Sec.; Beaudoin, R., V. Pres.; Rochefort, R., Pres.; Matheson, T., Treas.; Cloutier, G., Sentinel; Follelt, D.; Dearmao, A.; Muller, H.

To the

departing

bumper

and vice

brothers: You w^ill remember

crop of

pledges

The

who

kept

you

walking

Pledge Formal,

The

leaky

And, of

Moonlight

Dinner

<

-^

lin you will

see

The

i

Girl.

Dance, and the Hobo Hop.

The vie dances and the beach party.

roof and the

course, the line.

When you

versa.

The coffee hours and the

Hrisanthopoulos, A.; Russo, J.; Siciliano, V.; Seagrave, R. Row 4: Smith, R.; Ducharme, J.; Lovegreen, J.; Stephenson, W.; Zompa, J.; Robinson, D.; Snow, B.; Eollett, R.; Partyka, J.; Boris, A.; Kinecom, P.

SIGMA KAPPA

PHI The

Row 2: Dyer, C; Blackwell, R.; DeSimone, R.; Hoffman, W.; Clark, R.; Savarese, F.; Barnes, J.; Records, D.; Mcintosh, D.; Fusaro, A. Row 3: Hutchins, R.; Strawderman, W.; Croasdale, W.; Cornell, D.; Johnson, R.; Short, J.;

Some old faces and many

new ones.

And, though the house may look different, the

spirit

of brotherhood inside.

;


W n

jK^^^PlL \1 if flEs Row 1: Kolaczkowski, R.; McGair, G.; Enos, J.; Schuit, K.; Caleshu, P., Sec; Sarkisian, L., V. Pres.; Norton, D., Pres.; Sefton, N., H. Man ager; Cotnoir, E., Treas.; Martel, S.; Boyle, C; Schmidt, R.

Row 2: Proui,

'

n

E.; Murray, J.; Sahagian, G.;

Prescott, D.; Madreperla, S.; Hopper, D.; Pal

agi, D.; Fayerweather, H.; Magliocco, J.; Yessian, R.; Errico, R.

Row 3; Marozzi, R.; Lindquist, E.; McDaniel, E.; VonWeyrhe, R.; Suokas, R.; Dougan, D.; Chelak, G.

RHO IOTA KAPPA Rhode Island's first fraternity, Rho Iota Kappa, will, year, celebrate- its 50th anniversary. Plans are al ready under way for a Founder's Banquet at which the sur viving members of the thirteen original founders will be next

introduced

to

chapter

both the active and alumni members of the

fraternity. The growth

growth

to the occupancy of the present house in 1926, P.I.K. has shown the individual ism of spirit and nonconformity of action that typifies our New England background.

the old Wells house,

of the

fraternity can be likened to the University. From humble beginnings in

of this

When finally we, as seniors, leave this institution, the traditions fostered by our association with P.I.K. will travel with us throughout all our endeavors.


ftlif1

fii

T

itm^^w

^^m

1

JAy lyP^.^iflji

*r

Row 1 1 Ciccone, T.; DeBlasi, A.; Cameron, H.

Wheelock, H., Soc. Chair.; Serra, J., Rec. Sec. Stenhouse, D., Vice Pres.; Sullivan, P., Pres. Kehew, R., Treas.; Walsh, D., House Man, Earle, H., Corr. Sec; Tyrell, J.; Minisce, L.

Row 2: Pisaturo, R.; Swindells, N.; Christ, K.; Leach, J.; KillheHer, P.; Arnold, J.; Fitzgerald, P.; Dalpe, P.; Barnes, G.; Tierney, J.; Parker,

Roiv 3: Haworth, D.; Gauntlett, W.; Fracassa, L.; Roberti, C; O'Neill, W.; Bradley, W.; Thorton, W.; Ray, C; Giordano, P.

SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON No

longer

much

to

UConn

part saying, "See you in the fall!" undergraduates are over, but we have us. Homecomings both here and at

can we

Our fall reunions

as

take with

the Metacomet

enumerable

good

the "Shuffle"

times which have

no

and those

formal titles, but

would in themselves fill this

We never,

must no

journey

now

matter

leave

a

where

year-book.

part of our

outside the bonds of

il

our

lives behlndj but

fortunes take us,

can

Sigma Alpha Epsilon,

we


-f *f

%

^

.^i

^ r^

Stephenson, E.; Tremblay, R.; Gardella, S.; Sellen, A.; Peterson, E.; Roberge, R.; McConnell, T.; Duchesneau, R.; Gagnon, D.; Lakey, D.; Harrington, D.; Carvalho, R.; Corey, R-

Row 1: Dinger, D.; Hennigan, E.; Unsworth, R.; Messere, E.; Briden, R., Treas.; Brassil, V. Pres.; Mrs. A. Little, House Modier; Lombardi, R.. V. Pres.; Reinhardt, F., Sec; White, R.; Corey, P.; Capaldi, V. Roil- 2: LaSalle. R.; Winkler, B.; Wiliiston, K.;

Row 3: Armstrong, E.; Houanesian, V.; Smith, R.; Alvarez, A.; Bogaert, E,; Thompson, L.; Cardoza, J.; Bateman, A.; Dubois, R.; Wilson,

,; Carroll, R.; Beauchamp, B.; Chaplin, D.; Cook, S.; Gagnon, R. Row 4: Hynek, S.; Avila, R.; St. George, P.; Wright, H.; Randall, H.; Schafer, R.; Wilson, B.: Eitzegerald, P.; Lambert, M.; Vatcher, E.; Mathewson, G.; Hamblin, R.; ""

'

SIGMA CHI The year is over almost before it has started. For some, it's the last before the letter which starts, "Greetings". For

a glorious beginning. Ah, what largest and best pledge class ever

others, it's been only the

memories what new

place

pressions go and the new ones become shopworn the nightly windy dissertations in the kitchen sions of the AA members

suffering

artists

the cries of revolt from the

the snowy Centennial, the BIG Sweet and through it all, the

are

heart

Weekend, the B C Ball

pride of finally capturing a first the trite ex cheering section

spirit

of

was once a

failure becomes

fiascoes

the

the basketball

a

success,

but there

friendship

statement to

the excur

and brotherhood. It would be under

say it's been

quite

a

year.


^ Row 1: Friedemann R.; Dambruch, E.;

,-ajifeii

Zagar-

Row 2i McKechnie, I.; Mann, D.; Conti, G.;

Brown, L., Treas.; Spain, H., V. Pres.; Kane, R., Pres.; Herdecker,

Liusey, R.; Kenyon, G.; Walsh, R.; Coleman, J.; Martin, D.; Matteson, A.; Caruolo, R.

ella,

E.;

McCarthy,' G.;

Row 3: Wiesner, C; Joyal, A.; McDonnell, F.; Richardson, D.; McShera, J.; Kahler, A.; Palmet, F.; Connerton, J.; Kohnle, A.; Simpson, E.

W., Sec.; Newlander, R., H. Manager; Crepeau, P.; Marrah, E.; Chace, C.

SIGMA NU dances, Christmas party, and e

"White Rose" formal.

(Not

feature mention

our

to

at-trac-

pledge

walks, paddle sessions, second degree and We also had plenty of laughs on the athletic well as many sighs. As Coach Palmer says "Wait

cursions. )

field 'til

as

next

year."

As we reminisce house ;

we

m\

remember the life which made

ml

?N.^

Page

89


Row

ll

Schaeffer,

Schmitt, B.; Gledhill. S.; Pitas, T.; H.; Paul, W.; DeCosta. A., Sec; V. Pres.; Ja-

Hughes, C, Pres.; Edberg, R.,

worski. P., Treas.; McDowell, D.; Stewart, W.; Boorujy, P. Row 2: Hanna, P.; Richardson, D.; Treanor, J.; Butzigger, R.; Wrigley, R.; Cybulski, J.;

Riley, W.; Sozanski, E.; Polis, W.; Lennon, P.; Peckham, C; Clark, H.; Harley, K.; Langvedoc, R.; Colacone, A.; Traficante, D.

SIGMA PI It is only fitting that Sigma Pi Fraternity, founded as on the rights and personal integrity of each of her individual members, be they brother or pledge, had its beginning in an independent gathering of men, called the Tau Sigma Association. The Association came into existence in lune of 1944, in what could be termed a "filler" capacity, to replace other fraternities disbanded because of the War. This Association continued as such until December of 1947, when it was recognized as a it is

local fraternity on campus. Recognizing the advantages of affiliating with a national organization, Tau Sigma Fraternity applied for, and received, its charter as Alpha September Upsilon Chapter of Sigma Pi Fraternity, te a bit of of. 1948. A glance at the records indicates living and progress for our fraternity. Our the dorms evolved from the old "tin huts", through and finally to "Doc Pease's house", affectionately ki as the "Little Rest Chicken Farm."


Row 1: Mack, S.;

Manekofsky, M.; Lendrum,

Row

R.; Lang, B.; Andriesse, P., Soc. Ch.; Heinstein, H., Treas.; Germani, E., Pres.; Hodosh, M., V. Pres.; Gleckman, T., Sec; Schneider, A., Steward; Perry, A.; Warshaw, J.

2:

Row 3: Goodman, R.; Karp, H.; Karp, D.; Chason, H.; Beet, B.; Blitzer, A.; Mann, J.; Bilgor, B.; Brookner, S.; Sherman, K.

Winkleman, M.; Hirsch, C; Tobey,

R.; Aiken, A.; Gibbons, C; Rebe, S.; Beretta, R.; Weil, W.; Galinger, J.; Fine, H.

TAU EPSILON PHI Practically everyone returned to Smiley's house smiles

did

school

Half of Wink

Brown game, Gib Homecoming on the 8 ball great, we're amazing Hank opens season strong, Dino is happy, so is Maaaack, Dick has OUR sw^eetheart, Duke pinned Helen, food Mambo pledged A D Pi great! Rebe's sleeping club the good in intramurals good in scholastics is! UConn blasters! Moody king Happy.' .

.

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.

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.

Page 91

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.

.

.

.

.

.

Jamestown

.

.

brothers! Charlie Little Christmas party New Year's Eve

congratulations,

.

AU-American

.

.

.

.

.

.

Return of Hymie recuperation study social equality "Gimmeabreak" Rhody Review new pledges ahh, the SUN Teepee Trot and the year is over farewell to Mambo, stujy Husky, Bruno, Marv, Carl, Salty, Deek, and George. It ; but remember.' quick .

.

.

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.


fit f! 1: Mahoney, D.; Vigliotti, E.; Peckham, K.; Yeaw, R.; Travers, J., Sec; Gushing, W., Pres.; Mrs. Stockbridge, H. Mothet; Magoo, mascot; Conde, R., Pres.; Cruff, R., Treas.; Corbett, R., Marshal; Beirne, L.; Byrnes, E. Row 2: Seal, K.; Cunningham, J.; Burns, W.:

Row

Chatowsky, A.; Lanois, G.; Kennedy, A.; Dumais,W.; Potter,R.W.; Arnold,A.; Mansfield, G. Row 4: Davison, E.; Gulvin, D.; Kohlsatt, P.; Arnold, W.; Gifford, R.; Lamb, G.; MacDuff, G.; Dixon, R.; Adamo, J.; Mason, J.; Chrostek. A.; Griffin, J.

Hofford, H.; Mormando, P.; Rowan, R.; Gammell, R.; Trumbull, J.; Smith, K.; Hammond, H.; Bibbo, J.; Gustafson, R.; Leuba, R.; Reed, A.; Piacitelli, J.; Dexter, S. Row 3: Horton, K.; Gates, B.; Foltz, C; Trainor, W.; Morris, R. S.; Wells, J.; Leyden, J.;

THETA CHI So many it is hard

things

to

be remembered Mom's

go into

making

recollect them all. most

reprimands,

a

school year that which will

watching Magoo grow up. cold nights on deck, "scholar

are:

the

ships," pledge training,

continual

least many hours

the books.

not

up

Among those

on

hazing,

and last but

Page 92


Ill J ^-

^

Sr^

^

K,5--~*( ^g^lPmi^q^ Row 1: McCool, T.; DeRita, G., Treas.; Cam-

bio, F.; Theroux, K.; Becker, R.; Brown, R., Pres.; Mrs. Lydia Ellis, House Mother; Bolger, P., V. Pres.; Kerins, E.; Finlay, W., Sec; Ben oit, P.; Capaldi, G. Row 2: Isherwood, K.; DuPuis, E.; Pacheco,

^-1

t;

_

B Gauch, G.; Olson, B.; Gallucci, J. CorisC; Wright, T.; Kirby, R.; Ryding, W. R.; Bolger, J.; Rawlings, J.; Saglio, R.; Casey, R.; Madden, P.; Norton, G. DiPrete, H.; Otis, S.; Morey, H.; Turner, N. Kiernan, J. H.

E.; Gauthier, M.; Brown, H.; Gammage, R.; Sundberg, G.; Fracassa, H.; Gerlach, J.; Jerue, J.; Smith, E.; Musler, M. Row 3: Kindlund, K.; Turano, G.; O'Leary, J.; Keefe, H.; Rainone, R.; Kerr, D.; Clemson,

tin e,

Ro w 4: L'Heureux,

TAU KAPPA EPSILON was once a fraternity composed of five has evolved into a national organization comprising than 119 chapters and over 55,000 tekes".

"From w^hat men

more

1955-56 will leave many memories for

us at T.K.E. Blood Drives U.Conn. mere Beach Parties Game Lively Pledge Class incidents in three years crowded with wonderful adven tures and experiences.

Donnely's

Then,

Police Stations

too, the

bigger things

.

.

.

Harvest Dance,

Pledge

Formal, Roman Holiday, French Underground holds

a

.

.

.

each

cherished memory for every senior.

Ed's missing tooth paste, Capoldi's last stand, Soundbarrier Saglio, Aunt Lydi's coffee hours, and the return of the Greek Dynasty were added to Teke history.

Yes, these years w^on't be forgotten, the big white house with the green shutters holds many fond memories we'll miss it so .

.

.

.

.

.

4


Heald,

3i Murphy, J.; Lord, R.; Marrah, T.; Binns, G.; Gallagher, J.; MaGuire, J.; Loudenslager. M.; Redinger, J.; Mangili, A.; Casey, K.; York, R.; Cook, T.; Dmytryshyn, M. Row

Budnick, A.; Mattlin, L.; Saxon, G.; Unley, H.; Cornell, L.; Blake, D.; Turner, N.; Supski, C; Oliver, R.; DePalo, M.; Erickson, P.; Scungio, L.; Pinheird, C. Row 2:

Row I.- Cahalan, L; Martens, D.; Duffek, J.; Treas.; Frucht, M., V. Pres.; Mrs. Lincoln, H. Mother; Brownell, C, Pres.; Izzo, A., Sec; E.

BRESSLER HALL The purpose of the Bressler Hall tion is

to

promote

a

fraternal

Dormitory Associa

atmosphere

Dormitory. During

the year,

within

ing

athletic

teams

and social

events.

the It is

hoped

that this Association will be able

petuate itself for the benefit of the students we

have been very

;

the

following

years.

to

per

through


ow 1: Munroe, B.; Holt, R., V. Pres. Maneofsky, M.; Burns, R., Pres.; Mrs. Ni en, H. lother; Foley, J.; Keenan, W., Treas. Furey, .,

5; Vermette, R.; Saltamai Perry, E.; Tacelli, D.; Ellic Mcintosh, J.; Barrett, J.

Row 2: Petrin, C; Amick, D. Irving, H. Col 1). lins, C; Markey, R.; Schartn r, D.; Scot DeFreitas, T. ,

Sec.

BUTTERFIELD HALL The

Butterfield Dormitory Association, keeping its objectives in view, has not only been able to gain position in the social activities on campus but is recognized as a vigorous contender in intramural sports. Having realized its social and athletic objectives, the association is now in the process of forming a self governing body for the dormitory. main

a

warranted

Among our successful activities of the past year were the Christmas party, the Rhody Review and the Mayor with mops, drum beating, and torch ality Campaign carrying, the "Double Cross Party" succeeded in having their candidate elected as Mayor of Kingston. .

And

now

memories

.

for the future

sessions, bombs, as

.

.

.

with beach parties, bull fights, and salt in the sugar shaker look forward to new^ goals.

water .

we

.

.

.


ACTIVITIES

Page 97


Agricultural..

,

W ^

^*^^^^^, Hull Secietai

3S>Ba

; ^^oung ,

A.

.

Munk,

F

R. Hah-

Helgetson,

E td

Kat.enste.t.

R

H^

^^,^, c. Chapman,

^^^^^^^

1. M

r. Ruzo,

''".'rHu"c*-'3^''"''"tnond, R-

""""

AGGIE CLUB Aggie Club is comprised of agricultural biggest annual dance held on campus, the Ag gie Bawl, is sponsored by the Club. Each year the Aggie Club awards keys to outstanding Senior agricultural students and a plaque to the outstanding Junior Aggie. Once during the year, the Club publishes the Gleaner. An annual picnic and a field day round out each year's Started jears ago, the

students.

activities.

Page 98

Possibly

the

.

y.

Vice A Gavitt,

"

^^^^^ei. Social

^^

^a,


Showmanship Club

^^^^^^^^^\,;ce Roberts, The Showmanship Club is one of the more re cently organized clubs on campus. Within a period of three years its popularity has been rapidly in creasing. This organization is made up of students who are interested in preparing, showing, and judging plants and animals. The club sponsors a dairy judging team and a poultry judging team. It is noteworthy to mention that both teams have done exceptionally well in New England compe

tition.

Aggie Judging Team Row 1: L. Mitchell, G.

Row 2:

J. Barnes,

V.

Wildes, Coach.

Tuxbury,

E. Fein-

President:

H-

P;;^^^,.C. Chap.uan,Se.-

^^"^tMitcheU. retary; L-

'*"'


\ou"S

,

,.

t.

Sa^^'^t^ Pt.si<i-''bWas, ^^,.

X^-?'^aoCb--^^'=" Da>i^', foao, )

Hag"''

'

CbauS-

places the foreign University of Rhode Is

From far distant

students

at

land

practicing

are

the

the methods of demo

cratic government in their club. The members of the club hear dis cussions and talks and

see

strange

as

to

unfamiliar

interesting

to

Americans

A

more

misunderstanding club is the North

handshake.

Page 100

picnic

NATIONS

culminates each

activities.

The result is

and

hear of

and listen

customs

Foreigners.

year's

various countries

pictures of them; they

music. It is as to

on

ALL

place

in

friendship the

where East

meets

South

and less

world.

in

meets a

This West

friendly

CLUB


The Chess Club year,

was

organized

of the youngest clubs

one

campus. Its activities include

CHESS

ment

for the campus

intercollegiate the main

CLUB

event

Every

join

fered each

1

A.^;^^*^W-

eon,P^^"":"'i'>"-''-

last the

tourna

championship

and

games which will be

in the future.

U. R. I. student interested in

chess may

members

team

a

on

to

the

semester

club;

by

lessons

are

of

the Chess Club

all those interested.


Row J: A.

Thompson,

Secretary; M.

Goashgarian,

President; S.

Kojabashian,

Vice President Row 2:

H. S.

Shoushanian,

Alhosaini,

R. Yessian,

J.

Oer

L.

Sarkisian,

Sahagian,

Historian

ARMENIAN

The Armenian Club of the one

of many Armenian Clubs

Armenian Clubs exist, for L. A., and

a

on

University of Rhode Island, known

a

instance,

at

Harvard, B. U.,

"ACURI", is

colleges. T., Wayne, Clark, U. C. was the first, probably, to

M. I.

number of other schools. The U. R. I. group at a state land-grant college. Its example is

club has been

as

the campuses of American universities and

be established where

CLUB

being

followed

at

U-Mass

organized.

The Armenian Club is open

to all students, staff members, and faculty members, understanding of Armenian culture. Its object is to acquaint its members and the campus community with Armenia's contribution to world history, culture, art, linguistics, etc. That this is a worthwhile purpose is demonstrated by the movement to establish a Chair of Armenian Studies and Re

and Alumni interested in the

search

Page

102

at

Harvard.


The Socius Club is ested in

Sociology

aspects of this and

places

an

organization

and the

professional

subject. Study trips

of interest and its

aird fourth

Tuesday

selected group of

of each

are

and

made

meetings, month,

of students inter

held

are

occupational

to

institutions

on

the second

addressed

by

a

speakers.

SOCIUS

Row 1: L. S.

Haut,

Flichtenfeld,

V. Tootell, R. Ca B. Broomfield,

President;

J. Averbach,

Heller,

M.

S.

Goashgarian,

L. Golden.

Ro R.

L.

I

2:

Barish, Publicity;

Sarkisian, Treasurer;

A. Gavitt, Social

M. Satnick, H.

Chairman;

Wysell,

Secretary; J. Loxsom, A. Gursky, Vice President. Page 103


Q ^ ^J^3 1 A J\ J^ ^ '^ iilAiiiftili ^^^m^^d^^^ |^f~f'"'"i:"'^'^' 1

(B^^-' 9^^9

^^mp

^^W'

^^^ff

Row 1: R. Lally, M. De Palo, R. York, E. J. Foley, W. McDermott, R. Rudy, Ca/)/. /h/. Advisor; F. Varieur, B. Schmitt, G. Latour, D. Schartner. Row 2: G. McCloud, L. Silvia, T. Cook, T. Mancini, C. Col lins, D. Collum, R. IVIosher, R. Provoyeur, J. Barrett, M. Coken, C. Pinheiro, B. Burns, Row 3: A. Burlingame, G. Triplett, R. Sousa, W. Noble, R. W. Northup, R. Hemond, J. Redinger, E. Perry, A. Coates, R. iVIuIcahey.

PERSHING

Pershing Rifles is the drill team of the R. O. They practice outside of regular drill hours to gain proficiency in drill. They represent the University in intercollegiate competition as well as The

T. C. cadets.

in Parades in Rhode Island communities

RIFLES

and local

on

national

holidays.

performances campus, when Pershing Rifles perform publicly, are in honor of the girl selected as honorary Colonel at the Military Ball and the girl selected Miss University of Rhode Island at Open House in the spring. The

most

noted

on

the

,

1

l^*Enr ^

^M

^-J

.

-

-

-,

-'jJH

Ig^gll^^^i^^^ i^^B

*

'i^^l


RADIO The

primary

University

purpose of the Radio Club

of Rhode Island campus is

and disseminate information relative radio. In

1948, equipment

KIKMV,

was

contact

other

to

a

400

amateurs

throughout

Membership

anyone interested in

the

to

promote

to

amateur

watt

station,

constructed, making it possible

States and Canada. is open

for

on

the

CLUB

to

United

in the Radio Club

amateur

radio

com

munication..

Row 1: A.

Sellen, Jr.

Secretary-Treasurer; B.

Winkler, President;

D.

McDowell,

Vice President. Row 2: R.

Avila,

J. Maguire,

R.

D.

Dubios,

Dinger.

Page

105


SCROLL

The Scroll is the campus mote

interest in all types of

literary compositions. ings, faculty noted

guest

speakers

The

society

literary Society. Literature, and

Its informal

speakers,

Its purpose is

to

meetings

encourage

include

to

pro

original

play

read

book reviews, movies, and other

in the field of literature. was

Potter is the present

founded in the

faculty

Spring

of 1938. Miss

Nancy

advisor.

Row 1: S. Flichtenfeld, M. Satnick, L. Haut, H. VnsiM

s

Heller, R

Barish, J.

Averbach, L. Golden. Row 2: E. Janes, M. Leino, J. Jorgensen, President; J. Saklad, Secretary; R. Silver,

Page 106

D. S.

Spaziano, Treasurer; E. Armstrong, Biderman, R. Hausler, J. Peckham.


PURITAN

opinion and literary membership is open contributions of sufficiently

THE PURITAN is the annual organ of campus effort, both humorous and serious. Staff

and artistic to

anyone interested and

willing

to

work, and

are accepted from both on-campus and extension students. Last year for the first time, THE PURITAN gave up its intimate pocketsize format in favor of the larger 9" x 12" size preferred by "big-college"

high caliber

magazines, and

also offered

story submitted

to

Row 1: M. Art Editor.

a

twenty-five

dollar

prize for

the best short

them.

Goashgar

,

Co-Editor: L. Sarkisian, Advisory Editor; J. Peckham

Row 2: R. Avila, Business Manager; M. Le Missing: E. L. D'Andrea, Co-Editor.

Caleshu, Circulation Editor

Page

107


^^KPS^M^?

WSKk

%

1

Sr^'l

I'm

i,

^m

KhlkM

m i

^

mi

k

Ik

f'S'

VRow 1;

J. Silva,

P.

Mitson, Secretary; P. Barnes,

Vice

President; D. Huntington, President. Row 2: D. Martin, J. O'Shett, L. Walde.

WRANGLERS

J. McCusker, J. Janas, J. Whiting,

PORTIA

"Remember the issues" is baters will

bags

to

go

long

a

phrase

remember after

to tournaments.

they stop packing their

Spending long

brary, analyzing evidence, learning these

^^W

Page

108

are

things

the Rhode Island de

the debaters will

to

never

hours in the li

think

forget.

logically


Tau

outstanding at

the

scroll

in

to

recognition

speaking

competition

national

honorary society

those who have been

activities for

at

least

of Rhode Island. The

and wreath

poraneous

a

membership

speech

University

achieved

is

Kappa Alpha

which invites

with

is

worn

in

debate, discussion,

not

only

by

those

on our

two

key

years

with the

who

have

or extem

campus, but in

college students from

all

over

the

East Coast.

l^jlgSSS

TAU

KAPPA

^^^9

fi

ALPHA


Veteran's

Row!

W

K(,un

[

S

Turgeon,

Johnson,

Kerr^n/

R. Hahn, Piesident, R. Deverc.uix, Treasurer; L. P. Morin, Corresponding Secretary; R. N. Hamilton, H. J. LaChapelle.

ing Sccictuiy,

Ro

Organization

I

2

R Cruff, B Roslii k Millnin, L Beirne, L. A. Helgerson, J. Harrison, |. McDonough, J. Cunningham, R. Corbett.

Philhps,

R. Yeaw,

Men's Commuter Row 1: C. Dyer, berry, Treasurer;

mentozzi, Dansereau,

N. New F.

Tre-

President;

J.

Secretary;

G.

Riani. Row 2: F. Dowiot,

J.

Con-

nell, L. Phillips, J. Lindsay, D. Cota, C.

Terry.

Organization


International Relations Club

k"

I

K

Ll 11^^ M.

L.

The International Relations Club holds in formal discussion

meetings throughout

Also, about

every month

once

addresses the Club

on

some

a

the year.

guest

i

President;

Goashgarian,

Sarkisian, Vice President Row 2: W. Trainor,

W. Dumais,

J. Maguire, W.

Rogers

speaker

aspect of world

affairs. The IRC makes available several maga zines

at

It sends on

the Student Union

delegates

global problems.

importance the

to

interested students.

intercollegiate

to

Its chief aim is

of world

events

to

conferences to

bring

the

the attention of

University community.

w Page

111


^

Walker, D. Dinger, Vice President; B. Friedrichs, Secretary; B. Arnold, President; E. Miner, N. Turner, Row 1: A. McKenzie, D.

J. Conley. Row 2: M. Cohen, C. Glynn, M. McFadden, S. Harrington, P. Hoyle, S. Chisholm, B. Loxley, J. Turner, A. Wenderoth, M. Casey, D. Tennis, C. Sherman, H. Brownridge, R. Earle. Row 3: D. Scott, R. Dubois, J. Karol, R. Yeaw, G. Lamb, R. Walls, R. Dixon, T. Chrostek, R. Lord, A. Alvarez, R. Unsworth.

YACHT CLUB

The

University of

Rhode Island Yacht Club

was

estab

lished in 19.^5 for the purpose of gathering together all stu dents interested in sailing, to improve their skill by instruc

experience, and to encourage and promote good sportsmanship in racing competition. The club maintains a tion and

club house and boats

on

Salt Pond in Wakefield for the

use

of its members. The club is

an

active member of the New

collegiate Sailing Association collegiate Dinghy Team.

Page II2'

and is

England responsible for the

Inter

Inter


MEN'S GLEE CLUB

The

newest musical organization on the campus is the Univer sity Men's Glee Club. This group of fellows meet Tuesday eve nings at 10:00 p.m. in the Choral Room for an hour or two of relaxation through singing. The reason for the late rehearsal hour is that it is expected and desired that the fellows will study for the greater part of the evening and then come together for

song session. Their first guest appearance was for the Christ Convocation when they sang on the program featuring the University Band. It is the wish of the conductor, Mr. Ward

a

mas

Abusamra,

that the

in this worth-while the

men

will avail themselves

activity.

A

spring

to

program

participate

was

also in

offering.

Row 1: L. Brown, R. Delurme, B. Sweet, Ward Abusamra, L. Mattlin, N. Danis, D. Gordon, I. McKechnie. Row 2:.G.

Martin, A. Burlingame, R. Duchesneau, R. Kehew, J. Bergeron, R. Arnold, J. Cavaliere, N. Swindells, H. Caniglia, S. Quetta.

Page

U3


Musical

.

.

.

BAND

This

year's University

year-long performance

Band gave

sincerety. Strengthened by

creasing by

Majors

majorettes,

white" assumed

in

activities.

campus

leadership the band

and

the march

ing "blue and role

fine

the ever-in

enrollment of Music

the addition of

a

of enthusiasm and

a

greater

Under

the

of Professor Frank Van Buren,

performed

at

all home football

games and added needed color

to

rallies. The annual Christmas and

Spring

concerts

cannot

be

member of the band of his

forgotten, can

be

our

and each

justly proud

organization. Page 114


The

University Orchestra,

up of students and

faculty

members and

members, has

a

was

few

standard

faculty

of about

Instrumentation

last year

improved

where

a

membership

thirty members.

made

augmented by

to

the

point litera

symphonic

is included in the orchestra's

ture

repertoire. once

The orchestra rehearses

each week and presents

program each

a

major

semester.

ORCHESTRA

The

University Chorus,

surprising number

with

a

of male voices,

Tuesday during

the

year. The Chorus is directed

by

practiced

each

Mr. Ward Abusamra and includes

in its

repertoire

the works of such

Bach,

as

composers

Beethoven,

Mozart, and Wagner, along with more

modern and contemporary The Christmas Con

composers. cert, in

music

conjunction

ly successful, and has

with the other

organizations,

seen

fit

Glee Club

as

to

was extreme

Mr. Abusamra

organize

well.

a

Male

CHORUS


In its first full year of operation it would appear that the union is on its way to fulfilling its purposes.

Undergraduates flock to the build ing at the conclusion of every class as well as during the evening. It has become the headquarters of a large segment of the commuting

MEMORIAL

UNION

students and appears to be the base of operations for those who remain on

campus

over

the week-ends.

The Games Committee has run individual tournaments in chess, pocket billiards and table tennis for men and women. The Music and Arts Committee has arranged the year's exhibits in the corridor display cases and a number of jam sessions. The record collection and the more than 300 art prints avail able for rent are also under its jurisdiction. The movie program in CinemaScope and special mat inees are planned by yet another committee and the dance committee has conducted a series of Candle light Cafe and other dances. An other committee has been respon sible for weekly coffee hours in the with programs ranging from recorded jazz to an interview with Robert Frost. Birthday and Christmas parties, bingos, commit tee luncheons and the annual Nite to Forget are the responsibility of

lounge

Program Committee. All these plus the many services, by already taken for granted, such as the food operation and meeting rooms, have been just a part of this year's well-rounded the

events,

UNION BOARD OF DIRECTORS Row

1:

Lang,

Marcia

now

program.

Page

116

Mrs.

Row 2: Ted Essex

Cook, Nancy Nordberg, Bruce Matteson, Phyllis DeBIasio

Tedesco,

Mr.

Berry, Jim North,

Pete


STUDENT SENATE

The Student Senate is the campus that is

body for every

one

student and

forty and

one

alternate

students. Its powers

of all student activities

by-laws,

only organization

truly representative of

not

regulations

are

elected

permit regulation

covered

of the

on

the student

by

the charter,

university.

Student

Body President Jack Tyrei-L


Row

1: N. Bowden, N. Norberg, Vice-President; P. Dwyer, President; J. Gencarelli, J. Capalbo. Row 2: H. Amoriggi, P. Jones, D. Walker, P. DeBIasio, M. Ryan, A. Wenderoth, P. Attwill, M. Underwood, J. Anderson, D. Huntington, M. Goashgarian, S. Bahn.

Women's

Student Government Association

Bach year the W. S. G. A. instills

a spirit of co friendship among the women stu dents here at the University. Being composed of several elected officers and highest women officers

operation

and

of the various G. A. has

organizations

contact

with

campus, the W. S.

on

nearly

every

organization.

Annually the W. S. G. A. has a Philanthropic Project which this year was a donation to the World University for the purpose of buying books. Merc week, a week in the spring when the women students take the

men

activity sponsored by time W. S. G. A. a

guest

serious

Page

118

out, has become

a

favorite

the W. S. G. A. For the first

sponsored

speaker whose topic courtship.

a

Social Hour with

of discussion concerned


Board

Judicial The

Judicial Board, with the President of acting as the presiding officer, is composed of the Dean of Women, six members elected by W. S. G. A., and six members ap pointed by W. S. G. C.

W. S. G. A.

This group of students, with the sincere guid and advice of Dean Morris, acts not as a

ance

jury,

as

might

council whose

be

suspected,

but

as

an

primary interest is that the women students adjust to college its necessary regulations.

of

advisory helping

life and

to

Row I: M. Cook, B. Barsamian, P. Dwyer, President; P. Cronin, Secretary; J. O'Brien. Row 2: J. O'Rourke, M. Satnick, N. Mansfield, L. Mosher,

S.

Thorp,

D.

Jensen.

Page

119


CUSS

Class of 1957

Left

to right: Kay Ward, Secretary; Judy Nowakowski, Vice President; Dick Walls, President; Priscilla Waterman, Social Chairman, Dave Anderson, Treasurer.


Class of 1958

Left to right: Peter Essex, Social Chairman; Barbara Barsamian, VicePresident; Paul Fitzgerald, President; Phyllis DeBIasio, Secretary; William Gould, Treasurer.

C.>l3,SS

Left to right: Charles Hirsch, Social Chairman; June Capalbo, Vice President; Paul Benoit, President; D'Ann Frechette, Secretary; Ralph Gifford, Treasurer,

or

l"5y


ra

"flBEACON

Duquette, Art Ed.; A. Gavitt, Ed.; J. Norman, Editor-in-Chief; Cruff, Managing Ed.; P. Benoit, News Ed.; R. Avila, Bus. Manager. Row 1: D.

The

college weekly

News

B.

CON, a

Row

2:

Glynn,

P.

Waterman, D. Walker, C.

Loxley, M. Ryan, Goashgarian, H. Brown-

N. Werner, B.

A. Bennett, M.

a

was

small

first

ten

month.

printed

page booklet

At

present,

which has grown Row 3: R. Oliv r, R.

Armstrong.

Corbett, J. Long, E.

operates in

lished each

paper, the BEA in 1908, and

a

printed

the

by leaps

professional

Wednesday,

with

to

sixteen page issue and over

122

bounds,

a

a

pub

twelve

circulation

2,400, including students, facul

ty, alumni and advertisers.

Page

BEACON,

and

manner,

of

was

once


m "The

Gang"

The election of officers and staff is

held in the mester

to

early part of

afford the

the benefits of

the second

se

incoming officers seniors'

graduating

ex

perience. BEACON is

The student

of

representative

efforts, publishing editorials, in

formation, articles, faculty notices and news

stories and ideas of student

or

col

lege problems.

Experience

in all fields of

news, sports and features,

any interested student as

well

as

at

opportunities

in

are

the

writing: open

university,

makeup w^ork

and in the commercial aspects of nalism such and

as

to

jour

advertising, circulation

photography.

"Jim and Paul"


Burt Rosen,

Editor-in-Chief Leo Sarkisian and Judy Averbach of the Art Staff

This

bring

year's

you

made full

lay-outs, Our

student we

a

use

and cover

we

of color

on

can

is

padded,

body.

will, In

a

reflection,

the Student we

year and for their

believe, of which

hope, be appreciated by

everything, then, we have done University's students, whom

to

congratulate

the various editors

efforts during the cooperation. Also, special recogniearnest

Marsha Satnick, Women's

Editor

we

Directory

represent. 1 would like

Photography

to

behalf of the

and their staffs for their

Bob Avila,

do its best

be

appropriate photography.

have included

best

to

proud of. We have potentialities, modern and neat

you

opinion. Also,

the student our

Grist staff has tried

yearbook

Editor

Advertising

Sports Editor


Row 1: P.

Kohlsaat,

Turgeon,

B. Rosen,

L.

J. Norman,

L.

Sarkisian, B. Avila.

J. Lyons, Row 2: D. P.

DeBIasio, B.

B.

Loxley,

Manganelli, Barsamian, N. Werner,

S. Averbach, M. Satnick,

J. Rubery,

P.

Hoyle,

D. Walker. Row 3:

J. Long,

P. Benoit, R. W.

Fowler,

Gould, K. Sullivan, R. Cruff.

tion should go

difficult

to

those editors who assumed the

responsibilities,

Photography, Features, est

thanks

to our

to

everyone

to

the

ever

such and

Business

who, in

as

some

others. And, hearti

Managers,

even some

more

Sports, Advertising, our

typists,

and

small way, contributed

completion of the 1956 Grist degree of success it may merit.

and toward what

oCtxr^A<JiX*i a^

John Lyons, Co-Business Manager

Sob Ma Sh^'"^ oara

GJilST

Copy

"^y'Af.'"yi.

Hil

oufie

R

'at-sa,miaj.

^I'AFf

'y.^, ^ncy ^"

7oafl U6, 'ery ieo f

Jim Norman, Managing Editor


The

University

Theatre has had

an

ex

tremely successful and active year. The season opened with G. B. Shaw's, "Devil's

Disciple."

From

there,

work

we set to

on

High School Workshop. The first semester ended with "All My Arthur Miller. This show de Sons," by the second annual

serves an

added comment,

by

as

many

the best show

as

it

was

ever

hailed

presented

the Rhode Island campus.

on

The Theatre lost Mr. Will

ning

at

the

begin

of the second semester, but he shall from sabatical leave in the fall. We

return

missed his wonderful guidance and friend ship, but we soon lost our regrets as we began working with our new director, Miss

Kidd, who did

"Bird In Hand,"

Along we

UNIVERSITY

THEATRE

Row 2: M. Cohen, R. Mills, M. Hall, P.

Page 126

Caswell, N.-

have also

cial year. So, all of us are

final show with us, Drinkwater.

increasing membership, experienced a firmer finan an

as we

end the 55-56 season,

anticipating

the fall when

again we will start learning lines, grind through rehersals, smell the grease paint, and finally, when no one thought we would ever make it, opening night once

a

Row 1: R. McDermott, E. Dupuis, R. York, E. Kidd, Tech. Director; K. Wheelock, Pres.; R. Will, Fac. Adv.; M. Lechtman, V.P.; C. Sirr, R. Downs.

with

our

by John

show!

Sowder, J. Parrot, D. Frechette, A. Savastano, S. Mc Carville, L. Farnum. Row 3: J. Siegal, E, Lisker, R. Pailes, C. Lingquist, E. Prout, W. Hoving, M." Underwood, D. Shores.


19 5 5

-

5 6

FLAYBILL 'The Devil's ,

Disciple'

George Bernard Shaw November 3, 4, 5, 1955 ,

.

"ALL MY SONS .

.

.

"

Arthur Miller

January 5, 6, 7, 1956

"BIRD IN HAND .

.

.

John Drinkwater

April 12, 13, 14, 1956 Page

127

"


WRIU

Row 1: P. Hanna, E. Armstrong, Rec. Sec; R. Labush, H. Clark, Prog. Man ager; J. Norman, Station Manager; D. Richardson, Tech. Manager; D. Mc Dowell, D. Duquette, Treas.; G. Martin, Chief Engr. Row 2: T. Angell, S. Payne, W. Harrison, M. Farrell, P. mann, P. Mitson, I. Cahalan, A. Mangili, A. Budnick.

Burgess,

Row 3: R. Unsworth, H. Renkin, R. Higgins, C. Emmerich, R. W. Podorzer, D. Coken, W. Hollingworth.

R. Heit

Northup,

Station

Manager Jim Norman

Page

128


The campus Radio which

was

Station, WRIU,

formed in 1939, adds

the

to

University community the service of radio broadcasting from a student's viewpoint. This organization, open to any interested

of the

regularly enrolled student University of Rhode Island, has

grown in size and

of the

largest

campus

popularity

student

125

numbering

into

active

pants. Music, news, sports, and programs

constitute

WRIU

WRIU has grown from

a

in the

special airtime.

small group

Intercollegiate

casting System and

are

on

partici

of radio enthusiasts, in South Hall, member

one

organizations

now

to a

Broad

housed in

the Rhode Island Memorial Union. Dur

ing

the past year, WRIU has been in

stalling new technical and programming equipment, and is now known as the "Voice of U. R. I."

L-r:

George Martin,

Charles Emmerich,

Jim Norman, Howie Clark, and

James

E. Norman.

Page

129


Row 1: P. Atrwill, Sec; R. Lombardi, Treas.; M. Cook, M: Ryan, A. Gavitt, N. Swindells, P. Boor ujy, S. Bahn.

CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION The University of Rhode Island Christian Association is a fellowship of the Protestant students on campus which sponsors many activities for those interested. The "9;30 Class" on Sunday morning and the Sunday evening group which meets at the Protestant Chaplain's house for supper and informal discussions are two of the activities.

Study groups on the Bible, Tuesday evening Chapel, and Thursday evening forum and discussions are also part of the campus program. Deputations and social action have become increasingly more active and important. To complete the list, there are summer service projects, program planning retreats and intercollegiate conferences.

Page

130


(% jK

1

<vJ

Row Ron' 1: K. Ward, N. Young, M. Rev. E. Fetter, W. Polis, Pres.; T.

Underwood, V. P.: Butziger, Treas.; C. Johnson, Sect.; J. Anderson, M. Mainland, S. Livingston.

M. Sii

Row 2: B. Griffith, N. Werner, M. Law, P. Booruiy, C. Chapman, J. Andren, D. Scott, J. Norman, B. Loxley.

D.

P.

!:

Row

2:

?.' A.

Row

Clentic,

F.

C

J.- C. Bell, C. Anderson, P. Brune, D. McDowell, Wiggins, C. Collins, J. Barrett, J. Davies, H. Uttley,

J.

B. Baxter, M. Smith, L. Farnum, J. Helm, B. Nadeau, J. Bush, N. Rigby, D. Huntington, L. Gants.

Row

M.

Kapff.

Yeargain, Fraser, D.

S.

Harrington,

L. Mc-


a

^^

ittj

-^

^w

s^

if^iilfli } f-i:! fi'iiiiiltirt?! If' Row 1: S.

Bedard, L. Sullivan, A. Alvarez, Treas.; M. Ryan, Father Daly, R. Lom bardi, Pres.; Father Wiseman, H. Amoriggi, V. P.; A. Wenderoth, P. Walsh, M.

Casey,

N. Wood.

Row 2: M. Berry, E. Bogan, M. Short, P. Cardin, P. Cunningham, A. Mangili, R. Bedard, R. Dubois, R. Nordberg, S. Hynek, K. Casey, A. Dijeser, V. Calitri, J. Sullivan, A. Richardson, M. L. Berry, P. Shunney.

Row 3: F. Lee, W. Arnold, W. Trainor, W. Dunais, R. Kalunian, M. Loudenslager, J. Leyden, J. Travers, J. Foley, J. Maguire, T. Kennedy, C. Foltz, A. Chrostick, B. Hayden, J. Marriott.

The Newman great

John

formed

at

Newman,

was

Pennsylvania University in

1893. There

NEWMAN

Club, named for the

Cardinal

are now over

five hundred

clubs in American universities and col

leges. It is the official Catholic on

CLUB

campus,

organization holding meetings twice a

month. Its aim is the

religious,

intel

lectual, and social welfare of the Cath olic

students, who are given the oppor tunity of the daily privileges of their

faith

Page

132

at

the

Chapel

of Christ the

King.


/3 rpi

mt|]i Jlllf Row 1: S. Ansuini, M. DiMase, V. Sweeney, M. Lawton, N. Vitullo, N. O'Connor, D. Desmarais, P. Mit son, M. McFadden, D. Sullivan, M. Grills, C. Moreau.

Row 2: C. Glynn, J. Turo, B. Bajik, L. L'Hereux, M. Waters, D. Cinquegrana, M. Styborski, C. Zoubra, J.

Row 1: M. Romano, A. Winfield, R. Spetrini, J. O'Brien, J. Peckham, J. Conrick, L. Gelardi, C. Sav arese, M.

Hanaway,

Row 2: A.

E

M DePetrillo, B. Carlesi, M. Kennan, M. O'Connell, D. Tennis, S. Gorton, J. Capalbo. Row 3: M. DeBartolo, C. Petrarca, M. Barbieri, L. Scuntio, R. Unsworth, S. Payne, R. Nolan, T. McConnell, V. Brassill, J. Duchesneau, R. Rendine, C.

Boucher, P. Cronin, E. Martin, E. Lessard.

nevale, V. Maccarato, A. Aissis, J. Malloy, C. Chaves, D.

Wujcik.

A. Berube.

Row 3: R. Oliver, C. Petrin, E. O'Brian, R. Corbett, L. Beirne, J. Cunningham, R. Burns, R. Cruff, R. Ver-

Sardelli, B. Horting, M. Mostecki, R. Car

> A'


. man,

A.

^uv*.

-"' ^^

HoU-

E

Kaplan

^^TdSdr^M. ^Jdt

Qloane, L- vog:i7

nte'^lN^'siW^^srein^M.

wrobel,

M.

Streitfeld.

Hillel is

an

organization established

for the purpose of providing students of the Jewish faith with religious, cultural,

and social activities. On

our

numerous

campus, Hillel's activities are and varied. The best known of

Hillel's affairs

HILLEL

are

its

Sunday "Brunches"

and the annual "Model Seder"

orating the Jewish Holiday

commem

of Passover.

its many activities, which all, Hillel hopes to better

Through

are

to

ac

open

the members of the campus with the Jewish faith, in an effort to strengthen

quaint better faiths.

Page 134

understanding

among

religious


CAmBRBOKV

ASSOCIATION

Cant^buyJon n^ Jb^e^^^^,, sponsored by th^ ^ Ecclestam Aay^'J' college .^ ^''"^^^rouXout '^' Through ctfrr^ ''I :'I'' with ^^^.^.^^^^ Christ .

-tv ot of .,,

Tin versity The University r,-u

affiliated

with

h

and island Island*:-'^"'!Ass"^' Nation .nd Rhode J^n ^^,hury -.^i^n's Canterbury Asso^^^.^^.^^,^ .Fr Church.

J

ide the

Chur

coffee hours. ad xs students and

Tuesday '"

Membership ested

copal Church.

Smith, Schnitzer, ^^"'l R<,..I.-W.Schnttzer,C.Sch^.^, ^ ^^, Sec, ALevels, ?j'"' f ,Tergh~-Bg ]. Kenzte, jchartner, .

E.

r

A

p

^"-.-.'X"3 Sw.nden, itt, C.

Ro"- ? T,

P^ ^-^^'^ Ege

Anderson.

F^

,

^^^ YorK, J. I-oo-, j^^^j^, r. A. snep N. Po'"="' 1 Pilton, R Heitman, ,u R. HoUingworth, W "''

^'J'cf,, L.

redge, p.

E.

McGav-

s^ibett.

_g^i^nsaKa2;

*e

the

*7"\iedar

^

P-jS "o^Uets of

^u iaterthe

Epts-


Rovi 1: R. Hull,

J. Magliocco,

E.

Feinman, Censor;

R.

Chancellor; A. Gavitt, Chronicler: W. Munk, Treas,:

Row 2: R. Stewart, M. Gordon, E. Edwards, N. Sefton, W.

Bill, Advisor; P. Coste,

L. Minisec.

J. Leyden,

F.

Lanphear,

Gatmtlett, H. Goldman, J. Partyka.

the national honorary agri fraternity, maintains its purpose by fostering and developing high standards of

Alpha Zeta,

culture

ALPHA

scholarship, character and leadership and a of fellowship in the agriculture pro

spirit

fession.

ZETA

Each year the Rhode Island Chapter of Zeta awards a loving cup to the freshman in agriculture with the highest

Alpha

scholarship

honors.

In addition an

annual steak

to

the customary activities, staged in the Fall for

roast

member-alumni, and and

an

initiation ceremony

banquet in the Spring constitute this dedication of agri Chapter's objective culture through achievement.

Page 136


Pi

Sigma Alpha is a national honorary polit society. The University of Rhode Is chapter was initiated last Spring at a ban

ical science

land

quet held for the occasion. An sentative guest

names

were

of

charter members

History

repre

from the national group and other

speakers

The

initiating

present.

eighteen

are

student and

inscribed

on a

Quinn

Hall. Included among the charter members

Professor Itter, Dr. Metz, Professor

Thomas, as

twelve

jors.

The

Dr.

Stitely,

Tilton, and Mr. Warren,

as

students, mostly Political Science student

Donald D'Amato, ical Science.

president a

graduate

of

the

SIGMA

faculty

scroll in the

and Political Science office in

PI

are

Dr. well ma

group

is

student in Polit

ALPHA


PHI

SIGMA

Row I: G. Brown, S.

The Phi

Sigma Biological Society

ter on

this campus. It

society

consists of active,

bers. Juniors with

jects

are

biology.

elected

an

on

was

chartered

has the on

Alpha

Xi

May 17, 1935. The

alumni, faculty, and honorary

average of

B,

or

Chap

mem

better, in Biological sub

the basis of their interest in the field of

Howe,

H. Haseotes, Pres,; T.

Fanning,

M. Rehwaldt. Row 2: R. E.

Lepper, Hartung,

E.

Maine,

J. Wells, D. Zinn, R. DeWolf, F. Serra.


TAU

BETA PI

Row 1: W.

Hagist,

Fac,

Advs,;

H. Brown, Corr, Sec; R.

Higgins,

Vice Pres.;

O. Dolan, Pres,; Rec, Sec;

B.

Bishop,

L.

Phillips, Cataloger.

Row 2: G.

Hyde,

C. "Wiesner, G.

Sahagian,

R.

Gifford,

G. Fiddes,

J. Dawson, R.

Tau Beta Pi is

a

national honor

fraternity of engineers.

fraternity is, in, engineering, equivalent

to

what Phi Beta

This

Kappa

is in the Humanities. The purpose is

to

recognize

in

a

fitting

manner

those who

by distinguished scholarship and exemplary character as undergraduates in Engi neering, and to foster a spirit of liberal culture in the engineering

have conferred honor upon their alma

mater

colleges of America. An

engineering faculty rating

system is

one

of many

projects

of Tau Beta Pi.

Mosher,

A. Rufo.

Page

M')


Alpha founded

OMICRON

organization

Mu

Chapter

is

a

Omicron

Nu

was

October, 195 1.'

This

national honor

society established

promoting scholarship,

leader

and research in the field of Home Economics.

Outstanding juniors year

of

this campus in

for the purpose of

ship,

NU

on

an

on

chapter

and seniors

are

admitted each

election basis. The activities of this

are set

up in accordance with the

general

purposes of Omicron Nu.

;.- M.

Stauffer, V. Pres.; J. Collins, Pres,; C. Hunter, Sec

2: C.

Brine, O. Brucher, N. Bowden, Treas,; E. Grady, R.


SCABBARD And BLADE

Row 1: R.

Corey, A. DaCosta, E. Davidson, J. Dawson, Jr., Lt, Col; B. C. Mulroy, Capt,; G. H. Gulvin, L. Phillips, A. Gavitt.

A. MacDonald,

Fiddes, D.

D.

Wiesner, R. Saglio, R. Cunningham, A Saunders, R. Mc-

B.

Dermott.

Lan,t,, j Markoff, C. Finklestein, R. Nord berg, J. Short, R. Fowler, L. Grinnell, C. Emmerich, F. Lingaitis, R. Pickthall, E. Edwards, F. Goldman, H. Gold^o^, 3. q

J. Norman, W. Tweedell, W. Paul, W. Earle, G. Capaldi, P. Boiani, D. Chaplin, J. Wojick, C. Row 2: R. Cruff,

man, R. Rowan.

Society of Scabbard and Blade was University of 'Wisconsin in 1904. H Company, 6th Regiment was established at the University of Rhode Is The

founded

at

National the

land in 1927. The purpose of this society is to raise the standard of education in American colleges and universities, and

military to

encourage the essential

qualities

of

good

and efficient

leaders.

Company through the years Military Ball and Blood Drive. H Company, 6th Regiment of Scabbard and Blade ex tends its heartiest congratulations to the graduating class, and Prominent functions of H

are

the annual

best wishes for the future years.

Page

141


Row I: P. D.

Dwyer,

Manganelli,

Corr.

Sec;

SACHEMS

T. Tedesco, Moderator; H. Amoriggi, Rec Sec; M. Matteson. Row 2: L. Sarkisian, N. Bowden,

Sachems is

J. Norman, Dr. Cruickshank, Dr. Dr.

of Seniors who

Lepper, Wiley, Faculty Advisors;

G. Edwards,

Membership

service

"tapped"

organization composed

in the

spring

is based upon active

Treas,

body,

the

organization

problems. Among

the

eses", the University

attempts

to

mascot, the

faculty

cam

coop

and the student

are:

the

care

of "Ram-

supervision of freshman

traditions and sophomore vigilantes,

Rhody

Junior in

find solutions for campus

responsibilities

of the football rallies, the

of their

participation

scholarship. By fostering

eration among the administration, the

Wexler,

missing: J. Wojcik,

honorary

are

pus activities and creditable

J. O'Rourke, S.

year.

an

planning

and execution

mayorality campaign,

and the

Review. Since their formation the Sachems have

tributed

to a more

active school

spirit.

con


The Blue

Key Society,

an

organization

of

eighteen students

from all classes, has for its objective, the furthering of friend ly relations between the University of Rhode Island and visi tors to our

ic teams, ences

campus. Included is acting as host to visiting athlet groups, and dignitaries, as well as at confer

touring

and alumni functions.

During 1955,

the Blue

Key has,

in addition

to

its usual

host functions, assisted the Alumni in the initiation of a Home coming Hop and participated in the Freshman Week and Open House programs. The activities of Blue Key have continued grow in scope and importance, so that, now, in 1956, Blue

to

is taking its place among our campus groups as an honor organization of student leaders and coordinators, second only to Sachems and cooperating more and more with that

Key ary

group.

Page 143


MARCIA M. MATTESON

WHO'S

Delta Zeta

JOSEPH

WHO among

NANCY G. NORDBERG

STUDENTS

in American

M. NACCI

Providence, R. I.

Sigma Kappa

Colleges

JAMES W. NORMAN Phi Kappa Theta

and

JAMES

W. NORTH

Phi Mu Delta

Universities J. O'ROURKE Campus Avenue

MARY 30

1955-1956

LEVON SARKISIAN

Rho lota Kappa

HELEN D. AMORIGGI

Alpha

Xi Delta

RONALD L. BEDARD S

Campus

Avenue

Alpha

Chi

EUGENE T. EDWARDS

SYLVIA E. SUNDEL

Lambda Chi

Sigma Kappa

Alpha

ALEXANDER R. GAVITT,

Alpha Chi Omega

Lambda Chi

Alpha

J. BOWDEN

Delta Pi

J. CARLESI Sigma Kappa

CAROL

JOYCE

L. COLLINS

PAUL J. SULLIVAN Sigma Alpha Epsilon

Omega

MARY E. BORDEN

NANCY

Page 144

MARGARET P. D^WYER

Jr.

Alpha

BRUCE R. LANG Tau

Epsilon Phi

FRANCIS

J.

TEDESCO

Phi Mu Delta

JOHN A. TYRELL, Jr. Sigma Alpha Epsilon

CATHERINE R. MacDUFF, (Mrs.) MARIANNE UNDERWOOD Eleanor Roosevelt Hall Sigma Kappa

WILLIAM D.

MacQUATTIE

EDGAR I. VATCHER

Delta Zeta

Lambda Chi Alpha

RONALD A. CRUFF

DOROTHY R. MANGANELLI

JOHN

Theta Chi

Chi Omega

Phi Mu Delta

Trailer Park

D.

WOJCIK


Washburn 208 Ranger Hall

Larmie, Walter E. (Prof.) Lepper, Robert, Jr., (Dr.) Odland, Theodore E. (Dr.)

PHI

KAPPA PHI

Honorary Scholastic Society University of Rhode

Taft

Quinn

Metz, William D. (Dr.) Palmatier, Elmer A. (Dr.)

Island

Pastore 125

Parks, Margaret M. (Dr. ) Parks, W. George (Dr.)

Pastore 228

Pelton, Frank M. (Dr.) Potter, Nancy A. J. ( Dr. )

South Hall Pastore

Arthur L. (Dr.) Rockafellow, Robert (Prof.) Salomon, Milton (Dr.)

Quirk,

Sayles,

Washburn 302 Taft Davis 101

Martha O.

Quinn

Simmons, Walter L. (Dr.)

Taft

Quinn

Abel, Paul I. (Dr.) Allen, Francis P. (Prof.) Ballentine, George A. (Dean) Bell, Robert S. (Dr.) Bender, Harry A. ( Dr. )

Pastore 202

Green Hall

Washburn 305

Washburn 6 North 2 1 1

Washburn 302 Briggs, Winfield S. (Dr.) Washburn 106 Brown, L. Guy (Dr.) Green Hall Browning, Harold W. ( Dean ) Quinn 102 Brucher, Olga P. (Dean) Clark Lane, Kingston Burgess, Paul ( Dr. ) Bliss 201 Campbell, Henry (Prof.) Mason H.

(Dean)

Campbell, Carpenter, Philip L. (Dr.) Carpenter, Virginia V. (Prof.) Christopher, Elizabeth W. (Prof.) Christopher, Everett P. (Dr.) Crandall, Elizabeth W. ( Prof. ) Crawford, T. Stephen (Dean) Cummings, Mary H. (Prof.) DeFrance, Jesse A. (Dr.) Leo (Dr.)

Diesendruck, DeWolf, Robert A. ( Prof. ) GoUis, Morton H. (Dr.) Grady, Ethyl R. (Prof.) Hartung, Ernest W. (Dr.) Higbee, Violet B. (Prof.) Howard, Frank L. (Dr.) Itter, Lucille P. (Dr. ) Itter, William A. (Dr.)

Kinney, Lorenzo F., Jr. (Prof.) Kraus, Douglas L. (Dr.)

Washburn

Ranger

Hall

Quinn 309 Quinn Washburn 208

Quinn

218

Washburn 108 Davis 204 Bliss 301 Washburn 102

Stuart, Harland F. (Dr.)

FACULTY MEMBERS (Active)

107

Quinn

Smith, John B. (Prof.) Smith, Warren D. (Dr.) Spaulding, Irving A. (Dr.) Stockard, Raymond H. (Mr.)

1955-56

220

Ranger Hall

Stuart, Homer O. (Prof.) Thomas, Daniel H. (Dr.) Tilton, Arlene P. (Prof.) Tucker, Ruth E. (Dr.) Votta, Ferdinand, Jr., (Prof.)

Quinn 220 Quinn 112 Quinn211-A Bliss 211 Green Hall

Weldin, John C. (Dean) Wiley, William H. (Dr.) Wood, Richard D. (Dr.) Woodward, Carl R. (President)

Washburn 103

Ranger Hall Green Hall

GRADUATE STUDENTS Taft

Bannister, Edward J. Champlin, Barbara J.

Taft Taft

Hart, Stewart

Joy, Barbara

128 Ann

E.

Brown

Drive, Edgewood, R. I.

Mary

South Hall

Menard, R. Regina (Mrs.) Troll, Joseph

Taft

2 1 1 -C

Bliss 101

North Hall Taft Pastore

Ranger

Hall

RESIDENT UNDERGRADUATES

(Elected October 13, 1933) Bedard, Ronald

Leo

Pastore 126

Bishop, Benjamin Borden, Mary E.

Quinn

DeWolf, Roberta

Ranger

Hall

Quinn 116

F.

Heald, Emerson F. Maine, Ellsworth C.

Taft

North Hall

Quinn

8

Campus Ave., King,

1 1 Rose

207 E. R.

307 Bressler Hall

498 Kingstown Road, Peace

Matteson, Marcia M.

Dale,

R. I.

75 Oakland

Ave.,

220

Washburn Pastore 309

Court, Narra. Hall, Campus

47 North Rd., Kingston

Sheehan, George H. Vatcher, Edgar I.

7 West

Memorial

Cranston, R. I. St., Jamestown Union, Campus

Page

145


ECONOMICS

CLUB

Row 1: E. Haseotes,

E. Prout,

The main purpose of the Economics Club is

enlighten

students

on

affairs in the economic

sphere and

the It

community

was

body

it is also open

who wishes

organized

in

of

who wishes

to

any member of

to

meetings.

of 1954. In conjunc

tion with the main purpose of this club is the pur pose of

jects

hearing

as

many

speakers

in the economic world

national trade and business

Page 146

as

on as

possible,

cycles.

J. O'Donnell, Leuba,

Row 2: R.

W. Dumais,

attend its

to

February

composed

is

Boorujy,

E. O'Brien.

domestic and international

any member of the student

join. However,

B. to

many sub

e.g. inter

D.

Gulvin,

P. Sullivan.


Row 1: C. Hirsch, Corr. Sec: R. Pickhall, Vice Pres,; B. Rosen, Pres,: L. Guisti, Treas,: G. Mansfield, Historian, Row 2: R.

J. Mazza, R. Avila, Hammerlund, E. Sewall, J. Travis, C. Foltz, Turilli,

W. Gates, E.

E, O'Brien, Dr. Bretsch, Advisor.

Alpha Delta

Sigma

Alpha Delta Sigma is a national professional adver tising fraternity with more than fifty chapters in colleges and universities throughout the United States. Member ship is for life and includes an affiliation with the Adver tising Federation of America. Its many activities include: printing your school blotter, promoting better advertising on campus, attending conventions and going on field trips. The fraternity also presents two $25 awards for excellence in advertising.

Row 1: R. Nordberg, B. Baray, Sec; N. Craddock, Treas,; F. Wiener, Fac Adv.; E. Giusti, Pres.; R. Hammarlund, V. P.; E. O'Brien.

Marketing

Row 2: C.

Hirsch,

A. Schneider, M. Winkleman, E.

Sewall,

L.

Fracassa, E. Turilli.

Club Page

147


Accounting Association

Row 1: M.

J. Greer, P Amoriggi. Row

2:

Wolfe,

Accounting Association was formed in March, 1949, to supplement the study of account ing, to investigate the possibilities of employment for graduating members, and to promote social activities. Another purpose is to acquaint all stu dents at the University with the uses and functions of accounting. Each year the name of an accounting major who over the first 3 years has attained the highest average in class work at U. R. I. is in scribed on a plaque in the College of Business Ad The

ministration.

L R.

:m ^^^Enold, es,;

M ^B.

Fernbach

T. M.

Hamblin,

V.P,; Liner, H.

McConnell,

M.

Manekofsky,

E.

O'Brien. Row 3: N

Cooper,

A.

Saxe, D.

Kennedy,

Eliley, R

.

L.

Secular, R.

"Vosinoff.


a^

L|J^^^V\^|B\ p

i^^Hft^^H^mk ^^^^Hkt^fli

1

i^^^tl flft

^^^ fl|^K v'-fl

^^^^^^^^^L

^^^^^^^^^^^K

J.-'

Row 7

.i

H rjl

49 R

Row 2: E.

T

^^^^^n

Prout,

R.

S^H

H

'

Sands, Treas

G

1 1^^k

^^H;'/ Jj^B

-

Corbett, A Helmus, Sec

jl

.-.

-S-ASf-

T

Daley

(^ ,

p^^

Gustafson, F. Kuntz, L. T. Beirne, M. Kortick.

In surance A ssociation ^i

The Insurance Association of the Rhode Island

1950,

to

was

formed

advance the

surance at

U. R. I.,

insurance student

during

merous

enhance the

during

position

his business

by

the

of the

career.

society

include

from various insurance concerns, and

field

trips

to

of

study and knowledge of in

to

The programs offered

speakers

University

the Fall semester,

visit

large

insurance

nu

organi

zations.

Page 149


SOCIETY FOR THE

ADVANCEMENT MANAGEMENT

OF

Row 1: L. Borden, L. Walde, Treas.; W. Earle, V,P,; E. Vatcher, Pres.; R. White, Treas,; R. Kane, Sec; J. Dubuque. Row 2: E. O'Brien, D. Gulvin, R. Kehew, E. Rumowicz, J. Short, A. Kennedy, K. Sullivan, V. Brassil, L. Giusti.

The Society for the Advancement of Management (known S. A. M.) was started on the Rhode Island campus in 1945, reactivated in 1948. The Society is the recognized national pro fessional society of management people in industry, commerce, as

education, and government. It is the purpose of this organiza

acquaint the student with people in these fields of busi keep them in contact with the latest information con cerning employment, business and management. tion

ness,

Page 150

to

and


Engineering Societies

ENGINEERING COUNCIL

Row 1: G, Giornelli,

hagian,

R. Mosher,

J. Nacci, J. Baker, G.

J. Diller,

R.

Sa

Gustafson, J.

Norman.

The

primary

Council is

to

function of the

Engineering

coordinate the activities of all

the societies affiliated with the

Engineering. year which was

The main social was

sponsored by

College

event

Row 2: W.

Gushing, Sec;

A,

Cappon, Treas,;

G.

Lamb, Chairman; R. Toher.

of

of the

the council

the Slide Rule Strut.

Page

151


Row 1: R.

Saglio,

J. Dawson, Sec; The American tional

Society of Mechanical Engineers

professional society to

portunities

for

engineers

recent

to

band together and discuss

Society.

Its purpose is

of the benefits of the parent nate

the student into the

to

Page 152

and other

special

supported by

provide

prob

It

the Na

students with

organization

society.

events.

G,

Lamb, A. Smith,

R.

Languedoc,

Its R.

Smith,

R. Newlander.

Row 2: W. Paul,

neering educaton by providing

trips

a na

developments.

The A. S. M. E. Student Branch is tional

is

Engineers.

advance the profession by providing the op

purpose is

lems and

for Mechanical

and

to

supplements

technical

C. Wiesner, D.

Janes,

most

L.

Phillips,

A.

Baker, G. Lanois,

C.

Emmerich,

indoctri the

speakers,

engi field

A. Post, P.

Berger.


n.

U.

o.

L.

Row 1: E. Reed,

J. Karol,

F. Reinhardt, Sec; R.

D,

Toher, Pres.;

Duquette,

J. Norman,

Vice

E.

Pres.;

Vigliotti.

Row 2: A. Rufo, N. Turner, E. Marrah,

F. Mormando, E. L. A. Schreiner, K.

Simpson,

J. Migneauk,

Casey,

R. Rowan,

R. Buser, R. Gustafson.

The Student

Engineers,

Chapter of

which is open

to

the American

gineering curriculum, participated and social activities ited such Central

places

Artery,

as

throughout

in both

professional

the year. The

the Scituate

the Cranston

Society of Civil

all students of the Civil En

society vis

Reservoir, the Boston

Sewage Plant, and

the South

County Sand and Gravel Company.

Page

153


A. I. Ch. E.

1: A Bekelman,

'nfitante, P. Lennon,

'Regan, The

R.

Giornelli, Pres.;

Engineers was organ professional attitude, to acquaint its topics of interest by means of addresses by

R.

Cunningham, Sec;

R.

Gifford, Treas.;

Rhode Island Student

the American Institute of Chemical ized

to

promote

members with

a

experienced men and through student research, and to foster a spirit of good will among chemical engineering students. Dr. Shilling is the faculty advisor to the student Each year in the Fall and Spring an outing is held to acquaint the new students in chemical engineering with the organization and to promote a closer contact with the

Page 154

G. McGair. Row 2: E. Martel,

J. Cavaliere,

and students.

R. Delorme,

E. Davis, R. Conde, L. Metz, G. D. D.

chapter.

professors

Vice Pres.;

Chapter of

University of

J.

Shilling,

Altman, G. Nacci, Hatch.


A. I. E. E. I. R. E.

Row 1: W. Tweedell, E.

Davidson, A. Cappon,

G. Helsens, H. Brown, W. Arnold, D. Richardson,

A. Kohnle. Row 2: G, B.

McLaughlin, Bishop, Sec;

O, Dolan, Ch.; R.

Higgins,

Vice Ch.;

R. Mosher, G.

Capaldi.

Vi,

This is the student branch of the

Engineering organizations today. the advancement of the

engineering

theory

and of the allied

maintenance of

a

and arts

leading Electrical

principal objects practice

are

of electrical

and sciences and the

high professional standing

members. Its members sponsor

field,

Its

speakers

among its

in the electrical

present and discuss technical papers and take part in

inspection trips

to

places of engineering interest.

Page

155


PHYSICS SOCIETY

Row 1:

J. Peckham,

G. Conti, W.

J. Diller,

Gushing,

R. McDermott,

D. McDowell.

J. Nacci, Pres.; Vagnini, Treas.

Row 2: R. A.

Page 156

In

1948 the Physics Society of the University of Rhode

Island

was

end of

acquainting

organized

and

the

officially approved.

physics

To attain its

student with the

objectives

and methods of modern research physics, the society has

prominent speakers sions movies

are

lecture

to

the group. At other

shown, and discussion groups

are

occa

formed.


CHEMISTRY SOCIETY

The purpose of the

istry Society is

to

University of Rhode Island

present

an

interesting

program. This includes lectures

field

trips The

to

chemical

plants,

Chemistry Society

Chem

and diversified

by prominent speakers,

and technical movies. is

a

chapter

Affiliate of the American Chemical

to

all who

Society. Students

are

Sec;

V. P.;

J. Hanley, Pres,; M.

Rider, Treas,;

N.

Volpe.

of the Student Row 2: R. E.

Kolaczkowski, Heald, E. Benben,

P.

Caleshu,

R.

Lanyon.

ma

joring in chemistry or chemical engineering are eligible for membership in the Student affiliate. The Chemistry Society is, however, open

Row 1: R. Rainone,

J. Marriott,

A.

DeCosta,

interested in chem

istry.

Page

157


Home

7/ E. Martin, N. Vitullo, J. Conrick, C. Townsend, Treas,; M. Ryan, Pres.; N. O'Connors, V. Pres,; N. Powell, M. Wrobel, S. Oringel, J. Berghman. Row 2: J. Fine, J. Fine, P. Walker, J. Rubery, M. Far rell, L. Petrarca, D. Tennis, L. Harrington, E. Hoff man, C. Oster, C. Sherman, T. Parker, M. Grills, M.

Economics

Cook.

Club

Row 3: F.

Egerton,

J. Collins, B. Loxley,

M. Fraser, N.

M. Mostecki, K. Ward, H. Sloane, B. Seibert, M. Berry, P. Walsh, P. Lovis, Rigby, S. Ansuini, P. Water-

The Home Economics Club, affiliated with the Na tional Home Economics the

University

open

to

An

any

woman

opportunity

student

are

on

for service

nity, information about

development

Association, has been active

of Rhode Island since 1921.

the

offered

to

Membership

at

is

campus. to

family

the and

college

and

commu

home, and personal

each member.

Each year the club sponsors a get-acquainted picnic and a Silver Tea, which is for the benefit of foreign stu

dents, besides

Page

158

its

regular meetings.


NUTRIX The Nutrix has been School of

Nursing

an

organization of the Through this organiza

active

since 1950.

tion the students

keep

on campus and in the clinical area informed of the activities and developments of the

Nursing and nursing profession, and have the opportunity of planning activities together. Apart from having representation on the R. I Council of Nursing Students, a delegate is sent yearly School of

Row 1: C.

Savarese,

P.

Cunning

ham, R. Jursa, Treas.; C. Ander son, V. Pres.; S. Hilliard, Pres.; S.

Thorp, Sec; J. Ormiston,

Edi

tor; V. Naccarato, Soc Chair.; M. Mainland, Pub. Ch, Row 2: E. Lessard, D. Brown, M.

J. Lanning, Capuano, B. Lyon,

M. Dimase, N.

Caswell, L. Skolnick, C. Stallwood, J. Loxsom, D.

DeBartolo. Row 3: R.

Carnevale, M, Casey, Wishart, M. Simonelli, M. Lawton, S. Livingston, L. Sulli van, D. Donahue, C. McKenzie,

C.

M.

Johnson,

C. Davis.

to

the National Student Nurse Association Convention.

The students also support the Isabel M. Stewart Scholar ship Fund.

Missing who

are at

from the

picture

are

the

present in the clinical

Juniors and

areas.

Seniors


Rameses'

1

Year

i

Page 160


1955

RHODF KEVU

Page 161


Paddy Murphy's Wake

Fraternity Pledging


b

I


Page 166


Merc Week

Page 168


IPO


Row I. L-R: Head Coach Hal Kopp, J. OLeary (Jr.) HB, J. Leach (Jr.) FB, B. Montanaro (Jr.)HB, P. Dalpe (Jr.) E,

(So.) HB, H. Fayerweather (So.) HB, B. Mairs (So.) E, E. McDaniel (So.) E, D. Fuller (So.) HB, J. Adams (So.)QB, J. Ryan (So.) G, C. Kachougian (So.)HB, J. Gerlach (So.) G, J. Jerue (So.) FB, Assistant Coach B. Collins, End and Freshman Coach J. Guy. Players missing from photo: J. Almonte (So.) C, A. Cappalli (Sr.) G, J. Stanelum (Jr.) T, G. Turano (Jr.)- E, C. Doeges (So.) E, T. Chrostek (Jr.)HB, G. Hall (So.)T, D. Ding wall (So.)T, C. Johnson (Jr.)HB, J. Van Baalen (So.)HB, A. Holmes (So.) T, and Ken Seal, Manager.

H.

Bogosian (Jr.)HB, P. Fitzgerald (Jr.) G. D. Daubney (Jr.) E, B. Novelli (Jr.)T, D. Gourley (Jr.) E. Row 2: B. Gallucci (So.) HB, B. Sammartino (So.)QB, K. Apkarian (Sr.) FB, E. DiSimone (Sr.) HB, C. Hunt (Sr.) C. E. Edwards (Sr.) G, C. Gibbons (Sr.)T, J. Hayes (Sr.) G, J. Mathews

(Sr.)T,

B.

Horton

(Sr.)-E,

Peosavale. Row ?,: Line Coach H. Maack, W. Burns

Backfield

Coach

C.

(So.) QB, J. Warren

FOOTBALL The Long Hard Road To Fame And

Glory

Kopp, New England Coach of the Year, his staff, or the boys realize that first week in September when only twentywould have the first one boys reported to practice, that the baby blue unbeaten and greatest football season in the long history {sixty years Little did Coach Hal

of the school; or that they would have one of the East's small-college reams; or that, as a fitting reward, they would travel by plane for a post-season bowl game. Yes, things look rather dismal back in September for a coach that was said to be rebuilding after a loss of a powerful line and such a great back as allto

be exact)

best

to

the midwest

star

Pat Abruzzi.

quickly, and,

as

But this meager group got down to serious business

the

days progressed,

was

strengthened during

the first

weeks of praaice, and, after school began, by the late arrival of Since the team had less than three weeks of practice more gridders. before the opener against Northeastern, Kopp held double sessions, two

morning and afternoon, until school started; and then, when school pushed the boys to perfection by bard practice and late Now for the story of Rhody's triumphant and first unbeaten 1 the school's history.

did start,

^.^t^^iHB

^m TEAM CO-CAPTAINS L-R: C. Gibbons, E. DiSimone, K.

Apkari an, C.

Hunt.

Northeastern At Boston The Rams, in their first game, started and finished fast, and gained a come-from-behjnd 13-13 tie with Northeastern, on an extremely w^arm

being the opening game for each team, and both teams rebuilding, first-game mistakes and inexperience play somewhat. On its first play from scrimmage, after Hunt had intercepted an enemy pass early in the first period, Ed DiSimone and Dick Gourley combined on a fifty-one yard pass play for a touch down. Gourley rambled the final twentj'-six yards into the end zone unmolested. Jim Jerue converted to make it 7-0, Soon after, the Huskies combined on a ninety-five yard pass play to tie the score. After Northeastern went ahead midway in the second period, Rhody traveled forty-six yards in ten plays early in the fourth quarter to tie the score at 13-13- Fullback Johnny Leach slanted over from the 7 for the score. afternoon. This

being

in the process of

marred the

DiSimone, Fayerweather, and Leach

were

instrumental in this

come-

from-behind drive.

Jerue's potential winning kick went wide to the Rhody's whole forward wall, featuring Gourley, Gibbons, Ger lach, Fitzgerald, Novelli, and Dalpe, did a good job both oflfensively and defensively, while DiSimone, Apkarian and, Leach were the lead ing ground gainers. side.

STARTING ELEVEN Gerlach,

J. Row 1: R. Gourley, R- Novelli, J. O'Leary, C Gibbons, P. Dalpe. K. Apkarian, E. DiSimone. Row 2: W. Montanaro, R- Sammartino, C. Hunt,

Page

172


Maine At

Kingston

setting of pouring rain, befitting only the legendary seagulls of Kopp's regime, the Rams scored a 7-0 triumph over Maine on an extremely muddy Meade Field. While the rain was at its heaviest and coming down in sheets at the start of the second half. Rhody scored the game's only touchdown on a short quick pass from Jim Adams to Dick Gourley. This score was a climax to a sixty-seven yard drive and the home force's most determined bid of the afternoon. Jim Gerlach converted the extra-point to end the scoring of the day. Adams made several key calls that kept the Rams rolling on the scoring march. The Black Bears proved a stubborn foe defensively and threatened to tie the game in the final minutes, but Rhody was equal to the test and hurled back the enemy auack. Despite the wet going, the Baby Blue In

a

better offensive in spots than it did in its opener the week Apkarian had the best run of the day when he bulled

showed

a

before.

Kazar

his way up the middle for forty yards. DiSimone, Montanaro, Adams, and Apkarian were the leading ground gainers, while Charlie Gibbons

played a particularly strong defensive gerald, Hunt, Gourley, and Gerlach.

New In the

a

see-saw

Rarns

score

staged

Hampshire

battle

played

another

late in the final

period

game up

At

Kingston

before four thousand

come-from-behind for

front, along with Fitz

a

surge

13-13 tie with New

at

and

Meade Field,

knotted

the

Hampshire. After

number of set-backs in the first period, the Rams scored first on a forty-seven yard touchdown march with Ed DiSimone going over for the score on a plunge from the one. Apkarian, DiSimone, and Mon a

accounted for most of the yardage in the drive, with a fifteen yard DiSimone-to-Montanaro pass setting up the score. Jim Gerlach converted for 7-0. New Hampshire showed an explosive attack as it took the return kickoff back sixty-eight yards for a touchdown. The conversion attempt was short. Gibbons, Fitzgerald, and Hunt were the leaders in baiting a Wildcat threat early in the third period. Then both teams had many marches stopped before New Hampshire scored on the tanaro

first play of the fourth quarter, and converted for a 13-7 lead. After a couple of punt exchanges, the Northerners gambled and lost on a fourth-and-one situation on their own forty-two yard line, thanks to Gibbons and Fitzgerald. From here, late in the period, the Rams pushed over the tying score with Adams cracking over from the 3. A thirt>'-five yard Adams-to-Mairs pass had set up this tying plunge. Gerlach's conversion attempt was blocked. New Hampshire threatened again late in the final minutes, but the rugged Rhody line stiffened and McDaniels recovered a fumble on his own thirty-yard line to end the threat. The whole Rhody line performed outstandingly, along with Adams, DiSimone, Leach, Montanaro, Apkarian, and Sammartino in the backfield.

Vermont At

Burlington

After twice staving off Vermont at the goal line in the first half, over the Rhody went on to a fairly easy 16-0 Homecoming Day victory Catamounts. Vermont took the opening kickoff and marched to the

yard line, only to be stopped by a stubborn Blue defense. From ninen-eight yards to their first score. DiSimone Apkarian picking up the bulk of the yardage, with Montanaro then got his sweeping the end from the five into paydirt. Gerlach first of two conversions. Early in the second period, the Rams got two Chuck Gibbons, on one of his more points on a safety, as workhorse the day and season, knifed through to nail a many contributions of Catamount back in his end zone. After Vermont again marched to the Rhody two yard line, and again was stopped cold, the Rams could not until a Sophomore mount a sustained attack due to extreme fumblitis, backfield of Fayerweather, Warren, and Adams built a scoring drive in the final quarter. Adams scored from thirty-three yards out on a beautifully executed option keep play, while Warren contributed to the drive. Gibbons, Fitz twenty yards and Fayerweather twenty-four in the line, while Di gerald, and Novelli, were the game's standouts were the leaders in the Montanaro and Adams, Apkarian, Simone,

R. I.

two

here the Rams marched

and

backfield.

Page

173


Massachusetts At Amherst The Kingstonites hit their season's peak in scoring at the Redman's Homecoming, as DiSimone and Apkarian got two touchdowns apiece to lead the Rams to an impressive 39-15 victory. This victory put the Rams in a commanding lead for the Yankee Conference championship. They opened the scoring early in the first period as DiSimone ripped off 39 yards for his first score, and Gerlach converted for 7-0. Apkarian. got the next counter soon after as he plunged over from the 5 after a short 43 yard march in 6 plays. In the same period Junior fullback Johnny Leach hammered off the right side for 58 yards and a score, aided by a beautiful block by Gibbons. Here Jerue converted from the 25 after a penalt)-. The best run of the day, that of 70 yards for a T.D. by Jim Adams, was then called back for a backfield in motion penalty, and UMass scored before the half ended. Apkarian opened the second half scoring with a 16 yard canter around left end. This was followed by DiSimone's second score from 28 yards out which was set up by long gainers by Leach and Montanaro. This drive covered 71 yards in 3 plays. Jimmy Warren ended the R, 1. scoring with a 33 yard scoring jaunt in the final period. Beside the scorers, Fayerweather and Sam martino both did good jobs in the backfield, and needless to say the whole line lead by Gibbons, Fitzgerald, and Hunt opened the holes for the backs to see daylight and pay-dirt.

Brown At

Providence

Yes, the boys really had revenge in their eyes for last year's loss the Bruins which broke a two game winning streak against our favor ite grid opponents. Led by our AIl-American tackle, Charlie Gibbons, the whole gang played a highly inspired game as they cut down the favored Bears 19-7. Gibbons' performance was the greatest individual exhibition on Brown Field in many long years. The whole Rhody line to

put up a superb performance before 16,000 in sunny weather. The vic tory, only the forth in forty-one contests against the Ivy Leaguers, was particularly sweet since it kept their slate clean for the season. Center Charlie Hunt, a bulwark on defense along with the other tackle Bob Novelli, started the Rams rolling to their first score when he inter cepted a pass on the enemy 45. From this point, with Montanaro, Leach, and DiSimone doing the lugging, the Rams scored in seven plays, with DiSimone cracking over from the 1. Soon after. Gibbons partially blocked a punt that was eventually good for only 12 yards to the home team 40. From here DiSimone swept end for 25 yards; Leach smashed up the middle for II; and Montanaro scored from the 4. In its only sustained drive of the afternoon. Brown then scored before the half ended. Again in the third period workhorse Chuck Gibbons, who seemed to be all over the field at the right time all afternoon, blocked another Bruin punt on the opposition's 34 yard line, then chased the bounding pigskin to the 10 where he fell on it to set up an easy score. Montanaro only needed one play to get the score, and Jerue converted to end the scoring in the Rams finest victory.

i1


Springfield At Kingston In our first Homecoming Day game the home forces roared to an early first quarter T.D. and then coasted home to a 20-7 defeat of Springfield College. The Indians gave the Rams more trouble than Brown, but maybe it was that Rhody wasn't as sharp as it had been the week before. Hard hitting Kazar Apkarian scored the Rams opener after DiSimone had made a nice return of the opening kickoff, when he over from in close at 3:25 of the opener. This score had been up by a beautiful 45 yd. pass play from DiSimone to. Gourley who finally hauled down from behind on the Maroon 15. For Rhody's 14-0 edge at half-time, the Rams marched 73 yds., in jolting gains with a few short passes from Adams to Gourley. After one of these passes had advanced it to the 5, DiSimone cashed in for a payoff over tackle. End Dick Gourley set up the final Rhody score as he blocked a Maroon punt on their 25 in the third period. DiSimone ate up most of the remaining yardage for his second score, and Jerue converted his second of three tries for the day. Along the U.R.I, forward wall. Gib bons, Novelli, Dalpe, O'Leary, Hunt, and Gourley were tough as usual, and the backfield headed by DiSimone, Apkarian, and Adams performed well.

crashed set

was

Connecticut At Storrs Hoping and praying to keep their slate clean and be the first Rhody unbeaten eleven ever, a determined Ram squad walloped the Huskies 25-0 in what was supposed to be a down-to-the-wire game. This start ling victory not only gave them an unbeaten season, but returned them as rulers of the Yankee Conference, while keeping their unbeaten string going at twelve straight. The Huskies took our opening kickoff and drove to the Rhody one yard line, only to have a penalty set them back and stall this drive cold. The Rams then set their gears into high speed after Montanaro had intercepte'd a UConn pass on his own 24. Still in the first quarter, they rambled 76 yards in nine plays for the initial score, with a DiSimone to Gourley pass and runs by Sammartino, Leach, and DiSimone featuring the drive. The crusher however, was a beautiful A(y yd. jaunt by Montanaro, with good blocking especially from dependable No. 72. Montanaro was knocked out of bounds on the one, from where DiSimone scored two plays later. Midway in the next stanza R. I, got possession again on a fumble stimulated by a fierce, jarring tackle by Gibbons. A Sammartino option play run and lateral to DiSimone good for 32 yds. set up the next score. After Ap karian had smashed in close, Sammartino scored on a keep play from inside the one. Jerue converted. Within 15 seconds after the start of the second-half kickoff, DiSimone with the aid of ten other Rams, ap plied the clincher with a highly electrifying 75 yd. return of the secondhalf kickoff. This great run with the aid of perfect blocking took all the fight out of the Huskies. The Rams scored again late in the same period with Apkarian plunging over after a Sammartino, DiSimone collaboration good for 16 yds. DiSimone's ground gaining was a fea ture, but the Rhody forward line of Gibbons, Hunt, Fitzgerald, Novelli, Dalpe, Gourley, Gerlach, and O'Leary put the clamps on a strong UConn offense. Montanaro, Leach, and Adams were also brilliant in victory.


REFRIGERATOR

STATE AND

JACKSONVILLE

THE REFRIGERATOR BOWL the

Although

team

had received

feeler for this

a

the actual post-season tilt before the UConn game, bid hinged on a victory at Storrs. When this

iplished

the

long awaited bid

bowl game preparations began although bad weather often interfered. Following an the ng pep-rally on the Friday preceeding Sunday afternoon game, the team embarked for He by airplane. After the among loads of fanfare and hospitality, practiced Saturday afternoon in between much pictaking. The Rams, who had been made slight 12-10 by a pre-game favorites, were tripped up

After

M^m^^Mm

a

lay-off,

short

surprisingly strong Gamecock eleven from Alabai featuring the hard, pile driving running of fullback Billy Hicks. Undoubtedly the margin of victory in a close, tightly played contest, this explosive back, who reminded you of Pat Abruzzi, scored the first Gfamecock touchdown and was highly instrumental in

setting up the second

one.

The Rams drew the first and only blood of the first half as the second quarter was closing when Jim

Jerue booted a perfect 28 yard the opposition off its feet with

field

goal

seconds

to

which took go.

After the Rams kicked off in the second-half. Hicks

carried the ball

11 of l4 times to

score

the first

points

Jacksonville. The conversion attempt was wide. Later in the third quarter Ram stalwart Chuck Gib bons pounced on a rebel fumble deep in the south for

territory where they booming, coffin-corner

erners

tiful

After three

rushing

had been put by a beau kick by Apkarian.

attempts failed

Jerue

on

came

the field and lined up for what looked like another field goal attempt, but Sammartino caught the op

position six

by standing

unaware

touchdown pass

points. Jerue

to

up

and

throwing

DiSimone who barreled

over

a

for

made the conversion and the Rams

led 10-7. With less than four minutes

remaining in Rhody looked victory bound, but one of proved costly to the Rams all day ball to the southern players on the R. I. 8

the game,

many fumbles that gave the

yard

line.

From

had the winning two.

Page 176

here, in three tries, the Gamecocks score

as

Skates

With little time left

to

went over

from the

play the Rams tried


BOWL- 1955

valiantly to score as the opposition gave them a golden opportunity by failing to make a fourth and When the one situation on a gamble, on their 30. Rams took over, short gains got the ball to the 10 where Rhody got an important first down. But on the next play, a highly costly fumble from a jarring Jax State tackle turned the tables and wrote an end to the most thrilling Refrigerator Bowl game in its eight year history.

VARSITY FOOTBALL

"ODDS AND ENDS" it goes without saying that history was outstanding contributions achieved by the school's first undefeated season. Outside the college realm, Pat Abruzzi whom we shall all long

Of

course

made, and

many

remember, broke into the

pro ranks with the Mont

an outstanding season, being leading ground gainer and the

real Allouettes, and had

the Canadian League's

Player as a rookie. Meanwhile, back the local scene, our boys received awards as fast they could be established. Charlie Gibbons became the only R. L Player to ever be honored as a "Little AIl-American," and in many quarters the opinion is he would be "All American" at a large college. Most Valuable on

as

He

was

also first

team

U.P., All New England, and

unanimous choice for all Yankee Conference

along

Ed DiSimone was honorable mention for "Little All American", second team U.P.,

with Paul

-All New

Fitzgerald.

England,

and

a

breeze

ference all-team choice. Coach New

England

as

Kopp

a

Yankee Con

was

honored

as

coach of the Year and R. I. Coach of

the Year for the third consecutive time.

Dominating

the all Yankee Conference

team

along

with Gibbons, DiSimone, and Fitzgerald were Pete Dalpe, Chuck Hunt, and Bob Novelli. AU the other starters

were

either

second

team,

third

team,

or

honorable mention. Almost

every

starter

others all-opponent

was

team at

on

some

one

or

the

the season's end.

The New Year of 1956 opened on a sad Coach Kopp accepted an offer from Brigham

note

as

Young University and announced that he was moving to the Mormon School at Provo, Utah, for the coming Well done! We'll season. Hats off to all the boys! miss you Hal, Good Luck and Bon Voyage!

Page

177


BASKET BALL

(l-r) Kohlsaat, Ronnie Marozzi, Eric Anderson, Bob Stairs, Row 1: Pete

Bill

von

Weyhe,

Kenny Schuit, Row 2:

Denny Haworth, Bobby Schmidt, Frank Mormando,

Opponent

St.

Josephs

Providence Coll. Brown Boston College Fordham William & Mary

U.R.I.

Opponent

Weyhe

72 84 71 72 71

84 75

36

13

New

27

74t

24 26

Northeastern Providence

75

22

89

19 34

96

100

Army Virginia Tech St. Johns

74 59

99

18

80

16

81

20

Connecticut Holy Cross

86 61

86 88+

Page

178

20

105

14 29 20

25 24 04 20 16 11

t Overtime

Brad Southworth,

Jimmy Adams, Steve Madreperla.

35

roal

iNumber

Plaj-er

Games

Bill Von Weyhe Ronnie Marozzi Eric Anderson Bob Stairs Steve Madroperla Frank Mormando

25 25 25 25

23 19

Field Free Goals Throw

206 179 101

89 75 30

180

145 62 47 46 28

Opponent

Maine

592 503 264 225

196 88

23.7 20.1 10.6 9.0 8.5 4,6

Opponent

Weyhe

81

63

71

58

80 95

82

24 17 28 19 30 31

73 78

roiz

19 24 11

22

Vermont

88

78

Connecticut Maine

90

921:

21 15

22

95 83

83 61

32 16

Brown

Colby

93 104 83

63 63

22

31 21

Double Overt ime

nts

verage

U.R.I.

19 23 24 23

Massachusetts New Hampshire

t

Po Total J

Hampshire

Player

Number Field Free Total Games Goals Throws Points

Dennis Haworth 21 12 Jim Adams Pete Kohlsaat 21 Ken Peckham 6 Brad Southworth 8 8 Ken Schuit

19

16

17 11

12

54 46

4

1

2

4

35 9 8

1

1

3

13


Ken

Schiik, Forward

Eric

Our 6

9

O

Jack Guy season one

but

boys

came

record

wins and fourteen losses. was

under

a

won-and-Iost

compile

season to

highly respectable

the

started the

of their first eleven games, along very strong in the

out

second half of the

team

$

d

and his

of

a

eleven

Although

the

.500 percentage in the boys

column,

played fine ball after their early-season slump, and, with a few breaks here and there, they would have had quite a few more wins. The Rams only hit the century-mark once for the season, and played in three overtime battles, all of which were lost by slim margins. Jack Guy, ably assisted by Herb Maack, was faced by the toughest schedule since his advent at Rhody, and, with only a small bench to work with, did a noteworthy job. Leading the team during the cam paign were the high-scoring juniors from Jersey, Bill Von Weyhe and Ron nie Marozzi, Senior co-captains Bob Stairs and Eric Anderson contributed

heavily son

to

the

scoring during

but will be remembered

the

more

season was

either Steve

Madreper

la, Frank "Dusty" Mormando, or DenHaworth, all of whom were fine,

Page 179

scorers, and

0

@

Pete Kohlsaat, Jim Adams, Brad Southworth, Kenny Schuit, Ken Perkham, and Rudy Schmidt.

were

Team

highlights of the season were: spanking given to Providence College Jerseyite Marozzi scoring twenty-seven points, guiding the team; a heart-breaking 74-71 overtime loss 84-75

an

with

to

Brown

blond

at

Providence in which

"ace"

from

the

Rams

in

Union

our

City had

the appearance of

twenty-six points;

the annual Richmond,

Virginia, Invitational Tournament during the Christmas holidays; a close thrilling encounter with St. John's of Brooklyn in which the record-break ing juniors got twenty points apiece; two unforgettable home and away overtime tussles with the University of Connecticut in which Von Weyhe had thirty-five in the first, a single overtime loss, and Marozzi twenty-two in the double overtime defeat at Storrs; a

twenty-point

win

over

Brown in the

engagement at Kingston ; a hard-fought overtime loss to Provi return

dence

for

nie

steady playmakers, plugs. Capable and

Seniors

9

sea

their unfaltering, steady, heads-up competitiveness and leadership. out the five Rounding starting during the

Center

Graduating

in rather dismal fashion with

win

Anderson,

College by

Providence; and over

New

an

82-80

score

crushing 104-63 Hampshire. a

at

win

Individual highlights were the fol lowing. In the season's opener Bill Von Weyhe scored thirty-six points in a losing cause against St. Joseph's for his highest varsity point total. Soon

spark

after

reliable substitutes

high

Ron

Marozzi

of twenty-seven

got

his

points

season's

in the Bos-


ton

Cojlege

game

at

Boston Garden.

In the first UConn game

swished

home. Bill

thirty-five points through

nets, and while

ney

at

at

garnered thirty-four against

liam and

shire

Mary. Against

Billy

the

the Richmond Tour

New

Wil

Hamp

missed his first foul shot

attempt and then made 13

straight

in

the first half. For the second half he

again on

to

missed his first but then

get 19 for 20 for the

he made his

next

tied the all-time for

consecutive

went

night

as

6 straight. Billy also major college record foul

shots

with

33

straight early in the have his scoring pal

only to fraternity

season

and

brother, Ron Marozzi, come along later and break it with 35 versions. Until this

straight

foul

con

had held the

Billy

record with Howie Shannon of Kan State who made his

sas

unusual

an

for

plishment

33

straight is quite

early 1940's. This and outstanding

back in the

have

same season to

the other break

in the

tie and then

one

all-time

an

accom

teammates

two

major

col

lege scoring record. In the last home game of the

season

against Springfield, Von Weyhe broke Ernie Calverly's 11 year old Rhode Is land individual single seasons total mark of 547 totaled

25

points.

He

points. Billy in this game points to give him 550 very dramatically tied it

with the first of 2 minutes of

free throws with

two

and then

play remaining

dunked the second

break it. Before

to

the end he also sank another field for

good

he received

ment

For this

measure. a

goal accomplish

gratifying standing along with

ovation from the crowd

Stairs and Eric Anderson who

Bob were

playing their final home games Baby Blue and Ronnie Marozzi fine season's work in scoring.

for the for

a

These

ovations

standing

moving

and occurred

as

were

each

the game for substitutes. Von in his final

two

very

man

much

went on

games

left

Weyhe

scoring to set a more sub stantial season scoring record of 592 points for a 23.7 scoring average for further in

the

season.

really be team's

This 592

hard

season

ing, they

to

record

showed

basketball

seen at

point record will Although the

break.

was not

us some

Kingston

few years. The decision left

was

really

few

moments

outstand

of the finest in

quite

to most

a

games

hanging until the last boys, along with

and the

Jack Guy, should be very proud of their accomplishments. We enjoyed every last minute of each game and

only

wish

we

could have

the away games. Nice

seen more

job, gang!

of


BASEBALL SEASON'S RECORD RJiode Island

8

Quonset

0

Rhode Island

2

Boston

1

Rhode Island

4

Trinity

1

Rhode Island

2

Brown

3

Rhode Island

2

Maine

4

Rhode Island

11

Vermont

2

Rhode Island

3

Vermont

9 3

College

Rhode Island

2

New

Rhode Island

7

Brown

1

Rhode Island

5

Quonset

3

Rhode Island

3

Providence

College

2

Rhode Island

4

Providence

College

0

Hampshire

Rhode Island

15

Rhode Island

0

Massachusetts

Connecticut

5

Rhode Island

1

Massachusetts

0

Rhode Island

5

New

9

Hampshire

10

Rhode Island

1

Springfield

14

Rhode Island

4

Connecticut

7

Last year's Ram nine, under the tutorage of Coach Bill Beck, turned in a very fine season on the diamond with a winning record of ten wins and eight losses. This was indeed a fine record considering that four of the losses w^ere by one run, and that last year's record was only 5-12. This squad, which included 11 lettermen and 10 sophomores, was a pre-season "dark-horse" choice for the Yankee Conference Title and compiled a record of 3-6 for fourth place on that count. During the season the squad played 3 extra-inning contests, all of which ended up in 3-2 decisions. One, against P. C, was won in twelve innings 3-2, while two were lost by this score in 10 innings against Brown and New Hampshire. The squad was made up of a starting nine consist ing of regulars Jack Wojcik, Sal Fararra, Dick Cahiil, Pete DiMasi, Dick Lendrum, Ken Dellner, Gus Ed wards, and either Angelo "Junior" Dagres or John Leach and a pitcher. The mound corps was made up of Senior ace Dave Stenhouse, Ray Peltier, Dick Nord berg, Al Clegg, Tony Horton, and John O'Donnell. Infielder Doug Hopper, outfielder Dick Gourley, and catcher Al Alvarez saw limited duty as capable re placements. Others on the squad were Jim Boyden,

John Lace, John Ducharme, Jim Norman, John Long, and Bob Becker. In the season's opener, Rhody whipped the Quonset Flyers 8-0 in an abbreviated five-inning contest on the strength of eight hits and a combined three-hitter by Peltier, Stenhouse, and Nordberg. Peltier went three hits in three innings, Stenhouse and Nordberg got one each, while Leach and Farrara had two hits apiece. Both of Leach's hits were triples, while Fararra's were line singles.

In the first game at Meade Field, "Ace" Dave Sten house twirled the Rams to a 2-1 verdict over Boston College with a very strong four-hitter. Dick Cahiil singled in Wojcik from the keystone sack with one counter in the eighth, while Dave Stenhouse won his own game in the last of the ninth as he stroked a

Page

181


to bring in Dagres, who had also singled, with the clincher. Wojcik had two hits while Leach, Dell ner, and Lendrum had one apiece. Stenhouse had fifteen strikeouts.

single

Strong twirling

from

Junior Dick Nordberg, with an ninth, was the highlight

assist from Stenhouse in the

of

4-1

in the third en at Hartford. a shut-out on a four-hitter until he ran into trouble in the ninth, as he tired and needed an assist from the "Sten". DiMasi, Edwards, and Lendrum were the sticking leaders with two singles apiece. The R. I. infield helped the cause with three fast double-plays by Cahiil, DiMasi, and Farrara, while Nordberg had seven strikeouts. a

victory

over

counter

Trinity College Nordberg had

Although outhit 8 to 5, the Brown Bears took the Rams into camp 3-2 in Providence in ten innings for their first defeat. It was a heartbreaker for Dave Sten house, who deserved

a better fate by far. Dave had a two-hitter (two infield hits) going for eight innings

Dick Cahiil first

safely. The top hits of the inning were a solid two-run triple by Sal Farrara and a booming two-run homer by "Junior" Dagres. These same two inning

hit

also collected

had

a

singles

for the

afternoon, and DiMasi

double.

In the nightcap Vermont bounced back to a 9-2 win the maple-syrup men collected 11 hits from Horton, Clegg, and Peltier, Horton didn't retire a man, while Clegg was combed for seven singles in the first two innings when Vermont collected all their tallies. Rhody had only four hits, a triple and two singles by Dagres and a single by Lendrum. as

The next week-end, Rhody made their annual trip up North to Maine and New Hampshire. After being rained out at Orono on Friday, the Rams played on a soggy field at Durham on Saturday and were shaded 3-2 in ten innings despite only two hits being given to the Wildcats by Stenhouse. Dave pitched no-hit ball for seven innings, but then the two bingles and a walk tied the score for N. H. in the eighth. Wildness

Ken Dellner and had struck out thirteen batters. If was an outfield miscue on a fly ball in the tenth that allowed the win ning run and kept Stenhouse from his first varsity win over Brown. Farrara was the only Ram with two hits. Lendrum had tripled in the top of the tenth with only one down but was left stranded. Cahiil and Stenhouse both collected doubles. Harry Josephson, ace Brown outfielder, was the thorn in Rhody's side in hitting. Back at home the Black Bears from Maine kept Rhody derailed for a while by stopping them cold 4-2 Dick on a measly two hits and three unearned runs. Nordberg, who pitched six innings, allowed only one hit, and Ray Peltier, who also allowed only one hit, finished the game; both deserved a much better fate. Farrara had two base hits w^hile Lendrum, Leach, and Cahiil had one apiece. Stenhouse recorded his second win of the season 11-2 in the opener of a double-header against Vermont at Meade Field, as he scattered four enemy singles while his mates were banging out nine hits, three for extra bases. The highlight of the game was when the Rams countered six times, as the first seven batters in the

Page

182

Pete DiMasi


old innings of the first as Ray Peltier outduelled his the high school teammate Herb Hearne, and 4-0 in nightcap of seven innings. Clegg won the nightcap after taking over in the third for Peltier, who, trying to do an outstanding iron-man job, acquired a couple of blisters on his pitching hand. Peltier spun a neat six-hitter in the opener, and Dellner, Lendrum, and Leach collected the only hits. Clegg allowed only two in finishing up the second tilt, while Leach had two of the eight Ram hits, including a double. In the first game

against

Yankee Conference

Champs

Connecticut, the home forces simply outslugged them 15-10 in runs and 22 to 11 in hits. Pehier and Clegg withstood the UConn barrage while Rhody was having a field day at the plate. Dagres had four singles; DiMasi, Cahiil and Lendrum a home run and two singles apiece; and Dellner a home run and a single. DiMasi's and Cahill's home runs were back to back. Leach and Wo jcik also had two bingles.

The following week Rhody split a double-header with UMass as Phil Tarpy, the visitors' "ace", shut out the U.R.I, boys 5-0 on a three-hitter in the opener, and Al Clegg helped the Rams to cop the nightcap 1-0

Sal Ferarra

undoing in the last of the tenth when he walked three batters and Wojcik dropped the ball on an attempted steal at home. Of Rhody's five hits, Dagres again collected three singles, Lendrum doubled, and Cahiil singled.

proved

Dave's

Once back from up North, Rhody regained its win ways with a 7-1 victory over Brown at home, on Stenhouse's blazing three-hitter. Dave struck out four teen and, for a change, was ably assisted by his mates' seven hits. Farrara, Lendrum, and Cahiil had two hits while "Sten" and Dagres had the others.

ning

Then the Rams beat Quonset again 5-3 at home, as and Peltier shared the pitching duties, Clegg up two runs and Peltier the other. Farrara and Leach had three singles apiece while DiMasi collected

Clegg giving

Then, still at home, the Rams took both ends of a double-header from Providence College, 3-2 in twelve

Dave Stenhouse

by pitching a similar three-hit shutout. Rhody col lected only four hits in this nightcap, with John Leach getting three and the single RBI. Clegg looked good down

to

In the

the last out; he had six strikeouts.

game, the Wildcats from New Hampshire turned on Clegg for fourteen hits and nine runs as they drubbed us 9-5. Of the Rams' seven hits. Hopper was the only one to collect two, while Cahiil had a triple and Farrara a round-tripper. next

When the Rams next

and tier

Jack Wojcik

met the Gymnasts in Springfield the day, they were downed 14-1, as DiMasi, Farrara, Boyden collected the only three Ram safeties. Pel went the distance, giving up fourteen hits.

In the season's curtain closer, the Rams traveled to Storrs and were turned back 7-4 in a close tilt although the Huskies were outhit 10-7. Clegg and Peltier handled the Rams' pitching chores, and Farrara was the hitting star with a single, triple, and home run.

Page

183


TRACK & FIELD

Yes, it happened again. Coach Tootell directed his another undefeated outdoor track season last The track team romped through another season captured their eighth straight Yankee Conference Championship. Since 1932 under the guidance of Coach Tootell the outdoor track squads have lost only three dual meets out of approximately a hundred. Coach Tootell's forces have won every Yankee Conference Track Title since the six state universities became a playing con ference back in 1948. Rhody's all-time scoring mark in these meets is 525 5/12.

boys to spring. with

a

4-0 slate, and

Scoring very heavily in the field events the Ram track men overpowered Boston College 99-36 in the opening meet. They completely swept all three finishing positions in 6 of the 16 events. Chris Segar was the only double winner and Chick Sands won the 100 yd. dash in the sen sational time of 9-8. Bill MacQuattie and Harry Hampson led the scoring in the long distance events.

The summary of Rhode Island scoring: Hammer Throw 1st Bob Taylor, 2nd Carlos Roberti, 3rd Le Roy Grinnell. High Jump 1st Chris Segar. Javelin 1st Chris Segar, 2nd Ed Maiello, 3rd Joe Short. Pole Vault 1st tie between Tony Chrostek and Ed Devine. Shot Put 1st Kazar Apkarian, 2nd Carlos Robert!, 3rd Stan Chorney. Mile 1st Bill MacQuattie, 2ndHarry Hampson, 3rd Hank Trembley. 440 1stDon "Knobby" Walsh. 100 1stBob "Chic" Sands. 880 1st Stu Smith. 2 Mile 1st Harry Hampson, 2ndBill MacQuattie, 3rd "Hank" Trembley. High Hurdles 2nd Fran Brown. Low Hurdles 2nd Fran Brown. Rhode Island took the second meet of the season by pasting Providence College 102 2/3-32 1/3. Dominating the meet from the onset and taking 13 of 15 first places, the Rams overwhelmed the Friars who were shut out in four events. Rhode Island scoring summary: 880 2ndSmith 220 1stCharlie Guber. High Hurdles 1st Brown, 2nd Bruce Wilson. 100 1st Sands, 2ndBill Mattos, 3rdBob Horton. Mile 1stBill MacQuattie. 440 1stWalsh. 2 Mile 1st ^Hampson. Low Hurdles 1st Brown, 3rd Wilson. Discus 1st Roberti, 2nd Friend, 3rd Chorney. Pole Vault 1st tie between Devine and Chrostek. 1st High Jump Seegar, 2nd Dick Morris, 3rd Horton. Javelin 2nd Maiello, 3rd Seegar. Shot Put 1st Apkarian, 3rd Chorney. Hammer Throw 1st 2nd 3rd

Roberti.

Taylor,

Grinnell,

Broad Jump 1st Seegar, 2ndMorris, 3rdHorton. Rhode ran into a little tougher opposition against Springfield but still managed to trim them 78-57. The Rams again won 12 of the events but only completed a sweep in one of these. Double winners for Rhody were Chris Seegar and Fran Brown. The Rhode Island scoring: Hammer Throw 1st Taylor, 2nd Grinnell, 3rd Roberti.

Page 184


^M^^'tU.

High Hurdles 1st Brown, 3rdWilson. 100 Yard Dash 1st Sands, 3rd Horton. Mile 1st MacQuattie, 3rdTrembley.

440 1stWalsh, 3rd Smith. 2 Mile 1st Hampson. Discus 1st Roberti, 3rd Friend. Low Hurdles 1st Brown, 3rd Wilson.

High Jump -1st Seegar. 880 1stMacQuattie. 220 2nd Guber, 3rdWalsh. Broad Jump 1st Seegar. Shot Put ^Ist Apkarian, 3rd In the fi^nal meet of the

Chorney. season

the Ram clobbered

events and took Field Record in Double winners were: Bob Sands in 100 i nd 220, and Bill MacQuattie in the 880 and mile runs. Seegar was first in the javelin, broad jump and high jump and took a third in the low hurdles. The Rams copped twelve first places and tied for yet another. Rhode Island scoring: High Hurdles 2nd Brown, 3rd Morris. 100 Yard Dash 1stSands, (9.8), 2ndGuber, 3rd Horton. Mile 1stMacQuattie, 3rd Smith. 440 2nd Walsh. 2 Mile 1st Hampson, 3rd^ Trembley. Low Hurdles 1st Brown, 2nd Wilson, 3rd Seegar. 1st 880 MacQuattie, 2nd Smith. 220 1st Sands, 2ndGuber. High Jump 1st Seegar, 2nd Morris. Shot Put -1st ^Apkarian, 2nd Chorney. Javelin 1st Seegar, 2nd Short, 3rd Maiello. Discus 1st ^Friend. Devine. Chrostek tie for first, 3rd Pole Vault 1st 1st Hammer Throw Taylor, 3ard Grinnell. 2nd Morris. 1st Broad Jump Seegar, A great team performance along with a couple of in dividual record-breaking or tying performances were the essential factors in Rhody capturing their eighth straight Yankee Conference Championship which was held here

Brown a

104-31,

third, while

Seegar won three Bobby Taylor set a Meade as

Chris

Meade Field last spring. The Ram trackmen compiled total of 51 2/8 points. Other team scores were: New 4l 6/8, Maine 30 3/8, Connecticut 27, Massa chusetts 7 6/8, and Vermont 6 6/8. Towards the end of the meet a one, two, finish by Sands and Guber in the 220 yard dash clinched the championship over runner up New Hampshire. Apkarian set both a new conference and Meade Field mark with a heave of 51' 1" in the shot put. The old conference championship meet record stood at 49' 85/8", also set by Kazar in 1953, Boy Taylor also set a new conference record in the hammer throw with a toss of 172' 2". "Chick" Sands also broke the conference rec ord in the 100 yard dash with a 9.8 second performance, and equalled the record in the 220 yard dash with a clock ing of 21.9. Charlie Guber who Bob nosed out in the 220 also holds this 21.9 record. Chris Seegar also won the

at a

Hampshire

high jump competition. Bob Taylor set a sensational new record in the ham mer throw at the Penn. Relays in Philadelphia. Taylor won a gold watch for his first place finish as he threw the hammer 177' 1".

180' IVs" which

smashed

the

old

record

of

itjdoor track this past winter the school ran a mile team of quarter milers Hal Voorhees, Kenny WillisBill MacQuattie, Dick Dubois, and Ken Peckham in most of the indoor invitational meets. In the IC4A meet at New York, Bob Mairs grabbed a highly respectful fourth place finish in the high hurdles. Jerry Ferrara also won the high jump at the N.E.A.A.U. championship meet at Providence, along with a third in the Knights of Columbus Games at Boston Garden. In

relay ton,

Page

185


Row 1:

(l-r) E. Hennigan,

K. Wiliiston, W. Turnbull, Coach Tootell

Row 2: (l-r) F.

Gardella,

A. Vilardofski, T.

Wright,

W.

Schnitzer,

. Sozanski

COUNTRY

CROSS Thehill-and-dale harriers, ably coached for the last time)

(probably

by

athletic director, Fred Tootell,

able

to

capture

man team

indicates that

will be

proved.

squad

was

one

who did

in the fall.

man.

not

showing

coming

season.

dual

varsity

school

McQuattie

loads of

scorer,

was

with

and Al Vil

promise

for the

Other members of the

scoring.

order of finish

ardofski

Bill

were

Turnbull, Steve Gardella,

Wright,

Eddie Henni

four-mile

contributing

were

Vilardofski

Wright (8) next

run,

also

experienced his

career

blanked

and

Page 186

course at

the

for R. I.

(4), Turnbull

(7),

home. Coach Tootell

at

as

a

strong

or

Fordham

Fordham's

best

team

their

team

score

total

of

score

be achieved in cross-country.

In the Yankee Conference

ships

at

Orono, Maine, the

fourth in

a

heart-breaking

close

son's

at

Champion

team

field of six. The

shire 28-29 back

one to

finished

boys

New

Kingston

lost

a

Hamp

in the

sea

windup.

Prospects but

were

edged by

McQuattie right

on

zanski the

a

ran

Northeastern 21-39,

as

finished third and Wiliiston

his heels in fourth

position.

and Vilardofski

(9)

other

race

strong

(11)

Providence

scorers.

So

were

College

19-42 whipped McQuattie, our first finisher, in Also were Wiliiston place. scoring

then

us

with

on

their

course

(6), Vilardofski (11), Sozanski (15), (16).

home

again, the Rams got a they ate bear meat in a 27-30 conquest of Brown. Kenny Williston finished a strong first as Rhody took taste

of

victory

as

the fifth

to eighth spots with Vilardofski, Sozanski, Wright, and Turnbull finishing

in that order.

In the

Hennigan (9).

Rhody 15-49.

can

Kingston.

scoring

the first shut-out defeat of

15 is the lowest

which

to

and

Wiliiston (7), Vil

were:

At Boston, the Rams

Returning

Springfield nosed out the Ram har opening meet 27-29, although Bill McQuattie was the first one home Also

figure

Islanders

Ray.

riers in the

over a new

the

in the

(9). McQuattie (10), Wright

and Turnbull

gan, Bill Schitzer, and Charlie

only

(13), and Turnbull (14).

third

Ed Sozanski, Tom

Rhode

team

a

hurt

by the Junior Harry

return to

Senior Bill

ardofski

only

first five members of

and im

seriously

the mainstay and leading Sophomores Ken Wiliiston

squad

fall's

about when Fordham had the

came

first six finishers in the race, and

got under way

season

loss of its number

Hampson,

next

seven

This

new

fine fresh

a

vastly strengthened

The

before the

were

of the

for the season, but

events

squad

one meet

our

Up took

at us

Storrs,

a

into camp

strong UConn

19-42,

as

team

McQuattie

finished third and Wiliiston sixth. So

zanski, Gardella, and Wright copped twelfth, thirteenth, and fourteenth re

spectively.

for

next

year

fine with the many strong

turning and freshman

look pretty

the addition

sophomores re of a top-notch

led

Tom Hill and

squad

George Chappell.

by


wins, the

GOLF

lost many close decisions the other

teams

easily gone early season by its "ace",

which could have

ties.

rwo way and recorded The team was ably led

number

Opponent U.R,l

Score

Opponent Trinity

131/2

13'/2

Bates

131/2

13V2

Maine

20

10

Brown

4

3

Providence

2

5

two

and Burt Rosen

man,

Paul

was

Harry Hampson

Butler, while

the

num

Jim ber three. Others on the squad Marble, Bob Hammerlund, Ralph Scor were

pio

Redding.

and Bill

The was

feature of the

outstanding

season

copping the New Inter-Collegiate Oakley Country Club.

that of Paul Butler

Individual

England Championship

at

He walked away with top honors in

171/2

91/2

Bates

Colby

22

5

Maine

23

4

Connecticut

19

8

only won

141/2

Providence

Coached

Paul Butler New

good

Conference

Chapman,

ny

came

after Score

indicates

only

V.R.I.

and

the R. L

with

up

RECORD

Op.

and other matches. Al

Under the fine tutorage of Coach

TENNIS Opponent

play

the record

though

an

eight

varsity

season

losses in the 1954

two

John

tennis

of

to

Knoxville, Ten

Inter-CoUegiate Championships where he did not fare as well. However, the trip was a quite wonderful experience and he played some fine golf. While there he was also hon ored

by being

many Eastern West match

selected from among all the golfers to play in the Eastthe

the

before

Sunday

tournament.

favor of Uconn

at

Storrs.

team

After

outstanding

disappointing

a

a

the links in both Yankee

season on

trip

a

for the National

nessee,

121/2

of Rhode Island Golf Team had

versity

England Intercollegiate Golf Champion

time any Rhode Island Collegian has this individual championship. By

this he earned

Paul F. Cieurzo the Uni

by

a

tourney that had 147 individuals repre senting 27 different colleges and univer sities competing in it, and this was the

season,

win

one

Trinity,

losing the

boys

its

to

up with three fine

showings, beating Maine,

season.

match

opening

came

New

Hamp

shire, and Holy Cross by comfortable

Trinity

8

1

Maine

1

8

record, and

New

Hampshire

1

8

termen;

Holy

Cross

Helmus, Mike Hattub, Art Helmus, Brad

Connecticut

Boss, and Pete Barchi

team

The

2

7

Brown

9

0

Massachusetts

6

3

Quonset

2

7

New

3

6

Springfield

5

4

ably

Connecticut

4

5

replace

peting

team

led

a

by

fine six and four

scores

the

let-

to

Brown, and then dropping

(captain), John

to

Mass.

Jack Bailey,

or

following

Dick Bird

for the six spot. Of this

three will

Hampshire

posted

was

return

this

season.

captain elect Hattub and

the

brothers, John

They

and Art.

be coached Mr.

by

com

squad only They

two

are

Helmus

will

prob

Hub Maack who will

Chapman

who has left

us

before

bowing again

Quonset, were

dropped

a

New

in a

a

shutout

close

Hampshire,

one

and

subdued, although the

close

one

to

Springfield

before the final Uconn match. The

team

finished third in the rain in competition for

the

Yankee

though they

were

Conference Title, al

leading

until the final

day.

in

Page

187


Row 1,

Left

to

Right: J. Redinger,

M. Grills, A.

Row 2: h.

Scungio, J. Neal, J. Berghman,

Firth, C. Cuppels, J. Gencarelli, D. Sundquist, B.

esi, N. Wood, K. Ward, J.

Barsamian, R. Stenmark.

R.

Cheer Leaders

Go-Rhody-Go!

Fight-Rams-Fight!

our

football and basketball games, these

the

encouraging words, along

enthusiastic cheers, of

our

At are

with many

vivacious cheer

leaders. The squad so ably led by Captain and Jean Gencarelli, added loads of pep color

to

the games.

Through

ber the Maine game shine they

were

seen

at

rain (remem

Meade Field) and

giving their job girls!

the blue and white. Nice

all for

Mainey.

Capalbo,

B. Carl

C. Munroe,


n

f ^

? # r

Row 1: A. Alvarez, J. Wojcik, D. Walsh, R. Stairs, Pres.; J. Hayes, J. Leach, K. Seal. Rotv 2: A. Chrostek, C.

John

,

A.

Clegg,

R. Hor

ton, E.

Edwards, R. Nordberg, P. Fitzgerald, E. Di

Simone. Row 3: R. Novelli, J. R. Conde, C. Hunt.

Short,

R.

Gourley,

L. Grinnell,

The Rhode Island Club The Rhode Island Club is

an honorary organi varsity lettermen. The club enforces the rules regarding the wearing of tiie letter and aids in the promotion of athletics at the college.

zation of

In addition to its athletic guidance program, the club takes part in many campus activities, the feature of which is the annual spring banquet.

are

At the finish of each school year, honorary keys presented to the most outstanding members of

the club.


Varsity

Rifle Team

Row 1: P. Winiarski, C.

Miller, J. Hatch, E. Rey

Cook, D. Har

T.

nolds,

rington,

T.

McConnell

2:

L.

Howard, J.

Row

Regan,

L.

A

PhiUips,

Schreiner, J. Nagel, W.

Wolslegel.

This year's varsity rifle team, ably coached by Sgt. Reynolds of the R. O. T. department, had an excellent turnout of 90 individuals at the opening of the season. The squad, by either the process of elimination or campus conflicts, in C.

two

months

was cut

down

to

about 25 riflemen. Some of these

men

were

also

competing on the R. O. T. C. rifle team at the same time. The varsity squad par ticipated in both shoulder to shoulder and postal matches during the course of the season. Rhode Island was entered in the southern division of the New Eng land College Varsity League which is composed of 12 teams. In this division the team posted a record of three wins and seven losses but this does not tell the whole story. Regardless of the record the team will participate in the southern divi to determine the top three teams. These teams will then compete against the northern division's best. Also on tap is the National Rifle Association team and individual

sion finals

championships

which will be held in March

Connecticut. The

postal matches bore competition are played with Members of the Dale

Harrington,

team were

Thomas

Howard Goldman and team

Pete

such for

Page 190

at

are

New

London,

indoor small

many other

colleges

all

the nation.

over

the

which

success

were

Harry

Taylor Cook, James Boyer,

McConnell,

Kim

Wheelock,

Goldman. Also

Leland

contributing to Phillips, George Sparkawk,

Winiarski, Walt Goodman, and Art Shreiner. With a

fine group of undergraduates year look very bright.

next

on

the

squad, prospects


Intercollegiate Dinghy

Row 1:

J. Turner,

D. Walker, E. Miner. Row 2: N. Turner, B. Rich,

Capt.;

B. Arnold, Coach.

Row 3:

J. Mullervy, G. Lamb.

Row 4: R. Walls.

During strength

the 1956

Trophy Regatta, we

still

placed

amount

of

among

strength

Team showed

major

events

such

signs of both

as

in this

showing

the Danmark

was

event.

Hoyt Trophy Invitation Regatta

a

Rhode Island

of Neil Turner and Bill Arnold with Dick Walls and

Jim Mullervy

as crews area.

Dinghy

of the

slightly below par even though the leading New England teams. Several of the the New England district showed a surprising

In the C. Sherman team

some

the team's

from outside of

teams

the

season

and weakness. In

placed second in a field of the major meets including

In other

top

ten teams

those with

of the New

England

freshman

skippers placed

our

of Dick CoUey, Dick Lord and Bob Rich the Rhode Island among the leaders of the New

England

area are

England

team

at

has

never

lost

a

National

The

teams

team

from the New

the best in the nation for

a

New

Championship.

good fall record the team is in line for several major invita including the Boston Dinghy Club Cup and the McMillan Annapolis, Maryland during the spring season.

With

a

tional regattas

Cup

England generally recognized as

area.

Team


Phi Mu

Repeats Again

Phi Mu Delta

repeated again ternity point honors and winning ship cup for the 1954-55 period. in

in taking individual fra the intramural champion

With first

place

finishes

basketball, foul shooting, wrestling, and track; along a third in cross-country and a fourth in Softball, they

with

able to easily nail down first place with a total of 507.3 points. Tau Kappa Epsilon finished second with a total of 455 points. They received most of their points on first place league finishes in Softball, and touch football, along with a tennis third and fourth in wrestling. After the points were totaled Beta Psi was found in third place. They took second place finishes in cross country, and wrestling, along with third places in tennis and football. They took fourth place in foul shooting and Softball. This gave them a total of 381.5 points. These results mentioned above are all regular season finishes and not play-off results. were

In touch football Beta Psi won the play-off championship after finishing second in their division for the regular season. they beat T.K.E. who was undefeated in the other division. Beta Psi beat them by an 8-2 score. In the finals they met P.I.K., who was the semi-final winner over Phi Theta, Phi Kap had edged out Phi Gamm in In the semi-finals

Kappa

a

special

by a 9-8 score. However, they had getting by P.I.K., 18-4, for the championship.

quarter final

little trouble

The "54" cross-country title was copped by P.I.K. by out Beta Psi, who had the individual winner, Ray P.I.K. had a low score of 70 points while Beta Psi was close behind with 79 points.

edging

Giornelli.

INTRAThe individual placings of Doug Hopper (4), Ken ShuU (5), Bill Von Weyhe (8), Tony Maorisi (25), and Jack Holmes (25), offset Giornelli and Pete DiMase (3), of the runner-ups. Phi Mu Delta was third with Don Riley plac ing second, and Sigma Nu fourth. The basketball crown was also won by Phi Mu who through the play-off with comparative ease after going through the regular season undefeated. For the crown they eliminated Phi Kappa Theta, Alpha Epsilon Pi and Phi Gamma Delta, to acquire 195 points toward the intramural championship. Phi Mu's team was composed of Art Helmus, John Helmus, Jim North, John Herald, Joe Bruno, Al Saunders, John O'Donnel, John Wojcik, Jack Abazaid, and Evan Haynes. Phi Kap finished second, A.E.Pi third, and Phi Gam fourth in regards to point standings. went

Phi Mu also ran away with the foul shooting contest as they posted 102 points to 87 points for Sigma Nu the second place finisher. Rho lota Kappa finished third with 85 points and Beta Psi Alpha fourth with 83 points. Jack Wojcik leader with an outstanding 24 conversions in 25 attempts, while Art Helmus also had a highly respectable 23 for 25.

The other three scorers were loe Bruno (20), Dick Silva (18), and Jim North (17). Sigma Nu was led by Dick Weekes who had 21, while Mitch Asadorian had 19 for P.I.K. and Norm Kennedy the same for Beta Psi. Other leading point scorers were Dick Blackwell (21), Phi Sig; Allan Beck (20), Phi Gam; Alan Blitzer (20), T.E.P.; and Henry

Papa (20),T.K.E.

Page

192


In wrestling Phi Mu also emerged the winner although they had to go all out to edge Beta Psi by a couple of points. Sigma Nu finished third, and T.K.E. fourth. Individual leaders for the "orange and black" were Nimrod Torkomian (120), Don Hall (150, Al Saunders (160), Ken Wheeler (170) and Dave Daubney (180). In the track

nosed

ent

most

out

every

meet in the spring a strong Phi Mu conting A.E.Pi for top honors and they scored in al Phi Kap finished third and P.I.K. fourth.

event.

The tennis title was taken by three competitors from Theta Chi who won and nosed out the Phi Gam boys who finished second. Those w^ho brought Theta Chi the tennis cup were Al Sonner, Joe Wells, and Kenny Peckham. Chuck Stew^art and Paul Ricciardi were Phi Gams leaders. A.E.Pi finished third.

T.K.E. won the softball championship after finishing first in their division for the regular season. Lambda Chi finished first for the regular season in the other division. In

play off Phi Mu beat Lambda Chi and T.K.E. beat Sigma Pi in the semi-finals. In the best 2 out of 3, T.K.E. won over Phi Mu in the finals for the cro^vn.

the

The 55-56 intramural touch football schedule.

season

got under way with the fall

out of the semi-finals with a w^in over went on to cap the championship with a P.I.K. who had downed Lambda Chi in the other semi-final. Beta Psi and Lambda Chi had ended up with alike 6-1 regular season records in their division, while P.I.K. had 6-1 for a first place finish and T.E.P., 4-2, for sec ond place in division number two.

After the

coning

T.E.P., Beta Psi

victory

over

MURALS Phi Mu won the basketball crown by taking two straight from Beta Psi in the finals. Beta Psi had beaten Sigma Chi reach the finals and Phi Mu had whipped Phi Gam.

to

In the foul shooting contest Lambda Chi and S.A.E. fin ished in a tie for the high point total.

Enjoying a 42 point margin over the second place fin isher Lambda Chi, a strong Sigma Chi team romped home first with a low point score of 4-2. Although the individual winner was Marshall "Toot" Home of Lambda Chi, Sigma Chi placed all its five scorers in the first five. They were: Carvalho (2), Roberge (7), Smith (9), Dinger (10), and Alvarez (12). Phi Mu was third, and Sigma Nu with Mann (3), was fourth.

Alpha Epsilon PI

Lambda Chi

Alpha 35

Page

193

18 64 57

245.4 236.8 224.5


ATTENTION ALL U. R. I. WOMEN: This is your Women's Athletic Associa tion. It is primarily the governing body of all women's sports activities. It consists of a board of directors composed of a President, Vice President, and SecretaryTreasurer, as well as house representa tives and head managers of the various sports. The Association is based on the theme of promoting good sportsmanship and teamwork. From the

Women's

Sports

of September to Association is a bustling beehive of activity. Besides spon soring interhouse sports, it backs various trips for the intercollegiate teams. Field Hockey teams and Basketball teams tra vel far and wide to "bring home the bacon" for the glory of ol' Rhody. the

end

of

beginning May,

the

An annual banquet is held in May of each year, at which time awards are made to those girls who have shown enough

interest in sports to receive a shield, key, or the coveted blazer. This year, the W. A. A. is sponsoring a square dance, the proceeds of which will send a girl or girls to hockey camp in Maine for a week.

Women's Athletic

Assoc iat ion

Field The

almost

hockey as soon

September

19,

Hockey arrived at U. R. I. did the Freshmen. On

season as

twenty-five upperclass

took to the hockey field in a demon stration game, with enthusiastic specta tors cheering them on. men

In October, the house tournament was officially started. Beautiful weather and extended daylight saving time allowed three games a night to be played, and a

double elimination type of tournament increased the excitement. After weeks of outstanding sportsmanship and competi tion. Alpha Chi Omega and the Com muters entered the finals. The two teams tied each other twice, but in the third playoff the Commuters were victorious. The Honor team lost its only game of the season to Pembroke College I-O, win the remaining 4 games. Three of these victories were achieved at the an nual Wellesley Playday where Rhode Is land won every game.

ning

19=!


Basketball By far the keenest competition intramurals ball

season.

occurs

during

in

The enthusiasm is great from

the first week of the

season to

For the second year in

a row

the very last.

Eleanor Roose

velt Hall remained undefeated and

the

girls*

the house basket

copped

trophy. Alpha Chi Omega fell short in

their attempt and

were

runners-up.

p^0^P ^#00

This year the basketball club had successful season,

losing win

5

winning

1. The club started the

over

Salve

wins with the

season

Regina. Following Quonset

a

very

and

games

with

that

a

were

Waves and Willi-

mantic State Teachers

College. The club

lost their

rival

only

Connecticut in

game a

to

University

close match. The

team

of

also

beat both Pembroke College and Bradford

Junior College

Page 195

at a

Playday

at

Pembroke.


Badminton

The old

English

and shuttlecock,

game of battledore

enjoyed

much

so

by

the natives of Glocestershire in years

past, is

annually

revived

the form of badminton.

signed

be

to

Lippitt Gym

lawns, the wind into

for the winter, where the

always permitting.

The women's a

on

campus in

the game is moved

permitting,

wind is

played

on

Originally de

partial

housing

units

played

round robin in doubles

termine the house

to

de

championship.

across e

With the advent of

again spor<-s. games

enters

the

spring.

scene

of

Lacrosse

outdoor

Although it is one of the oldest played today, it is still in its pri

mary stage here at U. R. I. A game al

entirely played in the air, it re well developed skill and good can which coordination only be achieved through constant practice.

most

quires

But Lacrosse isn't all work and

play.

Enthusiasm

runs

high

in

no

this

practice sessions, there playdays and field trips to

game. Besides are

many

exhibition games where experts show to be played. And so

how the game is the are

Page 196

season

again

ends,

as

the Lacrosse sticks

put away for another year.


Row 1: D.

Wujcik,

Row 2: M.

Although the rifle season was slow in starting this year, the girls soon got into full swing. Dressed in dungarees and old shirts, the girls spent many hours practicing at

the rifle range in Rodman Hall. The

sults

the

paid

score

The

off and had

by

the end of the

improved

T.

Styborski,

Little, Manager; J. Bush. C.

Zoubra,

P. Brune, C.

Kapff,

B. Nadeau.

re

season

100 percent.

University of Rhode

Island Women's

Rifle Team is affiliated with the National Rifle Association. tion

our team

and shoulder

Through

has fired many to

this

organiza

postal

matches

shoulder matches with other

colleges.

"Ready,

"A little

Aim

help from

.

the men."


Volleyball The

volleyball season got well under February. The house games

way

in

were

played

ination

in

a

double round elim

permitting each team to play at least two games. The object of the tournament was sports manship and interest and the results were always fun. Everyone tried to keep that ball in the air but sometimes too high in the air Lippitt roof beams. Along with the yells of "I've got it" and "Spike it" everyone had a good time and the season ended all tournament

not a part of Volleyball co-recreational program of

Although there is

a

Volleyball

teams

members of

a

four

Women's

consisting of four Housing Unit and Housing Unit. Rules were adopted so that both sexes had an equal chance at playing. It was always a time for laughter to see the boys depending on the girls for that of

a

necessary tap game.

Men's

over

the

net to

win the

Tennis "Match point" and "Deuce" cries resound from E. R. Courts as the Tennis Club struggles with the hun dred and

ten

factors incidental

Although tennis is primarily activity, the club practices in

to a

form

Spring

the Fall

and the members use the indoor back boards in Lippitt during the winter When

Spring

rolls

a fierct inside innocuous lob, as the weary instructor sighs help lessly. And those powerful forehands prove themselves as ball after ball soar over the twenty foot fence and join the odd swamp collection.

backhand smash,

becomes,

too

as

often,

Amazement

at a

healthy laughter the lively ping

around,

developed

an

perfect placement,

about their blunders, of a newly -stringed

racket, sore, sore muscles the first few times, matches with UConn and others they all go to make up the genteel and enjoyable pastime. Tennis, .

Page 198

.

.


The Modern Dance Club has

rapidly

since its

beginning

in

progressed September.

Miss Sandra Genter, Director of the Club has devoted much of her time and expe rience

gained

to

it and

as

only

in

not

a result the girls have learning about modern

participating in the techniques approaching choreography as an art.

dance and but in

By improvising

their

own

dances

to

music,

speech, the girls have found that a feeling for expressing life is necessary rather than experience in dance. drums and

Row 1: B. Baxter Miss Genter, K.

Maginnis, Pres,;

B. Broomfield.

Row 2:

J. Nichols,

R. Rainone, A. St. Germain, A. Gursky, J. Gold.


As this article is written the

Archery Club good

hoped that, as you read it, we can say "a for that is the purpose of the Archery Club.

it is

has yet time

to

was

meet, but

had

by all",

already signed up (we hope for more!) are enjoyable semester shooting their way to honors under the capable direction of their faculty advisor. Miss Crucker, who hopes to make the Archery Club an annual thing. The

looking

eight

members

forward

to an

As w^e said before, although archery is a demand sport in that it requires patience, cooperation, and training, nevertheless it can be a constant source of enjoyment, and enjoyment is the prime motive in the Archery Club.

Soft Ball

Page

200


STUDENT DIRECTORY BRADY, Martha V.

BATTY, Daniel R.

Juniors

Providence

122 Baxter St.

BRAYTON, Edward R.

BEAUDOIN, Adrien E.

ADAMS, Robert A. 10 Whelan Road 5-L

Central Falls

1262 Broad St.

BRIDEN, Richard

BEAUDOIN, Robert L.

ADAMS, Stephanie R.

Central Falls

13 Hawley St.

BROWN, Charles E.

BECK, Allan D.

122

Perry St.

Falls

ALLEGRETTO, Rose R. Hill Rd. Chepachet

Conn.

40

ANDREWS,

Howard L.

ANDRIESSE, Paul G. 124 Sims St. Newport

Providence

ANSUINI, Shirley M.

BROWNING, Lucille C. 11

BROWNRIDGE, Helen

Providence

Central Falls

874 Broad St.

Wakefield

Christopher St.

Providence

98 Waltham St.

BLANCHETTE, Ernest I.

Cranston

Woonsocket

368 Woodlard Rd-

BILGOR, William D. 603 Hope St.

Cranston

365 Auburn St.

Robert E.

666 Chalkstone Ave.

Campus

BROWN, Louis R.

Central Falls

BERRYMAN,

Central Falls

R.

BROWN, Letoy L.

Pawtucket

36 Hendricks St.

John

Trailer Park

BERNAT, Joseph J.

Bradford

75 Calaman Rd.

Pawtucket

Ordway St.

ANDERSON, Carolyn J. Bowling Lane

BROWN,

BERETTA, Richard R. 65 Hillcrest Ave.

Newport

27 Edward St.

BERGERON, John N.

Poquonnock Bridge,

19 Cliff St.

BROWN, George, L. Foster

Maple Rock Rd.

ALLEN, Richard S.

57

Pawtucket

713 Mineral Spring Ave.

BENNETT, Donald

Central

Tourtellote

Depot Rd.

Providence

150 Miller Ave.

Providence

AISSIS, Angela J.

8

J. Providence

92 Larch St.

Cranston

AIKEN, Alan D. Rochambeau Ave.

Norwood

18 Petansect Ct.

Apt., Providence

199 Pontiac Ave.

211

Valley Falls

61 Kinsman St.

BUCCI, Eleanor J. 195 Killlngly St.

Providence

ARNOLD, Allan W. RFD

Sterling,

1, Box 106

BLITZER, Alan D.

Conn.

BUCKLIN, Lyman A.

Woodmere, N. Y.

862 Woodmere Place

RFD 2

E. Greenwich

ARSENAULT, Aime A. Central Falls

29 Chestnut St.

BOETTGER, Adolf

BUSER, Richard P.

E. Greenwich

Stony Lane, RD 1

13 Goodwin St.

Newport

AVERBACH, Judy 63-46 99 St.. Rego Park 74

New York

BOGOSIAN, Harry D. 91

BAKER, Billy R.

Providence

Alvin St.

BUTLER, Paul J. 171

BOLGER, Patrick K. 57 Country Club Dr.

BAKER, James M.

Pawtucket

CAMBIO, Frank C, Jr.

Providence

19 Ravenswood Ave

BORIS, Andre BANAHAN, William J.

Providence

197

CAPALBO, June P. Westerly

Canal St.

Westerly-Bradford

Rd.

Bradford

Wakefield

Prospect Ave.

BOUSQUET,

BARISH, Rima E. 1901 Ave. P.

Ave.

Wakefield

38 Allen Ave.

12

Bristol

Peace Dale

5 Hathaway Dr.

Brooklyn,

N. Y.

47 Madeleine Ave.

Madeleine

J.

Woonsocket

CAREY, James W. 1 1

Westcott Ave.

Providence

Page

201


D'AMBRIA, Frank K.

CASEY, Kevin B. Rockland, Mass.

87 Central St.

Phillips

48

Wickford

St.

CASWELL, Prudence A. Narragansett Kingstown Rd.

542 Gaskill St.

Bristol

Ferry

75

Providence

35 Hess Ave.

20 Auerbach Lane, Lawrence, L. L, N. Y,

155

Point

Warwick

63 Albert Ave.

Box

East Providence

Belmont, Mass.

Providence

25

Cherry

North Scituate

58

Spooner

St.

Pascoag

Providence

COUTURE, Philip

Jamestown

Manville

955 Chalkstone Ave.

51 Summer St.

83 Bank St.

Westerly

East Shore Road

Woonsocket

Main

Providence

St., P. O. Box 53

Apt. G-South, URI,

Providence

60 Second Point Rd.

Cranston

107 Brandon Rd.

FRASER, Marilyn J. Warwick

133 Twin Oak Dr.

Providence

15 Spring St.

Jamestown

Harrisville

Cranston

DALEY, Thomas P. Woonsocket

50

Wyndham

Ave.

821 Mendon Rd.

Kingston

Warwick

39 Kelsey Rd.

Pawtucket

16 Winton St.

Peace Dale

75

Brayton Ave.

Warwick

GARDINER, Chester A. Box 71

Hope Valley

GARDOSIK, Joseph Providence

Providence

ELLERY, Gordon R. 1158 Plainfield St.

Woonsocket

GAGNON, Robert A.

GALLUCCI, Joseph A.

4 Bowen Court

F.

W. Warwick

GARTLAND, Rosemary 31

Paine

Ave.

Cranston

GATES, William M. Johnston

EMERSON, Raymond C.

DALPE, Peter G.

Westerly

FRIEDRICHS, Barbara J.

EKEBLAD, Robert F.

DAGLIAN, Neshan S. 154 Narragansett St.

Hoxsie

FRECHETTE, D'Ann P.

DYER, Charles J. 33 Health Ave.

Providence

234 Eighth St.

DUPONT, George B.

CUMMINGS, James W.

Pawtucket

FRANK, Mimi G.

DUFFY, John J.

CSIZMESIA, James

St. Albans, Vermont

90 Smithfield Ave

DUCHARME, John A.

CRONIN, Patricia A.

Pawtucket

FRACASSA, Harold R.

DRUMMOND, Hugh T.

CREPEAU, Paul James

Howard

FOSTER, Nancy A.

DOYXE, Thomas A.

CRADDOCK, Nicholas J.

Page 202

Greenwood

94 Myrde Ave.

A.

Hills, N. Y.

89 Brown St.

DOWNS, Robert S.

50 Scott Rd.

114 Margaret St.

Johnston

57 North Road

COTA, Donald J.

135 Cato St.

Ave.

Mass.

FORTIN, Richard A.

DOWLING, Charles J. Jr.

CORMIER, William F.

71 Herschel St.

Providence

Hill Rd.

Forest

12 Blais Ave.

DONALDSON, George, Jr.

COOK, Marcia I.

300 River Ave.

108-35 65 Ave.

DiSIMONE, Edward L.

168 KimbaU St.

34 Asylum St.

Church

Freeport, L. I., N. Y.

FITZGERALD, Paul St. Mattapoisett,

FOLLETT, David S.

Buttonwoods

Pkwy.

Cranston

FLICHTENFELD, Sandra J.

Waterville, Maine

460 Pleasant Valley

St.

43 Agnes St.

DiNAPOLI, Anthony R. Warren

Ave.

N. Scituate

207 Wethersfield Dr.

Brooklyn 30, N. Y.

FILKINS, Carol Ruth Slocum

2 Clinton Ave.

CONTI, George

Academy

Cranston

DILLER, James V., Jr.

884 Main St.

68

1284

DEXTER, Stuart R.

CONRICK, Jane

24 South Main

Providence

Trimtown Rd,

COLLINS, Gale S.

Central Pike

1064 E. 15th St.

DEXTER, Sandra V.

Edgewood

Providence

66 Providence St.

FERRI, Joseph R.

# 14,

CLOUTIER, Gerald J.

Hammond Rd.

St.

Narragansett

FAY, James V.

DeSISTO, Joseph G.

CLEGG, Alvin S., Jr.

17

100 South Pier Rd.

FERNBACH, Lewis E.

Warwick Neck

Bridgham

CHECK, Ruth V.

Brooklyn 29 N. Y.

ESSEX, Laura Cook

DeRITA, George T.

CHASON, Henry

37 Delway Rd.

1838 E. 16 St.

DAVIS, Lloyd H.

15 Ceres St.

Gaspee

W. Warwick

DAUBNEY, Dieudonne D. East Providence Vineyard Ave.

CECI, Americo

17 Lane 9

Woonsocket

244 Pulaski St.

Providence

EPSTEIN, Walter I.

DANSEREAU, Jerome D.

CAVANAUGH, Donald L.

G.

49 Savoy St.

DANIS, Paul H.

CASWELL, Mary Joan 2

EPSTEIN, Sarah

Providence

177 Bucklin St.

Cranston

9 Oak Sr.

Wakefield

GAUNTLETT, William W. 272 Sowams Rd.

Harrington


GAUTHIER, Maurice 473 Chace St.

E.

HENRY, Judith Ann

Somerset, Mass.

GERMANI, Elia Providence

29 Vandewater St.

54 Adelaide Ave.

L. Providence

Fordyke St.

12

Fay Ave.

Peabody,

Mass.

New

Forest Ave.

Y.

RFD

Cranston

Providence

Kingstown

Providence

398 Orms St.

HARRISON,

JOYAL,

HASKELL, Joan

Cranston

224

Suffolk

Middletown

10

Riverside 15

Slocum

HEINOLD, Edward F. Westerly Edgewood Ave.

R.F.D.

Ashaway

133

Hopkinton

Wollaston St.

498 Kingstown Rd.

KOHLSAAT,

Brookline, Mass.

HELIE, Caroline M.

155

Highwood

Ave.

Cranston

440 Pine St.

Mendon Rd.

Cumberland Hill

135 Western Promenade

Cranston

135-72 St.

North Bergen, N. J.

108 Park Ave.

Woonsocket

Barrington Peter F.

Tenafly,

49 Highland Ave.

Westerly

MATERNA, William C. 89 President Ave.

Providence

MATTLIN, Lawrence M. N.

J.

KRUEGER, George W. Hoxsie

Peace Dale

C.

MARRIOTT, Jean A.

KNOX, Judith E. 340 Rumstick Rd.

Cransron

MARRAH, Edwin K.

KIERNAN, John J.

HEINSTEIN, Herbert M.

16 Count Fleet Ave.

Shirley Blvd.

MAROZZI, Ronald J.

KENYON, Shirley L.

HEFFERNAN, John J., Jr.

94 Naples Rd.

88

MANNING, Joseph M.

Pawtucket

Tomaquag Rd,

Riverside

MALLOY, Jean

Warren H.

KENYON, Gillette C.

HEALY, Virginia A. Poplar Ave.

79 Leroy Drive

MAINE, Ellsworth C.

SaylesviUe

Ave.

Providence

MacGRATTY, Nancy J.

Cranston

KEENAN,

HATCH, John F.

18

Mass.

W. Warwick

26 Essex St.

K.

10 Dunham Ave.

Arlington,

KEEFE, Harry R., Jr.

Providence

570 Broad St.

140 Richardson St.

Arthur B.

1730 Louisquisset Pike

HARSON, Mary Louise

Providence

LOWENSOHN, Carol Ann

KAHLER, Amsden S.

Tiverton

1690 Main Rd.

Kingston Charles W.

41 Home St.

William L.

Mass.

LOOMIS, James K.

Rd.

79 Claremont Ave.

HARLEY, Kenneth G.

Danvers,

6 Schaffer St.

David E.

JOHNSON, Norwood

94 Gould Ave.

8 Riverview Ave.

LONG, John B.

Bradford

1298

Lakewood

LITTLE, Gertrude M.

Wakefield

JANES,

Newport

46 Atlantic Ave.

C.

Elizabeth Ann

Cranston

HARELD, Blaine E.

578 East Main Rd.

Peace Dale

Prospect Ave.

HAMMARLUND, Robert W. West Hartford, Conn.

19 Butler St.

LEUBA, Robert C.

JACKMAN, Reginald 28

Providence

LENDRUM, Richard E.

Bradford

JAMES,

39 Kenyon Rd.

572 Smith St.

HYDE, Gerald M.

HAHN, Russell J.

6 Pleasant St.

Newport

909 Kingstown Rd.

U. R. I.

LEE, Francis G.

#1

HABERSHAW, Joseph G. 26 Rochambeau Ave.

Hut E South

HUTCHINS, Richard Gerald

Rochelle, N.

Westerly

LANYON, Robert D. Wickford

29 Bliss Rd.

GUSTAFSON, Robert W. 121

Watch Hill Road

HULL, Richard J.

Pawtucket

Newport

LANPHEAR, Frederick O.

Pawtucket

4 Oakland Ave.

Cranston

Old Fort Farm

HULING, Joyce L.

GUIDA, Orlando C. 6 Fifth St.

532 Laurel Hill Ave.

LANING, Judity D. Warren

23 Campbell Terrace

GREGORY, Kathryn F. 452 Newport Ave.

Cranston

HUETTEL, Patricia A.

W. Warwick

Woonsocket

LANCIA, Thomas

8 Federal St.

GOURLEY, Richard M. 12

119 Dana St.

HOWARD, Leslie B.

Providence

Anthony St.

LAMBERT, Maurice N.

Providence

68 Tallman Ave.

GODEK, Evelyn M.

Bronxville

10 Wiltshire St.

HOLT, Richard H.

GLUCKMAN, Leon S. 50

Slocum

HODOSH, Marvin R.

Belmont, Mass.

GLEDHILL, Sydney

Edgewood

LAMB, Patricia M.

Mail Road

GIFFORD, Ralph M.

Jacqueline

74 Fort Ave.

HENSCHEL, Paul S.

17 Chaucer St.

2 Kent St.

LABEE,

Wickford

160 W. Main St.

Providence

254 Rathbun St.

Woonsocket

McCarthy, Gerald M. 5 Illinois St.

Providence

Page 203


NEAL,

McCONNELL, Thomas J. 40 Rankin Ave.

Providence

McCOOL, Thomas R.

NEARY,

Cranston

128 Lawnacre Dr.

Providence

Warwick

e.

Mclaughlin, George

Newport

McNALLY, Robert J. Wakefield 154 High St.

W. Warwick

North Providence

Narragansett

Providence

4 Anson Brown Rd.

129

Johnston

Cranston

59 Warman Ave.

188

Newport

Riverside

Woonsocket

Providence

MURRAY, 73 Ocean Rd.

2

Lafayette St.

Box

204

W. Warwick

Cranston

RHEE, Jihong

Providence

Providence

546 Wayland Ave.

RICHARDSON, David A. Kingston

Box 283

Ashaway

18 Walnut St

E. Cranston

37 North Road

Warwick Neck

Peace Dale

RUMOWICZ, Edmund S.

QUETTA, 232 Sunbury St.

Providence

Salvatore A. Providence

55

21

Selden

RYAN, Mary T.

Pawtucket

Benefit St.

RACCA, William H. 39 lona St.

Grand Ave.

Willimantic, Conn.

34 Garden City Dr.

Cranston

10 Lenox St.

Worcester, Mass.

SAKLAD, Janet G.

Providence

38 Cooke St.

Providence

SALHANY, Robert J.

RALPH, Earle K. 152

St.

RYDING, William L.

SADICK, Shirley Ann

QUINN, John S., Jr. 201

Wakefield

RUSSELL, Charles E. Windsor Rd. Edgewood

PRESCOTT, Daniel R. 18 Nichols St.

Peace Dale

72 Robinson St.

POWELL, Nancy K. Curds Corner

Central Falls

RORECH, Carol M. 513 Adams Ave., West Hemostead, L. I.

POTTER, William W. 69 Beaver Ave.

Johnston

309 Greenville Ave.

ROBERTS, Herbert H. U. R. I.

16, Trailer Park

POTTER, Phyllis

Stewart L. Narragansett

Riverside

31 Argyle Ave.

ROBERT, George C.

W. Warwick

4 Corliss St.

NAIGUR, Marvin A. 1350 Broad St.

REYNOLDS, Nancy

PETRARCA, Mary F.

MULLANEY, John J. 72 Taft St.

Tiverton

15 Dewey Ave.

RISK, Joan M.

MULCAHY, Delphine Old Lyme, Conn.

Howard

1961 Pontiac Ave.

POST, Arthur H., Jr.

Providence

Newport

PETRARCA, Constance L.

JVIULCAHEY, Francis L.

Rogers Lake

54 Ellery Rd.

RIDER, Martha

MOSTECKI, Marilyn C.

95 Rowley St.

Kingston

PAZIENZA, Francesco A. Cranston Farraington Ave

458 Providence St.

Exeter

REGAN, John W.

PERRY, Eugene L. East Providence 163 Spruce St.

MOSHER, Richard E.

50 North Ballou Sr.

Horn

RECORDS, David P. Heap Farm

Jr.

West

PERRY, Edwin Enos East Providence 360 Juniper St.

MOSHER, Lorraine E.

49 Becker Ave.

L.

Providence

123 Hanover St.

REINHARDT, Frederick W.

Providence

St.

Cranston

REIDY, Robert R.

Peace Dale

PARTYKA, John

MORELLI, Anthony

8 Gardiner St.

Cypress

RFD Box 131

MONTANARO, William J.

Armington Ave.

47 Lundon Rd.

O'NEILL, William C.

MITSON, Patricia

18

Cranston

906 Kingstown Rd.

Providence

RAWLINGS, John G.

RAY, Howard M.

O'CONNOR, Nola 8 South St. Danielson, Conn.

J.

Woonsocket

MITCHELL, Leonard R. 38 Ravenswood Ave.

324 Pocasset Ave.

PALMIERI, Simon C.

MINISCO, Leo W. 68 Caswell St.

Providence

119 Chestnut Ave.

MIGNEAULT, Joseph W., Jr. 1621 Smith St.

E. Greenwich

Leominster, Mass.

148 6th St.

McPEAK, Eileen M.

35 Providence St.

RAVO, Salvatore J.

O'BRIEN, Joan F.

Pawtucket

MICHAUD, Wilfred

Bradford

RFD

NOVELLI, Robert J.

Providence

11 Cranston St.

Wakefield St.

Warwick

29 Cathedral Ave.

Peace Dale

RANDALL, Howard M.

NOTARDONATO, Armando

McKECHNIE, Ian L. 56 Chandler Ave.

3 Branch St.

Maureen A.

Dedford St.

18

McDowell, David q. 627 Chalkstone Ave.

RAND, Marcus Cranston

NOEL, Robert L.

McDERMOTT, Richard L. 4 Kendall Lane

S.

30 Granger Court

McCORMICK, James T. 90 Pearl St.

Judith

59 KnoUwood Ave.

Cranston

38 Fletcher St.

Central Falls


SALZILLO,

Edward Mario

16 Lookout Ave.

SANGSTER, 117

Longmeadow

Warwick

Longmeadow

Ave.

SATNICK,

Warwick

13

Flushing, N.

Y.

Parkway

1

Rumford

9 Edward Rd.

Johnston

SCHIAPPA, Richard C. 208 Kenyon Ave. Pawtucket SCHNEIDER, Alvin 15 Park Ave.

Tuckertown Rd.

75 Pocono Ave.

Westerly

Bayview

Providence

51

75

High

Westerly

Wiliiston

34-6 June St

73 Vaughn Ave

Brooklyn 29,

N. Y.

Matunuck Pt

62 Lake St

Pawtucket

636 Cottage St

63 Indian Road

43 Rosedale St.

Valley Falls

TRIMBLE, Walter Providence

21 Glenwood Ave.

TURANO, George

SILVA, James R. Warwick

U Main Ave.

SMITH, Jacqueline S. W. Warwick

SMITH, Judith M. 57 Statler Rd.

118

Station St

Belmont, Mass.

SMITH, Kevin W. Cranston Lyndon Rd.

Cranston

25 Clarendon Ave.

Providence

WINKLEMAN, Murry B.

Wakefield

Providence

Providence

261 Rochambeau Ave.

WUJCIK, Dorothy

V. Providence

273 Charles St.

YORK, Anne F.

Warwick

Wakefield

928 Main St

Warren

ZAGARELLA, Eugene, Jr. 102 Leah St.

Providence

ZIEGLER, Manfred

Pawtucket

31 Doyle Ave.

Providence

WOLFE, Milton A.

Riverside

7 Beals St.

Brookline,

Mass.

Providence

U. R. I.

Apt E-North

SIEGEL, Sidney J.

10 Mill St

Bristol

TREHY, Joseph D., Jr.

SHUNNEY, Paula S.

122 Cass St

181

TREANOR, John R.

SHEPHERD, Gaylord O, Jr. Saunderstown

Providence

192 Lenox Ave.

WILSON, Bruce E.

TRAFICANTE, Daniel

SEROPIAN, Ara

258 Broad St.

Lakewood

TIERNEY, James P. Westerly

#2

Warwick

234 Sea View Drive

WILMOT, John T.

THORNTON, William B.

SCOTT, Owen, Jr. RFD

WILBUR, K. Louise

THOMPSON, Leslie F.

Park, N. Y.

SECULAR, Leslie A. 1763 East 22 St

Tiverton

THEROUX, Kenneth W.

SEAL, Kenneth S. 76 Collins Ave.

St

Providence

91 Carr St

WILLIS, Constance H.

TESSIER, Herve J. R.

Providence

# 1, Langworthy Rd.

SaylesviUe

Constitution St.

SEAGRAVE, Richard C. RFD

U. R. I.

TEIXEIRA, Mary L.

SCIARRETTA, Peter R.

Providence

WHEELER, Kenneth N.

Ave.

34 Tilden Ave.

Woonsocket

261 Massachusetts Ave.

TAYLOR, Leon E., Jr.

Wakefield

Barrington

WEST, Donald K.

Yonkers, N. Y.

G North

SCHWARTZ, Allen

91 Imera Ave.

456 Wood Ave.

TATE, June A.

SCHWAN, Martin R.

407 Morris Ave.

Wakefield

195 Walker St.

West

WASSERMAN, Herbert M.

SWINDELLS, Norman M., Jr.

Glen Cove, N. Y.

40 Silver Lake Ave.

45 Richmond Ave.

SWARM, Howell E. Apt.

Union City, N. J.

WALSH, Patricia L.

STOFKA, Barbara Ann

SCHRIVER, Charles B. 45 Granite St.

136-39th St

STEWART, Robert S.

SAVASTANO, Orlando Louis

VOLPE, Richard A. Larchmont Rd. Apponaug VON WEYHE, William C.

Cranston

Ave.

STEPHENSON, Wilfred J. Standish Road Jamestown

SAUNDERS, Nancy V. 323 North Broadway

24

SPAIN, Michael F.

Marsha M.

114-19 70th Road

Staten Island 7, N. Y.

282 Main St

Pawtucket

115 Second St

SOWDER, Nancy B.

SANGSTER, Richard D. 117

Cranston

40 Oakland Ave.

Earl R.

Ave.

VARIEUR, Francis J., Jr.

SMITH, Richard L.

Cranston

East

J.

ABIZAID, John G.

Pawtucket

E.

TURILLI, Edward A. 1908 Broad St

29 Wolcott St

Labezar Ave.

8 Bowen

Teheran, Iran

ALMONTE, Joseph D.

Cranston

78 Oxford St

TURNBULL, William R., Jr. Hut D-North

Medford, Mass.

ALHOSSAINI, Shafi

Westerly

Ave.

Sophomores

U. R. I.

TURNER, Neil B. St. Edgewood

ALTMAN, 143V^ Adelaide Ave.

Cranston

Daniel Providence

ALVAREZ, Alfred P. 232-26 St

Brooklyn 32,

N. Y.

Page

205


Port Ewen, N. Y.

Warwick

Cranston

N. Chatham, Mass.

AQUINO, Anthony

ARMSTRONG, Dale Norwood

162 Park View Ave.

ASDOORIAN, John East Providence

152 Vine St

ATKINS, Robert B., Jr. NAS, Quonset Point Quarters "G",

Warwick

Honeysuckle Rd.

BIBBO, Joseph

Providence

North Scituate

U. R. I.

Cranston

212

Norwood

239 Welfare Ave.

Carpenter

Warwick

181 Arnold's Neck Drive

87

Angell

Scituate

Warwick

Rumford

1300 Pawtucket Ave.

BARTON, John C. Summit, England Ave.

BURNS, Walter L. 29 Kirtland St

N.

J.

Providence

Oakland

Barrington

BRYNES, Eugene D. 71 Church St

BEAUCHAMP, Bruce A. Woonsocket

Cranston

1107

BECKER, Robert K. Lewiston, Maine

CALDWELL, Marilyn J. Wakefield

50 Main St

909

W. Warwick

U. R. I.

Peace Dale

30 West View Terrace, Haworth, N. J.

CAMPBELL, 112 West Lawn Ave.

William M. Pawtucket

CAPALDI, Vincent H. 63 Observatory Ave.

BROOKNER, Stephen L. Providence

Kingstown Rd.

CAMERON, Hugh

BRODERICK, Russell C.

15 Glen Drive

Bristol

Hope St

CAITRI, Louis G.

Kingston

P. O. Box 16

Riverside

17 Rowena Dr.

CALANDRA, Edward P.

Peace Dale

St.

Cranston

108 Pawtuxet Ave.

BRINDAMOUR, Bernard A. George

E. Greenwich

CAHALAN, Irving W.

BREWSTER, Edward W.

15 St

Warwick

131 Greenwood Ave.

CAHILL, James H.

Wakefield

50 Welfare Ave.

Bloomfield, N. J.

BAXTER, Barbara A. West

Johnston

No. Scituate

193 High St.

Lynn, Mass.

BUTZIGER, Robert A.

BRADY, James F.

BASSER, Nan M.

Cranston

103 Grand Ave.

Paul S.

Ave.

Trimtown Rd.

Warwick

BURNS, Robert P.

BRADLEY, Woodworth, Jr.

BARSAMIAN, Barbara J.

Cranston

Pondac Ave.

95 Mashuena Dr.

BOWEN, Ruth A.

Cranston

31 NoweU Rd.

Page 206

Seekonk, Mass.

38 Robinson St.

BARRY, Bernard J., Jr.

136 Summer St

1171

BOUTIER, Robert H.

N.

Elmdale Rd.

65 Hughes St

BURLINGAME, Alma C.

BURNS, Janice E.

140 Putnam Ave.

BARDEN, John A.

39 Fountain Ave.

St

Providence

97 Winchester St

BOURCIER, Mariette H.

BARBER, Kathryn H.

Ave.

J.

BOUCHER, Dorothea V.

BALL, John H.

Graniteville

10 Mathewson St

BORAGINE, Louis A.

27 Browne St

396 Essex

N.

Chatham, N. J.

22 Carmine St

BALIGIAN, Ara

Providence

139 Rankin Ave.

BURKE, Donald J.

Compton

57 Counter Club Dr.

BOORUJY,

East West N. Y., N. J.

6515 Blvd.

BOLGER, John C.

East Greenwich

Kingston

BRUNO, Joseph P.

BURHOE, Ruth Paula

Litde

265 Oak Hill Ave.

W. Greenwich

North Rd.

BLAKE, Donald L.

BAKER, Edward T.

66 New

Mass.

Newton, Mass.

Bixby Rd.

BAIRD, Jeanette A. 3 Ranger Rd.

61

BIXBY, Richard W.

BACHE, Dennis A. Danielson Pike

120 Breakheart Hill Rd.

B.

BIDERMAN, Susan J. Hudson Ave. Englewood,

169 E.

Woonsocket

BUGLIO, Benjamin

BERUBE, Anne M. Fall River, 1074 Highland Ave.

AZNAVOURIAN, Garo 26 Hudson St.

SaylesviUe

BERRY, Manetta J. Pawtucket 74 Blodgen Ave.

107 Pearl St

Narragansett

BROWNING, David G.

29 Cobble Hill Rd.

ATTWILL, PhyUis H. 95

Hoxsie

Silby St

Rd.

BRO'WN, Richard F.

BENOIT, Paul F.

Providence

161 Potters Ave.

25

S.

Judith

51 Alice Ave.

BENNETT, William J.

Providence

Wakefield

BROWN, Judith L.

Edgewood

174 Columbia Ave.

ANGELL, Thomas J. 14 Steere Ave.

Old Pt

V.

BENNETT, Audrey

L.

#1

BROWN, Carl Gene

Pawnicket

150 Whittier Rd.

ANDERSON, Judith C. Old Harbor Rd.

RFD

BEIRNE, Lawrence T.

.ANDERSON, Eleanor L. 19 Blaisdell St

BROOKS, Carl

BEICHERT, Philip J., Jr.

ANDERSON, Carol J. 75 Shenandoah Rd.

N. Providence

CARMICHAEL, Harold S. 178

High St

Peace Dale


CARNEVALE, Rhoda 719 River Ave.

64 Fairfield Ave.

Wakefield

461

CARROLL, Raymond

Warwick

16

John St.

E. Providence

CASEY, Richard C. Cranston 1720 Broad St

138 Brown St

Middletown

255

W. Warwick

Warwick

E. Greenwich

Barrington

Pawtucket

10

Nayatt Rd.

W.

N.

J.

Barrington

18 Home Ave.

Providence

CUNNINGHAM, John J.

R.

Barrington

CIOLFI, Robert P. 251 Welfare Ave.

Providence

CUNNINGHAM, John J., Jr. Norwood

1353 Pawtucket Ave.

Rumford

CUNNINGHAM, Mary P.

CITRIN, Barbara J. 69-40 Yellowstone B., Forest Hills, N. Y.

15 Mission Place

Providence

CUPPELS, Carolyn M.

CLARK, Howard W. 6 Everett St.

64 Furnace St

Newport

20 Amos St

Peace Dale

CURHAN, Sandra H.

CLARK, Robert H. Riverside

149 Irving Ave.

Westerly

14 Arlington St.

DeSIMONE, Richard A. 29 Cherry Hill Rd.

Johnston

DESMARAIS, Denise D. 1086 Stafford Rd.

Fall River, Mass.

DEVINE, Edward R., Jr. 121

Butterfield; Fletcher R., E. Greenwich

I

Gracefield Dr.

Great Neck, N. Y.

DICK, James A.

CROOK, Marjorie W.

Jersey City,

E. Matunuck

DIAMOND, Bruce M.

Greenwood

279 Main Ave.

CREAMER, Ann T.

CHELAK, George J.

85 Fenner Ave.

Succatash Rd.

CRANSTON, Jane E.

Coventry Center

W.

DeSALVO, Celia M.

DeSIMONE, Ralph A.

E. Providence

4 Manning Drive

CHEETHAM, Kenneth A.

14 Annawamscutt Rd.

Providence

Bristol

18 Charles St

CRANDALL, Robert L.

Providence

Pawtucket

DeRISO, Francis A.

Westeily

Squantum Dr.

Kenyon Ave.

CHAVES, Claire V.

CHRIST, Karl

DEMPSEY, Thomas

CRAGAN, Mary Therese

CHATOWSKY, Anthony P.

V.

Raymond

24 Potter St.

CONSTANTINO, Donald A.

CHARPENTIER, Robert E.

151 Hopkins Ave,

Warren

Providence

W. Warwick

17 Baker St.

COSMO, George

Wakefield

73 Elder St

Lonsdale

419 Benefit St.

CHAPMAN, John N.

Log Bridge Rd.

DELORME,

CORREIRA, Richard A.

N. Bellmore, L. 1.

Shannock

Heights,

36 Dexter St.

D.

13 White Rock Roud

CHAMPLIN, Thomas A.