Issuu on Google+

R.I-

COLL.

RB4^

Ex Libris

UNIVERSITY or

^RHODE ISLAND

^^m.A

J

HI. Con.

37^-, 745

V,

4

Che 6rl$t Published

jinnually dy

the

u^hode Ssland

J^ffTtculiure

and

junior

Class

Colieffe

///echanic .^rts

Volume 4

>7liTigston,

t/zhode Jrsland

fune,

J900

Contents

In Memoriam.

Dedication. Board

of

Marriages

Editors.

Introduction.

^thletiei.

College Calendar. Board of Managers.

College athletic Association.

Faculty.

College Athletics.

College Activity Committee. College Preachers. Progress

of the

College.

Foot Ball.

Base Ball.

List

of

Players.

Schedule

of

Games Played.

ifi/a55 yiistcries.

^iierarii S)epartmettt.

Senior Class.

Junior Class.

Basket Ball.

Sophomore Cl.ass.

Poultry

Freshman Class.

School.

Summer School.

Children's Page.

Summer

Hasoelaticns and 'Club,^

School Twaddle.

On Pie. In the Public Eye.

The Battalion.

Washington Trip.

Y. M. C. A.

The College

Y. W. C. U.

Nonsense.

Library

on the

Hill.

College Ads.

Club.

Davis Hall Regulations.

Glee Club. College Alumni Association.

Dedication

to

Checker Club.

Mud.

Alumni Directory.

Poem

Botanical Club.

Latin NotTaughtatthe College.

Chemical Club.

General Calendar.

Checker Club.

Grind.s.

on

Biological Exam.

Solitaire Club. Gooey Club.

Courses.

commencemf.nt program.

Competition Drill.

Cincinnati

Annual Military

List

of

New Publications.

Orations.

ing Room.

College Entertainments.

Ball.

Periodicals

in the

Read

List of Advertisers.

Sn

^ecoffn/iion of

the

high esteem in

which

ok

ist

she

is

held

hkr kindly help

respectfully

by the

and

interest, we

dedicate

volume to our :

^/ss

!^ockwea.

this

tditer-iif-Ckie! h.

G.

K.

CLARNER, Jr.

>tssislant tditora A. B. SHERMAN,

E. A. SHKRMAN,

E. E. DAWLEY.

Suainess 5ltanager A. A. DENICO.

^

---^tf^jBte.

Sn troduction

fllE

Grist

hardship,

Board, after many months of trial and issues the fourth volume of the college

hoped that it will be worthy of a place beside the publications of former years. Upon lo()l<ing at the diminutive size of the class roll at the beginning of the year, it seemed doubtful whether we annual, and it is

should be able

determined

to

not

undertake such

cided that the\- would issue

uphold the Accordingh-,

thus

here

we

an

affair. But the class,

by their predecessors, de publication at any cost, and

be outdone

to

a

honor of 'oi. us to prepare the book, and bearthe inevitable criticism and sar

they elected

staiul rcad\'

castic remarks of

to

our

merciless readers.

Well have

we

displeasure we shall cause some childish student, or, perhaps, some sensitive member of our honored faculty. But, nevertheless, we have spared neither time nor p.'iins to make this book interesting; our plan being to amuse rather than to abuse. So, if in the following pages j'ou should see your name mixed up with in

mind the

say nothing but pass on in search of If, however, the your fellow classmate. Board should in an}' way gain the ill-will of any of its some

harmless

some

roast

pleasure which the year's spoilt. by preparing an alumni directory

much of the

readers,

given

grind,

on

us

work has

will be

This year endeavored to add

to

we

have

the usefulness of the book without

the contents of the

infringing upon College catalogue. The Board extends its heartiest thanks to all who have assisted

in

labors, special acknowledgement being our alumni, whose helpful criticism suggestions have been of great aid to us. So, kind readers, if you wish to know about the college, of the sayings and doings of its great men, cast aside youV College catalogue and invest in a 'oi Grist. due

to

us

our

the members of

and

And

now we

you to further

following

will retire from

our

acquaint 3'ourself

pages at

arduous

task, leaving

with the contents of the

3'Our leisure.

se^iss

College Calendar

for /900-/90/.

1900.

yall Augitst jr,

September

g A. M.

iS.

lo

September iS,g September ig. r

A. M.

fferm. Entrance Examinations. Exam, of Conditioned Students.

A. M.

Entrance Examinations.

P. M.

Term

November 6.

begins.

Election Day.

Thanksgiving Daj'. December

Term ends.

21.

1901.

XOinter fferm.

/^^zmrj2.lc> [anuary

2, /

A.M

P. M.

Exam, of Conditioned Students. Term

begins.

January JI. February 22.

Day of Prayer for Colleges.

March 2g.

Term ends.

Washington's Birthday.

Spring fferm. Aprils.

IO

April

i

May

g,

IO.

May 30.

A. M.

P. M.

Exam, of Conditioned Students. Term

begins.

Arbor Day. Memorial

Day.

June

16.

Baccalaureate Sunday.

June

IS.

Commencement.

June

21.

Extrauce Examinations.

S^oard of T/fana^^ers

%6rpiFatim. Hon. Melville Bull, Hon

Neivport County

C. H. Coggeshall,

Hon. Henry L. Greene, Hon.

j.

V. B.

Watson,

Hon. Benjamin A.

Bristol

County

Kent

County

Washine;ton Co7inty Providence

Jackson,

County

"Slfieem

Hon. Henry L. Greene,

President,

P. O.

Hon. Melville Bull,

Treasurer,

,

Riverpoint,

R. I.

P. O., Bristol, R.I.

Hon, C. H. Coggeshall, Clerk, .

P.O., Newport, R.I.

Jacultj/

and

Assistants

JOHN HOSEA WASHBURN, Ph. D., PRESIDENT, Prof.oy 0/ Asri,ll,nl Chimhiry.

HOMER JAY WHEELER, Ph. D., Prf!.r ,f G,loe,.

ANNE LUCY BOSWORTH, Ph. D., Frc/esr of MaihimMic.

E. JOSEPHINE WATSON, A. M.,

WILLIAM ELISHA DRAKE, B. S., HARRIET LATHROP MERROW, A. M., Prof,r / Bolay.

ARTHUR AMBER BRIGHAM, Ph. D.,

GEORGE WILTON FIELD, Ph. D., Pro/t^or ./ Zo.losy.

FRED WALLACE CARD, M. S., Pn/e,r oJ

mrl,\lly,.

JOHN EMERY BUCHER, AiscciaU

A. C, Ph. D.

Pn/,uor / Chtmitl^y.

ARTHUR CURTIS SCOTT, B. S., y:,.,islal

Profur ,/ Pl.y.tc.

THOMAS CARROLL RODMAN,

MABEL DEWITT ELDRED, B. S., MARY WATKINSON

ROCKWELL,

B.

L.

MERCY WOODWORTH SANBORN, ELIZABETH WATSON KENYON, A. M., lUruotor i

Li;uas.

HOWLAND BURDICK, B. S., MARSHALL HENRY TYLER, B. S.,

JAMES SIDNEY ALLEN, Jk., A, B., ln,lrc,or i

Hi.Ur,

and PaUlkal J.

GRACE BURTON HAZLEWOOD, l,lrclor in

Sl,tin/,hy

ad

Typ,-.riline.

JOHN FRANKLIN KNOWLES,

B.

S.,

GEORGE BURLEIGH KNIGHT,

NATHANIEL HELME, Mitearologiii.

Steaiaati AahtaKU CARROLL KNOWLES, B. S., BLYDON ELLERY KENYON, B LILLIAN MABELLE

GEORGE,

B.

S.,

S.,

CAPTAIN TIBERIO GARCIA ALOMA,

Colleffe .Activity

Dr.

Field, Chairman

A. E. Munro,

Dr. G. W. Field Mr.

M. H. Tyler

Miss H. L. Merkow A. E. Munro, B. j. Cornell,

Committee

'oo '02

Edith Goddard, '00

Secretary

Dk.

j. E. Buchek

Miss E. J. Watson Miss A. L. Bosworth A. A. Denico,

'01

W. M. Hoxsie, '03

Anna B. Sherman, 'oi

^Preachers Oct I,

Mr.

Oct. 22,

Butler

of Yale

Univ.,

New Haven, Conn.

Mr. G. R. Montgomery, Yale Univ. New

Haven,

Conn. Oct. 2?,

Rev. Parley D. Root,

Nov 5.

Rev. W. H. Garth, Wakefield, R. I.

Wakefield,

R. I.

Nov

12

Mr. G. R. Montgomery, New Haven, Conn.

Nov

'9

Dr. a. a. Brigham, R. I.

College.

Nov 26

Rev. j. H. Wells,

Dec. 10,

Rev. L. F.

Jan

7.

Rev. j. W. Fobes, Wakefield, R. I.

'4,

Prof. Chas. F.

Jan.

King.ston, R. I. Randolph, Hopkinton City, Kent,

Brown

R. I,

University,

Provi

dence, R. I. Rev. Theodore Snow,

lan. 21 Jan. 2S,

Rev. John MacCalman, Swansea Centre, Mass.

Feh. '/,

Rev. E. T. Root, Providence, R. I.

.

Feb. //, Feb. ^.f.

Wakefield, R.

I.

Rev. W. H. Garth, Wakefield, R. I. Mr.

j. S. Allen, Jr., Rhode Island College. Providence, R. I.

ProI'-. Charles F. Kent,

Prof. W. H. Munroe, Brown

University.

Alar. ^5,

Rev. Parley D. Root, Wakefield, R; 1.

April 22,

Prof.

James Q. Dealev, Brown University. Rev. John E. Tuttle of Worcester, Mass. gave the baccalau reate sermon, June ii, 1899. Rev. Wallace Nutting of Providence, R. I. preached

Day of Prayer, January 25,

1900.

on

the

Ijhe 2iear's

(sf\ LTHOUGH

fej^

there have been

College during the year, and changes, and,

-'''V_- ments

A

vancement.

Jfiistorj/.

new

no

striking

occurrences

there have been as

some

and successful feature

was

at the

improve-

steady ad the summer school,

in former years,

a

introduced for the purpose of instructing teachers of the State in Nature studies. The fall term opened with about the usual num new students, though few of these joined the F'reshman The two years Preparatory course began with this term, through the preliminary work accomplished there, the College The classes iu general have done very standard is being raised. satisfactory work, although during the Winter term there was

ber of class. and

more

absence

on

account of illness than has

ever

occurred before.

Faculty remains about the same as last year. Miss Putnam, resigned her position as teacher of Expression and Eng She has been much missed by all, as she had been lish last June. Miss Sanborn filled her the College for several years. a part ol place during the Fall term, but in the Winter the course of Ex pression was omitted, and the English classes taken by Miss Eliza beth Kenyon, a graduate of Mt. Holyoke College and a student Miss Brooks, our first instructor in steno of Brown University. graphy and typewriting, having laid a foundation in those branches at the College, left us; and her successor. Miss Grace Hazelwood, Miss Bos has faithfully directed the work in that line since. The

however,

worth, who spent last

degree,. and ties, which Smith.

year

in

Europe,

returned with

a

Doctor's

Professor of Mathematics, resumed her former du had been carried on during her absence by Miss as

No

new

buildings

have been erected this year; but

improve

ments made

ing them,

upon those standing, and upon the grounds surround have added somewhat to the beauty of the place. There

have been several

cultural

changes departments.

in the

Experiment

Station and

Agri

There have been several

delightful entertainments in Lippitt Hall, some public and others private. It is evident that sociability has increased among the students. Faculty, and those interested in the College. The social life seems to progress from year lo The Y. M. C. A. and the Y. W. C. U. have been very

year.

tive.

The first reception of the year

was

tendered to the

ac

new

students

ing

by members of these .societies, with the purpo.se of mak the newcomers feel welcome to the College, and of making the

old members better acquainted with one another. The Junior Reception was given in good season and was one of the most en joyable occasions ever held. More enthusiasm than usual was shown at the Military Ball. Lippitt Hall was tastefully and ap propriately decorated, and in every way the affair was a success. Ahout the middle of the Winter term the Juniors ananged a musi eale for the benefit of the Gkist of 'oi. The evening of February 2ist was also an enjoyable time for many of the students and their

frieuds.

The Glee Club

again has not been idle, and great is its throughout the country around. quite often in the Chapel, and, although their doings are dark and hidden things, we know by the expiession on tne faces of the members that they are contented and like fame and The

to

success

Grange

meets

congregate here. The Committee

and

as

others

for the are

among the

on

clubs,

College

Activities has done efficient service

have

.some

flourishing. most important.

The

disappeared,

Library

and

as

prophesied,

;

while

Chemical Clubs

arc

More enthusiasm has been evinced in athletics than formerly ; although in football not every game was won, as last year, yet the team did excellent work. Much interest is taken in base ball, and the players are kept busy during term.

and,

Spring pleasant excursion was arranged by some members of Faculty for the ten days vacation between the Winter and Spring terms. This afforded students and Faculty an opportunity A very

the

to visit

New York, Washington, D. C, and other places in the vicinity of these cities. A party of fourteen went on the trip and reported having had a delightful timeA poultry course was given during the Winter term, as last year. So year by year new features appear in all things, and no less at the R. I. College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. We hope that future enterprise may prove even more successful than that of the past ; that many may be benefited by the opportunities here offered ; and, that the College may stand as a great monument of industrial success in the minds of many throughout the land.

se^iss

Cbe Classes '

5^:^i^;^^^^ ^' ^^^?^^^^^^?^^^ ^5:i*^:'^'^=^:^

Class

AMOS L.

of 1900

KENYON, President.

HENRY M. BRIGHTMAN, Vice President.

RALPH N. SOULE, TkeasukBk. BERTHA D.

JTonorary Mrs. Lucy

TUCKER, Secretary

'/^amber,

Putnam

Small.

9?fcmbers Arthur Earle

Munro.

Quonochontaug'

Levi Eugene Wightman,

South Scituate.

.

Anthony Enoch Steere,

John James Fry

Chepachet. Fast Greenwich.

Joseph Robert Wilson,

Allenton.

Ralph Nelson Soule,

Fast Greenwich.

John Raleigh Eldred, Bertha Douglass Ruth Hortense

Kingston Centre, Mass. .

Tucker,

Swansea

James,

Kenyon.

Robert Joseph Sherman, Amos Langworthy Kenyon,

Usquepaug

Charles Noyes Wheeler, Henry Maxon Brightman,

Charles Clark Cross, Edith Goddard,

.

....

Rena Hoxsie Steere, Gertrude Sarah Fison,

.

Wood River Junction.

Shannock. White Rock.

.

Narragansett

Pier.

Brockton, Mass. .

Paivtjtxet. Peace Dale.

1900

Class Colors,

Cwss Yell,

White and Gold.

Whoop-la-ra!

Whoop la-re.- !

Walk up. Chalk up, TJpidee ! Ninteen-huudred ! Yes-sir-ree !

WHEN

we

first afHicted this

made

a

big

adopt

a

class

College with our presence, we being original and got so far as to constitution, which was something totallv

bluff

at

unheard of here at that time.

meeting

where

we

To be

followed its

sure

provisions

there

in the

never was

but

one

slightest degree

or

gave it any thought whatever, but still we have it. We hope you have all noticed the extreme dignity which has

characterized

deportment this year. Always quiet and cor dignity" and for the better college duties have kept in close touch with the for Faculty. (Take example the case of St e and Mr. T-I-r.) Now if any one doubts or denies this statement, that simply shows that he is laboring under the direful idiosyncrasies of a gigantic else we hallucinatory phenomenon. (Or are). Yet, in spite of a few such weaknesses, it is with a certain degree of justifiable pride that we think of our success in some undertakings. The Junior Musieale given last year was the first program ol classical music presented here through the efforts of the students (and we hope it will not be the last) and was an undeniable suc rect,

we

cess.

our

have been models of "Senior

fulfillment of

our

We have also had

letic teams.

These with

several

more our

managing receptions in College activities, make a

than

our

share of

men

very

on

the ath

with the Grist 'oo, and in balls, and a general prominence

success

and

satisfactory

record.

Now for

a

Juniors,

when you

few last words. come

do), don't be dignified. nified

this

leave off don't get

year

that the

firing shot-guns sea-sick, its

"

{that is, if any of

back next year

We have

people

want

and base-balls

catchin'.

you

very proper and dig change. But do try to through the windows, and

been

so

a

"

Sophomores, you have been pretty good considering you have Ferry for oue of your number. In fact, almost too good, but keep it up, for variety. Freshmen, try

to

realize that it will be your duty next year to Wake up your has been asleep too long.

wake up this place, it selves and do it.

Preps, be careful what you do the night paint is expensive, so don't use more enough for a place of this size. Everybody, join the Snap Course.

Red

before Commencement. than five

or

six

pounds.

That is And

as we come

before the readers of the

Grist

for

our

fare

wells, how amusing it is

to look back over the last four years' ex periences. All the dances, the duckings, the physical exams., the ghost parties, and the various midnight parades and adventures will long be remembered when more important thoughts should fill our minds. Then the Watson House receptions, how pleasant these have always been, particularly when given by our honorary

member, Miss Putnam, whose kindness and encouragement we always remember with deepest pleasure. But here, we are sorry to say, are all of the events of the past ; as we finally say not good bye, but au revoir to the dear old R. I. C. it is with the best wishes for herself, her faculty, and her

shall

students.

JBO/

Miss Mary W. Rockweli, entered the

College with us and accepted to become honorary member

an

invitation

of our class. Since then she has been of great value to us in both social and intellectual problems. She is

an

The

excellent

pupil

teacher, au

But he who fears to be Comes Miss

Mary

thus far

w.

As

Rockweu.

easily succeeded

iu

and

:

who well knows liis lesson

Goes to class with

quaking

with

easy mind ;

questioned. fright on behind.

matron of Watson

House, she has

the young ladies

keeping

within

bounds. H. D. Smith is whom it man

of

can

be

quiet

;

a

quiet

sort of

lid that still waters

nd

gentle mien,

from North

chap, run

deep.

He

Scituate, of

came

to

but alas,

he has become enslaved to the demoraliz

ing

influences

has

lately taken

of his a

environment.

He

great deal of interest iu

social life, and has been induced to join the dancing class. It is also whispered about the

College

that he

is

showing

a

great deal of attention to the fair sex. We hope, however, that this will not be detri mental to

him, and lhat he will keep

the fine record he has made thus far student.

as

up a

Howard D. Smith.

us a

Elizabeth A. Sherman is very decided opinions.

a

young

When

lady of once

determined upon

erally

means

course,

a

to carry it

out,

she

gen

regardless

of

its effect upon whatever poor mortals hap Her independence, pen to be in her way.

frankness, and dislike of the plain pro ceedings of life are marked characteristics. She is

a

very

cept her

own

critic of all

good

abilities

and

things (ex

perceptions),

popular because she doesn't try to Her company ilways a much de-

and is be.

Eiizateti. E. Sherman.

sii ed

pleasure,

ston, and

unless she is "tired." She is

a

resident of West in the

daily

conies

friend Edna E. Daw-

LEV.

she

order

moves

bring

to

King-

team.

college

Our

Ah!

comes?

Sh ! Sh ! Sh ! Who

tries

She out

of

as

chaos.

She gazes with wide actions of her

eyes at the thoughtand felloW'Students

in disejaculates mustn't, girls !" She

tressed

less

and

ful

is

the

ston's illustrious

sons

"Ask and it shall

in. a

as a mar

With all

you

one

for the female

ness

can see

field.

his little

Where

a

is

class

is

sludent, and

an

The

good qualities he failing, a weak

Most any night leaning against the

sex.

his wheel

fence in front of

he

ICiug-

ill be found that of Arthur A. Denico,

proud of him athlete.

You

worker

uamcsof South

Edr.il E. Dawi.'j.

the well-known wheel

has, however,

"

tones,

faithful

knowledge, is inind-

always eager for of the precept,

given you." High among

a

certain house in Wake

Denny?

But

he is still

young and, like many another young man, is sowing his wild oats in his youth-

Johnnv Wiley, alias Johnny Bull. Little, but oh, my! He finds great pleas-

in

ure

annoying the occupants of Davis by playing on his clarionet, but to

Hall

him

play you would wonder how such ear-rending noises could be produced by see

diminutive person. Last year he on the foot-ball team, and met with fine success until he broke his nose(?)

such

a

played

end

His favorite

theme is the massive size of

Englishmen. Chari.es

S.

Burgess, the notorious

Crook from

Providence, takes great pleas playing base-ball, of which he takes { is a prominent member of the urse each He 35-l^our spring. Iso helps to make Solitaire Club, which his dreary hours at Kingston more cheerful. He finds it quite impossible to tear ure

in

,

himself

away

Providence and

later than Who our

his

comes

her

her

and

her

Her

lips.

not

is

pre-eminently

a

Had she lived in young lady of charm. the good old days of yore, she would have bound

animals of the

by the magic of

forest held

spell

her dark eyes.

As

prosaic present claims her, only the unsuspecting youths are drawn irresista-

the

bly

to her

of her net.

feet and She is

of ,

week

hasty words geatest fault is

no

chacies

Anna B. Sherman?

NeIvI.ie A. Briggs

a

quietly and .soothes gentle presence?

so

dispensable in the printer's room and is fast stenographer and typewriter as well as Have you guessed her name? typesetter.

had the

Westminster)

time,

lack of confidence in

What, if

attractions

and

spirits by

angers

from

the

vacations

the usual

ruffled

Nothing fall

from

(Olympic

extends

so

entangled in the meslies especially fond of lab-

bei

.expert

oratory work and

dancing.

Truly diverse

tastes, but there is method in her madness. Louis George Karl Ci.arner, Jr., is of those

one

come

sons

of rest, who,

from Pawtucket.

as a

Like other

rule, mem

bers of the class, he always appears about Ask some three days after school begins. of the

knowing

where

As

"

Fritz

would cut

figure

on

body

asks

as name-

him

what

When the

which he is constantly answers,

quite

in-chief,

i-dea(r)

we

hope

that

on

a

a

long girls

is about he

always

When he has

book of which

down and not try to be

of the

talking,

"You, dear."

finished the

one

is.

the side

lines if he could be induced to put uniform. In other words, he has as a

one:

"

athlete he

an

he

funny.

he is editor-

will

settle

if you wish to know

7902

9^emders. James E. Cargill

Oliver N. Ferry

Latham Clarke

Ralph

Bailey J. Cornell

Robert W. Pitkin

N. Maxson

Arthur L. Reynolds

jVonorart/ 9^em6er. Miss E.

J. Watson.

j. Cornell, President.

B.

O, N

A. L- Reynolds,

CLASS YELL until there

fT

does

not

editor has

we

We are not going to yell until we graduate members to make a good healthy screech.

:

seem

just

more

came

had but

a

than

a

few weeks

and made the

week to finish

In the first

past

made his rounds with the

place, WE

year and but

are

one

gro-wing

new one

same

to

should be about If

one

as

dull

as

so

the

Three have left in

in, leaving

Though

we

are

us

not

with "so

make up for the lack in

If there is any truth in that old

working we son's jokes.

tale of woe, here.

smaller.

the

numbers.

are

been taken

small but lucky number, seven. many," enough work has been done

ago when the 'oo

heart-breaking statement history. Now the 'oi

our

mill has been set in motion and the results

the

or

enough

are

Grist editor that

Vice-President.

Ferry,

and Treasurer.

Secretary

aboul

grind point

the

of

Jack

one

could stack up al! the note paper

over

of Maxwe

have

used; pour on the midnight oil that has been burned, and light the pile by some of the blue flames which occasionally emanate from No 26, the result would fry all the eggs wasted by the poul That expresses the whole

try class in the past three years. in

an

thing

egg-shell.

You may not credit it, but during the Winter term our brains were over-taxed to such an extent that our slumbers were affected as if we had been eating some of Helme's mince pies. Think waking up in the intense and murky darkness of Davis Hall and seeing the grillions of big overgrown molecules chasing poor

much of

little inoffensive atoms all

over

would often call for Dr. law

Avogadro's

It

was

In our terror we the wall paper. to arrest them for disobeying

Bucher

awful ! Sometimes

the mind would take

full of parabolas hyperbolas, and from the midst of them would come a sweet voice '"You can have just ten minutes to saying: gentle write the equations to these." The only thing that saved us from total madness was the dancing There all the cares and woes were forgotten in the mazes class.

a

different turn and the whole

room

would

seem

and

and

of the waltz and two-step, and our minds were allowed to relax from the strain of German and Chemistry and find rest in the strains

of

Whistling Rufus,

could outdo all of

change was

all

us as a

partners for

a

"

or

Home, Sweet

hour, but

Home.

He would often

relaxer."

whole

under

Reynolds neglect to

the circumstances it

(W)right.

Some doubts have been

expressed

as

to

our

ability

lo

publish

the annual next year, but if you will glance at the seven sturdy names of our members and think of the talent represented there I

anything. Just listen daily falling from the Now, professor, there is a question in lips of our wise men;" my mind whether the assimilatory activity of the proteinaceous protoplasm of the Equisetum can be attributed to chemical reac tions or to photo-syntax." One day in the biological lab. a dreamy sensation permeated through the region of one of the student's optic thalmi and slowly smoothed the convolutions of his medulla oblongata into a smoth ered yell. The professor looked at him a moment and said; ''Are think you will agree that we are capable of to some of the drops of wisdom which are "

"

Mr. M." ?

ill, thinking you

"Not

exactly," he replied.

vibration of my olefactory

about the

"I

was

ganglionic

only com-

meiseme caused by the saponaceous erudatiou from the epidermal epithelum of this cuss-eyed hellbender." Then he slept again. In

English

Mr. F.

"Mr.

:

In the Chem

college sheep some one

lab.

were

F., who

was

Johnson

?

"

a dictionary." balmy day in the early spring, when the the wind-mill, on the behind dump browsing

"Johnson

was

the fellow that wrote

one

glass bottles did not seem to be the right gentle creatures, but Mr. M. promptly reas the only affect would be the

remarked that

kind of diet for the

sured him with the statement that

production

of

glass

wool.

With all this talent at

ing

our

ol the "New Course,"

gladden

command and with the

can

superior train again

you doubt that the Grist will

your hearts next Commencement,

se^i>s

/903 ELVERTON J. CRANDALL, President.

JOHN G. CROSS, Vice-President. EDITH S. RODMAN, Secretary. FRED C.

HOXSIE, Tkeasukek.

Class Colors, Purple

and

Whitic.

Jffonorart/ ^^ember, Miss Anne L. Bosworth.

7f/embers Kate G. Barber,

Thomas Brennan, Louis F. Bell, Jr.

Class.

Carolina, R. I.

.

.

.

.

Emery P. Chase, Alhkkt S. Church,

John-

of

.

Peace Dale, R. 1.

.

Wakefield, R. I.

.

Warren, R. I.

...

Narragansett Pier,

.

.V.

Ci.akner, Lauka M. Cooke,

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Feed C. Hoxsie, Willard M. Hoxsie,

.

.

R. I.

Adamsville, R. I. Narragansett Pier, R. I. Narragansett Pier, R. I. River Point, R. I. Brockloii, Mass. Woodville, R. I. .

.

John G. CRO.SS. J. I';i)\vAKD fiuFFY, Wakken Goddard, Jr.,

Wakrjield,

.

Elverton J. Crandall, Frederick J. Cross,

R. I.

Pawtucket, R. I.

.

.

.

....

.

.

Quonochontaug,

R. I.

Edith L. Keefer. Raymond W. Kent, Robert B. MacKnight,

William Loomis, Arthur N. Peckham, .

Mary L.

Quinn,

Oceanus, N. Y. Woonsocket, .R. I. Adamsville, R. I.

Clastonbury, Conn Kingston, R I. IVakeJield, R. I. Brockton, Mass.

W. F. Rey'nolds,

George H. Rice,

.

Edith S. Rodman, E. A Tefft,

Wickjord, Kingston. Hope Valley,

White.

Charles E. Whitmore.

John Wood,

I.

R. I. R

I

Shannock, R I.

Everett E. Wheeler, Francis M.

R

Mass.

Amesbury Holyoke. Mass. Hope Valley, R. I.

m&i

,

1903

It is with great pleasure insignificant "Preps," as we

that

greet you

we

were

again,

not

called last year, but,

as

the

as mem

class, who after a hard .struggle have suc more step ahead, in the walk of our college

the Freshman

bers of

ceeded in

forging

one

career.

We

were

content

not

to

let

desire for advancement end

our

Preparatory course, so we have tried hard this year to grapple successfully wilh our studies. At times we have felt a little discouraged, when confronted with a few pages in German (a study dear to all Freshmen) (?),or perhaps, a number of Trigowith the

nometic

that seemed almost

problems

all

came

obstacles

derived from such

a

placed before training.

us

But

impenetrable. and

now

we

we over

leel the benefits

we were well represented, in foot-ball quite a num the majority, of players on the team were from our Unfortunately, some of our players on the team were injured at the first of the season, and as a result they were unable to accomplish what they might otherwise have done. We also

In athletics

ber, if

not

class.

contributed somewhat to the We have

condition. and

see

looked at

Let how

class is not

us now

they

quite

so

the

success

class

upon the base-ball field. body, and found it in good of the individual members

as a

run over some

have

large

prospered as

it

was

members have left the institution.

since

our

The

last account.

last year, since departure of

some

The

of

our

MacKnight Mac figured promin caused much regret among his classmates. ently in all the class affairs, as he was ever ready to do anything He is pursuing his studies at that would be a benefit to 1903. Friends School, and the class wish him the best of

success.

But

we

consider ladies:

should

how

not

complain

fortunate

we

too

were

much

in not

at

losing

his loss when

we

two of our young

from her constant interviews at the windows in

Lippitt son-stroke,' and at present is still Hall, experienced a touch of lingering (at the window), but under proper treatment will return The other young lady, in endeavoring to her usual composure. to cross a stream (well known to all of us) over-estimated her jumping abilities, and, as a result was precipitated into the rush ing torrent. At first it looked as if she would be swallowed up by the cruel waters, but having been brought up at the Pier, and, merry-made,'' therefore, possessing some of the qualities of a she managed to reach the opposite bank uninjured. Unfortunately she lost her school-bag, lo which she had become very much Another member of the class, during one of the excur attached. sions in search of Physiographic knowledge, became so absorbed one

'

"

in the wonderful works of nature that

he

was

the wilds of Wolf Rocks, unnoticed by the

soon

left behind in

other members.

Had

it not been for the appearance of a "guiding star" which attracted his attention, he never would have reached his destination. It is probably quile well known that a number of our class availed

themselves of

the

opportunity

Many ridiculous things occurred

on

lo

the

go

trip,

to

but

Washington. owing to the

sensitiveness of some, it would probably be unjust, as well as All we can say is that the wise to mention any of them here.

un

trip thoroughly enjoyed, with the exception of a little sea-sickness which prevailed from Kingston to Stonington. Having given you a slight insight into our progress during the past year, we will not impose further upon your good nature. In concluding, we would say that we hope to be able to feel as well was

satisfied with

our

studies in the future

with this end in view

we

as we

have in the past, and Now we our hopes.

will strive to realize

bid you ''Leber Sie wohl, biswir Ilinen nacUsies Jahr

begegnen.''

S^affe.

Children's

"wES,

little

ones,

although

are

you

in the

Preparatory depart-

We take a great ment the Board has not forgotten you. Jii deal of interest in you and want you to become good students ; and be will Mammas we know your Papas and very grateful to us for

Don't you think so? an eye over their little boys and girls. We realize the fact that it will be hard for you to get accustomed to

having

and ginger-bread, your new life, for you will miss Mamma's pies and will spend many sleepless nights tearfully thinking of home. however, which will We wish to offer a few

helpful suggestions,

help to make your life among us more successful. We suggest that you have nothing to do with the Freshmen, for they are green and foolish and will lead you to doing foolish things. Keep away from the

ready

Sophomores, also,

to do little

for they

boys harm.

are a

bad set, and

Always obey

the

are

Juniors,

alwaj

s

and do

If Mamma sends you a box of cook ies, always go and see if they would like some. Never fail to be and to the Seniors, always remove your hat whenever all you

can

for their comfort.

respectful

you pass them. Don't annoy Mr.

Try to be as dignified and manly as they are. Tyler by stealing his candy or playing with his

chainless safety, for he has lots to worry him. Don't say any thing about "Snap Course," for it makes him awfully mad. Don't Old Maid," for many a man has gone to ruin by learn to play

new

"

that

awful

money.

young we

things, don't be afraid of your Juniors and always take them to the

Above all

Lend freely to the and set them up.

Village We hope aud

game.

that these

suggestions

will be of

some

help

to

our

readers, but if you should happen to go astray, come will try to set you aright by our fatherly advice.

dear to

us

^Preparatory 'Department.

Ernest C. Barber,

Shannock , R. I

Cora Brown,

West

Martha Brown,

.

Frank G. Grinnell, Nellie A. Hakkall, Kate M

Kingston, R. Kingston, R. Kingston, R. Narragansett Pier, R. Narragansett Pier, R. Wakefield, R. .

Hoxsie,

.

Charles H. McCarthy,

James M. Macdonald, James L. Murray, LoLO R. Wright, .

Tiberio G.

Aloma, Briggs,

John Clancy,

.

Joseph Doegan,

I. I.

I. I.

I. I.

Woodville. R. I.

Central Falls, R. I. Wood River Jiinctio7l R. I. .

,

Narragansett Pier, R. Wakefield, R. .

I.

I.

Kingston,

R. I.

Mystic,

R. I.

Kingston,

R. I.

Frank O. Barber, Myron W.

.

R. I.

.

Elsie M. Case, Elizabeth S. Champlin, Rollin G. Clark,

Kingston,

Wood River

[unction. R.I.

Narragansett Pier, R. I.

Caleb G. Fl.'Vgg, Leigh O. Gardiner, Neva M. Sisson,

Lkroy E. Thompson, Thomas P. Wells,

....

.

.

R. I.

Wickjord,

R. I.

Narragansett Pier,

R. I.

....

.

Kingston,

P"^<^<^ Dale, R. I.

.

....

m^

Kingston, R. I.

}|$$ociatlon$ ana

lub$

Tlfillitarg Organization

'

R. N. Soule,

Captain

C. N. Wheeler,

Third /lieutenant First

Denico,

C. S. Burgess,

.

L. G. K. Clarner,

B.

.

Smith, .

Sergeant

Second

Sergeant

Third

Sergeant

Fourth

Sergeant

Fifth Sergea?it

J. Wilby,

A.

Adjutant

Second Lieutenant

H. M. Brightman,

H. D.

and

First Lieutenant

.

J. R. Eldred,

A. A.

Capiain

.

.

A. E. Munro,

J. Cornell,

First

Corporal

Second

Corporal

Third

Corporal

.

L. Reynolds,

O. N. Ferry, R. W. Pitkin,

L. Clark,

Fourth

Bugler

Corporal

2/.7//.ajt. R. W. PITKIN

President

E. J. CRANDALL,

Vice-President

H. D. SMITH

Secretary

L. G. K. CLARNER, Jr

Tkesurer

2/. w. a 71. EDITH L. KEEFER, ANNA B. SHERMAN

.

.

.

.

President

Vice-President

EDNA E DAWLEY

Secretary

LAURA M. COOKE,

Treasurer

TR ir^^

4

'?i^

%

%^ *

1>>

-JUiy

#

1* ....

%.

^^

^. V

'

'-

She Club Offic L. G. K. CLARNER, 'oi C. S. BURGESS, 'oi,

Secretary and Treasurer.

Manager. J. S. ALLEN, Jr., Director

R. N. MAXSON, '03, Business

^irsi C.

ZTenors

J- S. ALLEN, Jr.

S. BURGESS, 'oi. R. N.

MAXSON,

'02.

Second Venors

J. WILBY,

j. E. CARGILL,

'oi.

'02.

^t'rst ^ass L. G. K. CLARNER, Jr., 'oi. R. W. KENT, '03.

W. M. HOXSIE, 'o.-?.

Second Sass J- E. DUFFY, '03.

J. A. CLARNER, '03.

C. H. MCCARTHY, '04.

Quartette C. S

Burgess, 'oi, ist Tenor. 'oi, ist Bass.

L. G. K. Claknek.

J, Wilby, 'oi, 2d Tenor. J. E. Duffy, '03, 2d Bass.

^iumni' ^Association

President,

MR. H. B. CASE.

Vice President, MR. W. B. MADISON.

Secretary, MR, G. A. RODMAN.

Treasurer,

MR. J

F. KNOWLES.

First Director, MISS EDNA H. CARGILL. Second

Director, MR. HARRY F. KNOWLES. Third Director, MR. L. F. ALBRO.

Alumni

George E. Adams,

Kingston,

R. I.

Assistant Horticn

George C. Ammonds,

Kingston, R. I,

Chapin T. Arnold,

lington Street, Providence

George W. Burlingame,

Chepachet,

Helen M. Clarke,

Kingston, R. I.

John F. Knowles,

Kingston,

.

e

Warren B. Madison,

Island

South

William S. Rathbun,

.

George A. Rodman, Bridge Dept.,

Samuel W. Slocum,

John

B.

Speaks,

Greemmch,

R. I.

Keysville,

Reuben W. Peckham,

Assistant

R. I.

Collej^e.

Bast

Ernest H. Mathewson,

Charles S. Sargent,

R. I.

Va.

Portsmouth,

R. I.

Wakefield,

R. I.

Woonsocket, R. W

I.

'N.H. & Hart. R. R. .

peace

Dale, R. I.

Westerly,

R. I.

Rockland, R.

I.

Slocmns, R. /.

Stephen A. Sweet, Farmer.

George M. Tucker, Ph. D., OjiUan, Eslado

de

Cafetral

.

La Estrella

Resident.

Oax.ica, Mexico.

Manager Coffee and India Rubber Plantation.

Robert A

Wilber,

.

Greenwich,,, R. L

Fast

.

Express Ag-ent.

229 West

Lester F Albro.

^8th St.,

New

Vork, N. Y.

Slndentof Music.

Howland Burdick, Farm

.

Superintendent,

Charles S. Clarke,

Rtiode Island

iiludent of Marine

R. L

.

.

R. /.

fCingston,

.

....

Lincoln N. Oatlev.

Jamestoum,

Enifineering-

.

John E. Hammond.

R. J.

Conefre.

.

.

Mabel D. Eldred,

Kiiigston,

.

.

R

famcstown,

Wakefield,

.

/

R. L

Carpenter.

Arthur C Scott,

Jesse C- Tefft,

Kingston, R.

....

Professor of

Physics,

Purser

Byron E- Winsor,

on

/.

Rhode Island College.

fa^nestown,

....

R. L

Ferry Boat.

....

Summit, R. /.

Teacher.

'96 May Brown, (Mrs. Charles A.

White,) Narragansett Pier, R /.

Adelaid M. Greenman,

j5 Concord

Square, Boston, Mass.

Smdeni, School of Expression (Address after May 4, Narrajransett Pier, K. 1.)

Albert L. Khnyqn, Silver

Sprini; Bleachini;

Nathan L- C. Moore,

.

James E. Williams,

and .

Street. Providence R. L ,

Dyeing

Lo.

East

Greemvich, R. L

Smith Street, Providence., R. /.

Edg.\r F. Tabor, Silver

Camp

59

.

Spring Bleaching .

and

Dyeinjr .

Co.

Su7timit, R. /.

Welcome S. CARMicitAL, Boolt-keeper,

Shannock, R. I

.

Belcher an^

Herbert E. B. Case,

Loomis, Providence, R.

I.

R. I. yi2 Main. St., Pawtucket,

.

student. Brown University.

Archie F. Grinnell,

Young Ave., Providence, R. I.

7

.

Draufbtsman, Brown and Sharpe M'l'g

Gertrude M. Hanson, Bessie B. Hoxsie,

.

Peace Dale, R. I.

(Mrs. Ernest F. Rueckert,) So Atlantic

Jessie

Co.

.

.

B. Larkin,

.

Charles F. Kenyon,

.

.

Albert F. Kenyon,

Ave., Providence, R. I.

.

.

Westerly,

.

R. I.

Shannock, R. I.

.

Ashaway, R I.

....

Book-keeper, Maxon and Co., Westerly', R, I.

Louis H. Marsland, E. Alice Tefft,

Academy, Bridgton, N.J.

West Jersey

.

Allenton, R. I.

....

Teacber.

Irving

Thomas,

Wakefield,

....

R. I.

In Peace Dale Woolen Mill.

98 .14.2 Courtland St

Sarah E. Arnold,

.

,

Providence, R. I.

Clerk, Printing Dept., Livermore and Knight.

George VV. Barber,

.

Shannock, R. I.

.

.

Farmer.

Edna M. Cargill.

Kingslon,

.

R. I.

Book-keeper, Rhode Island College.

John

P

Case,

S25 Wilson Ave., Cleveland, Ohio

.

With Brown

Hoisting

and

Conveying Machine Co.

35 St.

William C. Clarke, Jr.,

BotolpKs St., Boston,

Mass.

student, Mass. Instilnle of Technology.

Henky A. Congdon,

.

.

.

,

Kingston,

R I.

Kingston,

R. I.

Farmer,

Martha R.

Flagg,

William F. Harlev,

.

.

.

.

.

loyy Main St., Pawtucket, R. I.

rt.ARRiETTE

F.

Turner,

N.

'

sist St., Philadelphia

Grace E. Wilson,

Allenton, R. I.

'99 Alf'REd W. Bosworth,

.

With

12S

.

Mossberg

and

R. I.

Agricultural Experiment Station'.

.

Lillian M. George,

Kingston,

.

Assistant Chemist R. I. State

Ralph O. Brooks,

Broadieay, Providence, R. I.

Granville, Draughtsmen.

.

.

.

'

Kingston,

R. I.

Kiiigslon,

R. I.

Librarian, Rhode Island College.

Mildred W. Harvey, Stenographer.

.

R.l. State

Blydon E. Kenvon, Graduate

.

Agricultural Experiment Station.

.

Assistant, Dept.

Carroll Knowles,

of

Kingston,

.

.

Physics.

K. I.

Harry Knowles,

R. I.

College.

Kingston,

....

R. I.

Point Judith, R. I.

Merrill A. Ladd,

Pier 22,

.

Brooklyn,

N. Y.

'ransport, McPherson.

Clifford B. Morrison,

Providence, R. I.

William F. Owen,

.

Walter C. Phillips,

Cannonsville,

New York

Lafayette,

R. L

SI

Robert S. Reynolds,

Ce?itreville, R. J.

Minnie E. Rice,

Plainville, Mass. ligh School Teacher,

Abbie G. Sherman,

Kingston,

George A. Sher.man.

R. L

Providence, R. I. Mossberg and Gr:

Sally R. Thompson,

Wakefield,

R. I.

Sn

charge

cf the Professor cl

^ctanij.

Those interested in botanical subjects discuss the local flora and

simple

meet

occasionally

botanical literature.

to

biological

Club.

Officers. L. CLARKE, President.

J. G. MORTON, Secretary. R.

N.

MAXON, Treasurer.

Chemical Club,

R.

Notice

N. MAXSON, President.

No other members

can

be found to exist.

-l^ol\lavx^ m CHARLEY BURGESS, President. C. STUART BURGESS, Vice-President.

CHARLES S. BURGESS, Secretary. C. S.

BURGESS, Treasurer.

Checker Club. 9lie. J. G. CROSS.

L- F. BELL.

T. BRENNAN.

E. E. WHEELER.

Offieers. R.

N.

SOULE, President. A. L.

REYNOLDS, Vice President. F. O.

BARBER, Secretary

and

Treasurer.

MISS E. J. WATSON, President, MISS L. M. GEORGE, Secreta

Gxacutive CommUtee Miss B. D. Tucker.

Miss L. M. George, A. E. MuNKO.

^embers. Miss E. J. Watson,

Miss M. W.

Miss G. B. Hazlewood,

Miss E. W. Kenyon,

Miss L. M.

George,

Miss E.

Miss B. D.

Tucker,

Mr. A. C.

Mr.

j. S. Allen, Jr.,

Mr. a. E.

Munro,

Goddard,

Mr. M. H. Mr. B. Mr. R. Pitkin.

Rockwell,

Scott,

Tyler,

j. Cornell,

fl>.

l/\offramme

Sixt/i Jinnual Commencement June PRAYER MUSIC: THESIS : THESIS

J3, JS99

;

"Amusements in Colonial Times.' Mildred Wayne Harvky. "Heating and Ventilation.'

:

Blydon Ellery Kenvon.

;thesis

"Libraries Past and Present.' Lillian Mabelle George.

MUSIC.

JTHESIS THESIS: THESIS:

"Are Acquired Characters Inherited? Ebenezer Payne "Tennyson's Debt to the Mort d'Arthur. Sally Rodman Thompson. "Some Tendencies of Militarism.' Walter Clark Philips.

MUSIC.

GOVERNOR'S ADDRESS. CONFERRING OF DEGREES.

PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS. By His Exciu.lencv

BENEDICTION. MUSIC. JEscused from re-iding.

Elisha Dyer, Governor.

of Cincinnati

^eadinff

Orations

for ifie

U^rize

jCippitt 2 ff'.

9^.

MUSIC.

Some Revolutionary

Correspondence Relating

to Rhode

Island

History, Ralph Ordway Brooks. Abraham

Whipple

in

the

War of

Independence,

Arthur Earle Munro,

MUSIC. A Hero of the Revolution, Walter Clark Phillips. Rhode Island's Committee of

Correspondence.

Bertha Douglass Tucker.

MUSIC.

ADDRESS,

By Ex-Governor Charles Warren Lippitt

MUSIC.

First Prize awarded to Arthur E. Munro. Second Prize Awarded to Bertha D. Tucker.

7//iiitari/

!^aii

^loor Committee.

CAPTAIN A. E. MUNRO. ist

SERGEANT A. A. DENICO. CORPORAL A. L. REYNOLDS. PRIVATE J. G. MORTON. PRIVATE J. A. CLARNER.

Patronesses.

MRS. J. H. WASHBURN. MRS.

JOHN UNDERBILL. MRS. H. F.

HUNT,

MISS. H. L. MERROW. MISS

A. L. BOSWORTH.

jCtsi of Zreriodicals in

the

Harper's Monthly.

to be

^ound

jCibrar^

Atlantic.

Journal of Society of Chemical Industry.

Century.

Harper's

Scribner.

New York Critic.

Cosmopolitan.

Quarterly Journal of Economics. Political Science Quarterly. Journal of Chemical Society. National Geographic Magazine. Popular Astronomy.

N. E.

Magazine.

Popular

Science

Monthly.

American Naturalist.

Chatauquan Monthly. Engineering Magazine. Nortli American Review.

Forum.

Bazaar.

American Mathematical

Monthly The American

Kitchen Maga-

Westminster Review.

School Review.

The Journal of School

Educational Review.

Public Libraries.

Blacksmith and

Carpentry

Geogra

phy.

Art Amateur.

and

Wheelwright. Building.

Review of Reviews.

Forest Leaves. Florist Exchange. American

Gardening.

American Journal of Science.

National Nurseryman.

Astrophysical Journal.

Canadian Horticulturist.

Journal of Franklin Institute.

Gardening.

Power.

N. E-

Botanical Gazette.

Public

Bulletin of the

Torrey

Bot. Club.

Journal of Education.

Opinion

Harper's Weekly.

MacMillan

London News Print.

Magazine

for

(Nature),

Life.

Evening Telegram.

Puck.

Pawtuxet

Judge.

Valley Gleaner.

American Machinist.

Rhode Island Pendulum.

Electric

Narragansett Times. Evening Call. Evening Reporter. New York Daily Tribune. Boston Daily Herald. Washington Daily Post. Providence Journal.

Age.

Electrical World and

Engineer.

Engineer. Engineering. Scientific

American

plement. Forest and Stream. Science for 1898.

aud

Sup

1898

IN MEMORIAM rN MEMORY OF

AMOS

JOHN

WOOD

DIED FEBRUARY 11,

1900

Whereas, God in his iiifiuite wisdom moved from among

mate,

John

Amos

us our

has

re

beloved friend aud class

Wood, and

Whereas, we recognize his friendly, generous spirit, his manly independence of character aud his conscientious devotion to duty, and do deeply re the loss of .so worthy a classmate, therefore be it

gret

Reiolved, That we, the members of the class of 1903 of the Rhode Island College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, do extend our iieartfelt sym pathy to the bereaved family in their affliction, and be it further

Resolved.

That

a

copy

of these

resolutions be

the family of our departed classmate, and copies be placed on file in the class records be published iu the College aud other publica-

sent to

that

aud

A. L. BOSWORTl-l,

W. F. Reynolds,

L- M. Cooke,

E. J. CrandalIv, For the Class.

T^arriages

ERNEST H. MATHEWSON, '94,

MABEL F. BATTEY.

February 5th,

Fiskeville,

R. I.

Narragansett Pier,

R. I.

1900.

MAY

BROWN, '96,

CHARLES A. WHITE.

February

21, 1900.

BESSIE B. HOXSIE, '97, ERNEST F. REUCKERT. October 9, 1899.

Quonochontaug,

R. I.

'

^-^^?^^^?^^=^*''=^'^=^''^^-"=^-"'==::i*''^*"''=:i'^=:i*"^^''^^

College

R. N.

Jithletic dissociation

SOULE, President. A. A. DENICO, Vice-President. H. D.

SMITH, Secretary. MARSHALL H. TAYLOR, Treasurer.

Foot

J^^

Ball

of College in September, it was found that five members and five substitutes of the famous foot The outlook, therefore, lor a strong representa ball team of '98.

At the

there

opening

were

tive team

was

good.

a victory lor our team; while the sec slight defeat, was a battle which the students of alas! Our men were so But of. this college may well be proud recover for the badly crippled in this game that they did not fully

The first game ended in

ond, although

a

remainder of the At first

a

season.

and gave excellent strong second team played against first; but after our first defeat the members of the

to the

practice

gradually, until near the end of the appeared on the field. This, dear under nor the way to win games. graduates, is not the proper spirit, from Next year let us try to get out two or three good teams, and these pick the players to represent the college on the "varsity." second

began

season a

to

diminish

bare first team

and all strive with every means in our power to de which will make "Rhode Island College" stand out in bold relief among the names of the other institutions.

Let

velop

us one

a

team

.football.

A. E. MUNRO, MacKnight

Centre.

Aloma

and

F. Hoxie, Maxom

and

Crandall,

W. Hoxie, Barber, Cargill,

Guard.

.

.

Tackle.

Tefft,

Ends.

Wilby, Cornell Cross,

Steere, Socle, Duffy,

End and Full Back.

.

htid and

.

Denico.

Lejt Half Quarter Left HalJ Right HalJ, Lefl HalJ and Full

Back. Back. Back.

Back.

Left HalJ. Right Half Back.

Munro,

Fry,

Lejl Half

Burgess,

Back.

TYLER, Coach.

S-ooiball Schedule, '99. R. I. C

Dean

October 14.. October iS.

R. I. C. R. I. C.

vs.

Academy, College, W. H. S.,

October 28.

R. I. C.

vs.

Brown

Nov.

f.

R. I. C.

Nov.

8.

R. I. C.

Nov.

II.

R. I. C.

vs.

Friends School,

Nov. iS.

R. I. C.

vs.

Storrs,

October

i.

ton.

ton.

vs.

vs.

Brown

at

Kingston,

"

"

"

"

at

Kings

Cancelled by Brown, '02. Brown Freshmen, at

Kings

Sophomores,

vs.

Cancelled by Brown '03. S. K. H. S., at Kingston,

vs.

at

Storrs,

"

ii

o

5

6

00

22

o

627 017

The national game of baseball has always been hailed with much at the college, and this year does not fall behind for

enthusiasm mer

years in any way.

It is with

students

pride that we watch our fellowgentlemanly manner credit

play this exciting game in a able to themselves and to the college.

It is now too early in the season to predict, with any degree of certainty, the result or this year's schedule, but it is reasonable to suppose that our team will do its duty as it has heretofore done. A very hard and interesting schedule of games is given below.

^aseiali Schedule, J900.

April i.^

R. I. C.

vs.

S. K. H. S. at

April April

21

R. I. c.

vs.

Bulkely School

28.

R. I. C.

vs.

East

Kingston, at Kingston,

29 5

101.5

Greenwich Academy at

Kingston, Meiy

9

5

R. I. C.

vs.

May May

12.

R. I. C.

vs.

zy.

R. I. C.

vs.

Westerly High School

May

ig.

R. I. c.

vs.

East Greenwich

Friends School at Providence, Peacedale's at Kingston, at

Academy

at

East Greenwich. 26.

R. I. C. ston.

vs.

La Salle

Academy

at

o

7

18

o

10

6

King

ston,

May

1

King

fune

2.

R. I. C.

June

6.

R. I. C.

fune

9.

R. I. C.

vs.

Connecticut State College

at

Kingston. vs.

Westerly High School

at

King

ston. vs.

Hope High School

at

King

ston.

fune

16.

R. I.

June

19.

R. I. C. Alumni

College

vs.

Friends

School

at

King

at

King-

ston. vs.

College Team

se^i)s

:Sase !Qall

A. E. MUNRO B.

Manager.

J. CORNELL

Assistant Manager.

Cross, Burgess, Bell, Dbnico, Steere, Hoxsie,

Catcher. Third Base.

Right Field. .

Pitcher.

Second Base.

.

First Base.

Fry,

Centre Field.

Munro, Duffy, Wrightman, Cargill,

Left Field. .

Shortstop. Stibstitute.

.

.

COACH:

M. H. TYLER.

Substitute.

Ciierary Departttiem

!^as/cet !8all

For three years the young ladies of the tem of

gymnasium work; There have

ket Ball.

and

never

an

been any

tions, but those fought between

exciting; and predict which we

as

the sides

leam

are

will win.

College

especial

games with other

our two

teams are

equally strong,

are

The

it is

We look forward

may oppose and defeat teams from other

tains

have had

a

feature of ibis is

to

usually never

sys

Bas

institu very

SEife

to

the time when

Colleges.

Our

cap

Miss Rowena Steere, and Miss Anna Sherman. called

gymnasium (familiarly

"Gym") is

very capacious England. It is in Lip pitt Hall, and has also been used for the Military Drill, entertain ments, graduation exercises, etc. At the ringing of the three o'clock bell on certain afternoons, a general buzz begins in the girl's room; and, "Are you going up and

to

as

fine

a one as can

Gym?" is

heard

on

be found

all sides.

the stairs which leads lo the debar all

in New

from the

Presently a rope is hung across Gymnasium, and this is expected lo Iu a few moments upper regions.

gentlemen girl's room is desolate, while from above there floats down the stairway a rumor of confusion. As soon as the players have donned their suits, they assemble around lhe captains in "Gym." MissH--l d acts as umpire and is always ready to call usfov^ls (fouls). The fields are lined off, baskets lowered, substitutes placed where needed, and then the captains try for goals. Nowall take their proper places, the ball is thrown up, and the gamu begins. It is useless for me lo try to explain the proceedings o( the

the game, for only those who are familiar with Basket Ball wouhl understand, and they already know what it is like. What if ynu

bang

your

head

against

the

sides

of

the

building;

gel

your

hit and

nearly

eye

from

out

elbow?

learned to be brave

we

important and, if

put

someone's

in

a woman

we can

keep

as a

it out

man.

teeth loosened by a fun the same, just loyal, which virtues are as If we get the ball, we are happy;

or

your It is

and

of the clutches of

until it may land in the basket, which great is the shout succeeding the struggle. mies

Flushed, breathless, ready for

a

even, the

playing

during course,

and with disheveled

few moments' rest.

momentary

our

hangs

above

heads,

are

at

score

is

length nearly

hair, all

After this, if the

is renewed with

ene

our

energy than was displayed After the finish some are, of

more

the first half of the game. satisfied, and others dissatisfied,

as

is always the

case

after

battles of all kinds. And

it is four o'clock, and time for us to depart, but, before reader, let me give you a friend's advice. If you are getting ruffled, if you are not in symjiathy with merry if a slight bruise would kill you, never engage in a sports, and

leaving

now

you,

afraid of

game of Basket Ball.

s^i?

class of 1900 might have graduated (?) with hon quiet village of Kingston respected by all and good reputation, if Claude had not eaten that "mince pie," but as the class, as a whole, were termed Rubes," it is not to be wondered at that a delicacy in the form of pie would have a bad

The

Poultry

ors, and lelt lhe

with

a

"

effect.

The class started strong aud full (this refers to numbers only), having twenty-three members, but was reduced by the sickness of four members, Messrs. Gifford, Soenke, Coggeshall and Marshall. One member. S.

J. Dornacher,

was

called home

because of

the

represented in this class, and all of the students, with the exception of the four men tioned, enjoj'ed good health and enormous appetites, the latter lo such an extent that it was rumored the boarding hall management had been thinking seriously of filing a petition of bankruptcy, and the waitresses declared they would be compelled to give up their classes. Usually there were four familiar faces at the table long death of his mother.

after the meal hour ment the

the

"

was

grand rush

victuals.

There

were

over, and

"

was

These faces

nine States

they lost

no

time from the

mo

made for the tables until the end of

belonged

to

"Mysterious Harris,"

''Old Bill"

Taylor, "Percy" Stoneburn, and "Claudie" Stearns. uo law against a man eating all he wants, but I imagine where the above-named parties got the idea that they could satisfy their appetites for $3.50 per week. We missed onr dear Marshall, aud it grieves us all to think ihal he gave Papa us no warning and left, even on account of sickness, without the Of course, there is

can't

"

"

usual fond farewell of

a loving parent. The faculty predicted a great future for the class of 1900, as we had members who had hatched two thousand chicks out of two

thousand eggs set, and raised every one of them, and, on the olher hand, we had members who had seen, but never raised, that lovely bird

(?)

known

the

as

"

Poland China."

rather

We had

long

da3"S; but, taking everything into consideration, the course was enjoyed by all, and we sincerely hope that the future discussed by the members will be carried out to the letter, plans liours

some

and the class of 1900 will be among the most

prominent

breeders of

the future.

Our

numerous

instructive excursions

were

enjoj^ed by all, say nothing of

and

the sights we saw were well worth seeing, to we enjoyed en route. While in Boston we were shown the town by our guide, Mr. Brayman (with the assistance of the Bos ton police force), and we enjoyed the trip immensely. The reception tendered the class by Prof, and Mrs. Brigham was a feature of the course and one of the pleasantest evenings spent while at college. Say ! are you interested enough in a trap nest to take one of mine (if it works)? was the greeting of the last few days re ceived from Steamboat Mag Stackus, and I understand that the trap nest has since been completed and works to perfection, provided every hen that goes into it lays (some people may have hens of that kind). Now, Professor, my experience has been" the

meals

"

"

"

"

"

"

Maine

snow

melons," "

the

lady

sea was

seen

the views of Cornell?

storms," and last but

were

MolUe"

near

the

Have you

familiar utterances to

Murray does

not us

"

"

Those awful

least, "'arry 'opes large all.

not think that

"

Bill

"

will venture

so

in quest of the tideHe was not to blame, as there to protect him. That beautiful moonlight ex

again

cursion to the Pier will be remembered

as a

jolly trip,

even

if Prof.

Card

was a

out of the

little slow in

sandwiches

getting

the

can

of ancient "deviled ham"

forgot all about that, however, after we long enough, and the pie, cake and enjoyed almost as much as the melodious (?) We

bakery.

had been in the fresh were

air

voices of the party" I'd leave my happy home for you," was quite popu The air, lar, but we are glad to note that Mr. Flagg is still in Rhode

Island, although one member seemed considerably worried over charge and volunteered his services as chaperone when ever Mr. F. failed to report, which was seldom. Mr. Coggeshall distinguished himself by his eloquent and much Mr. F.'s

applauded

defence of the Mediterranean class in the debate: "Re

solved that the Asiatic breeds

American

Taylor proved

poultry

made a

a

man

hit

are

the

source

of

more

profit

than the Mediterranean breeds."

with

his

caponizing.

friend in the time of

"Uncle

Gene"

need, and his safety

razor

to the

Brother

Tyler

did the

rest.

The writing of letters and long ones, too, seemed to be a mania Some of our with some, but we refrain from mentioning names. members were bent on breaking ladies' heart, but to keep young ladies

penned

some one

go home

else

up in a corner at a church social and not even give chance to invite them to supper, and then let them

a

hungry,

is

breaking enjoyed

The lady members

hearts in the wrong way. the carpentering and dissecting lec

tures, even if rubber gloves were brought into play. We feel authorized to tender a vote of thanks to the several members course,

of the

and

we

faculty who will

that the Rhode Island

try and

College

ment will prosper and that the

may become the most

popular

so

us through the teachings. Hoping Poultry Depart

earnestly piloted

profit by

their

of A. and M. A.'s Pea Combed

of all breeds,

Red we

Yours

Island

Rhodes

remain

truly, COMMH^TEE.

School

Oummer

Summer vacation in cannot be

separated

is

Kingston

few faithful souls who become from it

so

usually

very

attached to the

during

the months of

peaceful, and the College that they July and August

"

are no

allowed to pursue the even tenor of their way " disturbed by events than an occasional Board meeting or the advent stranger from the Pier. The devotees become so unaccus

greater

of

a

tomed ment

to

the

hurry and bustle

introduced from there

The

suinmer

of the outside world that any ele

causes a

commotion.

of 1899 was an exception to the general rule, for of expectation to put it mildly .seemed to

atmosphere pervade everything. All the young men were requested to leave the Dor mitory and take up their abode in Lippitt Hall, whereupon strange sights began to be seen. When the shades ot evening were fall ing, the outcasts might be seen cheerfully (?) rushing handcarts filled with household goods from one building to another, singing the while of the good time coming. This accomplished, stranger sights appeared in the early morning. Women with brooms, pails filled with hot water, soap, mops and cleaning cloths made frequent journeys to the deserted building. (It might be noted that this general appearance of house-cleaning was a mere matter of form.) Shades were replaced in the windows, new paper covered the walls an

and many you

to

new

wondering

The

articles of furniture what ail this

first session of the

open

young

the

lady

5th of July.

were

preparation

carried to the

rooms.

and excitement

were

Are for ?

Summer School for Nature On

Study was of the fourth, one acquainted with her surround "do" Kingston. As .she had her the afternoon

who wished to become

arrived and proceeded to wheel, she "did" it before supper. The multitude arrived the next day and would you believe it ? There was only one man

ings,

among them, and he

was

so

overcome

before the two weeks

were

only were the sights interesting, Anywhere on the ground one might easily have imagined the sights and sounds in Babylon at the time when the people presumptuously attempted to construct a tower over

that he

but

the

disappeared.

sounds

Not

well!

as

which should reach to He'aven. sion occurred the first

ing

of

the

lights,

a

served from that time

evening sign not

The time of the greatest confu

about ten minutes after the wink theu understood, but

carefully ob

on.

Let us pause a moment to consider the feelings of the worthy instructors of the Summer School for Nature Study when they

fully comprehended (if such a thing were possible) the nature of the people who composed the class. To an outsider.they appeared

unhappy but appearances are often deceitful. One delightful (or most trying) experiences of the day was the class held in the earlj' morning to learn the songs of the birds. The first delight was awaking the fair inmates of Davis Hall, a anything

but

of the most

janitor ; the second was the walk to charge of the biologist and his assistant, who were of sight among flowing draperies, and the third, the shade of the trees, in charge of the two people last

task left to the devices of the the woods in very much

out

the class in mentioned.

is

It

instructor took

rumored

that the class

part, arranged

a

it

shouted his words from the centre.

in

a

But

was

divided and each

circle around him and rumor

is not

always

to

be relied upon.

The chief feature of the day was perhaps the excursion. The a time of trial, because of the great anxiety as were reserved seats enough. As a matter ot fact

start was in truth to whether there

there

were

times

when

brought

back from

attacked

by huge

subject but

as

ant person and

some

there

were

not.

Strange reports

of these excursions

lhat the ladies

black ants, and that Dr. F

has been remarked

ought

The lectures in the

not to be

before,

rumor

were were

became full of his is

a

very

unpleas

believed.

evening were well attended and were often illustrated by specimens gathered during the day. The receptions, balls, socials, etc., were remarkable chiefly for the lack of the male element, but they were enjoyed by the ones who were fortunate enough to be in or about Kingston.

The day of departure was sad in many respects sad for those A fea who went away and sad for those who were left behind. ture worthy of remark was the assiduity with which trunks and wheels

were

fact that

goods.

a

collected and sent to

team was

Kingston

has

sent

to

never

troubled spot since their exit.

the station.

W. K. been the

to

It is

known

as

a

bring back confiscated calm, peaceful, un

same

Has not memory lived?

m

oummer

School Tjivaddle

"Hello, Hattie!" "

Do you know if B. E. K. is coining out rs loves to go a-boating, ho ! Jean, lovely Jean ! S

"

-

to-night ?

"

-

Say,

can

keep step

you

How about P

Miss T

-

with W

y ?

"

cy ?

-

t loses

Suinmer School

five cents.

girl

goes

sailing,

a

gale

comes

up, all

sick,

tea

galore required. Mr. M

hunting "

11 and

Ch

-

-

ie K

-

-

-

-

Love makes P

Rey

Indian file go

-

-

-

I've lost Mr. Eld

-

-

d."

t's n

-

-

guardian. stays out quite early. n suddenly dizzy, falls from haymow. -

ds makes love to Ariel.

Wonder ii P

Oh 1

in

bird whistles.

Oh, girls, what shall I do?

Ssii becoms K

"

sixty-three young ladies

-

-

cy's

worn

I think Mr. M

out

those handkerchiefs yet? just lovely !

11 is

"

On Pie

to Scott Sir

(With Apologies Breathes there Who

never

I'd like

a man

with soul

to himself hath

some

pie

'fore

W.)

so

dead

said,

going

to

bed !

Oh, I really can't live until breakfast If such there be, go, mark him well ; For him no midnight revels swell ; Or late debauch, Of

pie,

or

magic spell

be it mince, prune,

or

lemon.

unexpressed desires, quench the stomach's hidden fires. pie, but finally he retires.

Boundless his

To

Seeks

Baffled, then calmly death awaits. Oh, pie, thou Thou

ever

Lulled ill And

source

of many

a woe

!

sweet, yet treacherous foe. arms to

thy smiling nightmares flaunt

before

sleep us.

we

go.

Sn the iPublic Oye,

A is for Aloma, quite Not the sort of

B is for

a

Brightman,

a good-looking Cuban, chap you would take for a

Reuben.

.seller of soles,

a

A great Y. M. C. A. man as everyone knows. C is for Cornell, a smart little dandy. With gloves

or

with brains you will find him

D is for Duffy, a most popular man. Sells jokes by the wholesale, fresh made E is for Eldred, Who

ogles

a

the

bit of

girls

a

or

quite handy.

in

can.

dude.

and is inclined to be rude.

F is for Ferry, a most cheerful young fellow. But like Malmsey's sack is readily turned mellow.

G is for Grinnell, held back in his youth. Still, he's only a Prep to tell you the truth. H is for Hoxsie, "Hail fellows well met," Both live at the Annex where apartments

I

I'm afraid I shall have to

As I can't find

J

is for

Jack Fry,

a name so

a

She lives in the

a

let.

mis-fit.

modest is he,

Prefers darkness to

K is for Keefer,

are

omit,

which is uot

light;

acts

as

watchman you

see.

bashful young mayde. village, to say more, I'm afraid.

L is for Levi, you know whom I mean, A grtat .sort of rubber, wilh wit sharp and keen. M is for Maxson, brimful of 'cetylene. Whether he'll

ever

N" is for a-nother, who He's

cutting

blow up still remains to be cannot be found.

his classes

again,

I'll be bound.

seen.

O is for orange,

big

so

We'll capture them Platoon A.

and

so

round.

next year

when

prize

drill

comes

round

P is for Pitkin, conscientious and slow. Reads French like a native, though about it won't blow.

Q

is for

which

questions,

And make

us

all

R is for Rodman,

a

She lives out in

are

asked in the

in the

indulge

sweet little

Mooresfield, medal,

graudsire's

exam.

d

which I think is

S is for Smith, who's made of the As his

epithet

.

dame. same

though

a

shame.

stuff.

he's still in the

rough.

so prim and so neat, A dainty young maiden so charming and sweet. U is for Urrutio, a slim Porto Rican, Full of nothing but noi.se, yet thinks he's a musician.

T is for Tucker,

V is for Veneer, which this ribaldry lacks. For I'm but

a

W is for Wilby,

beginner, hung up on our own Johnny Bull,

the racks.

Whose face is wreathed in smiles when his stomach is full.

X, Y aud Z,

see

Miss Bosworth about,

I've had all I want, of the rest,

I hope you'll As

we

forgive

me, ye

haven't got

room

please

find out.

friends whom I've missed. for you all "in the Grist."

^on

excursion

Wednesday morning, March 28, 1900, fifteen hearts were made glad by the following announcement: "The Washington excur sion sails to-morrow, Per order of the Commodore."

Then prep

arations

began in earnest, for had we not expected to have one day more to think in and how many necessary articles one can remember in twenty-lour short hours! Due to the unseemly haste comfortable shoes, rubbers and various other commodities were forgotten by difierent members of the party. But it turned whole

out that

it

was

not the

had that troubled

us

things

we

had not, but the

things

that

we

the most.

We lelt

good old Kingston HiU amid the flourish of trumpets and the tinkling of cymbals and almost amid the demonstrations which accompany a bridal party. For some unknown reason the good wishes of our friends left behind were not answered by the of the "bus." Who cau understand the human heart? occupants

Verily it is un.searehable. The car ride to Stonington was unde niably stupid, for had we not all ridden in the steam cars before? Enthusiasm began to appear when we boarded the boat for New York, but it soon died out and we sought our staterooms to be lulled to sleep by the harmonious sounds of boxes and barrels dropped into the hold. The children of the party were up bright and early to see the sights, but the older, more sedate members stayed in their little white beds saving their energies. They were the wiser, for when we left the boat we took a long walk in the fresh morning air. It may be said that this was not premeditated, nor

did it

which

we

which

we

lining,"

form part had

no

of the programme, but

control caused it, and then it

had not gave us no anxiety. however, and we gained two

circumstances was

that the

over

things

"Every cloud has a silver things experience and a

We were ready to settle down in for breakfast. enjoy the next ride in the scorned steam cars. from a seeming trial. blessing Nothing of importance happened in Philadelphia, where we stopped to visit places of historic interest. We made R. I. C. fa mous by paying lo cents to join a society to keep the old Betsy Doubtless more will be heard of that by Ross House in repair. the next generation who read the history we are making. Another and in order not to go astray ride us to Washington, long brought

hearty appetite our

seats

and

Another

again

we

bargained

with several hackmen to take

Sad to relate, the hackman's

lected,

and he landed

us

us

to

E

street.

been much neg The astonished inhabitants

early education had

in D street.

kept out of sight and did not .seem inclined to be hospitable. But just then we discovered the blunder and packed ourselves away in Several houses were needed the vehicles again for auother ride. for our accommodation, but we were quite comfortably settled in a short time. We

began

our

sight-seeing

that

evening,

but

no

regular

"itin

erary" was made out until Sunday. Saturday we visited Mt. Vernon, a very beautiful spot, and later Alexandria. Time and to tell of the many places of interest visited and objects seen. Some of the party became dissipated to the indulging in a glass of water and a toothpick late in the evening, others desired more substantial food and hunted around until an ideal place was found, where all that could be desired might be procured for 29 cents baked beans, ham and eggs, cof

space

wouldjfail

many

extent of

fee, bread

and ice

creain.

Who could wish for

more

in the

wee

embarrassing experiences for in stance, when our guide was conducting us over the Capitol, we came to a spot where a person can here a whisper many feet away. The guide, being shrewd, a.sked one young man, "Do you say your The young man blushed and did not an prayers every night ?" Which ? swer; but the guide remained firm, and said yes or no. Our guide for the Navy Yard will always be kindly remembered He was he us. of information amount for the large very gave willing to answer questions, and when we were in the great shop where the guns were being made for the battleships, we said: "These are the guns He replied: What are these guns lor? small hours ?

"

We

had

some

"

for the

"What

battleships."

are

the great

pieces

of iron,

being

hammered into squares, for?" "Those are for the big guns that Several other questions receiving similar go on the battleships."

refrained from asking more because we feared to tax ingenuity. We visited the White House, the Senate, and ail of interest, and enjoyed our walks there immensely. We places

ansswer we

his the

were

On

very sorry to leave. our

way

back

was

that

a

stopped in New interesting things

we

We discovered many

York for

a

party did not come back with us, principally for the sake of the sea in the cradle of the

deep"

a

half.

city.

One

All of

our

day and

about this great

ten-mile ride could be taken for five cents. the

Sunny South, they might be "rocked

some

went to

trip

that

and become rested after their wander

ings. Whether all their anticipations were fulfilled we know not, for they were rather silent on the subject. All were ready to begin the new term, which is saying a great deal, and all were very en thusiastic

over

the

journey.

S<?i9S

Zjhe

College

When the study days

are over

the Jrill

on

and the

summer

full

comes

soon,

just beginning with its joyousness and tune. evenings each grow longer and the busy birds are still. Think you ever to remember the "College on the Hill?"

When vacation's When the

When fair

Kingston

is deserted for the

When sis meets you at the

station,

city and the town. "you're looking well

says,

and

brown, Introduces you to her friend's

Think

Will," you'll find

sister,

your fancies

as

turning

"My

own

to the

brother

dear

oh

"College

the

Hill?"

When the

summer

girl

and hammock

When the bell of the ice

cream man

When the sweet attractive maiden

Please,

oh

please,

one

thought will

In your dreams still-

me

you be

there'll be

Where you used Hill,"

coaxes

to

out of

giving no

sight

"College

and out of

to that dear

racket in the

on

appear.

so

clear.

the Hill?"

mind.

place

vision of those halls

make such

scene

you to eat your fill.

won't you remember the

No, alas! t'will be I fear Not

upon the

soon

sounds upon the air

left behind; so

lone

"College

on

and

the

Tionsense. Why is Wilby Because he

Miss Sherman

short ?

so

was

fed

(in

Ferry

"

Hoxsie

comparing

"

J.

Soule

condensed milk.

"

Lab.)

Where

are

tbe borax beads ?"

Where is the concentrated acid ?"

Prof. Allen R.

on

Chem.

"

in German,

"What condition

Cut, guter, gutest."

was

the

army in at this time?"

Very poor: it consisted mostly of military men."

It used to be the

style

to say, "I

take mypen in hand."

I take my typewriter Now it is proper to say, Miss X No one ever tool; me that way.'' "

upon' my

knee."

"

Prof.

Tyler What is 1-2 2x begosh!"

Barber.

ol x?"

"

Prof. Allen "Hold your book with other."

Instructor

oue

hand, and read with the

"What is your favorite book ?

"

Student" Pocket Book."

What is the most Alls.

unchangeable thing

Wheeler's voice

on

Parade.

in

College

?

"

Wilby

Why

Didn't you hear

me

give

the Freshmen like the

are

Ans. Something Prexy

Cornell "Shall

we

can

sit

you the wink ?

F'aculty

benches ?

on.

fall in before

we

drill?"

Miss Sherman "May I look at you, Mr. M Mr. Maxon "Certainly. A cal may look at -

M

-

-

-

"T say, what

n.

1 1

C M

are

ynu

"My electives for "Who

n

Poultry student Prof. "That's

"Have yon

are

you

"Oh! a

seen

-

n?"

king."

al)Out?"

next term."

going

see

thinking

x a

to

elect next term?"

that pretty little black one!"

Rhode Island Red."

my roo.ster and

pullet?

I can't find them any

where."

Waiter (to

thirsty student) "No

more

water; just

enough

for

second table."

Tuo of

boys "

are

onr

What

"Oh!

prominent belles, overheard in conversation

getting stupider are

all these

and

women

stupider doing

every

day."

the

place?"

on

"The

It's mother's day ill Room I."

Barber, reciting in Chemistry Sodium's It is found mo.stly in its oxides.

a

very

rare

element.

Dr. Clark

Instructor Dr.

"Palaeoechinoidea." "Will

some

Sweet, the bone-eUer

Clark

(in

Bench

oue

go to the office and

telephone

for

"

Work)

"

Mr.

Rodman, where

rouud square ?''

W

can

I get

a

College Wanted

Petroleum

Steam heated. Baby

Ball Bearing, Preps.

Motor,

carriages.

Wanted

Holidays.

Wanted

Position in gas house

Free to AU Wanted

join

My W

Found

-

class.

Wanted

A

Wanted

h

Found

Apply

make his

Position in U. S.

-

-n.

-

r

-

enough

-.

Athletic Ass. term's

regular

All of

Bursar.

deposit.

us.

for

Wreckage Dept. lifting schooners

cominittee

man's

off

traveling

expenses.

an.

People A hair

Let to

to

Funds -

-

Wanted

To

x

Stub.

Wanted B

St

The roads in bad condition.

the bar.

-

nose.

Liberal Contributions.

Found

M

i.

He must have money

in the Grist.

Wanted

man

tired.

1902.

name

lb

-

our

filling gasometer.

in Room No.

Day Nursery

Men to

Pneumatic

Students.

to pay his class dues.

Wanted

^ds.

with small

on

his upper

Unlimited

lip. advertising

Levi.

Smoke the Gooey mixture.

Waiters.

appetites. B

-

-

space

g

-

on

-

s. a

spacious

collar.

^ules

I. able

of

'Davis JKall.

Anyone wishing to reside in Davis Hall should be perfectly break the regulations of said building at any time it should

to

be necessary.

He should also be

an

active

member of the

An

cient, Reckless, and Independent Order of Prevaricators with license from said

society certifying

proper person to hold The

II.

an

that he is

an

eminently fit

a

and

office in the said order.

is

supplied with a janitor, whose business it cool, invigorating air flowing through your during Anyone found with their ther mometer above 50 degrees will be shot out of the building in

is to

keep

a

building

current of

the winter months.

room

twenty minutes' time. III.

Students

port the

themselves out of their

locking

rooms

must

re

to the person in charge of the building, and, if after days of careful study on the case, he finds that they did it accidentally, he will give them admittance. a

same

few

IV.

Persons

wishing

to

take

a

bath

must

present their

appli

cation to the

Activity Committee at least two weeks prior to the which they wish to take it. This application must be ap the Bursar, read iu Chapel every day for at least a proved by week, must be posted on all the bulletin boards, and then acted on date

on

at the

joint

.session of the

any of the bath

leges V.

Activity Committee. Anyone breaking regulations will be deprived of the bathing privi

for the rest of his

Each

man

course.

is furnished with

a

copy of the fire

drill orders.

Everyoue must read these over at least three times belore attend ing any fire held ou the college campus. N. B. These rules are subject to change without notice.

dedicated

to the

Checker Club

While others while away the hours In treading science devious mazes. Or seek tbe

mystic fleeting flowers

Hid 'neath sad German's tedious hazes

The Checker-fiend with buoyant heart And glances skilled to watch the men. Sits in dreamy 'joyment of his art And comfort far beyond my pen. His heart is

light, his eye is clear. by conning History's pages. to him a source of cheer.

Nor dimmed

The

game's

He envies not your ancient sages.

TJhe SPsalm of jCife,

etc.

TeU

me not, you mournful walker. That this mud's an empty dream.

And the sole is dry, you talker, And you step not where 3'ou

seem.

Mud is real, mud is earnest. And to dry you's not its goal; Dust thou art, to dust returnest. Was not spoken for your sole. Not to

dry and

not to

Is its destined end But to

slump,

Finds your Mud is

And

deep, our

harden.

or

way;

that each to-morrow

footprints the soil is

of

to-day.

sinking.

shoes, though large and stout.

Still Uke bashful

girls, are shrinking. Very little sticking out.

In the walk up to the village. In the struggle of our life.

By the Be

Trust

a

small

thing

be not

rattled.

hero in the strife.

no

footing,

howe'er solid.

Let not dry mud be your bed. Jump jump in our very presence. Dresses up and feet ahead

.

Laws of suction will remind us, We can make ourselves all slime,

And, departing, leave behind us. Rubbers in the mad of time;

Rubbers, that perhaps another,. Coming by this lovely spot, A forlorn,

Will

bedraggled brother. replace what he hath not.

Let us then be up and jumping. With a heart prepared for more; Ever

hopping, ever sinking. patience and endure.

Practice

^=^^^*

jCaten

not

taught

Boyabus kissabus

at the

sweet

Girlibus likibus wanti

College

girlalorum,

some

morum,

Fatheribus hearibus kissum somorum, Bootabus kickabus out of the doorum.

Seneral Calendar. 1099.

Sept.

20.

College

21.

Ho,xsie

Dr. has books sent by telegraph. caught swiping watermelons. Carries them

opens.

back per order T 22.

Oct.

7.

10

14.

iS. 20.

Spears springs

26. 27.

p.

joke.

1

nose

is

Miss

gets the Reynolds mixed up.

Boys all First "At home" at the Watson House. go to court.

Duffy

6.

First fire drill.

7.

Morton is relieved of his class

g.

Dr.

advises

picks 10.

Wilby's

Football game. Brown College vs. R. I. C. Football game, R. I. C. vs. Westerly. Junior reception. Crandall makes a.speech. Wr

Nov.

a

Football game, R. I. C. vs. Dean. found in the game. Discovery of Y. A. S. by Maxson.

MacKnight

so as to

Rooms 31 and

let 13

a

little

are

going pin.

sees axe

to

up stairs.

do his hair up

more

on

Physiography

closed to all visitors for

tooth

in. a

short

time. 14.

Dec.

Steere returns from Wakefield at to room with shoes in his hand.

22.

Smith attends Y. M. C. A.

28.

Redfern is ducked.

I.

late hour.

Goes

Ferry telephones his baby.

5.

"ROTS"

6.

Burgess leads

8.

"ROTS" holds

II.

a

move

to the annex.

Y. M. an

Morton serenades

ing

results.

C. A.

"At home" at the the Watson

annex.

House with

dampen

Great celebration in the

globes Poultry floor.

Military

goes up. class arrives.

Barnyard

Trunks blown Ball.

Price of electric

Dormitory.

concert

on

the third

the front lawn.

out on

Smith rushes the

can

aftenvard.

"And the next day it rained."

Duffy goes to the Pier to see Candy disappears from Tip's Munro goes skatiug and falls Dr.

R.

J. attends

play

a

(Age i8.)

room.

in.

that the measles

announces

and Amos

Joe

his Aunt.

cards until

are

elective.

quite early.

dance at Wakefield.

Levi commits contempt of court. Mass

meeting.

Dormitory regulations undergo

an

alteration.

Junior Musical, Burgess has an attack of stage fright. Al n invites boys to Watson House. Chickens depart. Prexy walks up to College. Skating good. Smith returns from home a day late. -

-

Surrender of General

Cronje.

Great

rejoicing

on

the

part of Wilby. Prof. Allen states that collars and cuffs are unneces sary articles. Boys appear the next day arrayed in sweaters.

Competition

Drill.

Platoon B wins.

Wheeler

comes to chapel with a hair cut. Tefft appears at supper in low neck. Ferry detects a sulphide of skin. First day of Spring. Brightman appears in

Golf

trousers.

Washington

excursion

sets

out

under Com. Wash

burn.

Tip buys

a

chainless.

Washington party goes astray in New York. "Dewey is slain." Fry appears in "loud" Golf trousers amid the cries of "Outlet."

Olden

Ball

Hall.

Cross

Ye

28.

Loomis appear in Colonial costumes. R. I. C. defeats East Greenwich at Baseball.

30.

Girls have fire drill.

celebrate with

5.

Miss

Library

and

Boys

parade in night shirts.

by Miss Sh m Kenyon goes -

May

held in

25.

-

-

Great exhibition in

"sprinting"

n.

to church

(Kent

goes to

m^&i

church.)

SrindsJ

"

A little

nomcisf. iww

atid then

Is relished by the wisest

His studie

but

was

a

little

''

jnen

the Bible.".

on

B

.

No herd hadde he, ne never scholde have. As smooth it was it were late i schave, -

From

That

mixture of all kinds

a

heterogeneous thing,

.

began Englishman,"

an

large

and

sinewy hands,"

'

Ye ancient one,"

'

But this

'

So green that the grass turns

place

.

.

.

.

pale

A

'

A rural New

'

'

.

'

by

-

k

n

-

-

h

-

R.

J.

Davis Hall

.

,

Freshmen

.

-

He could be made to smile at

But all that is

anything," aright," childlike were they," to read

.

;

for

now

he does

-

-

-

-

t

r

-

e

.

Preps.

.

nothing

but smile, and dance, and break fair hearts." And bring ye forth music into the air." He

W

.

.

passed

-

-

-

German Translation

.

.

'

-

-

as

cheerful

Beautiful and

'

ss

Miss G d -d jollier, none ever saw," Yorker," B.J. The world knows nothing of its great men," Dr. C k e Where the feet of angels tread, so must the plow Watson House Lawns follow," more

Full hard it is '

-

-

Sm

.

'

-

.

.

with envy

they pass," '

P

.

.

.

is too cold for hell,"

r

W

.

Too good, too pure, for this wicked, bad world," The Smith a mighty man was he. With

-

The .Seniors

.

Sm

.

-

-

th

Glee Club

.

doth, indeed, show sparks that are like wit." Nay, you shall find it no snap course, I can tell you."

.

Levi T-l-r

"

And

gladly

"

One

eare

"

I

am

gladly teche.'

wolde he lerne, and

it heard, at the other out it went.'

right

sorry for your

"

Go, little book

"

He ruleth all the roost."

"

So many heads, so many wits." Love ine little, love me long." Speak low if you speak love."

"

"

!

my little

Go,

tragedy ! T-l-r

-

For there

"

I'll

"

Lord, what fools these mortals be ?

-

ss

-

the Hall

was never yet philosopher. That could endure the toothache patiently.

speak

in

a

monstrous little

voice.' 11 in

Mis:

"

Eating

"

His

"

F. H

"

E

the bitter bread of banishment."

cares are now

Methought bag lay,"

I

saw

all ended."

the grave where Laura'

3

Agreed

to

-

xs

-

dr

-

T

r.

1

-

e

d

-

r

-

book-

......

Miss

I've lived and loved," '

room

of the Grlst

ers

I'll warrant him heart-whole."

"

girl's

"

Purcha

differ,

" .

.

.

.

And what is writ is writ. Would it were worthier,"

"

My life is one demd, horrid grind," Happy am I; from care I'm free. Miss Why aren't they all contented like me?" If you haven't any le.ssons, why you needn't come

.

.

.

J

md W

G

"

"

d C

1

.

"

'

Teacher

:ing

heavinesse."

m

-

-

1

-

-

I

Grist

.

Stub

.

"

around," "

AU the

of Arabia will uot

sweeten

A

comedy of errors,"

this

After

little hand," "

ulty

........

perfumes

.

.

Snap

Biological

Course

Lab.

Computations

Courses of

with each

new

year every

college

seeks to

its field of usefulness, and for this reason the curriculum are always more or less subject to

lege

a

very

great change

was

made iu the

expand courses

change.

courses

aud

in

a

At

enlarge college our

col

of study in the

fall of 1898, when a preparatory department was considered neces sary for adequate preparation ot students for the college course. The

introduction of this preparatory course naturally followed a rais ing ol the standard of the college proper; and at that time five dis tinct

courses were laid out, all leading to the degree of Bachelor Seience, Agricultural (i), mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, chemical and biological. Since the adoption of these five courses in 1898 some slight internal changes have taken place, but none that would materially affect them as a whole. It is thought that any one of the above courses offers ample oppor tunity for a student to prepare himself thoroughly for whatever

of

career

he thinks himself best

adapted.

As the second year since the adoption of the new course is now to a close, there seems to be every reason to feel that the

drawing

work at present required of students is of such warrant their having a feeling of ju.st pride in

from the Rhode Island

College

of

Agriculture

a

character

holding

a

as

to

degree

and Mechanic Arts.

Competitive One of the most

past

year

was

the

A)rill

interesting entertainments given during the competitive drill between the two platoons.

From the day the challenge was issued until the night of the drill both platoons worked hard to perfect all those minor points which escape the watchful eyes of the judges. The drill took place on the night of March 2, which

never

be

pleasant, aud by the platform was well filled ence.

drilled

proved to bugle sounded the first call the and appreciative impartial audi divided into four parts, The platoons

time the with

an

The programme was alternately, first with the manual of

marching, As the bugle

arms

and then with the

assembly the first platoon formed, in com mand of First Lieutenant Wheeler, and the drill commenced. It did the manual and firings remarkably well, showing thorough work on the part of the officers. After the scheduled list of com mands was done several times, the platoon retired, and the second sounded

platoon, in command of Tliird Lieutenant Brightman, immediately took possession of the floor, This platoon did equally good work, showing itself in no way inferior lo ils predecessors, Thenext half of the programme consisted of marching, In this the second platoon proved to be the superior, although both did fine work. The judges then retired. The .second platoon remained on the floor engaged in drilling for the entertainment of the audience, who were awaiting the decision of the judges. The whole com pany was then formed, after which the judges announced the sec ond platoon as the winner of the contest. Congratulations and the customary cheering were then in order until taps sounded.

junior T^usicale enterprising class of 1900 is responsible for the Junior Musieale, which has now come to be looked forward to as a regular entertainment of the Winter term. For a year ago for the first time under the auspices of that class a very enjoyable

fHE

given at Lippitt Hall. Junior class, uot wishing to be outdone by its pre to follow the precedent which has been estab lished, and, therefore, planned for an entertainment similar in na ture. One very gratifying thing about the Junior Musieale of this year was the fact that the College itself furnished the entertain ment. The largest part of the programme was given by the Col lege Glee Club. They were assitcted by Miss Bosworth and Mrs. Small (Miss Putnam of a year ago). The Glee Club is always well received at R. I. C, and certainly on February i6th they merited the appreciative applause which concert

was

The present

decessor, decided

they received, for they sang better than ever before. The careful training of their director, Mr. Allen, and the faithful practice of the club itself every

were

manifested

the programme, and in a year's previous train

throughout

respect the club showed the effects of

ing. It

was

with much satisfaction that the

the services

secure

Junior class

was

of Miss Bosworth and Mrs. Small.

able to

The fact

that Miss Bosworth had been away from Kingston for over a yeai made ber reception at the Junior Musieale even more enthusiastic than usual, and it

was

with much

pleasure

that all listened to her

numbers

The when

a

on the programme. affection and esteem in which Mrs. Small

teacher at the

College

was

shown

by

the

was regarded applause which

greeted

her wheu she first

appeared

on

the

platform.

year she has been

During

the

continuing her studies in Boston, and the selections whicii she so admirably rendered exhibited a strength and freshness which came from further study. It was a pleasure, indeed, to hear her once more and feel that her interest in R. I. C. still continues, although Boston now claims her. The class feels a just pride in the success of its Junior Musieale, and wishes to thank all who by their presence manifested their in terest uot only in the musical talent of the College, but also in past

the

success

of the Grist.

Se^iSS

junior Sneception

ROR

to

several years it has been the custom for the Junior Class give a reception sometime during the fall term. These

efforts have

always been appreciated and the occasion has pleasant memory in the minds of all present. The recep given by the Class of 1900 was specially succes.sful and it was with feelings of doubt that the present Juniors undertook their task. Although few in number, they possess ingenuity, ability and perseverance and the entertainment of October twen tieth was novel and pleasing. People were welcomed to the Hall b}' the reception cominittee, consisting of Miss Rockwell, Miss Dawley, Mr. Clarner and Mr. left

a

tion

Denico, rhymes

and were

given

ceived blank numbered

cards with

and

for

on

which

to half the company,

pencils

some

When the cards

briskly.

time

attached.

the

were

The two

search for

Goose

Mother

while the other

half

sets

partners

re

were

went

on

matched, the person holding the illustrate his partner's verse. supposed Surpris artistic talent suddenly developed and some of the sketches

blank

ing

after small cards

soon

went

far

ahead

Melodies.

were

to

one was

of the

A free

ones

exhibition

commonly found in Mother Goose was given when all were finished

spent iu trying to guess the rhymes which the pictures were intended to represent. Toward the middle of the evening refreshments were served, and as is often the case, they put everyone in the right frame of and

some

mind for

haps

time

dancing. enjoyed

more

spent and all

were

This

was au

that

unexpected

feature and

was

A very happy evening sorry when the time came to go home. on

account.

per was

Military

*Sall

Wl

1 think of the Military Ball without having his mind filled with many delightful recollections! Surely, never before has the Baltalion so distiugnished itself as this

year, aud

to

we would cry. Long live the Battalion ! ! The Floor Committee had carefully planned everything and is be congratulated on the success of the affiir. Much thought

and

care

the hall

had been put into the decorations

with

the result

lhat

artistically and effectively trimmed. Bunting, flags were conspicuous as usual, but one thing in par ticular attracted attention. A large and impressive shield placed opposiie the door caught the eye of everyone on entrance. The disk of sabres has always hung here, but this year that was rele gated to the platform, where it .seemed to have found its proper down the stacked It was very appro place looking upon guns. priate that the emblem of the State should ornanieDt the interior as well as the exterior of Lippitt Hall and we hope that this shield may alwa>s find a place among the decorations. Langstaff's Orchestra played with unusual spirit and the com pany seemed to enter with much enthusiasm into the dancing. Everything conspired to make the Military Ball of 1900 the most satisfactory that has yet been given. was

banners and

very

Si.

9ii.

C. si.

deception

religious societies of College the first Friday evening of the fall term was devoted reception for the new students, and Sept. 22, 1899 found a Hall. very pleasant company assembled in the chapel of Lippitt As the purpose of the reception is to enable all connected with the college to make the acquaintance of the new comers, all formality A shield, bearing the name and class, was was done away with. handed to each person on entering the hall, and this was supposed to break down all barriers and give everyone permission to speak to his neighbor without waiting for an introduction. Toward the middle of the evening the Rev. Mr. Goodwin of In the few minutes allotted to him Pawtucket spoke informally. he gave a strong, pleasing address which proved an inspiration to all. He had the faculty of putting himself in the place of the stu dent and could thus drive home the points he wished to emphasize. A very pleasant feature of the evening was singing by Miss Bos As always, she added the finishing touch to the occasion worth. The hour of saying good and delighted everyone with her songs. night came all too soon, and the memory of the pleasant evening spent in renewing old friendships and forming new ones lasted long in the minds of everyone present. In accordance with the custom of the two

the to

a

^arch

Once upon a night, not dreary, as Down the road from Kingston

J6

we

wandered, feeling cheery,

Village

the Watson

to

House

once more.

Suddenly

across our

vision,

came a

Then another and another, then "These

are

naughty boys,"

dreadful

one more:

I muttered,

apparition. they numbered four,

"trying

now

to scare

us

sore,

Only

Oh! it

was a

And the

this and

nothing

glorious night,

moon

it

was

more."

really

"out of

and stars above us, shone

as

sight,"

many

times before.

bridge, we watched the spectres, filled with many grave conjectures. Wishing we could see the features, features of the ghostly four, For we longed to kuow more surely, who were of this ghostly four, Merely this and nothing more.

From the

Presently Out

we

souls grew stronger, hesitating then no longer. rushed to overtake them, groaning, moaning four.

our

the fields they started, till from us parted. And they still kept up their groaning, groaning And their arms were wildly waving, catching up But

across

wore,

These

were

wings

and

nothing

more.

some

as

distance

before.

the robes

they

Ah ! but after them

running,

came

silvery ball with legs,

a

so

cunning, We

were

sure

this cat called "Rubber,"

ran

for

he did

one

adore, For

we

knew that this

kitten,

wee

ne'er would be

so

badly smitten.

That he'd follow mischievous students from the dormitory roar. not for a minute,'' single, would he fain their haunts ex No, "

plore. Her he cared for,

Now that

know without

we

nothing

question,

more.

some

who

this cele

helped

bration, I

was

This

-minded of disturbance I'd heard

was

it: "That's what we'll

they up to," As the noise of pealing

laughter

Ah, this thought had told Of this

But

ere

So

this the

we

me

through close'd door. do," and I thought "what

sounded

was

sinking

the

four,

would

soon

four.

and the

hurried down to Watson.

are

the door,

truly, still another of

groaning, moaning

moon

through

Once

lights inside

we

heard

be

the

four ''

"Come, let's sing,"

some one suggested, Ghosts don't sing," a protested. Then, with just a bit more groaning, all was silent rouud the

second

door.

They

were

gone, these

ghostlj^ figures, such

before, To return; ah,

nevermore.

as

ne'er we'd

seen

!Personals.

Reuben

Mr.

Wightman

of

the State

College

Sunday with his parents in this village. Pawtuxet

pondent

Valley

at

South

Kingston spent Scituate

Corres

Gleaner.

Saturday night, April 28. a surprise party was given to te at her home on Kingston Hill by a large number of The guests were all in evening dress and appeared The lawns. very picturesque as they promenaded on the spacious were highly entertained, and the event proved to be a guests Last

Miss W

-

-

her friends.

memorable

one,

her friends.

A.

Mr.

E.

both

in the minds ol

the

Munro spent

Quonset Vo'ml. Wakejield

Sunday

afternoon

at the R. I. C. this year.

Yesterday, J.

R. Wilson,

can

seconds.

be obtained

Narragansett

These wheels

through

Times.

a

Iriend

leading

the

at

spring

"Eagle Chainless," fitted with

Eagle patent coa.ster, rode a Bicycle Track, in the remarkable 12

with

IK//i' Sun.

on an

the

and

and

Times.

Times.

Mr. Charles Wheeler of Shannock has heen

stjdes

hostess

young

Kingston Correspondent Narragansett

are

mile

on

the Little Rest Park

time of 13 hours, 10 niinutes, for .sale bv H. D. Smith, or

the Seniorclass.

Kingston Correspondent

SceneThe

College Campus.

A very damp Sunday in winter. Time 5:55 p. m. Two people under an umbrella. One, who might be called tall, the other, shorter by several inches. For

the sake of saving time they cross the lawn on the way to Boarding Hall. Suddenly from behind them comes a voice. Why, Mrs. T you'll get your feet soaking wet. Mi". T why don't you pick the

"

,

,

her up in your arms and carry her ? " No answer and no movement on the

wild look of

Then "

a

Sposen

part of the two,

only

a

surprise.

rush and the I'd done

speaker disappears as rapidly as possible. it?" vouchsafes the lengthy individual.

Jldvertlsemms

Want

Bicvcle?

a

Want Furniture? We'll

fit

or

Wheel at make

the

&

with

fit you with

light

expense

payments

Postal brings

^rUNT

Room

your

Furniture

our

a

and

easy.

Catalogue.

COiiPANY,^

1 56 Wevbosset street.

Providence, We

are

the

Oldest

and

Most

R. I.

Reliable

BICYCLE REPAIRING bicycle prepared

Does your I

ing?

am

need lo

repair

-

and

for reut

by hour, day,

and

mouth.

Full line of

Large

and

Complete On

Slock

Coliamtaia

Corner,

CRESCENT and TRIBUNE AUTHORIZED

AGENTS

Crescent

Bicycles. FOR

Supplies

REPAIRING.

Cycle Co.,

Opposite Depot,

WAhEPIELD, R. I.

tlj-

SOLE AGFNTS FOR

RENTING.

WILCOX,

Cons tan

Hand.

Eastman Kodaks and

Sundries.

B. C.

Supplies

Cameras and Supplies

class

Bicycles. Bicycles week

Bieyeles

tjuarantee

workmansliip ard quote lowest possible price ou all kinds of bicycle repairingCone and Axle work a special Agent for the Eagle, Union, ty Springfield, and Club Special first

WAKEFIELD,

R.

I.

9

E. S. HODGE, PEACE DALE, R. I.

Fluttibing, Steam andeasTUtindt SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO

STEAM, HOT WATER

AND HOT AIR

HJiATING.

AGENT FOR THE FAMOUS GLENWOOD RANGES.

ROBINSON'S Blanding S, Blanding. Established 1821.

WAKEFIELD, R. I.

Wholesale and /~~\ ROCfc-RS

Imported

and

.

.

.

Retail

Druggists.

Domestic Fancy Gro

ceries. Table UelicacleB.

OUR SPECIALTY.

Tea,

Coflfee, Fanty Crackers, ClKU-rH

and Tobacco. Hams and

34 & 58

Weybosset

St.

Flllebury's Flour, Ferris

Bacon.

proplBence, 1?. II.

..n. Horse Shngjnty

LIBBY.. ^

and ,^

High Street,

General Jobbing,

Peace

Dale, R. I.

MACHINERY AND ALL

APPURTENANCES

A. B. Pitkin Machinery Company. 39

Exchange Place, Providence, R.

I.

IF YOU WANT TO BUY YOUR

DRUGS ^NP

MEDICINES

At City Prices, you will call

S. G. Wricht,

Wakefield, R.

MILLINERY Jlntiie C

I.

SHTISFKCTION It

miss

on

Bradlev's,

H/eSTHRUY, WAKEFIEIlD,

is

a

great satisfaction

itiid the leaults

never

i;Siis ;a

fail to

to ?ee

you

satisfy.

;j j47.^"^

WICKFORD. ciple, liavioi; theelenienis of belter and J C. Barbour.

0. E. Stedman.

helps

us

cu^lo^ttiers

be leaders and better and cheaper

to

tn?=,A5 often

.

.

Bentistr^

as

The Brick Mill is .

possible opposiie

ci^es

our

clothing.

tlie

people

our

btore.

.

GEO. H. BABCOCK, Siollinson Street, Wakefield.

16-20 Hain Street, Westerly, R. I.

Kingsston,

R. I.

H)ri2 (5oo58 anb (Broceries. FINE CONFECTIONERY.

LOWNEY'S CHOCOLATES.

JlH|WSTHO|G GflRRIflGE GO., BUILDERS AND REPAIRERS, REPOSITORY, 42,

Telephone

44 AND 46 CRANSTOM ST.

Providence, R. I.

984.

MAIN FACTORY AT WAKEFIELD, R. I.

A- A. Greenman,

PAUL WOODS, 0

DEALER IN

..Builder.. Groeeries, Dry Goods ,? ?

fine Carriages

sr'^,^.. Wakefield, R.l.

ETC.,

*

ETC,

Kingston, R. 1.

GEORGE T. HUTCHINGS, monumental (Uork of Every Description. I have all the best

do

strictly first-class

machinery work.

and

I have

workmen

nearly

in

Westerly,

three

nundred

and

refer

within twenty miles that I have done work for. Monu ments and headstones ahvays in stock to select from. Call on me

ences

when in need of you. may

Be

sure

anythinvr notify

you

personally

in this me

liiu-,

or

write and I will

in advance of

your

coming,

call

on

that

I

meet you.

George T. Hutciiings, Sole Proprietor. Lock Box 31, Office and Works 50 yards from the

MISS

Dre$$ maKing

R. I.

J S. SID6E, m. D.,

LESLIE,

fashionable^2^

Niantic,

depot.

I'liij.ficittn u.nii Siirgeott, Wakefield, R. I. Mechanic Street.

Telephone

3-4.

...and..,

CadlesXailorIng

Geo. H.

Sheldon,

VTEWSDEALER

.AND

'^^

STA" lONER.

Apeiit (or Ibe Spaldiiitr Bicycle.

AIsn

Prices Reasonable.

Bank Balldjng,

Wa&efleld, B. I.

188 Main

Street,

-

Wakefield, B. I.

la^ AT HEFLIN'S ""^^ It is here every want in foot wear can be satisfied; it will be hard to find elsewhere quality for quality and price for price. We carry a full line of low, medium and of highest grade Shoes, for Ladies, Gentlemen, Girls, Boys and All the latest styles. Black, Tan and Patent Children. Leather, at the very lowest prices,

A full line of Underwear, Fancy and White Shirts, Hose, Collars, Cuffs, Suspenders, and the finest line of Call and examine goods be Neckwear in Wakefield. fore

purchasing;

it will pay you.

WAKEFIELD. R, I,

MAIN STREET,

BATES,

LUTHER

W.

E.P.&S.L.TDCKER, West

Orchard Avenue, WAKEFIELD, R. I.

Kingston, R. 1.

Seneral

Otore.

DEALERS IN

LOCAL AGENT FOR

Alfred Peats & Co.'s Wall Papers

....Dry Goods, Boots and Siioes.... Gents'

Furnishing Goods. Flour.

Grain and Groceries, and General Also Anthracite Farm Supplies. Coal at Wholesale and Retail. Also Cartains,

Carpets,

lings, Oil

Cloth and other

Send

and

show

postal samples.

I

Agent

Straw Mai

for the Swift Lowell Fertilizer Com

specialties.

pany.

will

call and

Special

Attention Given to Orders

tor Goods Not

Kept

in Stock.

BROS.

HORTON

256 WESTM I NSTE R

pposiTE SHEPARD tl CO.

PROVIDENCE,

ST

R. I.

HIGH GRADE OF WORK AT REASONABLE PRICES.

WITH

NEW STUDIO.

UN

,

B. & H.

JAMES A. TEFFT, piorist ai7d /T\arKet Qardeijer

at

lectric

Construction

Electric light plants iusialled,

PEACE DALE, R. 1.

Fufieral ^orkof All Kinds

FACILITIi

Motors

SHORT

NOTICE. and

electric

fixtures.

Electric

supplies

Carnations and Violetsid thtir Season. ESTIMATES GIVEN FREE.

Decorating Plants Ior Rental and Sale,

Hodges Building, iU Weybosset Strtet, PROVIDENCE, R.I. A. B.

House closed

on

Saturday

BROWNELL, MANAQER. Take Elevator.

THE ENLARGED

B. W.

PALMER,

Men's, Boys and Children's

Tea House &. Market, Weybosset, Orange and Middle Streets, PROVIDENCE, R. The

one

place

neeil of the table at

lowest

home

from the est.

price.

of all

can

be

The

classes

smallest to

Branches

R. I., and

where

I.

CLOTHING, Hats, Caps, Gents' Fof-

every

supplied veritable

of

buyers, the larg

at Pawtucket, Worcester, Mass.

nishingfs. Bicycle Clothing. *en3 anO ffioss JBoota anC Sbocs

Main St.,

Wakefield, R.

I.

The Rhode Island News 3/ & 33

Books:

Pine St., 50 1-2

-j

Ejt.cMim'aT.'''' stationery:

Company,

St.

Weybosset

{JVarkness Court.)

^ l^rschooL^nroBice.

Bicycles and Bicy.

Sporting

Goods:

LARGEST

THE

(( <

bibb Ban

Goods,

LOWEST

ISLAND

PROVIDENCE:

-

J. A. MUMFORD, 4

wh.

Periodicals:

STOCK.

RHODE

i(

By .Single f

cle Sundries.

NEWS =

COMPANY,

R. I.

-

Are

)/^E

PRICES.

Headqaatters foi-

All Goods in the

.

.

4

Ipaint Xine-^

34, 36 and 38 Main Street, WAKEFIELD. R-

I..

WE

^'^ Grinders of Leads And Colors.

WH"

Sell

....

HACK, BOARDrNG. SALE AND LIVERY

The :an

[..argest Stable in Wakefield,

be found

reys,

HABLE

a

Large

Line of

Linseed Oil. \A/^ Are

.

of

.

.

.

Window Glass.

Esliiblished b4 Tears.

OLIVER CONNECTION.

.

and

Sing-le and Double Carriag-eg, Party

TELEPHONE

Importers

French

wliere

Single

Only Pore

3 to 15

JOHNSON

& CO.,

Exchange St., Prov.,

R. 1.

SOUTH COUNTY AGRICULTURAL

WAREHOUSE,

Seeds, Fertilizers, Farm Maehinery, HARDWARE, STOVES, PAINTS, OILS AND VARNISHES.

C. W. 23

& 24 HIGH ST

W. H.

MANCHESTER,

WILLARD,

J. S. HUDSON.

Manchester & Hudson, DEALERS

PIPE,

CALCINED

Main

R. I.

Che Printiitfl we do

IN

Briek, Lime & Cement DRAtN

'WliSTBRLY,

,

STONE,

PLASTER,&C.

ii/eli &one,

Promplly

'Done

A ND

Peasonably

"Done.

Office, 55 Point St.,

Up-town Office, 35 Weybosset SI. Yard, Poot of South St.

PROVIDENCE, R. I.

D. Sillies' Sons, TIMES PRINTINO

WAKEEIELD'

OPnCC,

R. 1.

A. H. SCHOLER ^

..STUDIO OF PHOTOGRAPHY^

^

innafteflel&, IR. H.

/ain St., ....

NEAR TiriES OFFICE

....

COMPLIMENTS OF

Walter A. Potter & Co., --^m SEEDSMEN @^ And Dealers In

6 EXCHANGE

Agricultural Implements.

PROVIDENCE, R. I.

PLACE, GO

James Jobnson, O.

Boots and

Sbocs

TO.____

c5.

made to

Uaj/lor' s.

Savings Bank Block,

Order.

WAIvKKIKLD,

Repairing Neatly Done. Ulork

Called for and Delivered.

...FOR YOUR...

Dry Goods, ^ Fancy Goods, ^

Columbia WAKEFIELD.

Corner, R. I.

Shades, Awnings, and

Paper Hangings.

The Fisl( Teachers' Agencies. EVERETT O. FISK & CO., Proprietors. Y of the

following addn

ATc.New York. IKing- St., West, Toronto 6 Fifth

0 Parroit

Blde:.,Saii

Fran.

Irons d Russell, rURERS OF

J'ine

Omdiems

J'ootwear, WAKEFIELD, R. I.

Charles A.

Clarke,

BOOTS, SHOES

Coiieffe iPins, 102

FRIENDSHIP

RUBBERS. HATS,

STREET,

PROVIDENCE, R. I.

JERE

Main St., Wakefield, R. I.

QUINLAN,

DEALER JN

Fancy Groceries. Tobacco and Cigars. .

.

j*

Jt

Call

J^

^

prices- No Expenses

and

see

Koods

Rent!

No

and get

Heavy

PRICES ALWAYS RIGHT. Store: Cor. Rodman and Boon Streets,

Narragansett Pier,

R. I.

THE GONGDOn

&

CRRPEflTEf^ GO.,

CANAL, ELIZABETH and NORTH MAIN STS., .

PROVIDENCE. R

.

I.

.

.

Troit, Steel, BlacKsmiths' Cools, Sbooels, erowuars. Picks, etc. fiarness and liorse Soods. Carriage Supplies. ,i

>s

j

WRITE FOR OUR PRICES.

Willis^^^

j

..^

,>

Pastels.

Carbons.

Water Colors.

Platinotypes.

matcbtnaker ana Jeweler,

Corner, Wakeflelcl, R.

ColmnMa

Makes

a

Specialty

Heald

1,

&

Brady,

of

STUDIO OF PHOTOGRAPHY,

Fine Watch and

333 Westminster Street, Providence, Rhode Island.

Jewelry Repairing. We always

carry

a

full line of

Up-to-date

Jewelry, Watches, Novelties,

Etc.

ASSEMBLY PHOTOGRAPHERS,

(Ue make Liberal Coans Loans Pianos and Furniture at lowest rates. Payment iu any may remain as long as desired. on priucipal accepted, thus reducing inter est. Absolute secrecy. No charge for papers.

On

amount

WILLIAM H. DRAPER & CO., S6

Cor.

Dorrance Street.

14

Weybosset.

FOUNDED 1824 B JACOB BEED.

Jkcob Reeds SONS, 1412-1414

Chestnut St.

Philadelphia.

rierchant and

Military Tailors, Makers of Uniforms for tlie Army aud Navy, Coheges, Academies and Military Schools. Correct, Choicest and latest ideas especially adapted to Yoiing Men's Wear in

READY MADE CLOTHING, FURNISHING GOODS, .

HATS AND CAPS F*rices

.

.

Invariat:>ly

Just.

Compliments

ofthe

Gradtiate of Ontario

OLD

Veterinary College.

DR. L. T. Veterinary

DUNN, and

Surgeon

Dentist,

Cor. Pond & Winter Sts., (Robinson's Stable.) Rrovidence,

R.

RELIABLE

Bostoiiil Provklw Clothing Men's and

Co.

Boys' Fine and Me Clothing at Whole-

dium Gr-ide

.sale and Ketail.

I.

Telepbone 11S6-3. Former student of R. I. C.

150 Westminster Street, Cor.

Orange, Providence,

R. L

THE

W.S.GAKDNEH&GO. jewelers The

and

watches

and

HISTORY

Opticians.

of

complicated clocks especially

repairing

Bryant & Stratton

solicited. Our

Business

Optical

pliances

fitted

Parlor is

and modern ap firstnecessary to do

with dark

room

Shows

constant

a

date n.etliods

of

improvement. graduates owe their

constant

cfass work.

of

W. S. Gardner & Co.,

To its

College

growth. Its up-toteaching show a Thousands

SUCCESS

WAKEFIELD,

R.

Illustra

thorough training. ted catalouge free.

I.

T. B.

Bell Block Bide of P. 0.

STOWELL, Prircipal, PROVIDENCE,

R.

l

my Cmc^^>of the

Hair Cutting consists following styles:

of

cbe

mercbant, Student, Professor, Olales. American, mest Point, Pompadour, Also the

C. II.

English

A

la

franklin Pm$o.

..PRINTERS..

mode.

BI^OWNE,

Providence, R. T.

COLLEGE BARBER,

l6

jCist of J'idvertisers. Armstrong Carriage

Co.

,

Wakefield

5

Arnold & Maine, Providence

9

B. & H. Electric Construction and

Supply Co.,

Babcock, Geo. H., Westerly Barbour & Stedman, Wakefield Bates, W. Luther, Wakefield

Blanding & Blanding, Boston & Providence

Providence

Clothing Co., Providence

Bradley Annie C, Wakefield Browne, C. L., Wakefield Clarke, Charles A., Wakefield Congdon & Carpenter Co., Providence Crescent Cycle Co., Wakefield Draper, William H Dunn, L- T., Providence Eimer & Amend, New York Fisk Teachers'

.

8 4

4 7 2

15 4

16 13

14 i

14

15 9

Agencies, Boston

Flint & Co., Providence Gardner, W. S. & Co., Wakefield Gillies' Sons, Wakefield Greenman, A. A., Kingston Heald &

Piovidence.

Brady, Providence

13 i

16 11

5 14

Heflin, H. M., Wakefield. Helme, B. E., Kingston Hodge, E. S., Peace Dale Horton Bros., Providence Hutchings, Geo. T., Niantic. Irons & Russell, ProvidenceJohnson, James, Wakefield. -

7 4 2

8 6

13 11

Johnson, Oliver & Co., Providence Leslie, Mary, Wakefield Libby, A., Wakefield Manchester & Hudson, Providence Wakefield Muiuford, J. A Palmer, B. W., Wakefield

lo

6 ....

10

.

9

Pitkin, A. B., Providence

3

Potter, W. A. & Co., Providence Providence Bryant & Stratton Business

3 11

12

College,

Providence.

16

Quiiilan, Jere, Narragansett Pier Reeds, Jacob Sons, Philadelphia

13

Rhode Island News Co., Providence

10

Ridge, J. S.,

M. D., Wakefield

Robinson, B. F., Wakefield

Scholer,

A. H., Wakefield

Shannon, D. W

,

Wakefield

Sheldon, Geo. H., Wakefield

Taylor, Esbon S., Wakefield Tefft, James A., Wakefield Tucker, E. P. & S. L., Kingston Wilcox, Benj. C, Wakefield Willard, C. W., Westerly Willis, W. R., Wakefield Wood, Paul, Wakefield

Wright,

S. G.

,

Wakefield

15 6 2 11

13 6 i

8

7 i 11

14 5 4

R54a

^^'JS

t^

r

\

1

J

\

^: 1


YEARBOOK_1900