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Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Editorial

AGM 2008 -

The Highlights

Welcome to the final edition of 'Herbal Roots'! Our new Journal in conjunction with the Association of Master Herbalists combines ‘Herbal Roots’ with ‘Nature’s Path’ to form 'The Herbal Path'.

Friday night: The path that lead to the pub

‘The Herbal Path’ is a journey, a direction we have all chosen to take, We are on this path united by our common passion for herbs and healing, the journal a valuable resource and means of sharing our knowledge and experience. We had a lovely weekend for the AGM, with considerable opportunity not only to learn but to meet old friends and greet many new ones. We followed many pleasant paths through Ness botanic gardens and even one that led to a lovely country pub! Thank you to the speakers who endowed us with their knowledge, which made for an informative weekend, enlightening us on many aspects of herbal medicine from first aid, birth, and plant identification to paediatric coughs and life for Aids patients in South Africa. Immense gratitude to Jane and Caroline for organising it all and taking such good care of everyone! Thank you to all who have contributed to ‘Herbal Roots’, without you, there would be no Journal, you’re time and effort is always appreciated! A special mention for Judy who has provided most of the illustrations and Andrea, thank you for all your time and support. Thank you also to Connie Feehily who has kindly let me use one of her fantastic photos for the front cover.

Saturday: Wandering through Ness Gardens

Best wishes, to one and all! Sonya Hope! Of all ills that men endure, the only cheap and universal cure” Abraham Cowley

Saturday: Herb Walk with Julia Bruton-Seal

Inside This issue F AGM - The

Highlights Breast Disease: F Attars; Fragrances of the Soul: F Rediscovering Wood Betony: F Working with Annette Montague: F Book Review: ‘Avicenna and I’ F Dates for your Diary Resources F F Fibrocystic

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By Sara Southgate By John Smith By Suzanne Woodword By Carole Wyatt By John Smith

Thank you to Judy Dutfield for her artwork which continues to add interest and creativity to our Journal and for the continuing support of our members who place the articles without which there would not be a Journal. Everyone’s valuable time and interest is much appreciated.

Sunday: The end of the road PAGE 3


Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Fibrocystic Breast Disease by Sara Southgate 95% of lumps in the breast are due to cancer, benign tumours, chronic mastitis or FBD. Also known as cystic mastitis, FBD is normally a component of PMS and is considered a risk factor for breast cancer due to oestrogen dominance. Some breast lumps cannot be differentiated from breast cancer by clinical symptoms alone and should be referred for examination. Ultrasound is used to aid differentiation; biopsy is considered the only definitive diagnosis. Epidemiology 20-40% of premenopausal women have FBD. Those in the highest risk group are between the ages of 30-55. Breast disease in general has been linked to constipation & a diet low in fibre. Women having fewer than three bowel movements a week have 4.5 times greater rate of FBD than those

Rib Fascia Intercostal muscles

Pectoralis major

experiencing daily bowel movements. Murray & Pizzorno put this association down to the fact that toxins (more specifically the excreted steroids that the bowel flora transform into toxic derivatives) from the bowel are reabsorbed if not efficiently excreted. High fibre diets, therefore, lead to a reduced risk of breast disease & breast cancer; those with low fibre diets are more at risk of FBD. Aetiology FBD is a result of a high oestrogenprogesterone ratio. Oestrogen levels become relatively high as compared to progesterone as a woman gets closer to the menopause and does not ovulate as frequently as she used to. In line with this, incidence of fibrocystic change increases as a woman nears menopause.

There is an increase in frequency towards menopause and a sharp fall thereafter. Dr. John Lee believes that women over 35 do not ovulate every month because of chemical pollution affecting their hormone cycles. Not ovulating means no progesterone is produced and the woman becomes oestrogen-dominant. Progesterone would normally keep oestrogen in check and when it is insufficient oestrogen causes breast cells to divide excessively, producing lumpy cysts. (Relatively high oestrogen levels also contribute to impaired liver function by causing cholestasis, reduced manufacture of serotonin, decreased action of B6 and increased aldosterone and prolactin secretions and increased risk of breast cancer.) Elevated prolactin levels may cause the changes in the breast; indeed high levels of this hormone are consistently found in women with FBD and may be responsible for breast tenderness. The Pill also elevates prolactin levels due to ingested oestrogens. Dr. Morton Biskind hypothesised that excessive oestrogen levels in FBD (as well as in PMS and excessive menstruation) are caused by deceased detoxification and elimination in the liver due to vitamin B deficiency. His reasoning was that the liver uses various B vitamins & folic acid to detoxify oestrogen and excrete it as bile. Oestrogen excess is indeed known to produce cholestasis (diminished bile flow, or sluggish liver). Subclinical hypothyroidism may be a factor. Molecular iodine has been taken internally & shown to soften the lumps (pain increased temporarily) & resulted in the resolution of the fibrous tissue. Bartram suspects excessive sugar intake as a causative factor. Pathogenesis/ Morphology Normally any fluid in the breast is carried away by the lymph system. If, for whatever reason there is excess fluid in the breast, it may accumulate in small spaces. Fibrous tissue will eventually surround the accumulations and this thickens as do scars,

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forming cysts. A cyst is defined as: “a cavity or sac with epithelium, containing liquid or semi-solid matter.” Breast cysts do not occur as a result of blockages, as do cysts in other organs, but as a result of cyclical changes that bring about an imbalance between epithelial hyperplasia and ductal and lobular dilatation. These changes differ with age: in younger women, there is a diffuse granularity in one or more segments of the breast and nodules may be up to 5mm in diameter. The area is generally tender, especially premenstrually. In older women closer to the menopause, there is normally an ill-defined rubbery mass. The finding of discrete (separate) swelling is indicative of a cyst. The cysts can vary in size from 220mm, although sometimes a large solitary cyst is found. Upon opening, the fluid is found to be yellow, clear or blood-stained. The cysts often have a dark blue surface. There are a variety of morphological changes in this proliferative condition of the breast. Histological changes include adenosis (enlargement of the nodules), sclerosing adenosis (enlargement of nodules with collagen intervening between the glandular components. The presence of collagen means the cysts can easily be mistaken for cancerous changes clinically, or on mammograms), epithelial hyperplasia (the proliferation of epithelial cells resulting in a solid mass that obliterates lumens), papillomatosis (papillae project into lumens of small ducts & may branch), cysts (dilatation of the alveoli. Cysts may burst causing an inflammatory reaction), apocrine metaplasia (cysts are lined with cells common to apocrine sweat glands) and fibrosis (normally due to hormonal imbalance causing change in the loose connective tissue, making it denser. This is found mainly in women with definite hormone imbalance). Atypical hyperplasia is epithelial hyperplasia that results in total or partial occlusion of the alveoli and small ducts. Abnormalities of cellular growth result. PAGE 5


Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Clinical Presentation of Signs and Symptoms One or both breasts may become lumpy, tender and swollen one week before menstruation. Characteristically, the lumps are round and move freely - as does an eyeball beneath the lid. They may be either firm or soft. Discomfort is highest around menstruation as the cysts swell. Pain and breast tenderness from the resulting pressure is common, although the condition can be asymptomatic. The size of the lumps may change throughout the cycle and symptoms may occur in conjunction with PMS.

Prognosis Most cysts are benign and non-neoplastic, although those with atypical epithelial hyperplasia are associated with an increased cancer risk. By way of differential diagnosis, cancerous lumps are firm, do not change during the cycle & are usually painfree. Elevated oestrogen levels have however been associated with an increased risk of cancer in some studies (Gascoigne). Further, regular mammograms, especially under age 50 are positively harmful (Gascoigne) due to the high levels of radiation exposure (20x that of a chest xray). There is no evidence that mammograms have increased cancer survival rates, in fact, Gascoigne cites a statistical risk of 1 in 4999 of developing breast cancer before a mammogram and 1 in 660 after mammography. Invasive techniques such as aspiration and/ or biopsy may increase the risk, as the lump is penetrated which may lead to spread, if it is cancerous, or infection. Biopsies also increase the risk of breast cancer by five if the biopsy contains atypical hyperplasia, with further increases in those with a family history of breast cancer. Normally biopsies do not confer an PAGE 6

increased risk of breast cancer. The psychological stress of having such procedures and awaiting the results should not be underestimated. According to Caroline Myss, the major emotion behind breast lumps and breast cancer is hurt, sorrow and unfinished emotional business generally related to nurturance. Nurturance also has to do with the health of relationships, a 1st & 2nd chakra issue. Also to be borne in mind is the fact that the immune system is intricately connected to the digestive system, the liver and the hormonal system. Dealing with any constipation, improving liver function and balancing hormones will indirectly strengthen it. Orthodox Treatment The primary aim of orthodox medical professionals is to rule out cancer. Large cysts may be drained. Dietary advice to reduce caffeine and fats may also be given. Androgen drugs, such as Danazol may be prescribed. Danazol inhibits the pituitary gonadotrophins, FSH & LH by combining androgenic activity with antioestrogenic and anitprogesterogenic activity. Stopping FSH & LH secretion means the primary follicle will not be stimulated to mature into a Graafian follicle, so ovulation will not take place. This will reduce both oestrogen & progesterone levels. Treatment commonly disrupts normal menstruation, and may in some cases stop it altogether. Higher doses may cause hirsutism, and deepening of the voice. The listed side-effects include swollen feet/ ankles, weight gain, oedema, hair loss, pancreatitis, nausea/ dizziness, acne/ oily skin, backache/ cramps, reduced breast size, vaginal dryness & irritation and clitoral hypertrophy. Anxiety, fatigue, nervousness and mood changes are also recognised. Periodic liver function tests must be carried out while on this drug as there is a risk of liver damage. The dose for FBD is 100-400mg daily for 3-6 months.

The Energetic Perspective Any condition of breast lumps is associated with chronic liver qi stagnation, perhaps with an underlying spleen, kidney or blood deficiency. Liver qi stagnation is very much related to emotional states & is common in the west. It ties in with feeling unappreciated, which according to Gascoigne is common around the

menopause. Also to consider are stagnant liver qi turned into fire and spleen yang xu

Western Herbal Treatment Strategy: l To balance the hormones l Move the liver qi stagnation. While regulating liver metabolism & detoxifying the

organ, it is prudent to support liver yin (i.e. blood) because the liver stores blood. This avoids exacerbating any deficient conditions l Use carminative herbs, which move and regulate qi generally l To cleanse the lymph he breast and surrounding area have a rich supply of

lymph nodes. One of the functions of the lymph system is to drain excess interstitial fluid away l To excrete the fluid in cyst(s) using diuretics his is a reduction therapy l Dry cysts out using herbs that dry damp l Counteract stress with nervine herbs l Ensure daily bowel movements

Contraindicated Herbs Dioscorea xternally this herb has a progesterone-like effect, internally it has an oestrogen-like effect and as such is unsuitable for FBD Suma ortifies hormones, especially oestrogen

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Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Herbs for Consideration Herb

Category

Reason for consideration

Glycyrrhiza

Qi tonic

Hormonal. Lowers oestrogen & increases progesterone levels. The glycosides have a similar structure to the natural steroids of the body.

Asparagus

Yin Tonic

Strengthens female hormones. Nourishes female reproductive system. Relieves menstrual pain.

Vitex

Emmenagogue

Lowers oestrogen & increases progesterone levels while also lowering prolactin levels (yet is a galactagogue). Decreases FSH & increases LH i.e. it normalises hormone secretions. Encourages ovulation. It takes about three months for effects to show. Especially good for all menstrual problems, especially those associated with PMS.

Bupleurum

Cool

Major qi regulating (carminative) herb. Regulates moodiness. Ascending energy – raises sagging spirits. All liver disorders. Dredges old emotions of sadness & anger out of body. Acts on disorders of mixed conformation.

Cyperus spp.

Slightly warm

Like Bupleurum in its’ ability to regulate liver qi. Treats depression & moodiness. Regulates menses.

Rosae rugosa

Warm

Relieves constrictive feeling of chest & abdomen (stuck liver qi)

Cyperus rotundifolia

Warm

Emmenagogue. Menstrual regulator. Depression. Moodiness. Regulates liver qi. Relieves cramps.

Smilax off.

Clear Toxic heat

Alterative. Diuretic. Tonic. Treats liver problems, rheumatism & hormone excess.

Phytolacca

Laxative

Constipation, glandular & lymphatic congestion. Purifies blood & lymph. Externally the root is used as a poultice to draw toxins out. Mastitis.

Berberis vulgaris

Cold

Mild liver tonic. Regulates liver qi. Mild laxative.

Fucus vesiculosis

Expectorant

Softens hard masses & dissolves cysts & tumours.

Tribulis terrestris

Warm

Treats constrained liver qi with pain and distention in chest and glands. Diuretic. Relieves chest fullness.

Trifolium

Clear Toxic Heat

Moves blood. Accumulations of toxicity i.e. cysts. Gentle herb: 50% alterative, 50% tonifying. Use to detoxify weak patients, before Phytolacca.

Viola odorata

Purge Fire

Softens hard lumps & counteracts cancer.

Leptandra virginica

Cold

Cleanses liver, stomach & intestines. Cholagogique laxative.

Scrophularia nodosa

Demulcent Febrifuge

Dissolves lumps in body. Traditional usage for FBD. Yin tonic. Deobstruent to glandular system. Affinity for the breast. Nourishes the blood. Detoxificant. Hepatic diseases.

Verbena off.

Cold

Delayed & painful menses. Nervousness. Urinary problems. Jaundice. Liver congestion. Mastitis. Diuretic. Galactagogue.

Citrus aurantium

Carminative

One of strongest qi-moving herbs, with power to break tumours and accumulated masses.

Echinacea

Clear Toxic Heat

Blood & lymph cleanser. Infected sores, abscesses & wounds.

Curcurmae longa

Warm

Isatis

Clear Toxic Heat

Broad-spectrum antibiotic effective against many infections & inflammations. Swellings that are inflamed. Lymphadenitis.

Cholagogue. Alterative. Analgesic. Regulates menses. Decongests liver. Aids digestion. With Mahonia = as effective as Bupleurum. Relieves menstrual pains & reduces uterine tumours.

Galium

Diuretic

Alterative. Aperient. Blood purifier. Specific to lymph cleansing. Traditional use for tumours & ulcers.

Qing Pi

Carminative

Treats liver, gallbladder & bile congestion, chest fullness & pains. Breast cancers & abscesses. Mucus & lymphatic congestion.

Cascara sagrada

Cold

Liver stagnation, digestive weakness & chronic constipation.

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Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Juglans nigra

Laxative

Cold

Liver congestion, chronic constipation,

Eunonymous atropurpurea

Clear Damp Heat

Cold

Removes liver congestion & thus pain & congestion in chest.

Gardenia

Purge Fire

Prunella vulgaris Taraxacum off. radix

Purge Fire Purge Fire

Cold

Cold Cool

Relieves liver congestion & with it, blocked emotions. Treats depression. This herb is very frequently used in TCM. One of best & most commonly used herbs for liver heat Used for all heated liver conditions. Breast tumours, abscesses, boils, constipation. Tonic. Possible preventative for breast cancer. Diuretic.

Rehmannia

Blood Tonic

Warm

Nourishes liver blood & kidney yin.

Verbena hastata

Diaphoretic

Cold

Treats hysteria, liver disorders, irregular menses & cramps. Alterative. Detoxifying. Diuretic. Expectorant.

Passiflora

Nervine

Cool

Sleeplessness due to mental restlessness. Sedative. Narcotic. Nervine.

Tierra – Formula 16: clear heat, remove dampness & soften & eliminate tumours Pau d’arco

Chief

Anti-neoplastic. Anti-inflammatory.

Echinacea

Chief

Toxic Heat

Cleanse blood & lymph. Stimulates immune system. Alterative. Antiinflammatory. Analgesic.

Larrea divaricata

Chief

Toxic Heat

Anti-neoplastic. Analgesic. Antioxidant. Alterative.

Trifolium

Chief

Toxic heat

Accumulations of toxicity (i.e. cysts). Anti-neoplastic. Alterative.

Poria cocos (Fu Ling)

Assisting

Diuretic

Eliminates excess fluid. Tonifies qi by dispelling damp. Calms mind & emotions.

Grifola (Zhu Ling)

Assisting

Diuretic

Normalises fluid metabolism.

Fucus vesiculosis

Assisting

Expectorant

Dissolves firm masses (cysts & tumours). Treats lymph node enlargement.

Panax quinquefolium

Assisting

Tonic

Qi & yin tonic. Rejuvenative. Nourishes & increases body fluids.4

Valeriana

Nervine

Warm

Insomnia. Allays pain. PMS. Nervine.

Convallaria

Nervine

Neutral

Breaks up hardness. Nervine. Depression.

Viscum album

Nervine

Cool

Nervine with affinity for female reproductive organs.

Poria

7

Diuretic

Eliminates excess fluid. Tonifies qi by dispelling damp. Calms mind & emotions.

Dong quai

Blood Tonic

Warm

Used for all gynaecological complaints. Circulates blood, thus improving liver function.

Bupleurum

4

Regulate qi

Baptisia tinctoria

Clear Toxic Heat

V. V. Cold

As ointment for inflamed tumours, cancer boils & ulcers. Internally for infections.

Acts on diseases of mixed conformation i.e. hot & cold, external & internal etc. Strong ascending energy. Primary herb for regulating qi. Used for all liver disorders. Dredges out old emotions of sadness & anger stored in the body.

Atractylodes

4

Qi tonic

Qi tonic. Diuretic. Counteracts fatigue & low energy.

Vitex

4

Emmenagogue

Specific. Counteracts PMT. Reduces FSH & increase LH, stimulating progesterone & reducing oestrogen production.

Dong quai

4

Blood tonic

Analgesic. Used for all gynaecological complaints. Promotes circulation.

Peonia off.

3

Blood & Yin tonic

Used by Chinese as Thompsonians use Lobelia. Emmenagogue circulatory stimulant.

Cyperus spp. rhizome

3

Emmenagogue

Like Bupleurum in its ability to regulate liver qi.

Tierra – Regulate Stagnant Qi

Analysis of formulae Bartram Hedera helix (ivy – ground) Galium aparine Equisetum arvense PAGE 10

Lymphatic alterative & detoxifier. Anti-inflammatory. Diuretic. Non-irritant diuretic. Connective tissue strengthener. Aids detoxification

PAGE 11


Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Viburnum prunifolium

3

Nervine

All painful affectations. Gynaecological aspect.

Dioscorea5

3

Nervine

Hormone precursors, Esp. of progesterone. Effective for liver & gall bladder.

Magnolia

3

Aromatic stomatic

Resolves damp.

Zingiber

3

Diaphretic

Regulates menses.

Glycyrrhiza

3

Tonic

Clears heat. Harmoniser. Regulates hormones.

Citrus aurantium

2

Carminative

Carminative herbs, regulate & move qi.

Ligusticum wallichii

2

Diaphoretic

Emmenagogue. Diuretic. Stimulant. Treats fluid retention.

Mentha

2

Diaphoretic

Regulates liver qi.

Gastrodia

1

Dose: 5ml TID throughout cycle. In menstrual related problems, treatment can be considered successful after 3 regular, nonproblematic cycles, so treatment should begin with this in mind. Adjunctive Advice

Diet

Formula Scrophularia nodosa

50

Cool

Dissolves lumps.

Phytolacca

30

Cool

Lymph cleanser. Constipation.

Eunonymous atropurpurea

40

Cool

Dries damp. Removes liver congestion.

Citrus aurantium

70

Slightly cold

Qi moving. Breaks accumulated masses.

Cyperus rotundifolia

80

Warm

Regulates liver qi.

Vitex

80

Warm

Hormone balancer.

Glycyrrhiza

40

Warm

Hormone balancer. Harmoniser. Adding warmth to formula.

Dong Quai

20

Warm

Nourish liver blood.

Viscum album

40

Cool

Nervine with affinity for female reproductive organs.

PAGE 12

Avoid Methylxanthines (caffeine, l

l Increase consumption of soy

theophylline & theobromine, the latter two are alkaloid drugs. Theophylline is used to treat asthma). These compounds prevent the breakdown of cyclic nucleotides, which promote overproduction of cellular products, such as fibrous tissue and cyst fluid within the breast tissue. Elevated levels of cyclic nucleotides are found in the breast tissue of women with FBD. Eliminating methylxanthines has resulted in improvement in 97.5% of 45 women and 75% of 28 women who only limited their consumption. Women over 40 may have to eliminate methylxanthines for 2 years before results become evident, whereas younger women may see results in 2-6 months. Lumpiness may not disappear, but pain may. Avoidance must be long-term and complete. Sources include coffee, tea, cola, chocolate & OTC medicatons. l Increase water intake to at least 8 glasses a day. l Salt should be restricted as it increases fluid retention in cystic tissue. l Lower the oestrogen-progesterone ratio. l Increase consumption of plant foods (vegetable, grains, nuts, legumes, seeds). l Consume small to moderate amounts of meat & dairy. l Reduce fat & sugar intake -pain & lumpiness decrease with reduction of saturated fat.

foodsthe phytoestrogens will compete for receptor sites. l Avoid foods sprayed with pesticides & herbicides, as well as inorganic meats & the Pill & HRT as these are sources of environmental oestrogens. Establish proper bacterial flora. This is important because the body detoxifies oestrogen (and cancer-causing chemicals) by attaching them to lucuronic acid& excreting them in the bile. bglucuronidasebreaks the bond between excreted toxins & glucuronic acid. High levels of this enzyme are associated with cancer, especially oestrogen-dependant breast cancer and PMS. Bacterial flora reduce its activity. l Oestrogen excess increases the need for B vitamins (with B6 levels of 50mg), Mg (6mg per 2.2lb of body weight) Mg bound to aspartate, malate, succinate, fumarate or citrate are preferred), as they are both needed for proper detoxification. l Enhance liver detoxification

PAGE 13


Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Attars Fragrances of the Soul by John Smith

Attars (pure perfumes) from India and The Middle East.

Unani Tibb, was developed in the 10th Century, by the Persian physician Hakim Ibn Sina (known in the west as Avicenna). Avicenna compiled the classic text ‘The Canon of Medicine’ which influenced both the teaching and practice of medicine for the next thousand years. Literally translated as ‘Greek Medicine’ Unani Tibb is influenced by the teachings of Hippocrates (circa 500 B.C.E) but also incorporates much of the healing arts of China, India, Tibet and The Middle East.

JOHN.E.SMITH B.A. (Hons) M: URPH, Dip. C.H. Herbs, Formulae, Spagyrics, Attars, Consultations Bristol Based Practitioner

Avicenna was also known for his development and use of Attars (pure fragrances) which are used to treat many disorders, particularly those associated with the heart, emotions and evolution of the soul (Ruh); adding to a range of elatives, exhilarants and nervines unequalled by other traditional medicine systems.

Fragrances of the Soul

Herbalkhemy www.herbalkemy.com herbalchemy66@aol.com 0117 9631622

The word ‘Attar’ is an Arabic word meaning ‘fragrance’ or ‘essence’. Attars are traditionally prepared by ‘cold rolling’ or ‘steam distillation’. The most popular botanical substances used in attar preparation include: Oudh, Rose, Saffron, Jasmine, Tuberose, Amber, Myrrh, Sandalwood and Frankincense. Attars are generally either cold rolled in stone troughs or distilled in ‘degs’ (traditional stills with copper lids sealed with cotton and clay); both of these methods have been used for nearly a thousand years.

PAGE 14

The plant materials used are replaced several times during the process to create a high concentration of their essences. Many of the secret Attari formulae use as many as forty different essences often including the rarest and most expensive perfumes e.g. Oud (eaglewood) so expensive it is sold in India by the gram, saffron , and the finest rose petals (about 30 roses are required for just one drop of pure rose attar). Attars are manufactured to emulate, celebrate or honour great people, places, occasions or states of bliss. A great Islamic teaching outlines “the six stations of the soul”, from “the station of the Ego” to the higher stations of “Divine Secrets”, “Nearness” and “Oneness”; and recommends the use of certain Attars, to support the evolution of the soul, through these realms of consciousness. A Moroccan Whirling Dervish, who according to legend ascended to celestial realms while in a state of bliss, for example designed the Attar Jannat Al Ferdous, the attar was manufactured to emulate The Perfume of Heaven. Attars give another dimension to healing, and are a useful addition to a dispensary. They are used largely for their aroma, which has a great therapeutic effect. They are rarely used internally, but can be, with caution, in certain preparations. PAGE 15


Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Rose: More than a hundred species of roses are used in medicine for their tonic, astringent and carminative properties, used in gargles enemas teas & salves to treat everything from mouth ulcers to uterine bleeding etc. and many other nutrients The perfume of rose works directly on the heart, and features in many of the “Soul Station” medicines. Attar of Roses was known by Avicenna to nd be cold & dry in the 2 degree, it is commonly used in all cases where heat is the major problem.

Jasmine: (Chameli, Sien hing hwa, Yasmin) Jasmine Attar is a calmative, antidepressant and aphrodisiac essence, Mainly used to calm the nervous system. Jasmine Flowers are pressed with Olive oil between glass or gauze frames (the flowers are changed many times) – it takes approximately 3lbs flowers to 1lb of oil to produce a high quality attar. The mystic whirling dervishes of Turkey favour jasmine. It uplifts moods and lessens depression. Lily of the Valley: Lily of the Valley slows the heart – as with digitalis, it is diuretic, emetic, purgative, and a heart tonic. This attar helps promote recall of pleasant events. PAGE 16

Musk:

Musk can be either of animal or plant origin, although animal musk is now prohibited in Europe. It is very useful in the removal of negative influences and traditionally worn by Arab women following menses to balance the internal environment. Musk is also used for fainting, dizziness and palpitations. This attar elicits raw animal energy.

Sandalwood: From Mysore, India, Arabia and Tunisia As with Rose Sandalwood is cold & dry (2nd Degree). Uses & Properties: Astringent, stimulant, diuretic, disinfectant, heart tonic. This Attar is used for heart disease, bronchitis, gonorrhoea, inflammation of mucous membranes, cystitis, chronic diarrhoea; or to promote a relaxed, meditative state.

Oud: (Oudh, eaglewood, agarwood, aquillaria species, jin-koh, Ch’en Xiang) A resinous wood taken from ancient trees, the resin is produced as a natural immune response to parasitic growths and therefore mainly found in infected trees; as a result Oud is exceedingly rare and expensive. Oud is highly cherished and traded amongst Unani, Ayurvedic and Chinese healers, exotic oil traders, alchemists and religious leaders and is referred to in Biblical and other religious texts. The resinous wood is burned on charcoal; it releases a perfume that inspires a relaxed positivity. Oud can also be purchased as an Attar and is often priced in the region of £500 - £5000 per ounce, depending on age, quality and origin. Much of the Oud available is either falsified using other botanicals or illegally

poached from conservation areas; some oud is cultivated although this has not the ‘depth’ of that coming from older trees. The perfume of oud attars can vary from a rich, almost fecal, smell to sweeter, spicier fragrances. Medicinal Uses: Stimulant, tonic, calmative, aphrodisiac, eases pain, useful for lung disorders (including asthma, TB etc.) Oud calms the heart and nourishes the spirit. A disciple asked a Sufi Shaykh how to deal with emotional disturbances. He was told to wear high quality Oud attar at 4pm each day, sit in a quiet corner and reflect on the immeasurable generosity, kindness and mercy of the One who created this fragrance.

The above represents just a handful of the hundreds of fragrances used in this system of medicine. Attars can be used therapeutically, intuitionally, or sensually, their range of application is without bounds.

Acknowledgements: Qasi Shaikh Abbas Borhany Yemen Times, Issue 863, Volume 13 Syedi Abdulqadir bin Qazi Habibullah, “Al Risalatil Nadira Fil Attur al Fakhirah” manuscript, Hiraz, Yemen. Hakim G.M.Chishti N.D. The Traditional Healer. Thorsens Publishing Group 1988.

Bukhur: A preparation made from agarwood and other woods, roots, barks and resins, bound in syrup. There are many Bukhur formulae, some dating back 1000 years. Origin: Yemen Bukhur is used in Islamic holy cities such as Mecca, during religious celebrations, and shared with guests as a token of great hospitality. Bukhur is found to aid concentration, improve memory, awaken the mind, enliven the spirit and repel negative psychic forces. It is also haemostatic and antiseptic.

Saffron: (usually made from blending saffron and sandalwood oils). Saffron attar aids digestion, acts as a sedative, rejuvenative and antidepressant; it regulates menstrual disorders, prolongs vitality and acts as an aphrodisiac. PAGE 17


Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Rediscovering Wood Betony by Suzanne Woodward

Wood Betony (Stachys officinalis) is a perennial native to Britain and Europe found in open woodland, heaths and hedges. A true member of the Labatiae family with characteristic square upright hairy stems arising from a basal rosette of long stalked oval crennated (crinkle cut) blunt tipped leaves 3 to 7 cms long. The stems bear two or three pairs of leaves ending in tight, whorled terminal spikes of small reddish purple flowers. Betony thrives on both acid and calcium soils. Throughout the ages Betony has been extolled as a panacea for all ills. The high regard for Betony ensured a place in physic gardens, monasteries and apothecaries. As far back as Roman times, Antonius Musa – chief physician to Emperor Augustus wrote a treatise on the virtues of Betony for forty-seven diseases. Robert Turner, a 17th century physician wrote of more than thirtyseven complaints for which Betony was considered efficacious. Culpeper recommended Betony as the “sovereign remedy for the head”. Many country folk grew Betony, harvesting the flowers and leaves in July/August, to be used as teas for headaches and migraines. The leaves were also used as PAGE 18

compresses for ulcers and wounds. th The 20 century saw a decline in Betony’s popularity in favour of another member of the Labatiae family, her American relative Skullcap – Scutellaria laterifolia.

Scutellaria laterifolia – Skullcap Skullcap rose to fame along with the growth of the Eclectic physicians in America. The Eclectics such as Thomson and his followers strongly influenced the use of herbs in Britain. British herbalists revered the writings of King, Thomson and Ellingwood this resulted in many excellent indigenous European herbs being overshadowed and almost forgotten until about 20 years ago. Although, Skullcap is regarded as a Native American herb, it is believed by some botanists that Scutellaria laterifolia is a hybrid of the wild European Scutellaria galericulata. The two species are identical in appearance and medicinal properties. A theory exists that seeds of Scutellaria galericulata were transported to the New World in grain seed sacks, quickly becoming established when sown with the grain. There are no medical references by British herbalists prior to the late 1800’s to Skullcap. The

earliest references to Skullcap as a medicinal herb are by the Eclectics who discovered the American Cherokee Indians, using the herb for childbirth and menstrual problems.

Dosage: 1 teaspoon per cup to relax 2 teaspoons for headaches and migraines Used as a tincture 1:5 in 45 % alcohol, dose: 2 to 6mls.

Without doubt Skullcap is an excellent nervine, antispasmodic, sedative and anticonvulsant. In recent years, the price of Skullcap has soared to more than five times the cost of Betony depending on supplier. More alarmingly, there have been reports of unscrupulous dealers adulterating the dried cut Skullcap with Germander (Teucrium species) in particular Wall Germander (Teucrium chamaedrys). Wall Germander is a lesser Labatiae herb with tough dark green leathery leaves high in tannin content that may lead to hepato-toxicity, if used for prolonged periods.

The fresh bruised leaves have been successfully used as compresses for wounds and as washes for leg ulcers due to the astringent effect of the high tannin content. Similar to Motherwort, the presence of the flavonoid glycosides supports Betony’s use as a calming remedy for hysteria, palpitations and nervous anxiety. Both Betony and Motherwort (Leonorus cardiaca) contains stachydrine. Stachydrine is a systolic depressant, which explains the antihypertensive effects of both herbs. Like Motherwort, Betony is a uterine stimulant so avoid during pregnancy.

The medicinal properties of Betony Betony contains alkaloids (including betonicine, trigonelline, stachydrine), betaine, choline, flavonoid glycosides, and tannins. The Celtic name for Betony, Bew (head) ton (good), (good for the head) says it all. Betony is a cerebral tonic for all nervous afflictions of the head: neurasthenia, migraines, headaches, asthma, and drunken hangover. The aerial tops of young leaves and flowers are used in infusions or tinctures.

Copyright Suzanne Woodward PAGE 19


Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Working with Annette Montague by Carol Wyatt Hello to all medical herbalists in the AMH and URHP! My name is Carole Wyatt and I am Annette Montague-Thomas's P.A. My boss is far from boring and I have known her from many years as firstly a friend and later as an employer. Multi tasking seems to have become the order of the day with my job and what's more I enjoy every moment of it. Annette began her training as a Pharmacist, and I worked across the road as a trainee bank clerk. I was used to this tall and then very slim young woman dashing into the bank and giving everyone a huge smile. Annette used to be seen early in the mornings unpacking supplies for the chemist and leaving very late at night having done up all the ointments and the next days prescriptions. Clearly devoted to healing from a young age and out with the public at every moment offering health advice and healing with a very calm and kind ear. She had told me that she found the pharmaceutical industry frustrating and that she felt that really she was just another agent for the large drug consortiums. We sort of lost touch for a few years and I learnt later that she had gone to manage a health resort in the Caribbean and then on to Kenya East Africa to manage another health resort, oddly enough she had never wanted to go to Africa and when she was invited to fill a contract in Kenya she found she loved it. We would catch up from time to time when she was back in the U.K. and I would wonder how she always had such huge energy. She went on to work for UNICEF and became the Chief Information Officers assistant, apparently he was like Hitler!! But PAGE 20

Annette learnt a great deal from him and she went on to manage various campaigns such as Breast Feeding Awareness, Oral Dehydration and finally Immunisation. Several years later in 1984, Annette was back in England and had started her training as a Medical Herbalist, “this is real medicine Carole” she told me one day, “and this is the only medicine.” Five years of her life spent in training and for the last couple of years she lived and breathed it to the point of NO social life. I was surprised that she had also trained as an Osteopath as I was aware that Annette had had a very serious riding accident in her youth and hadn't been able to walk for 6 months. But to her this was all about inner and outer therapies and she embraced it all with great gusto. Some time later when I injured my ankle whilst working late at the National Health Clinic I decided to book in as a patient and get some help. It was interesting to be a patient and renewed our friendship of old, and soon Annette and I would ride out on our horses together and catch up on old times and news. Within a couple of months Annette said, “one day I think you should come and work for me!” "O.K.," I said “I will.” I don't think we talked about wages or hours but duly I started at The Herbal Clinic in Truro 17 years ago. Can it really be so long I ask myself! 15 years ago Annette came back very heated from a General Council and Register of Herbal Practitioners

Conference in London. ”That's it!” she said, “ I am starting my own organisation” and after a few phone calls, Roger Dyson, Jean Pierre Cousins, Richard Stewart and Annette had formed a new organisation which was later to become ‘The Unified Register of Herbal Practitioners.’ Soon other organisations were joining in with a common love of herbs and healing and needing to bond in one large professional organisation. Heady days and long nights of typing reports and papers became the order of the day. I watched it grow with delight and soon others joined in and the load was well shared. I remember our first news letter with hundreds of sheets up and down the stairs and pining it all together and getting it out in the next days post. Thank god help came quickly because we had an ‘All change situation’ in 2000 Christmas morning when Annette was watching a channel 4 documentary. There was Africa, there were the old Mammas pounding the grain outside their thatched huts, there were the young children running with their Heinz 57 dogs and makeshift toys, but where was everyone else? Were they out hunting, was there a town nearby? No ......everyone else was dead...HIV/AIDS had left its very cruel trademark. Just then the telephone rang and it was Pauline Annette's friend from Kenya, Pauline's brother Peter had been the love of Annette's life and was sadly killed in a light aircraft that developed an engine fault. Annette had learnt to fly herself, and had been flying with him earlier in the day and even then remembers a strange engine noise. I tell these stories well as when you have worked for someone for 17 years and known them for over 30 you know them well! Pauline asked "are you watching this Annette?" "Oh yes," she replied "and what's more I am going to do something about it!" Annette rang her ex UNICEF boss and asked him where in the world was the worst place for HIV/AIDS. He didn't even draw breath…. “South Africa”, he replied.

Annette has just returned from her 71st trip to her project in South Africa. I watched the formation of her registered charity The Global Natural Healthcare Trust unfold, as Oh yes! I was typing out reports and filling in documents like never before. I listened as she told me how serious the situation was in South Africa. “Carole there is no real medicine” she said, “I am going to help and I am not sure how but it has to be with medical herbs, nothing is going to touch this virus but herbs.” She ordered a huge stock of herbs, and then ordered a huge stock of various seeds, plants and trees to start her herbal nursery, somewhere in between and I forget just when and where she found an old building, recruited staff and within a couple of months she was off to South Africa for two weeks every month. All I knew is that she had decided to open a clinic on the Orange Farm settlement which was then home to over two million Africans of various tribes living in very impoverished circumstances. Now in 2008 it is home to five and a half million and Annette is still the only white face.

The patients in the U.K. all seem to manage to fit in around her U.K. home visits and as her secretary there were times when I wondered how The U.K. Herbal Clinics were going to manage to survive with this erratic pace, but they have. Making medicines late into the night, miraculously the trips to Africa seem to suit her well. I had often thought PAGE 21


Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Herbal Roots Summer ’08

one day I would like to go out there, so earlier this year Peter my husband of 30+ years and I booked our flights and go we shall we said! Annette by this time was on her forth clinic and now had a 120 acre farm, had opened a new Holistic treatment centre, and all but completed a basic R&D department had cultivated part of the farm and had begun to work on a centre for HIV/AIDS babies and toddlers which once completed will be called ‘The Cuddle Centre’ the other side of this huge building was to be the hospital. She had started with a handful of children; I think 7 orphans and now had a Foster Care System with over 7,500 children. I knew things would be tough as I had seen hundreds of pictures of the project. Although Annette's energy is amazing I had noticed that at time's the strain was on, the clinics in the U.K. were really good and the project in Africa all seemed fine with wonderful results and amazing healing stories. What was obviously exhausting was the fundraising to keep the project afloat. The weeks fly by and each weekend we are all out fundraising, be it shaking a tin or actually at an organised event. We landed in South Africa in March earlier this year, Annette for the first time was happy everyone was with her as three days earlier she had had a very bad fall with her horse as he slid on the tarmac and landed on her with the result she had broken five ribs. Liz Lyden the President of the URHP was making her fifth trip with Annette and as Annette and Liz are great friends and colleagues over the years with all the herbal changes that we have all witnessed in the U.K. I was glad Annette had some back up. But would she really let Liz see her patients I wondered, and would she be able to touch the herbs in the dispensary!! I know Annette and every patient is hers and hers alone and slowly and in pain I watched Liz gently take the odd patient here and there! What a great lady Liz Lyden is and how lucky we are to have people like her in the world of herbal medicine. PAGE 22

My husband having retired after 30 years with the water board managed to find jobs to do including milling the dried herbs from the first farm crops. I sat with Annette in clinic and worked with Thebo her Zulu PA in reception. They had started the day with a small speech to welcome my husband and I and then from nowhere burst in to wonderful song, all the patients stood up and joined in, it made you want to cry and yet you knew you had been part of the process already of keeping many alive. I had spoken to the staff many times on the phone, now I was actually here with them and trying my best to help. Hundreds of patients came to the clinic in the week, and such sad cases I had to control my emotions. Everywhere there were frail, sick and emaciated bodies desperate to be healed. Every patient had a smile, and they all left clutching their FREE herbal medicine bottles. Liz was often asked to go to the sick room to give Reiki healing with patients, Annette herself a healer could barely move so at least Liz was able to do her thing alone! And do it well she did. Each day we saw a steady stream of patients with HIV/AIDS and AIDS related disorders. The T.B. situation had been rife in those early days, and Annette had treated several thousand cases and virtually managed to eradicate it. Each patient desperate for help, some cases so very serious and others who had been with Annette since 2001 were encouraging the new patients. The long term patients get seen four times a year and the new ones every month. I went out onto the settlement and saw the two new Bi Polar homes, Blind home and the Disabled centre that GNHCT had taken under their wing. Everywhere Annette drives; people call and wave to her and now I too am part of the project for I have more than collected the pictures from the photographic studio now I am here myself battling with fatigue and dust and disease and understanding that the need for an official fundraiser is very real. Please God.

At the end of our trip we had a treat in store, Annette and Liz had a meeting with various Ward Councillors who are the new tribal chiefs. After lunch, on came the tribal dancers and yes for the first time I saw the colours of Africa and the pride and courage of so many young people who struggle to keep their heritage. The dancers are led by the South African celebrity Welcome Nkleko who seems to have adopted Annette and vice versa, this young man who made his name singing in a musical called Safarina with Whoopi Goldberg has voice to die for. He spends all his available free time training the youngsters on the settlement, Annette and GNHCT have been very involved in raising funds for costumes and getting the youngsters to complete in competitions. Recently my boss Annette started writing songs, I had seen poetry over the years, I had seen publications and now I was typing lyrics to songs! They have just completed a 9 track album entitled "Beautiful Child of Africa" and its out on sale for £10, so please try and buy a copy from us. Oh and now I have to go as Annette is calling me as she wants me to type a report about the new Cultural Centre that she is applying for funds to attract tourist to the project and I have just been asked to make sure that I carry out the dispensary stock take before I leave tonight, and did I remember to print out her new newspaper called ‘The Voice of Orange Farm.’ Yes is my answer to all three. And with that I leave you and perhaps I forgot to mention I also run the URHP head office in between all of this! And finally I am delighted to see that the AMH are now drawing closer to the URHP, I know that Jill Davies and Annette had always had huge admiration for each other and for me I feel that this is the way forward.

Global Natural Healthcare Trust

The Cuddle Centre, a special orphanage for babies & toddlers together with a new, larger treatment centre will open with the first admission of 55 babies and toddlers many of which will inevitably be suffering from the HIV/AIDS virus. We need a commitment from 1,200 persons of just £5 a month. This will give us the ongoing funds we need to permanently run the ''Cuddle Centre'' orphanage. For more information or to make a donation: Visit the GNHCT website: www.gnhct.org Phone: +44 01872 222699 Email: info@gnhct.org

Note from Liz - lest you think I just twiddle my thumbs I don’t! Actually I never stop working albeit as a building supervisor, growing herbs, harvesting and milling them, fundraising, political meetings, dispensary work etc., etc., whilst I am there and Annette has felt able to leave me to run the clinic for up to 3 days a week on the last 2 weeks we have been there!

PAGE 23


Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Dates for your Diary “Panchakarma - A Practical Approach"

Reading the Body

Two-Day CPD Seminar with Dr. Avinash Lele & Dr. Bharati Lele Saturday & Sunday 6th & 7th September 2008

A two day seminar on patient assessment with Margi Flint, Herbalist AHG 4th and 5th October 2008, Regent’s College, London. Organised by Guy Waddell URHP

Middlesex University - Archway Campus - London We warmly invite you to register for this event, which will be a valuable opportunity to gain practical insights from vaidyas with long-standing experience in Ayurveda and Panchakarma. For more details, please see http://www.apa.uk.com/events/7/ To register, please email info@apa.uk.com Ayurvedic Practitioners Association info@apa.uk.com www.apa.uk.com

Healing Roots A Foundation Course in Shamanic Healing for Herbalists with Andrew Johnson and Jane Dagger September 13-14th 2008 Venue: Moorlinch near Glastonbury, Somerset. A two part non-residential course created for herbal practitioners and others with an interest in the role of Celtic Shamanic Healing, Plant Spirit Medicine and Celtic Traditional Medicine. This foundation course is for beginners, it teaches students shamanic journeying, how to gather spirit allies along with other Celtic and traditional folk healing methods. JANE DAGGER has been involved in many aspects of traditional folk magic, healing and shamanism for most of her life. For the past 15 years she has taught workshops on Celtic Shamanism as part of the Faculty of Inspirational & Oracular Studies (FiOS). She works as a shamanic healer and maker of shamanic tools in Dorset. FFI: janedagger@tiscali.co.uk ANDREW JOHNSON MAMH. MBANT. RIr. has been in clinical practice for 23 years, he has a background in social work; and a clinical practice that includes herbal medicine, nutritional therapy, iridology, kinesiology, healing and shamanic healing. FFI: www.glastonburynaturalhealth.co.uk Course fee: £280 inclusive of the two weekends, printed material, lunches, light snacks and teas. To secure a place at a reduced fee send a 50% deposit of £120 (£60 for each weekend) before 1st March 2008 = total fee £240. Lunches, teas and snacks at the weekends will be from mostly organically grown sources with options for vegetarian/vegans, wheat and sugar free. PAGE 24

This seminar is open to herbalists, naturopaths and students of these disciplines and other complementary medicine practitioners who wish to develop additional diagnostic skills. Attendance certificates will be issued. The seminar will cover: • Facial signs – including tongue, ears, eyes, mouth and nose and their organ/body correspondences. Also nail signs. • Significance of tissue colour in diagnosis. • Signs of hot, cold, damp and dry conditions. • Elimination analysis by stool and urine appearance. • The use of pulse analysis when selecting remedies.

Margi Flint has been practising western herbal medicine for 30 years. Margi is Adjunct Professor at North Shore Community College, The Tufts University School of Medicine and is a regular lecturer at Massachusetts College of Pharmacy. Venue: Regent's College, London NW1. Cost: £110 (£95 for students) Early Bird Fee: book before 4th September and take £15 off the booking fee. Please make cheques payable to Guy Waddell Please return to Guy Waddell, Reading the Body, 98 Vassall Road, London, SW9 6JA. For more information please contact guy.waddell@virgin.net

PHYTOTHERAPY RESOURCES Endobiogenic Medicine Training Cycle 2008-2010 No. 3: Cardiovascular Disorders with Dr Jean-Claude Lapraz Friday 10 October to Sunday 12 October 2008 Endobiogeny is an integrative approach to the philosophy and practice of medicine, developed by the French doctors Christian Duraffourd and Jean-Claude Lapraz over a lifetime of intensive medical practice. This seminar is the third in a series of nine that will comprise a training programme in endobiogenic medicine, running over three years. There will be an examination at the end of each year (for those who wish to take it), with a final exam at the end of the programme; PAGE 25


Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Book Review by John E Smith B.A. (Hons.), M: URHP, Dip. C. H. successful candidates will be awarded a certificate by the British Endobiogenic Medicine Society. This third seminar in the programme will focus on the cardiovascular system, looking at the role of the autonomic nervous system in cardiovascular pathology, and the endobiogenic approach to conditions such as arteriosclerosis, arteritis, hypertension and venous insufficiency. It will also include the clinical examination of a patient. Venue: Lecture Theatre, Furnival Building, Middlesex University, 10 Highgate Hill, London N19 5NF. For more information: Email: cnicholls@phytores.plus.com.

BNA Oncology Group Saturday, November 22nd 10am – 4.30pm Professor Jane Plant and Professor Dan Burke at The Brockway Room, Conway Halls, Holborn, London The Oncology Group is a Special Interest Group of the BNA set up to review, discuss and debate Naturopathic Approaches to Cancer Care. 1. Professor Jane Plant Dietary treatment of Breast Cancer and Prostate Cancer 2. Professor Dan Burke Phytonutrients and Disease Prevention 3. Short Presentations (to include) • Gastric Cancer and the Hay Diet. • Herbal Medicines and Cancer: What’s the evidence? The attendance fee for this meeting is £30. CPD certificates Delegates are requested to bring a snack lunch *Postal address of the Venue: The Brockway Room, The Conway Hall, 25 Red Lion Square, London WC1 (nearest tube station: Holborn) To reserve a place at this meeting please send a cheque for £30 (made out to the British Naturopathic Association) to: David Potterton ND, MRN, MNIMH, 27 Lower Elmstone Drive, Tilehurst, Reading, RG31 5EB. For more information, Tel: 0118 945 4040, or email david.potterton@ntlworld.com

PAGE 26

Avicenna and I (The Journey of Spirits) A Novel by Manoucher Parvin ISBN 1-56859-040-7 MAZDA Publishers CA. USA This novel is a must for all health practitioners with an interest in, and a respect for, one of the guiding lights of herbal wisdom. ‘Avicenna and I ‘could only be written by a Persian poet/philosopher. Manoucher Parvin’s writing is reminiscent of Omar Khayam and Hafiz. The novel is both a metaphysical mystery story and an observation of natural beauty. Passages such as: ‘ the roses perfume urges the nightingale to serenade us, and the sun to reach its zenith, for a better view of our togetherness’, mingle with glimpses of ancient Persian history, modern Iranian politics, and philosophical insights: (e.g. ‘our minds are just the instruments by which light investigates its own nature, and attempts to know itself…’)

This great book is littered with the poetry of Rumi, Tagore, Attar, and other profound poets of the Eastern world, and provides rare glimpses of the life and influence of Ibn Sina: ‘The Prince of Medicine’. ‘Avicenna and I’ explores some profound questions of metaphysics, but does so in the guise of an absorbing novel – it is both a joy and an education to read.

Set largely in Iran during the Iran/Iraq war, the novel’s main character is an incarnation of Gorgani (Avicenna’s biographer), who is forced by destiny to leave his New York tenement flat, to return to the land of his birth, and explore his historical links with the founder of Unani Tibb medicine. PAGE 27


Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Resources

Resources

Suppliers

Information

Western Herbs

Western

www.healingherbsupplies.co.uk www.herbalapothecarystore.com www.granaryherbs.co.uk www.herbs-hands-healing.co.uk www.baldwins.co.uk www.revitalshop.com

www.botanical.com www.iherb.com www.herbs.org www.umm.edu www.ars-grin.gov/duke/ www.itmonline.org www.herbs2000.com www.herbsociety.co.uk www.naturaldatabase.com www.herbmed.org http://earthnotes.tripod.com/ckbkmenu.htm

Chinese

www.acusupply.ie www.shizen.co.uk www.shulan.co.uk www.oxfordmedical.co.uk www.herbprime.co.uk www.acumedic.com www.mayway.com www.healthwise-clinic.com www.harmonymedical.co.uk

Ayurvedic

Ayurvedic www.niam.com www.ayur.com www.ayurveda.com

East West

www.pukkaherbs.com

www.herbalist.on.ca/resources/freeman.html www.planetherbs.com www.jerremyross.com

PAGE 28

Planetary Formulas

Research

www.planetaryformulas.com www.earthforce.com www.herbalkhemy.com

www.pubmed.com www.intute.ac.uk/healthandlifesciences/ medhist www.herb.org PAGE 29


Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Herbal Roots Summer ’08

Resources Unified Register of Herbal Practitioners

Traditional Chinese Medicine www.tcmassistant.com http://tcm.health-info.org/Herbology.Materia.Medica www.medicalacupuncture.com www.jcm.co.uk www.itmonline.org www.chinesemedicinetimes.com www.shen-nong.com http://tcm.health-info.org www.cancersupportivecare.com/chineseformulary.html www.cancerlynx.com/chinesemedicine3.html www.ontcm.com/herbsgarden www.senhealth.com www.tcmbasics.com www.tcmtreatment.com www.rmhiherbal.org www.drgascoigne.com www.bluepoppy.com www.mendieasestcm.com www.acupuncture.com

TCM Students www.acupuncturestudents.com www.tcmstudent.com www.tcmbasics.com www.tcmtests.com

Herbal Interaction www.sona.ie www.naturesway.ie www.iherb.com

PAGE 30

URHP Officers President: Liz Lyden president@urhp.com

Chinese Tradition: Andrew Loosely chinesetradition@urhp.com

Vice President: Vicki Pitman vicepresident@urhp.com

Ayurvedic Tradition: Vicki Pitman ayurvedatradition@urhp.com

General Secretary: Annette Montague-Thomas generalsecretary@urhp.com

Western Tradition: Annette Montague-Thomas westerntradition@urhp.com

Membership/Registration: Jenny Boys membershipenquiries@urhp.com

Unani Tibb: Ahmed Gill unanitibb@urhp.com

Safety Officer: Sebastian Pole safetyofficer@urhp.com

General / Public Enquiries generalenquiries@urhp.com

Publicity Officer: Gabi Heyes, Caroline Daniel publicity@urhp.com Newsletter: Sonya Oldham newsletter@urhp.com General Education Enquiries: Vicki Pitman educationchair@urhp.com

URHP Ireland: Sonya Oldham urhpireland@urhp.com URHP South Africa: Louis Van Aswegan urhpsouthafrica@urhp.com Telephone Enquiries Head Office: 01872 222 699 or fax 01872 222 300

Education Director: Brian Day brianday@urhp.com PAGE 31

Herbal Roots  

The last issue of Herbal 'Roots', The URHP Journal of Herbal Medicine It is now joined with the AMH journal and is called 'The Herbalist'

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