Page 1

2017 PREVIEW ISSUE


SPARTA VAR EXTREME MUSCLE BUILDER

5a-Hydroxy Laxogenin

SPARTAN LABS

a-Hydroxy Laxogenin was discovered in 1996 and shown to have an anabolic/androgenic ratio similar Anavar, but without the side effects of liver toxicity or testing positive for steroidal therapy. Athletes claim to have seen strength increases in 3-5 days, and muscle mass increases in 3-4 weeks. AKA Laxogenin 5a-hydroxy-laxogenin is a steroidal sapinogen, although whether or not it is the desired laxinogen is a mystery since no lab standard for it is available, nor was it referenced within the GCMS library. Marketing claims for this compund say it is the only product ever designed to increase mass and strength without steroidal influence and that it doesn't test positive for steroids.  Tests showed that protein synthesis increased by over 200%, the key to lean muscle growth and accelerated repair. In testing, 5a-Hydroxy Laxogenin has balanced cortisol response, which is the major cornerstone to healthy recovery and reduction of muscle wasting.  It's also been shown to balance cortisol on calorie restricted diets, helps control glucose and increases thyroid function.  "Laxogenin does indeed have some pretty profound anti-inflammatory effects. In addition to being able to be synthesized from Diosgenin, it is a component of smilax sieboldii." "Laxogenin is a steroidal sapogenin isolated from Smilax sieboldi. As a spirostanic analogue of the brassinosteroid teasterone, Laxogenin is noted for it's growth promoting activity [in plants]. It has also been demonstrated to aquire [cytotoxic] properties however, to what degree, I am not sure. In contrast, Laxogenin was demonstrated to aquire antitumor-promoting activity in a two-stage lung carcinogenesis experiment." "The best (published) study can be found in the journal Phytochemistry, 1971, vol. 10, pp 1339-1346. Again in 1989, same journal vol. 28, no. 9 pp 2509-2511 (laxogenin acetate). There is reference going back to 1965 in Chem. Pharm. Bull. 13(5), pp. 545-550 (laxogenin).  It was Syrov's paper of 1976 though, appearing in Farmakol, Toksikol that really sparked my interest. The paper is entitled, "An Experimental Study on the Anabolic Activities of 6-keto Derivatives of some natural sapogenins". It details the 4 sapogenins (referred to as compounds 1-4 in the Soviet Union) and gives source material, results of the classic steroid model (levator ani studies) and mentions other clues critical to their use. Most of these compounds can be derived from Diosgenin (so can testosterone). Laxogenin appears closest to Compound 2, the most desirable of these. Thermo includes it as 25R in their formulation and I very much wish it were available as a standalone. I can tell you from experience that when you get the right Laxogenin, it for sure delivers on the recovery, anti-inflammatory etc. side of things and is a superb regenerative agent.

ADVERTISING

SpartanLabsOnline.com

SPARTAN LABS


Seven years ago I had a vision that turned into an action, and Sparta Combat League was born! My vision and dream was to build a combat sports empire that did things differently and helped people along the way. We started this business with no money, but a gas tank full of motivation and a strong vision for what it could become. I went from gym to gym selling my passion and vision, recruiting fighters to Sparta, telling them what I believed it would someday become. Slowly but surely I started to secure the top talent and Sparta was on the rise. My next move would be to recruit and build a team that in the end would be more of a family, and I strongly believe we have succeeded in doing that! My hope is that fans come to an SCL event, maybe as just a fan of their fighter, but leave a fan of SCL because of the overall experience. The magazine was just another late-night idea, filled with passion and love for our brand, a vessel to distribute content and highlight our young fighters, giving them better exposure! When people ask me, “Jeff did you really believe Sparta would be where it is today?”, My answer is swift and to the point, “You better believe I did! If you don’t believe in yourself, then who will?”. With that being said, thank you to all of our fighters, fans, staff, media, and sponsors, we are truly grateful.

— Jeff Cisneros


FEATURED MMA MEN’S

UP AND COMING 145LB PRO JUSTIN GONZALES

TABLE OF CONTENTS

FEATURED MMA WOMEN’S

SCL RISING STAR

BREAKING DOWN BARRIERS SHANNON SINN

MISAEL LOPEZ FEATURED GYM

THE LION THAT LIVES AT TRIALS MMA GYM

08

15 10 20


FEATURED BOXING

BLUE COLLAR CHAMPION MANNY ‘MANOS’ PEREZ

FEATURED STORY SCL FEATURED GIRL

HOPE BEEL RANKINGS

MMA PRO P4P FEATHERWEIGHT WELTERWEIGHT RANKINGS

24

32 26

FROM THE DARK CORNERS OF A PRISON CELL TO THE BRIGHT LIGHTS OF CAGE GLORY THE IAN HEINISCH STORY

38


SCL

STAR ALERT

MISAEL LOPEZ

by Leann Perez AKA “The Boxing Chick”

8

SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE | January 2017


PHOTO BY RICK DOWDY

IS TO BE A WORLD CHAMPION! I PLAN ON STAYING “ MYBUSYMAINTHISGOALYEARINANDBOXING START BECOMING AN EXCITING MAIN EVENT FIGHTER! ” Like most boxing fathers, when Evenezer Lopez walked into the gym, his son Misael was right behind him. “My dad wanted me to learn how to box mostly to protect myself. Growing up in a tough neighborhood, he knew one day I’d need to know these things”, says Misael. Knowing those things was right, growing up in the north side of Denver in the Five Points area. Misael Lopez (3-0, 1KO) turned professional in May of 2016, and has stayed active with two more fights to follow and one scheduled bout for November that fell thru. His next bout is scheduled for January 2017. “I saw something in him the day a 10 year old Lopez had to spar against some pretty active amateurs”, says Aurelio Martinez. Martinez is one of his trainers along with Lopez’ father, whom Martinez use to also train when Evenezer was younger. “I wasn’t excited to see him spar that day, he had only really been watching his dad, but he surprised me when he put

a whoopin on these kids. At that point I knew, this kid was something special.” Now at 20, Lopez has found a pretty successful start to his career, becoming a newlywed and a father. As if that wasn’t enough, his construction job takes most of the hours out of his day in between a run in the morning and training at night. “Luckily my wife is very understanding, she helps me value every moment I get to spend with her and my son. Our weekends are filled with spending time together since the weekdays are long and full of training and work.” Lopez proposed to his wife in front of the crowd after the unanimous decision win against Jairo Delgado in May. The long days and early mornings will be a continuous routine as the plans for 2017 seem to be just as busy and successful for Team Misa. “The plans we have are for Misael to fight a minimum of six times in 2017 to

include a WBC World youth title and or Regional titles such as Intercontinental. At this point in his career we really can’t call out specific names but I will say that we will not shy from anyone in this region who is willing”, says Martinez. Lopez has his eyes on the ultimate prize, and has the dedication to give his son and wife everything they deserve. “My main goal in boxing is to be a world champion! I plan on staying busy this year and start becoming an exciting main event fighter! I just want to say this is going to be a big year for Team Misa Lopez and we’re ready to put in work this upcoming year. I want to thank my team for a great first year as a professional and to SCL and Jeff who have shown nothing but love to our team and created awesome opportunities for us! I’m looking forward to continuing to work with them in the future!”

PHOTO BY RICK DOWDY

January 2017 | SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE

9


SEELEY INFO@BRETTSEELEYPHOTO.COM 720. 579.8217 WRITTEN BY ANDREW SMITH

THE LION THAT LIVES AT

TRIALS MMA GYM

“I want to teach people that it is not about winning or losing inside that cage - the real win is the character that you bring inside and outside of the cage.” Spoken from Ryan Schultz himself. Schultz is part owner of Trials MMA in Fort Collins, Colorado. A former fighter himself, Ryan has taken the life long lessons he has learned in the combat sports world to put together a gym that not only allows people of all ages to learn mixed martials arts, but to also grow as a family and a community. Another goal is to take the lion pride he carries so close to his heart with others. Born in North Platte, Nebraska, Ryan took up wrestling at very young age and has over 20 years of wrestling experience. Ryan wrestled in high school and also attended the University of Nebraska where he wrestled for four years. His resume is filled with

10

SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE | January 2017

many accomplishments that he is proud of - like coaching at Team Quest, the Head Amateur Competition Team and training with Quinton Rampage for his fight against Rashad Evans. He is also the current undisputed light-weight champion. However, there is nothing Ryan is more proud of then what he is currently doing at Trials MMA in Fort Collins, Colorado. It has given him a chance to open up the doors for kids and adults who are not into MMA to get their heads punched everyday but to learn the real love of the sport and to prove that stereotype of MMA fighter is misunderstood. “I want to prove and show the world that MMA is not filled with just a bunch of thugs that want to smash each others face in, it’s better than that - we are good people and I’m here to prove that.” said Ryan.


January 2017 | SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE

11


After leaving Team Quest, Ryan teamed up with two friends Ed Herman and Reed O’Malley to open up Trails MMA. Trails MMA is a gym that will allow the three to really focus on helping people learn MMA the right way. “The real motivation of the gym was to have a family oriented gym, where anyone who comes in will feel comfortable and feel accepted. It’s not about money to me, we are about helping each other learn here at Trails.” said Ryan. When asked what he loved about coaching MMA at Trails, Ryan explained that he has always been a giving person and coaching kids and adults is allowing him to give in the best way

he knows how to. “I love coaching because I love giving to people. To me, coaching is better then fighting”. With many programs such as Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, MMA Technique and Muay Thai, Trails MMA is a type of gym that carries many different options. No matter what you want to learn, they can teach it. With a very open schedule and open mostly every day of the week, to the exception of certain days where they close the gym off for their competition team, there is always a way you can attend a class to learn the fundamentals of MMA. They even have a program for kids called “Little Champs

and Champs”, which range from 4-8 years old and 9-12. It’s not only about teaching wrestling, kickboxing, and other sports like so, but the importance of teaching self respect, discipline, and dedication. Its goal is to leave with something that will help the kids at Trails MMA not only inside but also outside the cage. “I love helping people and love watching them learn and grow, from kids to adults. Again I can’t express how great the energy is in the gym. Once you walk in, you can feel it from my wife, who helps a lot around the gym, to the coaches to the students. We are family with a learning

environment.” Ryan speaks very passionately about his reasons behind what he does.

does not like much change but some change is good if it’s right and everything happens for a reason.” Ryan says. With the new change in the gym, Ryan doesn’t think it will hurt the gym at all and it can only get better.

In 2016, the gym underwent a change in ownership when Ed Herman and Reed O’Malley decided to step down from the ownership. Lion’s pride is something close to not only Ryan but While both are still close with the gym and O’Malley everyone at Trials MMA and it is something each and everyone of them live still coaching at Trials, by when they step foot both wanted to pursue into the gym. “The lion’s their personal and professional goals. Jerrod pride is more than just the tattoo on me, its more Hardy would join the company to assist Ryan in the “Lion” nickname I go running the gym and both by when I am fighting. It is the energy we all live look forward to making by while training here the gym even better. “Ed and you can feel it right and Reed will always be when you walk in those family - I wasn’t upset at doors and everyone will all. I’m a type of guy that January 2017 | SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE

13


tell you that.” Lion’s Pride is referenced to the lion’s mentality. The mentality where you feel in your heart that you are the king of the jungle and you act like the king of the jungle. That jungle is the octagon cage. “It’s awesome to see because we get to see coaches like myself and other coaches who have been through a lot get to teach new and younger students more than we were able to learn at their age. Its almost like the older lions teaching the younger cubs.” The one thing the Lion’s Pride will always live by is sticking together. “I want the people training here to know that team matters and sticking together is the biggest thing.” The future looks bright for Trials MMA gym with new people coming in

everyday and with Ryan putting in his full effort in making sure everyone gets the best experience, the sky seems endless for the gym in Fort Collins. Ryan has even teamed up with “Rocky Steady Boxing”, a non-profit organization to help empower people with Parkinson’s disease. “I had a chance to help them and help people who suffer from Parkinson’s use boxing skills to help make their lives a little easier and hopefully I can eventually bring it in Trials MMA and I am very excited to be apart of it.” Ryan says. With all the success at Trials MMA Ryan looks forward to the future and hopefully will be able to break out to the main MMA Scene. “I look forward to breaking out into the main scene. I feel once I crack into the Bellator or UFC scene with

a fighter from the fight team here at Trials, I will be able to open a lot more doors for my other fighters. Once that door is open though, everyone better believe its going to stay open.” If you’re looking for gym to learn MMA there are plenty around the state of Colorado. However, if you looking for a gym that shows pride, discipline, and respect on top of the beautiful sport of MMA, then Trials MMA Gym is a perfect fit for you. You’ll take more than not only lessons inside the cage, but leave with life lessons once leaving it. As Ryan said once before “The real win starts with your character, not the win inside the cage.”

PHOTOS BY Bianca Malone


on to become a Colorado


of encouragement helped move her life in a positive direction. It was said ‘FusBoxe offers the toughest workout anywhere’ and Sinn found that to be true. “I had been trying to work out on my own but after going there the first day, I was a believer and fell in love with it,” said Sinn. “I found a way to refocus my energy and that in turn kept me away from the negatives that had become part of my life. Michelle Blaylock was preparing for her first MMA fight and I was part of that preparation. Seeing her succeed was an adrenaline rush and I wanted that feeling for myself.” From that point Sinn competed in numerous grappling tournaments in 2010, her first MMA fight around 18 months after entering the gym. Finding fights was a real chore, her grappling background and physique had most women shy away from fighting her. Sinn was the first ever female SCL (Sparta Combat

16

League) title holder and would eventually hold two SCL amateur titles at 125 lbs. and 135 lbs, her amateur record a respectable 5-1. Going into her third amateur fight in 2012, Sinn met now boyfriend Albert Rosales while the two trained at FusBoxe, him supportive of women in the sport and had previously trained with Meisha Tate. There was an immediate connection, Sinn loving the straight forward, no nonsense coaching approach of Rosales. The two enjoyed training together but internal strife within the gym and at home forced Sinn making the decision to leave FusBoxe and end her marriage. Sinn ended up at Strictly Boxing (Rick Lopez) in Brighton, Colorado, where Lopez conducted amateur and professional coaching sessions while Rosales coached and ran the Title Gym in Thornton. Sinn quickly gained a following at the Strictly Gym those folks affectionately known as

SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE | January 2017

‘Grinders’. Lopez and Rosales helped hone the MMA skills of Sinn. Not much later it was time to move on as their following grew larger and Title Boxing (Thornton, Colorado) became the home of Sinn and Rosales following his promotion to General Manager. The Title Gym could only be used until after 8:30PM because of a ‘no contact rule’, that forcing Sinn into a more strenuous schedule. Working as a full-time driver for Aramark that began around 4AM Monday thru Friday with Sinn delivering uniforms, mats and other items during 10-12 hour work days was a physically demanding job. The only female doing that work was something Shannon relished, her competitive spirit not allowing any male driver to outdo her. She would complete her work shift (without complaint), come home for a brief rest and then head to the gym for an evening

workout that sometimes lasted until 11PM. She was often exhausted but never one to complain, she forged on. Rosales saw the mental and physical toll Sinn was enduring but she refused to quit working at Aramark. UFC star Raquel Pennington was present at one of the Cisneros SCL MMA shows and at the urging of Rosales, had a conversation with Shannon that helped change her mind. Having trained with Pennington and Cat Zingano (two Colorado UFC stars) she respected her opinion. “Raquel told me she once had to make a similar decision and for me to quit working and devote myself full-time and give it a go”, began Sinn. “With Albert reinforcing the idea that we could make it without my income, I decided to quit my job and train exclusively.” INVICTA match maker Shannon Knapp had approached Rosales after


Sinn had only a few amateur fights under her belt Neither Sinn nor Rosales had thoughts of turning pro that early but after awhile finding amateur fights became impossible. At one point they’d gone through 8 camps preparing for fights that fell through. “That was physically and mentally draining as well as frustrating, but we kept on pushing through. INVICTA (an all women’s fight organization) let us know they were watching”, said Sinn. “Had I been able to get the amateur fights needed, I truly believe my skills would have improved a lot faster and I’d have turned pro sooner. There was a time I went an entire year without fighting as one fight after another fell through.” In April of 2014 Shannon Sinn made her professional MMA debut on an ‘SCL MMA’ (Jeff Cisneros) show and won convincingly. Cisneros heard of her inability to get fights as an amateur and after seeing her present

at most every MMA show around town, they hatched an agreement. She then took her second pro fight and lost. Shannon was now convinced the INVICTA opportunity was gone with a professional record of 1-1. After a long wait INVICTA made their offer and it was accepted. From adversity and setback sometimes comes a motivation that can push you to heights once thought incapable. From that point on, Shannon Sinn has accepted every challenge and never looked back. Shannon Sinn considers SCL CEO Jeff Cisneros a ‘Dream Maker’, he’s an ambassador of women’s MMA and women’s boxing who works tirelessly helping promote the sport and her at every opportunity. “Jeff has bent over backwards to help promote me and women in MMA”, began Sinn. “I’ve had a number of fights fall through some with just two weeks to go but he scrambles hard to find suitable opponents.”

A memorable moment for Rosales and Sinn came on October 31, 2014, when Cisneros had Sinn scheduled to headline an SCL MMA fight card. The call came from INVICTA asking Sinn to be on a huge event scheduled for that same date. The conversation with Cisneros was typical, him encouraging them to take advantage of the INVICTA stage while pushing his own agenda to the back burner. Rosales contacted Julie Kedzie (INVICTA matchmaker) notifying her of their acceptance but Kedzie expressed concern citing Sinn seen on posters promoting the SCL event. Kedzie was adamant, “that’s not the way we do business, we’ll find something for Shannon later”. Cisneros intervened, e-mailing Kedzie giving his full blessing for Shannon to take the INVICTA opportunity, clearing the way for her to participate. That gesture of support is one neither Rosales nor Sinn will

ever forget. In her first MMA bout under the INVICTA umbrella, Sinn was signed for a November 1, 2014, bout in California against Andrea ‘KGB’ Lee. In what is widely considered a considered ‘a crowd pleasing blood bath’, Lee blasted Sinn in the first few seconds of the fight and although dazed, Sinn confronted that issue head-on. Her competitive spirit demanded she finish the fight and earned the respect of everyone associated with the bout. Sinn is always honest in her fight assessment and says she lost but it proved she had what it takes to compete to the end no matter the circumstances. This will forever be the favorite fight of Shannon Sinn and from that one loss spawned a newfound respect from others in the women’s MMA community that quickly became the launching pad for what Sinn hopes to accomplish. In her second INVICTA Boxing match held in April January 2017 | SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE

17


of 2015, Sinn defeated Maureen Riordan by unanimous decision. ‘GLORY KICKBOXING’ would later come to Denver looking to have Sinn on their show in a kick-boxing contest against Riordan. Challenge accepted and Sinn weighed-in at 2 lbs. under the contracted weight while Riordan weighed-in 8 lbs. over. Colorado Boxing Commission ‘weight differential’ regulations (10 pounds) nixed the bout. While preparing for her third INVICTA fight, against Christine Stanley in January of 2016, Sinn sustained injuries in training so severe it forced her to pull out of the fight, something she’d never done before. Rumors that hurt and angered Sinn surfaced indicating she was avoiding Stanley. That made her work hard to get the fight rescheduled. Shannon took time to rest and recover later losing to Stanley by unanimous decision in May of 2016 but that was not the issue. Sinn fought to quell inaccurate depictions of the original fight date being postponed. Having just quit her job and unable to train at all brought doubt into the mind of Sinn but Rosales did everything he could to push those doubts away with encouraging words. After a period of inactivity for much needed rest and recuperation, boxing became another form of preparation for MMA action. While preparing to fight Christine Stanley in May of 2016, Shannon’s dad suffered a heart attack and it was known he would need triple bypass surgery along with surgery for a lingering neck ailment. Sinn and Rosales reluctantly traveled to California, confident nothing would happen until they returned. While at the weigh-ins Rosales was informed by the family the bypass procedure was pushed up to the very next day. The decision to tell Shannon or not was placed on his shoulders. He informed the promoters and match makers of the development and they were both supportive and sympathetic. “As her coach the decision would be easy. No distractions can interfere with her performance”, said Rosales. “As her boyfriend, she needed to know.” An understandably poor performance ensued, Sinn suffering the loss. Rosales informed Sinn of the situation after the fight and the pent up emotions

18

SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE | January 2017

flowed freely. “I thought I could get through it,” said Shannon, “but it was fairly obvious where my head was at.” During preparation for the Jenny Liou fight it was discovered Sinn had a bulging disk in her neck but she refused to pull out or make any excuses. Rosales takes the blame for allowing her to fight, the injury originally thought not being that serious but it affected her arm strength. The popularity of Sinn in the MMA world helped further the dreams of Rosales and Sinn to one day have their own gym. That belief has turned into a sound business move as they were able to bring the majority of members from the Title Gym that closed to their new facility, where

some 200 members now call ‘GRINDERS FITNESS’, 455 W. 115 th Ave. in Arvada, Colorado, home. Next up for Sinn is the ‘SCL 57’ MMA card at the Grizzly Rose in Denver, on January 28, 2017, when she takes on Ashley Deen in the Main Event. Fighting at 135 lbs. boxer Heather Hardy (New York) has made the transition to MMA, fighting in Kansas City early January. Hardy is clearly in the crosshairs of Sinn and Rosales. Shannon Sinn is now 37 years-old and understands her time is now. She hopes to leave an indelible imprint on the sport of MMA and her community as not only a fighter inside the ring but outside the ring as well. Her nieces and nephews look up to her and she refuses

to let them down. Getting them and all others to understand and believe you can do anything you put your mind to being her ultimate goal. Past transgressions are a thing of the past for Shannon Sinn who works hard to see her own dreams come true. Challenging herself both physically and mentally is what enabled Sinn to become the first to accomplish so many things in her life. Her motivation and drive swirls around what others say she cannot do. Given the right opportunity Shannon Sinn will prevail. After all, it’s been proven that knocking down barriers is what she does best. Follow Shannon Sinn via Twitter: @ShannonSinnMMA

PHOTOS BY BRETT SEELEY


January 2017 | SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE

19


CHOO CHOO CHOO CHOO 20

SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE | January 2017


BY JEFF CISNEROS

UP AND COMING 145 LB PRO

JUSTIN GONZALES

of

January 2017 | SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE

21


22

SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE | January 2017


PHOTOS BY BRETT SEELEY

January 2017 | SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE

23


PHOTO BY BRETT SEELEY PHOTOS BY RICK DOWDY

SCL P4P MMA 2017 1. Cory Sandhagen 2. Ian Heinisch 3. Justin Gonzales 4. Sidney Bice 5. Anthony Adams 6. Kris Nieto

SCL PRO FEATHERWEIGHT RANKINGS (145)

7. Josh Huber

C- Cory Sandhagan

8. Kris Hocum

1. Justin Gonzales

6. Ben Lugo

2. Josh Huber

7. Randy Rowland

3. Maurice Salazar

8. Jesse O’Rullian

4. JD Hardwick

9. Jordan Titoni

5. Clay Wimer

10. Gerald Scott

9. Matt Johnson 10. Grace Cleveland

24

PHOTO BY RICK DOWDY

SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE | January 2017


SCL PRO WELTERWEIGHT RANKINGS (170) C- Kris Hocum 1. Anthony Adams

6. Andrew Lipp

2. Art Petrosyan

7. Austin Jones

3. Travis Coyle

8. Ian Stonehouse

4. Hayward Charles

9. Chip Avinger

5. Josh Cavan

10. Alex Escalera


written by Stephen Johnson

BLUE COLLAR

CHAMPION MANNY ‘MANOS’ PEREZ 26

SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE | January 2017


PHOTO BY BRETT SEELEY

January 2017 | SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE

27


28

SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE | January 2017


‘Lil’ But Bad’ Johnston put in work. “Stevie Johnston had just returned home from defending his title in July of 1997 against Hiroyuki Sakamoto in Kanagawa, Japan, when he took me aside and asked ‘Do you have any boxing shoes’?, began Perez. “I said ‘no’ and he reached inside his bag and pulled out a pair of white Pony boxing shoes with black lettering and gave them to me. They were size 8 ½, much too big for me but I was so excited I just stuffed tissue in the front and wore them religiously until they completely fell apart. I’d have them today if not for an old brown Nike gym bag that contained my mouthpiece, hand wraps and other equipment, got lost in one of the numerous moves made by my family as a young kid”. After a stellar amateur career it was time to turn pro and Perez did just that on February 28, 2004, winning by KO in round 2. Along the way he’s been in the ring with some of the top names in the sport, some clearly having the size/weight advantage. Brandon Rios (135), Diego Magdaleno (135), Mercito Gesta (135), DeMarcus

‘Chop Chop’ Corley (135), Jose Miguel Cotto (140), Jose Carlos Ramirez (140), Paul McCloskey (140), Edgar Santana (140), Vernon Paris (147) and Victor Ortiz (147) being just a few big names that Manny Perez held his own against. Manuel Perez has never lost a fight in the lightweight division where his opponent stepped on the scale at or under 135 lbs. “Every loss affects you in some fashion, says Manny Perez. “The purse you can demand, your ranking. That all falls with one loss. I’ve had to work my way back up that ladder several times”. The one question asked of Manny Perez countless times centers on how his career might have been different had he been given the same opportunities as Mike Alvarado. Perez shares his recollection of when he and Alvarado, under Henry Delgado, were primary sparring partners in Los Angeles, California, for Francisco ‘Panchito’ Bojado as he prepared for his fight with Emmanuel Clottey.

January 2017 | SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE

29


PHOTOS BY BRETT SEELEY

it

30

SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE | January 2017


Boxing has been such a

huge part of our lives since we began dating and will probably remain so even after Manny retires.

he’s

January 2017 | SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE

31


32

SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE | January 2017


HOPEBEEL

FEATURED SCL GIRL

PHOTOS BY BRETT SEELEY

January 2017 | SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE

33


34

SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE | January 2017


January 2017 | SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE

35


36

SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE | January 2017


January 2017 | SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE

37


FROM THE DARK

TO THE BRIGHT B

ad things can bless you in ways sometimes you don’t realize, the rough path that I have had to go through was my biggest blessing.” Those are the words from Ian “The Hurricane” Heinisch, whose life story is more like a Hollywood movie with Jake Gyllenhaal as the main character. It’s a story about a young kid who made bad decisions but took his responsibility like a man and took on the harsh consequences head on. He would never imagine the consequences of his actions would be so surreal and troubling. His experiences at the young age of 19 would be something he will take with him on the road to become the MMA star he has always dreamed of. Born in Parker, Colorado, Ian was just average kid who had a dream of one day becoming a mixed martial arts superstar. He picked up wrestling at the age of eleven and competed at Ponderosa where he attended high school. Like any other kid, Ian struggled with keeping wrestling first and the influence his friends had sometimes didn’t allow him to make the best decisions. “I struggled a lot with school, wrestling and partying.” Ian did graduate and decided to attended Northern Idaho College where wrestled for

only a short time. H drop out of college where he would wo Vancouver. “I really good place to live a there.” Around this start to change and the ways he would realize his actions c your world upside d

While staying with a involved in a physic friend’s husband w days in jail. When re to where he was sta and fighting continu at the house, Ian w months in prison an headed back home broke, and with no began to sell drugs sold pills mostly an money. It was good money.” It wouldn’t be long involved with he law by the police in a dr again, he was bailed was not going back no way I am going b the little things I ha

THE IAN HEIN 38

SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE | January 2017


CORNERS OF A PRISON CELL

T LIGHTS OF CAGE GLORY

He would then decide to and move to Canada ork as salesman in y liked Canada - it was a and I really enjoyed it time, Ian’s world would d it wasn’t changing in like. He would soon can sometimes turn down.

a friend, Ian was cal altercation with the which landed him four eleased Ian went back aying and the arguing ued. Things got so bad winded up doing four nd when released he e to Denver. Back home, clear path in sight, Ian s to make a money. “I nd I made really good d but very addictive

until Ian found himself w again. Ian was busted rug raid and was in jail d out and decided he k. “I told myself there is back there. So I packed ad and left the state.” Ian

BY ANDREW SMITH

left Colorado and flew to the east coast where he then flew to Amsterdam. Living now in Belgium, there was nothing going for Ian and it was hard for him to get by, especially not speaking the language. He eventually met a British man who convinced him to move to Northern England where the two took up a painting job. “I thought it would was a good idea because at least in northern England they spoke English, but that job was not something I expected. It was literally just one room we painted and stayed in.” Ian would take up a job at local pub as a bouncer and found himself in even worse state of mind. “As a bouncer, I would drink a lot. They would give me three or four drinks while working and three or four after my shift. I would really just be there to drink and winded up becoming an alcoholic.” After seeing so much dark and negativity in his life for such a long period, Ian’s life seemed to start turning for the better. He was taken in by a Cuban family and was treated like one of their own and was in very happy state. “They treated me just like family and I still see them as family I love them a lot.” After some time, one family member approached Ian and asked if he wanted to start making real money. Ian

said yes, of course, because who wouldn’t want to make good money - he didn’t realize he would fall back into the same lifestyle he was in once before. Ian began to transport drugs from different countries. From Columbia, Aruba, and Venezuela, Ian started to become good at trafficking drugs back and forth constantly. This was until he was questioned by authorities on why he had so much stamps between those Countries. He was taken to the hospital and it was found that Ian’s stomach was filled with drugs. He was back in jail but this time he was nowhere in the United States. He was in a completely different country where he would find out that prisons outside of home is a whole different nightmare. While sitting in prison in Canary Island, Ian would go a whole year without knowing any nothing. Not knowing where his trial sits, if he’ll ever see his family again or better yet the light of day. “There came a point where I just didn’t care anymore and that’s how I had to survive in there.” Ian was convicted and given a three and half year sentences. He would learn Spanish and become a completely different person than he was before. “I was so scared in there I tried to cracks survive in there by first staring at the cracks

NISCH STORY PHOTO BY BRETT SEELEY

January 2017 | SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE

39


from

40

SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE | January 2017


Latin Kings who respected Ian for what he had been through came and made sure Ian wasn’t attacked. They told Ian “We got your back but we can’t be there all the time.” Ian then tried to get into the protective custody service but was denied by the guards. “They would just tell me you are on your own, f**k you white boy!” Ian knew he had to get out of there and if he didn’t in the next twentyfour hours he may not survive. “I didn’t sleep at all I stayed up all night, and the next day a US Marshall came to my cell and said get up let’s go.” By the miracle of God Ian was out of Rikers Island and on his way back to Colorado “It was a blessing and amazing at the same time.” After seven long days of driving Ian was back in Colorado but the drive wasn’t easy, he was in the back of a van where it was just as bad as a prison cell. “It was cold and we had no heat and they treated poorly, it was just a survival getting back home. We asked for the restroom they said no, we asked for food and water they threw us a bottle. I basically dehydrated myself to make it.” Once in Jefferson County, Ian was bailed out two days later which fell on Valentine’s day and it was his last chance to prove to the judge he was a changed man. At his last court hearing Ian’s whole family and MMA team were there to represent for him. They all spoke on how Ian’s experience has changed him and was now fully committed to his dream of pursuing MMA. Ian was granted two years of probation and was able to go home. Once home, Ian started going around gyms to see where he can get help taking his MMA career to a full potential. After a short search, he ended up training at Factory X and has been there ever since. With amateur record of 13-0, Ian would go pro where he is now an impressive 7-0 with three finishes. He is considered one of the top prospects in the sport and the future looks very promising. “I learned so much while

in prison and it was my biggest blessings. A year and eight months into my prison stay I became spiritual after trying everything and it was the thing that helped me survive. My grandmother tells it’s the holy spirit that helped me. Ian’s story is something out of a movie, it’s something a normal person doesn’t go through or even think about going through. The fact that Ian has been able to go through the experiences he has and remain humble is something truly amazing. “I’ve learned that you can change the circumstances that are around you at any time, you just have to believe.” Ian has big plans and he wants to help kids so they don’t follow the same path he once walked. He plans on opening a gym that will not only allow kids to train but live in the gym. “I want to open a gym where kids can live and train there. If they have trouble homes, they can stay at the gym and train I want them to train and live there full time and not go through what I’ve been through.” Whether Ian makes it as a break out star in MMA or not, he will go down as one of the greats by the people who know him just because of his story. His nickname “The Hurricane” relates to his life and he brings that into the octagon every single fight. His life was a roller coaster but he survived and now he has the chance to tell his story, on how he came from the dark corners of a prison cell to the bright lights of cage glory.maxim volorio netur, qui aut es aut doles por aut et pedis et archicid quostia nis abo. Ecus sed excerro vitectentia aturita spienimus.

PHOTOS BY RICK DOWDY

January 2017 | SCL FIGHT SCENE MAGAZINE

41


SCL FIGHT SCENE MAG #1  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you