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“No Southern garden is complete without at least one crape myrtle – a true symbol of the South.” —David Payne “Midsized trees, such as the watermelon-hued Tuscarora, serve as foreground color and make a good hedge-like privacy screen when several are planted in a row,” Payne says. Tuscarora grows vigorously to be up to twenty feet tall. It bursts forth with new red leaves in the spring and when finished growing is a multitrunked, vase-shaped tree. The pinky-pink of the Miami variety or the dazzling reds of Red Rocket and Dynamite are a little slower growing but still top out at twelve to fourteen feet tall. Even smaller, the purple flowers of Catawba bloom on eight- to ten-foot-tall branches, with orange and red fall leaves. Catawba exhibits a shorter, denser growth pattern, so it’s a good screening plant for a yard. Contact David Payne of Home & Garden Landscapes at 919-801-0211 to add color to your yard with crape myrtles.

Crape myrtles even come in dwarf sizes. The newer Pocomoke has deep-pink blooms on plants that only grow two feet tall. They are even exceptional bloomers when placed in pots and can be moved around the landscape to fill in with color where needed throughout the summer. “These are just a few of the many varieties of crape myrtles. No Southern garden is complete without at least one crape myrtle – a true symbol of the South – although it’s hard to stop at just one with so many varieties in the marketplace,” Payne adds.u

June / July 2019 | Home Design & Decor Triangle 85

Profile for Home Design & Decor Magazine

Triangle June July 2019 Issue  

The most widely-read home and garden magazine in the Triangle and surrounding areas.

Triangle June July 2019 Issue  

The most widely-read home and garden magazine in the Triangle and surrounding areas.