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RE-THINKING MAPLEWOOD, NJ TRANSIT, GROWTH AND DENSITY PREPARED BY THE URBAN DESIGN LAB AT COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY


Re-Thinking Mapplewood has been prepared for the Township of Maplewood in February 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without permission. All images in this book if not cited are property of the Urban Design Lab and research memebers.

Principal Investigators Richard Plunz, Director Richard Gonzalez, Project Coordinator Maria-Paola Sutto

Research Staff Ankita Chachra Andy Golubitsky Vanessa Espaillat Carolina Montilla

www.urbandesignlab.columbia.edu

UDL Urban Design Lab at The Earth Institute Columbia University www.urbandesignlab.columbia.edu Cover Image: Source, RPI Regional Planning Association 1927


Table of Contents Foreword

i

History and Context

1-8

Increasing Mobility

9-14

Re-Linking Infrastructure

15-18

Defining a Social Core

19-26

Expanding the Building Stock

27-30

Alternative Scenarios

31-44

Recommendations

45

Acknowledgements

46

Resources

47-48


Can transit-oriented communities ‘share resources’ as a strategy for sustainable growth?

i

Re-Thinking Maplewood, NJ


Foreword Urban regions are expanding rapidly beyond their

due to the severe effects in the aftermath of the 2008

boundaries. Communities within the peripheries

economic crisis, Dunham-Jones and Williamson

will inevitably experience growth within their

argue that peripheries within the “new landscape is

population while places to live will be highly sought

evolving, hybridizing and recombining urban and

after. The America 2050 plan outlines the cities of

suburban patterns and practices in ways that are

Boston, Washington DC and New York to become

improving sustainability and nurturing urbanism”.

‘Megaregions’ of density and economic generation. Clustered suburban communities within the nodal

Many of the redevelopment strategies implemented

pathways will experience an increase in growth as

by suburban municipalities have been based on

demands towards housing options, places of work

smart growth principles, which rethink land use and

and recreational venues will need to facilitate the

zoning ordinances, mitigation of automotive vehicle

projected increase of 17 million new residences in

ownership and consideration of mass transit as a

the Northeast alone.

main node for transportation while providing diverse housing options.

Maplewood New Jersey is an example of a

In addition, many adjacent properties near the

community that would witness such growth patterns.

transit hubs of suburban townships are queued for

Due to its geographic location and supportive

redevelopment by representing opportunities to

infrastructure such as rail lines, bus networks and

reconfigure the centers of communities.

education system, smart development strategies need to concur in order to foster and maintain

If suburban townships along transportation lines

development in a sustainable manner. Many of

are all going through profound transformations, can

the North American suburban towns have begun

these transit oriented communities ‘share resources’

a process of radical transformations towards

as a strategy for sustainable growth?

sustainable, active, mixed-use communities closely linked to their urban counterparts. However, it

The Township of Maplewood is analyzed in this

has been recently argued, ‘that the lines between

study with four sections identifying focus areas for

urban and suburban are blurring’ Suburban

development; (1) Increasing Mobility, (2) Re-Linking

townships are reconfiguring their transit-oriented

Infrastructure, (3) Enhancing a Social Core and

downtowns in order to attract a diverse population

(4) Expanding the Building Stock. In essence, the

of young professionals, who are seeking new living

development trends for improving a community’s

opportunities such as affordable housing and

characteristics are derived towards investment in

supportive resources and convenient amenities.

transportation, infrastructure, social communication and housing. Can these resources become drivers

In recent years, there has been re-emergence of

of change, reconfiguring governance structures and

suburbia as an object of analysis and development;

redefining the concept of a town or village?

Foreword

i


“The town was renamed as Maplewood in 1860, having originated from a large maple tree standing near the new station. Gradually, the name Maplewood superseded Jefferson Village and included all the surrounding little settlements, united into one town�. Joseph V. Noble

1

Re-Thinking Maplewood, NJ


HISTORY AND CONTEXT Birds Eye View of Maplewood New Jersey 1910


How does What historic Maplewood’s assets contribute history affect to Maplewood’s its presentfuture and future? growth? History of Maplewood

The Township of Maplewood, also known earlier as Jefferson Village, has an interesting history of how it came to be. It has been influenced by famous citizens who contributed to the community and the growth of this town. The first inhabitants of the valley - which is now Maplewood - were a tribe of American Indians known as the Leni-Lenape. In 1678, Essex County which belonged to the Indians, was bought by the English with an exchange of 2,100 different kinds of goods including ammunition, clothes, utensils and live-stock. Maplewood in the 18th and 19th centuries, was primarily an agricultural community, consisting mainly of farmlands and rural industries. At the start of the Revolution, the valley housed only eight families; hardly enough to constitute a town, thirty-nine years later this number had only increased to thirty. It is said that patriotic fervor inspired its name as Jefferson Village, after Thomas Jefferson, the architect of the Declaration of Independence. In 1838 the Morris and Essex Rail Road, which ran from Newark to Orange, was extended to run through Jefferson Village and terminate at Morristown. This advent of railroad insured the

Image 2: Maplewood in 1958 “The Fourth of July Celebration

growth and prosperity of the community. A route was chosen lying as close as possible to the South Mountain in order to make the shortest level track to Morristown. This choice bypassed Springfield, a far larger town, which consequently declined in importance.

Sources: Noble, Joseph V. The historical murals of Maplewood . Maplewood, N.J.: Township of Maplewood, 1961. Print. Betelle, James. “New Grade School Buildings of South Orange and Maplewood NJ”, The American School Board Journal, 1926.

3

Re-Thinking Maplewood, NJ

Image 3: Columbia High School, Maplewood and South Orange, NJ


Image: Noble, Joseph V. The historical murals of Maplewood . Maplewood, N.J.: Township of Maplewood, 1961. Print. circa 1959

Image 4: View of New York from New Jersey. Google Maps,2010.

The importance of the railroad The Morris and Essex railroads were leased to the Delaware and Lackawanna Railroad in 1868, when there were about one hundred and fifty people living in the newly named Maplewood. The improvements to the railroad in 1910 reduced ew

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commuting time to Newark and New York City,

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and many of the larger farms were sold for building lots. The real period of expansion came through between the years 1920 to 1930, when

Jeffers

on Ave

the population increased from five thousand to Parker Ave.

twenty-one thousand. Although it was not until 1947 that Maplewood obtained an independent

Elmwoo

d Ave

Tuscan Rd.

ey

Vall

St. Art Gallery & Worskshop

was built in the town. The inclusion of the Post

*

Office brought a new anchor to the site that Bo

*

post office and 1958 before a post office building

Landmark Landmark Landmark designated township ordinance Landmark designated byby township ordinance Adaptive Reuse

yd

en

increased the economic stabiliy of Maplewood Av

e.

Village and its surrounding neighborhood.

Adaptive Reuse

Image 5: Maplewood Historic Buildings Report.

History and Context

4


How connected What are the boundaries are Maplewood’s that define local theand Township regionalofmobility Maplewood? networks? o

Maplewood New York City

New Jersey

Trenton Philadelphia

N

o

Image 6: Location of Maplewood, NJ.

5

Re-Thinking Maplewood, NJ


Median Income and Population

In Maplewood, the Median Household income in dollars varies from $28,000 to $165,000. While the lighter color below the Springfield Avenue represents the lowest incomes, the higher income groups are reflected adjacent to the Maplewood Village. (In dash area) The median household income for Maplewood

$165,000 - $250,000 $115,000 -165,000 $80,000 - $115,000 $60,000 - $80,000 $28,000 - $60,000 Maplewood Boundary Railroad Census Tract Boundary Post Office Site

in 2000 was approximately $79,000, which is 38 percent higher than that in 1990, signifying a marked rise in the affluence of its residents. Proximity to New York and the short commute Image 7 : Median Income in Maplewood, NJ (US Census)

through the rail has made Maplewood one of the most desirable towns to live in. The growing popularity of Maplewood has escalated the Township’s real estate value. From 2000 to 2005 Maplewood’s average housing sale price increased by 66.8 % i.e. from $254,610 to $424,666. (Source: US Census)

White Black Asian Hispanic Other Maplewood Boundary Railroad Census Tract Boundary

One of the concerns for the town is its growth; Maplewood’s current population is 23,867 people as per the US Census 2010. Although there has been a loss of only 1 person since the past Image 8: Races in Maplewood, NJ (US Census)

10 years, this change indicates that there has been no growth in the number of people living in Maplewood. In terms of Ethnic mix, the maps generated from US census helped to observe that the demographics of the town are predominantly

Legend Legend

White (58.7%), seconded by Black at 29.7%

MUNBOUND MUNBOUND RAILROAD RAILROAD

MunBound Railroad

LANDUSE LANDUSE

followed by Hispanic, Asian and others which

Commercial / Services Industrial RECREATIONAL LAND Recreational RECREATIONAL LAND RESIDENTIAL, SINGLE Low UNIT, LOW DENSITY , MEDIUM DENSITY Residential, Density RESIDENTIAL, HIGH DENSITY OR MULTIPLE DWELLING Residential High Density TRANSPORTATION/COMMUNICATION/UTILITIES Transportation / Communication Utilities COMMERCIAL/SERVICES COMMERCIAL/SERVICES

constitute the remaining 11.6%. It is also evident

INDUSTRIAL INDUSTRIAL

from the map, that concentration of similar ethnic groups; follow a pattern, lying below and above the Springfield Avenue and the Boyden Avenue. Image 9: Land Use in Maplewood, NJ (Maplewood GIS)

Sources: The Metro Company, LLC. SPRINGFIELD AVENUE REDEVELOPMENT PLAN.2008. Print. U.S. Census

History and Context

6


What are the boundaries that define the Township of Maplewood? Existing Conditions

The Township of Maplewood as of 2012 is primarily a residential community of approximately 23,867 residents with a land area of 3.85 square miles. Maplewood village is considered to be the central business district of the town. It is allocated as the Retail Business zone, and the regulations of the zone are intended to promote a walkable mixed-use environment typically found in an established suburban central business district.

Major Public Anchors

Retail businesses,( to not include thrift shops, pawn shops and check cashing establishments), Financial institutions, Restaurants, (to not include fast-food restaurants), Dwelling units over stores and office space, (not on the street level or lower) are the permitted uses within this zone. In addition, off-street parking lots, automobile service stations and houses of worship or other places of public assembly are permitted conditional uses in the zone. The Village caters to a more affluent set of users and strives to attract customers from other nearby townships like Millburn and South Orange. The Commercial Area in Springfield Avenue is

Existing Parking Lots

zoned as Highway Business, permitting a wide variety of commercial uses including automotive industries such as car dealerships and repair facilities. It was until recently a declining commercial strip, with lack of diverse uses and mostly small auto industries. Springfield Avenue has been recently redeveloped and revitalized with better roads, pedestrian sidewalks, on street parking, street lights etc. The most recent addition to its retail has been the Walgreens store.

Land Use 7

Re-Thinking Maplewood, NJ


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ACC

ESS

ACC

ESS

ACC

Maplew

Dun

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Pedestrian Access Points

The Post Office Site Currently, the town is seeking to redevelop the Maplewood Village Post Office Building site, along with the adjoining areas which have been identified in the ‘Area in Need of Rehabilitation Study for the Township of Maplewood (2011)’. The site is located next to a commuter railroad Image 9: Maplewood Avenue

station and in a key spot in Maplewood Village, the Township’s Central business district. The rail line physically divides the town, in to the ‘Village side’ to the north and the park side to the south. The site presents an opportunity to connect both sides of the town and develop functions and uses, which serve different age groups and communities. Sources: 2011 Master Plan Re-Examination Report 2011 - Phillips PreissGrygiel, LLC

Image 10: Post Office Building

History and Context

8


“A combination of access to transit as well as parking has helped many Jersey downtowns to revive. RPA, in partnership with Project for Public Spaces and NJ Transit, has been working with eleven downtowns to demonstrate ways to leverage access to transit into new development.’” Gary Johnson, New Jersey Office, Regional Planning Association

9

Re-Thinking Maplewood, NJ


OFFICE

PATH

BIKE PATH

BIKE SHARE

PARKING

PERSONAL AUTO

CAR SHARE

BUS

TRAIN

JITNEY

INCREASING MOBILITY Maplewood Train Station, NJ.


How connected are Maplewood’s local and regional mobility networks? o

TEB MMU ABE

LCA

MAPPLEWOOD, NJ EWR NYC

JFK

Mobility & Transport Infrastructure

Maplewood’s Proximity to Manhattan and Newark Ai

PHILADELPHIA City of Orange

South Orange

Maplewood

AIRPORTS RAILROADS HIGHWAYS URBAN AREAS

43 min

HIGH SPEED RAIL (2040)

1 hr 37 min

Proposed Travel Time: 3:23 Hrs

PERSONAL AUTO

21 min 39 min

11

Re-Thinking Maplewood, NJ

Penn Station

Newark Airport Hoboken


N

A regional advantage

The Township of Maplewood is strategically

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located in Essex County, New Jersey. Maplewood’s train station is part the NJ Transit system on the Morristown Line and linked to the Northeast Corridor high-speed rail that connects New York and New Jersey. On an average weekday, more than 3000 passengers use the train at Maplewood’s station. The ride to Penn Station takes forty-three minutes and the bus ride to Manhattan approximately one hour and thirtyseven minutes. At the same time, Maplewood is thirty-nine minutes from Hoboken Terminal, a major transportation hub for the region and only twenty-one minutes away from Newark airport, which makes it a competitive location for regional, national and even international markets. At the regional level, Maplewood’s connectivity

irport

OFFICE

BUS

TRAIN

represents an important advantage because of its cross-state-boundaries relationship

Union City

between New Jersey and New York. Maplewood

Weehawken

station provides direct access to midtown Manhattan eastbound and to Gladstone or Dover

Lincoln Harbor

westbound. According to the Master Plan for the

W 38th St.

Hoboken North

Penn Station

Mobility & Transport Infrastructure

Maplewood’s Proximity to Manhattan and Newark Airport

Union City

City of Orange

Weehawken

Jersey City

Township of Maplewood created in 2004, regional connectivity helped create a spike in both

Hoboken Manhattan

Newport

homebuyer interest and home sale prices in the surrounding towns, including Maplewood, South

Lincoln Harbor

Liberty Harbor Liberty Landing Marina

South Orange

BPC/WFC

Hoboken North

W 38th St.

Penn Station

Pier 11 Maplewood

Jersey City

Newark Airport

Newport

Liberty Harbor Liberty Landing Marina

Orange, and Summit. Commuter lines across the state involving the four Oranges (Orange,

Hoboken Manhattan BPC/WFC

Pier 11

Brooklyn

Newark Airport

South Orange, East and West Orange) offer an important precedent in suburban commuting and the development of transit oriented villages.

Brooklyn

43 min

Penn Station

1 hr 37 min 21 min 39 min

15 min

Penn Station

Penn Station Newark Airport Hoboken

15 min

Sources: The Township of Maplewood Masterplan 2004

World Financial Center

World Financial Center

Increasing Mobility

12


How connected are Maplewood’s local and regional mobility networks? Local Mobility

Maplewood is connected to its neighboring towns (Milburn, Springfield and South Orange) by Regional Bus System, which allows residents from these different townships to access shared services and extend their transportation network. At a more local level, Maplewood offers its commuting residents an alternative form of transportation through a Jitney service, which started in 1997 and has been replicated by other

Image 11: Pedestrian Community

municipalities. This service provides access to the train station during rush hours in the morning and evenings, reducing car traffic and congestion around the train station. The Jitney has limited capacity for the commuter population. The Parking Study report, prepared by Maser Consulting in 2012, proposes the implementation of a public awareness campaign to promote the availability of alternative public transportation (i.e. the Jitney Service and local bus routes) that would connect visitors, commuters and merchants throughout Maplewood Township. In addition, the study suggests that public

Image 12: Parking near Train Station

workshops can help identifying residential or retail locations that may benefit from an added Jitney or bus stop in order to make the a profitable investment in alternative systems. The town has been exploring different ways to expand the potential for the Jitney to serve transit needs beyond those of rail commuters since 2004.

Sources: Traffic Calming Policy 2012 – Maplewood Dept. of Engineering Parking Study 2012 – Maser Consulting PA

13

Re-Thinking Maplewood, NJ

Mage 13: Traffic Congestion on Maplewood Avenue


N

Rahway River

OFFICE

TRAIN

New York City South Orange

Wy om

ing

Av e

Maplewood

Par k

p Ma

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ood lew

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Ave

Pie r

ey

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Ba

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Milburn

Pro s

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St

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Milbu

rn Ave

TRAIN TRACKS PEDESTRIAN PATHS BUS ROUTE JITNEY ROUTE JITNEY STOP 10 MIN WALKING RADIUS

JITNEY

Jitney Local Service

According to the Proposed Master Plan for the Township of Maplewood, prepared by Phillips Preiss Shapiro Associates: ‘A further advantage of the Jitney is that it allows two-person working households, where at least one person commutes on the train, to live comfortably with one less automobile. This represents a cost savings for a household in excess of $6,000 per year, according to automotive cost-of-ownership statistics published by the American Automobile Association.’ Increasing Mobility

14


“Rahway River is severely polluted and is prone to destructive flooding, due to over-development within the watershed and a lack of green space within its watershed boundary to absorb storm runoff� Rahway River Corridor Study, 2012

15

Re-Thinking Maplewood, NJ


SEWER SYSTEM

STORM WATER

RE-LINKING INFRASTRUCTURE Rahway River


What is the role of infrastructure in the development of the township? o

North East Watershed

Raritan Watershed

Raritan Bay

!!

! ! ! ! ! !!

!

Maplewood Watersheds

NJ Water Zones

17

Re-Thinking Maplewood, NJ

!

! !


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Physical Infrastructure - Water System

Essex County lies within the Raritan and the Northeast Water shed Regions. The Township of

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Maplewood falls only under the Raritan watershed Region, under the Arthur Kill Management Area. There are two river sheds that lie in the upper and the lower part of Maplewood, Lower Hudson Basin, Rahway River / Wood Bridge Creek Shed of the Raritan Region shapes the north part of the town while , Lower Hudson Basin, Elizabeth River Shed of the Raritan Region lies in the south of the township. The town experienced its most intense period of SEWER SYSTEM

development in the 1920s and its infrastructure was in place by 1930, including its water and sewer lines, according to a review of historic Maplewood Village Post Office Dunnel Road Redevelopment Springfield Avenue Redevelopment

!

maps by the Township Engineer. Presently, sanitary sewer service is provided by the Joint Meeting of Essex and Union Counties. The major trunk sewer lines run parallel to the

!! ! !

East Branch of the Rahway River. There have been some backflow problems in these lines according to Maplewood’s Master Plan. The aged infrastructure lines undermine the efficacy of the collection system. Redevelopment Sites

The Master Plan 2004 noted that “the distribution system of water mains is aging and may become problematic in the future.” No major efforts have

RAHWAY RIVER

been undertaken since then to address the aging water infrastructure

Lower Hudson Basin Rahway River / WoodBridge Creek Shed Raritan Region

EAST RAHWAY RIVER

In the past three years, the township has proposed three areas for redevelopment:

Lower Hudson Basin Elizibeth River Shed Raritan Region

Springfield Avenue, the Dunnell Road and the Maplewood Post Office; several reports mention

STORM WATER

Wetlands Flood Zones

IRVINGTON BROOK

the age and condition of water and sewer infrastructure that needs to be considered for

Wetlands and Floodzones

future development and capacity. Sources: Springfield Avenue Redevelopment Plan 2009

Re-linking Infrastructure

18


“…And there is nothing that compares to Maplewood Village, our quaint, vibrant downtown shopping district. You can easily stage an “Around the World” progressive dinner there with all the different food establishments we now have. ” Mayor Victor DeLuca, State of the Township Address 2012

19

Re-Thinking Maplewood, NJ


JITNEY

CULTURAL

PUBLIC SPACE

RETAIL

RESTAURANTS

ENHANCING THE SOCIAL CORE “Maplewood Civic Association” Bulletin Board


Can Maplewood Village enhance the cultural and social core?

Train Station

Bank of America

King’s

Maplewood Ave.

Restaurants & Cafes

21

Re-Thinking Maplewood, NJ


Retaining the ‘Vibe’

According to the New York Times, Maplewood is one of those towns in New Jersey that has grown to be “affluent and much more likely to be foreignborn, college-educated and nonwhite.” Young professionals who found themselves priced out of Manhattan and Brooklyn moved here to raise children, a trend that accelerated in 1996, when New Jersey Transit increased the number of train lines taking commuters directly into Penn Station’ (New York Times, 2011). Because of this new generation of suburbanites, Maplewood has developed a new ‘vibe’ that reflects the interests of a community that responds positively to more cosmopolitan lifestyles, including food choices. Maplewood’s offers an interesting variety of restaurant choices, most of them clustered

Post Office

around Maplewood Village on the north side of the train station.

?

Maplewood Village is a social cluster of the community and its urban fabric has the potential to host other programs that can attract not only Maplewood residents but also neighboring towns.

Movie Theater

The town has a rich character and history that can be exploited. Less than a mile from Maplewood Village is Columbia High School, a public school whose alumni claimed the invention of Ultimate Frisbee in the late 1960s and among its famous alumni are two world-renowned architects: Peter Eisenman and Richard Meier.

Enhance the Social Core

22


Can Maplewood Village enhance the cultural and social core?

M AP

LE

W

O

O

D

AV E

RESTAURANTS

RETAIL FIELD

SPRING

AVENUE

Location of the Site

PUBLIC SPACE

Image 2: Memorial Park.

Green Spaces

Network of Amenities Clinton Elementary School

The town has about 300 retail and business

Columbia High School

20

10

AD RO GE

WO

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T EE

VAL LE

PR OS

PE

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CT S

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in

30

5m

40

AVENUE

in

50

FIELD

SPRING

5m

60

in

70

5m

recreational buildings. The recreational facilities

AVENUE

in

Seth Boyden Elementary School

PARKER

5m

and Branch Library, Civic House, and smaller

in

Tuscan Elementary School

JITNEY

5m

Fire Houses, an Equipment Building, Main Library

in

Maplewood Middle School

the Municipal Building, Police Headquarters, two

5m

and professional offices. Township buildings include

Jefferson Elementary School

RID

establishments in addition to financial institutions

0

include five parks and playground areas comprising

Jitney Stops

50 acres as well as 480 acres of the Essex County Park Commission’s South Mountain Reservation. There are eleven churches representing seven denominations, and there are three private clubs, one of which has a golf course. The school system is operated jointly with South Orange. Sources: Noble, Joseph V. The historical murals of Maplewood . Maplewood, N.J.: Township of Maplewood, 1961. Print.

23

Re-Thinking Maplewood, NJ

CULTURAL

*

Local Artists Galleries

http://www.studiotoursoma.org/abou


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ays t Frid nligh

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Vil l a

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Dick ens

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Moo

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Sma Cost n Parade ll Bu H a & rves ume sine t Fes Co Satu ss n t t ( e W rday algre st ens) Holi day Ope n Ho use

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Appr Custom e eciat ion D r Tast a y e for the C ure E vent

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Timeline of Scheduled Public Events Maplewood Avenue Springfield Avenue Memorial Park

Events as Drivers

Maplewood hosts diverse social events through out the year that attract visitors from adjacent municipalities among these are the Halloween Parade, 4th of July parade, Maplewoodstock Music Festival and the Annual Art Walk which also includes South Orange galleries. Most of these activities take Image 14: Halloween in Maplewood Village.

place in or in close proximity to Maplewood village, making it a social core. However, the village lacks visual and physical connection to the rest of the town. Specifically, from the train station or the parks across the tracks, which diminishes its potential as an active cluster of activities. Alternative modes of transportation such as bike sharing stations, a new Jitney route or Zipcar stations can be located in the village to improve its connectivity at the local and regional levels.

Image 15: Green Day Fest in Memorial Park.

Enhance the Social Core

24


Can Maplewood Village enhance the cultural and social core?

Image 16: Downded Trees in Maplewood Post Hurricane Sandy

Hurricane Sandy Hurricane Sandy became a true test of resiliency

trees, extended periods without power, very little

for Maplewood. In October 2012 it devastated

public transportation and shortages of gas. This

the Northeastern United States. Classified as

dark period exposed Maplewood’s problematic

the eighteenth named storm, tenth hurricane

aging infrastructure, such as the exposed power

and second major hurricane of the 2012 Atlantic

lines, which were knocked down by the wind,

season, Sandy touched down as a category three

and the large fallen rees. What at one time was

storm. At nearly 75 billion dollars in damage, it

perceived as an asset can just as easily become

is only second to Katrina among the costliest

a hazard during an emergency. In response to

hurricanes on record. Due to the unprecedented

the damage, the power and gas companies

nature of the path the storm took, the majority of

opted to shut off service to prevent further long

communities in the North East did little to prepare

term disruption. With the transportation and

for what became known after as “super storm

power infrastructure down, the residents of

sandy.� This was the first-ever recorded hurricane

Maplewood turned to their public facilities, such

to directly hit New Jersey.

as the library, municipal buildings, and schools

In the aftermath, the town saw numerous felled

for relief. Considering that a large portion of

25

Re-Thinking Maplewood, NJ


Maplewood Middle School Library City Hall Columbia High School De Hart Community Center

Emergency Response Centers

Image 17: Post Hurricane Sandy Maplewood Power Outages

people rely on the rail to get to and from work in New York City and other surrounding townships, most that were able to, worked remotely from these relief centers. Once again, the concentration of activity was focused on the one area where the power infrastructure is underground and was not susceptible to weather. This center naturally became Maplewood Village, albeit for the wrong Image 18: Post Hurricane Sandy Maplewood Downed Trees

reasons. If the frequency of mega storms increases as projected, what role will these public nodes of relief play on a day to day basis? How can we plan for prosaic program today while considering the resiliency and role of built fabric and infrastructures during the seemingly inevitable natural disasters?

Image 19: Post Hurricane Sandy Maplewood Downed Trees

Enhance the Social Core

26


Tomorrow’s suburbanites will “live,work and play” in dense nodes of retrofitted properties with “walkable, mixed used buildings and well defined, shared open space as the norm rather than the exception” Ellen Dunham-Jones and June Williamson

27

Re-Thinking Maplewood, NJ


AMENITIES

HIGH DENSITY

LOW DENSITY

EXPANDING THE BUILDING STOCK


How the Can connected buildingare stock Maplewood’s of Maplewood localgrow and to regional attractmobility an incoming networks? population?

Car Garage

P

Dwelling Setbacks

Side Yard Setbacks for detached garages

$31,535

$208,400 $675

Additions

P

$36,794

$222,700

Facade Dimensions

$950

Per Capita Income Median Gross Rent Median Housing Values (Owner Occupied Units)

‘McMansions’ Floor Area Ratio Coverage

P

The Fair Housing Act - 1985 The Fair Housing Act – adopted by New Jersey in 1985 - established that all municipalities should enable opportunities for the construction of affordable housing to those households of lower income in their townships. Sources: Dunham-Jones, Ellen and Williamson, June (2011), Retrofitting Suburbia. Urban Design Solutions for Redesigning Suburbs, John Wiley & Sons, New Jersey, p. 35. Township of Maplewood (2008), Housing Element and Fair Share Plan Report, New Jersey, p.1-20.

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Re-Thinking Maplewood, NJ

Chart: Housing Element and Fair Share Plan 2008 – H2M Associates, Inc.


Housing

Seventy percent of Maplewood’s housing stock is composed of single-family detached units. Newer structures containing two, three or four units account for approximately 20 percent of Township housing. The presence of larger structures with 20 units or more, reflects the trend towards Maplewood’s adaptability to a growing demand for apartment and townhouses typologies. According to the “Housing Element and Fair Share Plan”, adopted in 2008, 83.4 percent of Image 20: Maplewood Single Family Detached House

Maplewood’s housing stock was built prior to 1960. These numbers reflect an opportunity for developers to readapt old housing structures, proposing higher density and flexibility of use. Although Maplewood’s housing stock has gone through substantial remodeling and many residences have grown in size, the lots have not been subject to change and the residences have not been allowed to convert into multi-family dwellings. The township’s average housing sale price in 2000, reached US $424,666 dollars, a

Image 21: Housing Complex, South of Springfield Avenue

66.8 percent increase in five years. Given the escalation in housing prices, the high number of cost burdened households is likely to increase. Maplewood has taken important steps in the provision of the affordable housing and job creation. However, under these current policies Maplewood’s population will increase by 1,551 persons by 2018, only a 7 percent increase in 14 years. These numbers show that the current housing stock needs to be reconfigured to attract a diverse future population.

Image 22: Mixed-use Building

Expanding the building stock

30


“Even in this auto-dependent society, New Jersey downtowns are coming back around a range of policies that boost connections to transit, emphasize the pedestrian and create public places that can become a magnet for new development and new communities.� Gary Johnson, New Jersey Office, Regional Planning Association

31

Re-Thinking Maplewood, NJ


OFFICE

PATH

BIKE PATH

BIKE SHARE

PARKING

PERSONAL AUTO

CAR SHARE

BUS

AMENITIES

CULTURAL

PUBLIC SPACE

TRAIN

JITNEY

HIGH DENSITY

LOW DENSITY

SEWER SYSTEM

STORM WATER

RETAIL

RESTAURANTS

ALTERNATIVE SCENARIOS


Which design scenarios could reactivate Maplewood Village? Scenario 1

This first scheme concentrates on the connection

ground floor retail, mixed in with high density

between Maplewood village and Memorial

residential. This particular scenario uses Kings

Park across the train tracks. This connection

Super Market as the main anchor tenant to relocate

is currently interrupted by different visual and

to the ground level of the new development.

physical elements. Vegetation and topography blocks the view of Maplewood Village from the

This mixture of programs is aiming to create a

park. In this scenario, proposed building massing

24-hour community that does not rely on car use

spans across the railroad allowing for program

on a daily base. For residents that need parking,

and potential pedestrian circulation above the

a traditional parking garage structure is located

existing NJ Transit tracks. (See diagram 2) This

behind the existing Bank of America building

proposal allows Maplewood Village to physically

following existing scale and architectural articulation.

extend south and provide a threshold that will

(See diagram 4) Some sustainable features like

attract visitors to enter through the expanded

photovoltaic panels and green roofs are considered

underground tunnel or through the building

for this scheme.

above. The former Post office building site will now be occupied by commercial office and

1 e

f B

d c

A g N N Scenario 1 View West

33

Re-Thinking Maplewood, NJ


Legend:

2

High Density Housing Low Density Housing

RETAIL RESTAURANTS

Retail Office Mobility

HIGH DENSITY

New Landscaping OFFICE

New Pedestrian Path

N

Traffic Direction

AMENITIES

New Building Massing

3

PUBLIC SPACE

N PATH

Pedestrian Circulation

4 PARKING CAR SHARE

BIKE SHARE

N

BUS

Vehicular Circulation

5

Square Footages: Residential:

71,000 SF

Retail:

37,000 SF

Office:

38,000 SF

Public space: 25,000 SF Parking Spots: 848 A: 300 B: 300 c: d: e: f: g:

82 20 43 60 43

N Scenario 1 View West

Alternate Scenarios

34


Which design scenarios could reactivate Maplewood Village? Scenario 1

1 3

Legend: High Density Housing

2

4

Low Density Housing Retail Office Mobility New Landscaping New Pedestrian Path Traffic Direction N Scenario 1 View East

2

HIGH DENSITY

RESTAURANTS

View at Durand Rd

35

Re-Thinking Maplewood, NJ


3

OFFICE

RETAIL

PARKING

BUS RESTAURANTS

View at Dunnell Rd

4 OFFICE

HIGH DENSITY

RESTAURANTS

PUBLIC SPACE

PATH

View facing Bank of America Building

Alternate Scenarios

36


Which design scenarios could reactivate Maplewood Village? Scenario 2

Maplewood Village serves as a node of

be use as a drop off lane. This secondary access

activities for the town, however it presents some

also acts as a service road for the new and existing

challenges regarding vehicular congestion during

commercial businesses.

rush hours, limited parking and a disconnected pedestrian bypass with an entrance adjacent to

This new scheme allows for more pedestrian traffic

Maplewood Ave and not directly connected to the

along Maplewood Ave, more visibility and better

village.

connection from the train station. (See diagram 5) A new plaza is located opposite of the current Bank

This design scenario responds to vehicular

of America building. This new public space will be

circulation and the idea of attracting more

used for diverse purposes and be activated by other

residents and visitors to stay in the village by

activities happening at the Post Office site such as

using the Post Office site as a center and retainer of activities. In this scheme, Maplewood Avenue’s

More parking will be accommodated by two new

traffic is re-directed to be one way due west

parking structures, which will be on a perpendicular

alleviating some of the congestion at peak hours.

axis to Maplewood Avenue. They will be connected

The new secondary road south of Maplewood

visually yet remain outside of the major commercial

Ave behind the current commercial buildings and

strip of Maplewood Village. The availability and

potential new residential and office buildings is

visibility of these lots will allow visitors to enjoy the

also one way due east. (See Diagram 4) As a

commercial and cultural amenities while alleviating

consequence, vehicular congestion will diminish

traffic and car pollution problems for residents.

and traffic will be directed along this route and

1 E

f B

d c

A g N Scenario 2 View West

37

Re-Thinking Maplewood, NJ


Legend:

2

High Density Housing Low Density Housing

RETAIL RESTAURANTS

Retail Office Mobility

HIGH DENSITY

New Landscaping New Pedestrian Path OFFICE

Traffic Direction

AMENITIES

N

New Building Massing

3

PUBLIC SPACE

PATH

N Pedestrian Circulation

4 PARKING CAR SHARE

BIKE SHARE

N

BUS

Vehicular Circulation

5

Square Footages: Residential:

96,200 SF

Retail:

32,450 SF

Office:

77,650 SF

Public space: 15,000 SF Parking Spots: 1005 A: 300 B: 300 c: d: E: f: g:

82 20 200 60 43

N Scenario 2 View West

Alternate Scenarios

38


Which design scenarios could reactivate Maplewood Village? Scenario 2

1 3

Legend: High Density Housing

2

4

Low Density Housing Retail Office Mobility New Landscaping New Pedestrian Path Traffic Direction N Scenario 3 View East

2

OFFICE

HIGH DENSITY

RETAIL

PUBLIC SPACE

View at Durand Rd

39

Re-Thinking Maplewood, NJ


3

OFFICE

PARKING

RETAIL

View at Dunnell Rd

4

OFFICE

HIGH DENSITY

RESTAURANTS

RETAIL

PUBLIC SPACE

PATH

View facing Bank of America Building

Alternate Scenarios

40


Which design scenarios could reactivate Maplewood Village? Scenario 3

The third scheme attempts to maximize the site

the central entrance tunnel leads one directly to

for its development potential. The tower like

the back of the post office and behind commercial

element at the northern portion of the post office

buildings that are in dire need of pedestrian traffic.

site is meant to be a new icon for the maplewood

What if a new gateway was formed flanked by

village as people approach the town by train or

commercial space, with new residential and office

car. This will allow for more residential units to

space above. This new pedestrian only entrance

build the critical mass needed for ground floor

from the park side of town as well as commuters

retail and ammenities, which can be used by

arriving from New York City will be a major physical

the residents and the existing community, to

gateway that will embrace the residents and

remain economically viable. The remainder of the

visitors alike.

massing steps down to a four story structure as it approaches the center of Maplewood Village,

The visitors and residents will inevitably need

recognizing and respecting the existing scale.

parking as well. By building a base of parking partially wrapped with retail at ground level, the

Through the use of a tall element this scheme

residential compex on the former post office site

attempts to create a visual connection from

will house three full floors of parking alone. The

the park side of town to Maplewood Village.

additional parking structures off site will provide

By expanding the central tunnel passage and

all of the required parking for the commuters, new

providing a grand arcade like entrance in to

residents, and shoppers while at the same time

the village, this scheme attempts to solve the

relieving pressure from Maplewood avenue.

perceived lack of a physical connection. Currently

1 e

F B

d c

H A g N Scenario 3 View West

41

Re-Thinking Maplewood, NJ


Legend:

2

High Density Housing RETAIL

Low Density Housing

STORM WATER HIGH DENSITY

Retail Office OFFICE

Mobility

AMENITIES

New Landscaping New Pedestrian Path RESTAURANTS

Traffic Direction

N

PARKING

New Building Massing

3

PUBLIC SPACE

PATH BIKE SHARE

N

Pedestrian Circulation

4 PARKING JITNEY

CAR SHARE

N

BUS

Vehicular Circulation

5

Square Footages: Residential:

110214 SF

Retail:

27091 SF

Office:

27420 SF

Public space: 20,000 SF Parking Spots: 1283 A: 300 B: 300 c: 82 d: 20 e: 43 F: 275 g: 43 H: 220

N Scenario 3 View West

Alternate Scenarios

42


Which design scenarios could reactivate Maplewood Village? Scenario 3

1 3

Legend: High Density Housing

2

4

Low Density Housing Retail Office Mobility New Landscaping New Pedestrian Path Traffic Direction N Scenario 3 View East

2

HIGH DENSITY

PARKING

AMENITIES

View at Durand Rd

43

Re-Thinking Maplewood, NJ


3

OFFICE

BUS HIGH DENSITY

PARKING BIKE SHARE

View at Dunnell Rd

4

HIGH DENSITY

OFFICE

RESTAURANTS

RESTAURANTS

PATH

PUBLIC SPACE

View facing Bank of America Building

Alternate Scenarios

44


Recommendations

Present a formal application for the Transit Village Designation program initiated by the New Jersey Department of Transportation. This designation of Transit Village makes the redevelopment eligible for grant funding and technical assistance from state agencies. Include affordable housing in the transit village district, which requires reserving at least 20% of the residential units constructed for occupancy by low or moderate income households. Identify and preserve ‘placemaking’ areas that contribute to the maintenance of Maplewood identify such as preserving the current Bank of America building and readapting Ricalton Square in a way that enhances its historical significance. Create design guidelines that maintain the scale of Maplewood Village and follow specific parameters that respond to its current location, zoning and streetscape, defining Maplewood Village the social core of a more connected and walkable town. Follow sustainable guidelines that allow Maplewood to lead the region in terms of environmental efforts that can range from solar panels, green roofs and permeable surfaces to the implementation of bike-sharing programs and other alternative mobile sharing options.

45

Re-Thinking Maplewood, NJ


Acknowledgements This report is made possible by the generous support of the Township of Maplewood, New Jersey

Special Thanks to the following contributors: Municipality Victor DeLuca, Mayor of Maplewood

Advisory Committee John Branigan Tom Carlson Marvin Clawson Rene Clawson Renee Conlon Roger Desiderio Annete De Palma Julie Doran John James Kathy Leventhal Joseph Manning Jerry Ryan

Acknowledgements

46


Resources

Bibliography Walker, Philip. Downtown planning for smaller and midsized communities. Chicago: American Planning Association Planners Press, 2009. Print. Duany, Andres, Andres Duany, Elizabeth Zyberk, Elizabeth Zyberk, Jeff Speck, and Jeff Speck. Suburban nation: the rise of sprawl and the decline of the American Dream. New York: North Point Press, 2000. Print. Jones, Ellen, and June Williamson.Retrofitting suburbia: urban design solutions for redesigning suburbs. Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons, 2009. Print.

Reports State of the Township Address 2012 Parking Study 2012 – Maser Consulting PA Traffic Calming Policy 2012 – Maplewood Dept. of Engineering Maplewood Greenway: Reclaiming the River 2012 2011 Master Plan Re-Examination Report 2011 - Phillips PreissGrygiel, LLC Area in Need of Rehabilitation Study 2011 - Phillips PreissGrygiel, LLC Proposal to Establish a Township-Wide Residential Garbage Collection System Township of Maplewood Bulk Requirements 2011 - Maplewood Environmental Committee 271-70 Zone Requirements 2011 – Maplewood Zoning Board of Adjustments Community Forestry Management Plan 2010-2014 – ForesTree Consultants Annual Financial Statement for the Year 2010 – Maplewood Department of Finance Maplewood Bikeway Network Plan 2010 – Urbana Consulting, LLC Rahway River Corridor Study 2010 – Edgewater Design, LLC Drainage / Flood Mitigation Improvements Feasibility Report 2009 Springfield Avenue Redevelopment Plan 2009 – The Metro Company LLC Housing Element and Fair Share Plan 2008 – H2M Associates, Inc. Township of Maplewood Master Plan Open Space and Recreation Plan Element 2008 Environmental Resources Inventory 2006 – Maser Consulting PA Proposed Master Plan for the Township of Maplewood, New Jersey 2004 Trees and Utilities: Cooperative Management Strategies for Success 2002 – Rutgers General Improvements Refunding Bonds 2012 The Historic Murals of Maplewood -1961 Noble Joseph Draft Dunnell Road Redevelopment Plan v.1 Maplewood_Local Vendor List

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Re-Thinking Maplewood, NJ


SouthOrange_riverMaster Plan 20110824_GI Opportunities for JerseyCity Street Park Public Building Lighting Policy Wetlands and Floodprone Areas Map Redevelopment Area Study_Burnettave Maplewood Parking_Burgdorff Cultural Center

PowerPoint Presentations Maplewood Greenway: Reclaiming the River 2012 – Maplewood Greenway Task Force Pay as you Throw: Garbage Collection System 2011 JMEUC Program to Eliminate Storm Water Inflow

Maps Maplewood Map of 12 Sections Township of Maplewood Recreation Areas – Dehart Park Expansion Project Township of Maplewood Zoning Map 2010 Land Use Map, 2006 Avery Library, Columbia University NY Regional Plan starting 1925 -30. Call number around AA9127 N4. http://clio.cul.columbia.edu:7018/vwebv/holdingsInfo?searchId=3283&rec Count=50&recPointer=9&bibId=3302972 GIS - Township of Maplewood Google Maps John Branigan Archives

Resources

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Re-Thinking Maplewood- Transit, Growth and Density