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urban design associates


urban design associates

neighborhoods, towns, and villages

Introduction Baxter Village fort mill | south carolina

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Callaway Gardens pine mountain | georgia

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Celebration celebration | florida

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Daybreak south jordan | utah

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East Beach Pattern Book norfolk | virginia

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Ellon aberdeenshire | scotland

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East Garrison monterey county | california

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Easton Village on the Tred Avon easton | maryland

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Gibson’s Grant easton | maryland

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Gran Pacifica gran pacifica |  nicaragua

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Homestead Preserve Pattern Book hot springs | virginia

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Laurel yuma | arizona

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The Ledges huntersville | alabama

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Ludhiana Township punjab | india

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Nairn aberdeen | scotland

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Ni Village and East Campus spotsylvania county | virginia

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Roche Harbor san juan island | washington

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Yellowstone Preserve livingston | montana

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Introduction

Urban Design Associates has developed Master Plans, three-dimensional Urban Designs, Pattern Books and Architectural Services for new neighborhoods, villages, and towns throughout the United States and abroad. The focus of our efforts has been to create new places which continue the best traditions of the region and local community in which the new place is located. We do this through a collaborative design process that engages the development team and members of the local community in the creative process of building a new community. A New Development Model For many years, new development was limited to separate, single-use developments: residential subdivisions with a limited price range, shopping centers surrounded by parking lots, and office or industrial parks. The new development model builds walkable, mixed-income neighborhoods following principles of traditional neighborhood design. By creating real neighborhoods, towns, and villages, with a more convenient lifestyle, these developments have proven to be the most successful ones in their particular region. The UDA Process UDA’s planning process has been successful in creating new environments that have a unique image and identity based on the culture, traditions, and character of the specific local region in which the new places are built. Each project begins with a thorough understanding of the client's goals and marketing approach. At the same time, extensive reconnaissance and research are conducted into local traditional architectural and community patterns. These are documented in photographs and measured drawings to make sure we understand the precise attributes that are essential to creating the unique character of that place. The site itself is analyzed with a technique which we call X-rays, each of which evaluates a specific aspect such as environmental conditions, road patterns, and building contexts. Three-dimensional models of the site are often constructed on which various design alternatives can be tested. Local Character UDA establishes the character of the new development through compelling images that link the proposed building program components to the well-defined patterns of those historic places. By creating a vision for both the overall plan and the three-dimensional character of each place within it, we find it possible to provide a rich and diverse sense of place for the many different market sectors identified during the planning process.

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|  Neighborhoods, Towns, and Villages


For each project, we design a framework of streets and public open space which creates a diverse collection of addresses. Each address is designed to be a unique place with the design of the public space coordinated with the character of the architecture. Each building, streetscape, and landscape is based on the local traditions, rather than on its type, size, cost or means of financing. Once the character is set, it is then possible to work with the industry’s standard prototype building types and modify them to respond to the local character. In this way, it is possible to create diverse and authentic environments which become timeless in character. Consensus and Entitlements In the course of the process, several alternative concepts will emerge. These are then tested, using three-dimensional modeling techniques in open, public forums. This helps the development team build support and consensus – both within the team and with the local jurisdictions in which the development will be built – regarding the approach and character elements to be used. Since entitlements and approvals are such a key part of implementing these developments, it is essential to build consensus on the vision for the plan as it is created. By creating beautiful new places which respect and enhance the local traditions of the place, it is possible to gain broad support for new development, even in regions in which there is frequently opposition to new development. Implementation To further facilitate the process, developers often commission UDA to prepare a Pattern Book to ensure architectural character that supports the image of the development. Like the Master Plan, the Pattern Book is also developed in a collaborative process that brings together the specialist skills of builders, realtors, and marketing specialists to create architectural designs that are practical, support the marketing effort, and are true to the character of the place. On the following pages, a series of recent examples of Plans and Pattern Books created by UDA are illustrated. These demonstrate how we interpreted and applied this new development model to designing new neighborhoods adjacent to existing towns, to infill development in an existing historic village, new villages, and to new towns in rapidly growing regions.

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Baxter Village fort mill | south carolina

primary client

Celebration Associates project size

2,300 Acres year completed

2003 reference

Joseph Barnes Celebraton Associates Bundoran Farms 5473 Plank Road North Garden, VA 22959 (434)295-3700 jbarnes@celebrationassociates.com

Baxter Village is the first of several mixed-use villages to be built adjacent to 2,300 acres of a nature preserve that connects each village. UDA prepared the Baxter Pattern Book and worked with the development team to plan the town center and design the initial Main Street commercial buildings, Community Center and Attached housing. The village character is based on UDA’s research of regional historic towns such as Chester and York. The design and layout of streets, blocks and civic spaces are designed to create interesting pedestrian connections to the surrounding neighborhoods and the village center. Keys to success include the location of an elementary school, library and YMCA adjacent to 100,000 square feet of retail and office uses in the heart of the village. Trail systems and walkways connect the village center to the surrounding neighborhoods that have 1,350 residential units and a 2,300 acre greenway.

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|  Neighborhoods, Towns, and Villages


Callaway Gardens pine mountain | georgia

primary client

Cousins Properties project size

376.4 Acres year completed

2008 reference

Jeffrey Quinn Cousins Properties 2500 Windy Ridge Parkway Suite 1600 Atlanta, GA 30339-5683 706-663-8443 JeffreyQuinn@cousinsproperties.com

The Village at Callaway Gardens is designed as part of a comprehensive straegy to preserve 13,000 acres of property. The new neighborhoods have been designed as a series of individual placed each intimately connected to the local ecology, lake edge, woodlands or meadows. Each neighborhood enjoys close proximity to several gardens on the 13,000-acre preserve as well as +an extensive network of trails and paths. The plan for the new village involved extensive environmental analysis, landscape conservation, and dedication to building on the essential character of south Georgia settlements and Callaway Gardens. This approach has yielded an intriguing mix of neighborhoods and housing typologies: from the light-touch tree houses on a Martin Lake peninsula to garden cottages in a village setting that surrounds a historic community garden.

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Celebration celebration | florida

primary client

Disney Development Company year completed

2000 reference

Joseph Barnes, Director of Design Celebration Associates 317 E Water Street, Ste 200 Charlottesville, VA 22902 (540)839-3276

Urban Design Associates was commissioned by Disney Development Company to prepare community design and architectural guidelines for residential development in a new town called Celebration. Celebration is based on the best traditions of small towns found in the southeastern United States. It includes a wide range of house types and sizes, from rental apartments, to townhouses, to small lots with cottages, to very large estate lot houses. Celebration is a mixed income community, and the design guidelines emphasize scale and elements which will make it possible to have a harmonious relationship among houses of different sizes and styles. The community has received national acclaim and set new, high expectations of the quality and character in a production scale. As a result, Celebration transformed development paradigms across the country for years to come.

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|  Neighborhoods, Towns, and Villages


Daybreak south jordan | utah

primary client

Kennecott Land Company/Rio Tinto project size

4,127 Acres year completed

On-going relationship reference

Kennecott Land Company/Rio Tinto Stephen James P.O. Box 95550 South Jordan, UT 84095-0550 (801)743-4624 www.kennecottland.com

Located at the base of the Oquirrh Mountains, Daybreak is a mixed-use, walkable community with a full range of services and amenities for its residents. Daybreak encompasses 4,127 acres and at final buildout, it will consist of nearly 14,000 residences in 12 residential neighborhoods, each focused around a series of Mixed-Use Village Centers. At the Heart of Daybreak is the Town Center, consisting of mixed-use, commercial, institutional, and residential uses clustered around three light-rail transit stops that connect to Downtown Salt Lake City. Daybreak presents a unique opportunity to shape the Valley’s future in a manner that minimizes future negative growth impacts such as sprawl, water use, and congestion. Sustainable environmental design strategies employed throughout Daybreak complement its nature as a mixed-use community with employment, residential, recreational, and civic uses.

UDA has provided services to Daybreak that include: »» Neighborhood Planning »» Pattern Books and Design Regulations »» Programming »» Builder Workshops »» Public Architecture »» Single-family and multi-family architectural services for independent home builders.

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East Beach Pattern Book norfolk | virginia

primary client

Celebration Associates project size

14 Acres year completed

2003 reference

Joseph Barnes Celebraton Associates Bundoran Farms 5473 Plank Road North Garden, VA 22959 (434)295-3700 jbarnes@celebrationassociates.com

East Beach draws upon southeastern building types and town planning practices to create a unique waterfront village rooted in the traditions of the region. It is intentionally and distinctly Tidewater in feeling, from its overall layout and landscape design to the details of its buildings, pathways and parks. The Pattern Book of East Beach is a response to the historic pattern of neighborhood forms and specific natural features and contrasting qualities of the site. Pedestrian-scaled streets, hidden gardens, shuttered porches, narrow alleys and overhanging roofs have been brought together to provide a sense of familiarity, stimulation, and ease.

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|  Neighborhoods, Towns, and Villages


Ellon aberdeenshire | scotland

primary client

Scotia Homes project size

248 Acres year completed

2009 reference

Dominic Fairlie Scotia Homes 23 Bridge Street Ellon, AB41 9AA UK 1358 726261 dominic.fairlie@bruce-and-partners.co.uk

Urban Design Associates in collaboration with The Prince’s Foundation for the Built Environment conducted an Enquiry by Design process to study the expansion of Ellon. This public participatory process has produced a plan which calls for both restoring the historic core of Ellon and building new neighborhoods as extensions of the town which will support the existing town. The physical form and character of the new areas will draw lessons from the great traditions of Scottish Town Building, especially those of Aberdeenshire. The Master Plan focuses on three areas. First is the Cromleybank Site, which is a new mixed-use development that creates an extension of the town; the second is Castle Meadow, a residential development that links the now isolated Knockothie community to the Historic Core; and the Historic Core will be enhanced through introduction of new infill and restoration of existing historic buildings.

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East Garrison monterey county | california

County of Monterey, Planning Department project size

244 Acres year completed

2004 reference

Keith McCoy, Vice President Urban Community Partners, LLC 24571 Silver Cloud Court, Suite 101 Monterey, CA 93940 (831) 647-2446 keith.mccoy@urbancommunitypartners.com

The East Garrison Specific Plan (EGSP) area comprises 244 acres on a bluff along the northern edge of former Fort Ord. Fort Ord is situated about 120 miles south of San Francisco, and is 10 miles east of Monterey in Monterey County. Stakeholders at a design workshop held in November 2001 refined the vision for East Garrison, which is for it to be a new community based on the principles of Smart Growth, Sustainable Development, and Traditional Neighborhood Design. The EGSP proposes three residential neighborhoods surrounding a mixed-use town center. The first two neighborhoods are comprised by a mix of building types in a tight, urban configuration. The third neighborhood is designed as an arts district, situated close to the town center. This neighborhood features historic buildings renovated as arts facilities.

Setback Requirements Each lot has a series of setback lines that define a minimum yard between houses, streets, and rear lanes. There are also zones within which the house shall be placed. The Front Facade shall be placed within the Front Facade Zone described in the general conditions for the lot type and in the specific guidelines for the lot location within the Community Patterns section. The Front Facade Zone is set back from the front property line at a distance defined by the Front Yard Setback. The depth of the zone is measured from that line. The Front Yard Setback is the area between the Front Yard Setback Line and the front property line. Porches and bay windows can project into the Front Yard Setback. On corner lots, a Side Street Facade Zone is established adjacent to the cross street. It is set back from the side street a

specific dimension established in the Community Patterns for each neighborhood and is defined by the Side Street Setback. The depth of the zone is measured from that line. The main body, side wings, garages, and fences are placed within this zone. All facades within this zone must follow the compositional guidelines established by the architectural patterns. Rear Lane Setback defines the distance from the rear lane right-of-way to a built structure. Side Yard Setback defines the minimum distance between the structure and the side yard property line. A Rear Yard Setback is established as a minimum setback for garages and side wings. A Rear Yard Facade Zone is established for lots with rear yards visible to the public.

Rear Lane Setback Private Zone Side Street Facade Zone Side Street Setback Front Facade Zone Front Yard Setback Setback zone plan of East Garrison

Setback Requirements community patterns

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|  Neighborhoods, Towns, and Villages

The street facing facades of East Garrison houses will be placed in the Front Facade Zones as shown in the Community Patterns section.

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© 2003 ur ban de sign asso ciate s

primary client


Easton Village on the Tred Avon easton | maryland Easton Village on the Tred Avon is a new neighborhood designed in the tradition of the best small towns and waterfront villages found throughout the Eastern Shore of Maryland. There is an informal quality to the feel of the neighborhood with a mix of different houses that range in size and character.

primary client

Elm Street Development Company project size

138 Acres year completed

2006 Michael Burlbaugh Vice President Elm Street Development 175 Admiral Cochrane Drive, Suite 112 Annapolis, MD 21401 (410)266-9700 mburlbaugh@elmstreetdev.com

© 2004 ur ban de sign asso ciate s

Urban Design Associates modified an existing plan of the village to offer a variety of lot types and locations. Many of the lots have rear lane accessed parking – either a garage or paved ­parking pad. This creates a pedestrian-friendly street with continuous front yard gardens uninterrupted by parked cars and driveways. UDA provided a pattern pook, town architect services, and architectural design.

reference

Easton Village

Drive

Street Knapp’s Lot

Collinson Square

Hemmersley

Street

Plan of Zones and Setbacks for the Collinson Square neighborhood

Wishart Park

Hollyday Park

Perspective of the houses facing Collinson Square

Plan of Zones and Setbacks for other park neighborhoods such as Hollyday Park and Wishart Park

Park Addresses Easton Village is defined by a series of diverse and beautiful neighborhood parks. The character of each address around the park has been designed to respond to the architecture, scale and type of landscape design for the space and location within the Village. The images on this page depict Collinson Square, a central commons in the heart of the Village. The park was designed as a more formal space lined with garden and cottage houses to create a sense of enclosure. Houses will be elevated above the level of the park and front yards will be treated as flower gardens to create a rich and highly personalized park edge. Similar design elements influence the specific architectural styles, landscape palette and park design elements in each of the other park spaces.

Varies Setback

5' Sidewalk

Varies

5' 8.5' 8' Parking

Open Space

10'

8' 5.5' 5'

Parking

Varies Setback

Typical street section along Easton Village Drive adjacent to Collinson Square

Park Addresses community

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patterns

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Gibson’s Grant easton | maryland

primary client

Elm Street Development Company project size

138 Acres year completed

2006 reference

Michael Burlbaugh 175 Admiral Cochrane Drive Suite 112 Annapolis, MD 21401 (410)226-9700 mburlbaugh@elmstreetdev.com

Gibson’s Grant is a new neighborhood designed in the tradition of the best small towns and waterfront villages found throughout the Eastern Shore. The master plan combines an informal street layout of public ways of narrow vehicle lanes lined with porches facing front gardens and yards. Tree-lined streets will create a shaded, quiet atmosphere that transforms the neighborhood street into a shared “outdoor room.” The plan features a series of neighborhood parks and squares, each with its own character and sense of place, many of which will be connected to a pedestrian path and trail system that takes advantage of the site’s natural features. Residents are never more than a block away from a park. The community provides for a broad range of housing opportunities, from townhouses, small lot single family, to large custom lots. The master plan is supplemented with the Gibson's Grant Pattern Book that provides lot layout standards, housing types and architectural character that can be applied to both custom and production builders.

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Gran Pacifica gran pacifica |†nicaragua

primary client

Gran Pacifica project size

2,200 Acres year completed

2003 reference

Mike Cobb Plaza La Familiar, Km 1/2 Carretera Masaya, LM-201 Nicaragua (703) 795-2555 mcobb@granpacifica.com

Gran Pacifica is a 2,200-acre development nestled in the hills along the Pacific coast of Nicaragua. The design of this resort village will feature the preservation of natural areas, an 18-hole championship golf course and a 27-hole resort golf course; a 250-room resort hotel; a town square with a mix of retail and entertainment uses; and residential neighborhoods with a wide variety of house types, sizes, and styles designed in the tradition of the most admired historic settlements in the region. Neighborhoods are designed around a series of small parks and gardens, each overlooking the ocean, the golf course, and the surrounding mountains. An extensive network of walking trails, streets, and sidewalks will connect residents and guests to the amenities, the ocean front, nature preserve and to each other.

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Homestead Preserve Pattern Book hot springs | virginia Urban Design Associates and Design Workshop, Inc. teamed together to produce the Homestead Preserve, a Master Plan and Pattern Book for the Allegheny Highlands of Virginia. The remarkable character of this historic valley was unprotected from potential development. Celebration Associates commissioned the design team to create a master plan that preserves over 9,000 acres of open space in a public trust, while proposing new development in less-sensitive locations.

project type

UDA Pattern Books® and Form-Based Codes primary client

Homestead Preserve year completed

2008 reference

Joseph Barnes Celebraton Associates Bundoran Farms 5473 Plank Road North Garden, VA 22959 (434)295-3700 jbarnes@celebrationassociates.com

© 2004 urban design associates

The Pattern Book serves a resource for homeowners, architects and builders to design and build houses in a way that reinforces the sense of history, respects the landscape and contributes to the quality of environment. In Virginia, there is a rich history of extraordinary houses built by local craftsmen using Pattern Books imported from England and later prepared by architects and master carpenters living in America.UDA also provided architectural services for the development of civic buildings. UDA was awarded a Palladio Award for the preservation of a historic dairy barn to serve as a new center for the community.

Highland Houses once the railroad connected the Warm Springs Valley to the rest of the East Coast population centers, the ability to travel to the resorts created opportunities for a limited number of people to construct houses and set up more permanent residence. This trend followed the traditional Highland farm settlements and created an exotic mix of architectural styles and house types unlike anywhere else in this region of Virginia. There is a blend of vernacular, clapboard farmhouses, refined Virginia classical houses and imported Arts & Crafts, NeoClassical, Colonial Revival and European Romantic house styles. This blend sets the context for the design of houses Highlands Classical precedent

Highlands Farmhouse precedent

within the Preserve. The influence of English trends, techniques and aesthetic choices influenced the form and character of both the architecture and the setting of the yard and site. Later notions of the rural landscape as a picturesque experience became more important to the newly arriving resident in the mid 1800s. Local materials and available craftsman further refined the detail and character of houses. Local stone, brick, timber, and stucco methods further

Precedent sketches for proposed house types within the Preserve

refined the sense of place.

English Romantic precedent

Highlands Arts & Crafts precedent

Woodcut by Charles Smith entitled “Mr. Henderson’s House” from the book “The Springs of Virginia” by Perceval Reniers

Architectural Precedents introduction

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Laurel yuma†|†arizona

primary client

Tanimura and Antle project size

232 Acres year completed

2009 reference

Keith McCoy Urban Community Partners, LLC 24571 Silver Cloud Court Suite 101 Monterey, CA 93940 (831)647-2446 keith.mccoy@urbancommunitypartners.com

The Laurel Pattern Book guides the development of this 232-acre planned community and sets the tone for creating a unique district rooted in local tradition. Envisioned for development by organic agricultural grower Tanimura & Antle, sustainable design principles define the primary goals. Natural shading and native landscaping cools sidewalks and paseos to make streets inviting to pedestrians, and the existing canal is celebrated as a boulevard. Terminating the vista is the farmstead and on-site organic farm. The community will be annexed into the City of Yuma and will provide over a thousand new housing units. The Pattern Book will be used by builders and developers to regulate a character and quality of design.

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The Ledges huntersville | alabama Beautifully situated atop the hills overlooking the Tennessee Valley, The Ledges is a private community that encompasses 430 acres of a 750-acre mountain-top property with breathtaking views, a championship golf course, and a design that preserves over 250 acres of undisturbed woodlands and wetlands.

primary client

Ledges of Hunstville project size

430 Acres year completed

2002

Urban Design Associates, in partnership with landscape architects, LaQuatra Bonci, prepared the master plan and Pattern Book for the new community. UDA also prepared a series of house designs as part of the development program.

reference

John Blue Blue Realty 5003 Garth Road Huntsville, AL 35802 (256)705-5475

The design continues the American tradition of building picturesque villages. The neighborhoods are based on the inherited fabric of historic settlements in the Huntsville region. Neighborhood parks, village greens, and tree-lined streets provide focal points for neighborhoods and create highly desirable addresses.

Aerial Perspective

The Ledges Pattern Book The Ledges Pattern Book contains design guidelines for both community character and architectural character. The first section, Community Patterns, describes the general principles for placing houses on their lots as well as specific principles for lots within the different neighborhoods. These principles include setbacks, overall massing of the house, locations for fences and ancillary structures and access from driveways or alleys. The second section, Architectural Patterns, describes the palette of architectural styles for the Ledges and includes guidelines for designing the parts of the house that are visible from a street, golf course or public space. Once a lot has been selected, the guidelines for placing the house on the lot can be determined by turning to the page that describes the general conditions for the lot type and then

the page that describes the particular neighborhood in which the lot is located. For instance, if you have selected a Villa Lot on Mooresville Lane, you would first turn to page B-5 to determine the general setbacks and width of the house. You would then turn to page B-9 to determine what specific variations or additional site guidelines might apply. The specific house design would then be developed or selected in accordance with one of the styles described in Section C – Architectural Patterns.

' 2000 Urban Design Associates

Introduction

The Ledges Pattern Book

A-2

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Ludhiana Township punjab | india

primary client

IREO Management India Pvt. Ltd. project size

237 Acres year completed

2009 reference

Madhukar Tulsi Building No. 8, Tower A, 3rd Floor DLF Cyber City, DLF Phase II Gurgaon, Haryana, 122002 India 91 124 4574027

Ludhiana Township is designed as a world class, integrated, residential community with complimentary commercial, institutional, health care, and entertainment facilities. It represents a new model for Indian development which draws on Indian vernacular of the Northwest while offering contemporary lifestyle and conveniences. Care in design and implementation will result in a fully sustainable community, a unique opportunity in this market. Mixed-use development composed of single family residential, offices, retail and a host of social components including schools, religious sites and clubhouses will form the built environment. A lush array of neighborhood parks, a central lake and tree lined streets create inviting outdoor spaces.

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Nairn aberdeen | scotland

primary client

Scotia Homes project size

125 Acres year completed

In Progress reference

Mark Greaves The Prince’s Foundation for the Built Environment 6 Whittliemuir Avenue Glasgow, UK G44 3HU 141637-0555 Mark.Greaves@princes-foundation.org

Nairn is situated on the southern edge of the Moray Firth on the east coast of Scotland. The town is located at the confluence of Morayshire and the Highlands, a region that contains a rich collection of Scottish towns. The process is sponsored by a group of developers in connection with the owner of the land south of The Saw Mill bewteen Cawdor Road and Balblair Road. The vision for new development in Nairn draws on the best examples of residential architecture and planning within the region. Development will be integrated into its surroundings by reinforcing street connections, linking green spaces, and supplementing community facilities. In this plan proposal, two key features are a relief road connection at the south and a pedestrian green link from the Nairn academy to the River Nairn. Additionally, the plan has a series of unique character areas such as the Mill District with mixed-use development, and residential neighbourhoods that draw on the best housing design from Nairn.

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|  Neighborhoods, Towns, and Villages


Ni Village and East Campus spotsylvania county | virginia

primary client

Luck Development Partners project size

160 Acres year completed

2009 reference

John Pullen, President Luck Development Partners, LLC P.O. Box 29682 Richmond, VA 23242-0682 (804) 784-6302 jpullen@luckstone.com

Located at the heart of Spotsylvania County, Virginia, The Ni Village and East Campus will emerge fundamentally as a quarry town situated on 160 acres of land. Ni Village will be developed as a series of coordinated addresses that surround special, anchor buildings that indicate a specific use and sense of place for each address. The educational center, lodge and spa, shopping district, and regional farmers market are important anchors proposed for the Ni Village, each connected by a sequence of green terraces, parks and open spaces. The East Campus is a preserve, designed to attract high quality corporate facilities while respecting the surrounding wetland and stream network. The design will focus on the contribution of high quality office, retail and residential development, as well as reclamation and stewardship of open space, development and community investment.

S P OT SY LVA N I A C O U N T Y | V I R G I N I A

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Roche Harbor san juan island | washington Roche Harbor is a traditional town on the northern shore of San Juan Island 85 miles northwest of Seattle, Washington. Once a company outpost incorporated to employ the lime industry, Roche Harbor has since become a recurring destination for boaters, vacationers, and families. Traditions and memories have been established in this storied place that inspire the master planning of three residential neighborhoods extending from its historic core. This Pattern Book establishes the image and character of these neighborhoods while embedding the intrinsic characteristics unique to the San Juan Islands into its architecture, planning, and most memorable places.

primary client

Roche Harbor Resort project size

5 Acres year completed

2009 reference

Richard Hobbs, Town Architect 248 Reuben Memorial Drive Friday Harbor, WA 98250 (360) 317-5024 rhobbs@rockisland.com

ROCHE H ARBOR PAT T ER N BOOK San Juan Island, Washington

SECTION C

SECTION B

A RCH I T E CT U RA L PAT T E RN S

roche h a r bor lot t y pes

ROCHE H A R BOR PICT UR ESQU E The Roche Harbor Picturesque House is characterized by its cottage-like architectural language. Through its composition, massing, and detailing, the house creates a connection between the interior and the landscape, highlighting the lifestyle instilled within the architecture. The Roche Harbor Picturesque House takes its inspiration from the historic Victorian structures of Roche Harbor. The remarkable landscape of the San Juan Islands and the climate of Roche Harbor are essential elements in creating a traditional community feel and lifestyle. The architecture of the Roche Harbor Picturesque House responds to the views afforded by the landscape as well as the climactic conditions of Roche Harbor. The house is a marriage of styles, incorporating a diverse palette of inspiration, allowing for creative mixing of textures and details. Simple, elegant massing forms define the house and can be added to for variation.

C O M M U N I T Y PAT T E R N S

the town of roche harbor offers a variety of lot types, each with distinct characteristics and relationships to the street. Within each type of lot, several different house configurations exist that further diversify the design possibilities for individual buyers. roche harbor lots are designed to allow flexibility and provide a level of predictability along streets and open spaces. criteria are established that govern the location of the house's main volume; the degree to which porches can encroach on setbacks and yards; and where ancillary masses, such as wings, towers, and garages may sit. the requirements and guidelines in the roche harbor lot types section of this pattern book apply generally to all lots of that type in the plan. In many cases, lot-specific criteria is required beyond what is established by the particular lot type and landmark houses are identified where a specific opportunity exists. this additional information is found in the lot Matrix in the appendix.

ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS OF ROCHE HARBOR PICTURESQUE

» Simple, straightforward volumes with side wings and porches added to create more complex compositions

» Steep pitched roofs with modest

Historic Roche Harbor gable end

Open eave and bracket detail

Simple massing of the Roche Harbor Chapel

overhangs and exposed structural elements such as rafters and brackets

» An orderly, symmetrical relationship between windows, doors, and building mass

» Expressive detail and materials palette that draws from traditional regional and national influences

» Strong interconnectedness between the interior and exterior spaces through large assemblies of doors and windows

29 30

47

15/16

55 57

56

46

54 53

58

52

51

50

45

44

43 42

20

21

22 23

24

39 40

49 48 41

60

Village Lotting Plan

gAR AgE SETBACk

Minimum distance from lane to face of garage S I d E YA R d

» Responsive to climate, views, and collective community vision for the Roche Harbor Village neighborhood

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31

Minimum distance from house to side property line A Roche Harbor porch

Pitched roofs step along the landscape

P R I v AT E z O N E

Carriage Lots

Cottage Lots

Bluff Lots

Attached Housing

Terrace Lots

area in which structures and private courts and gardens are located FAC A d E zONE

Designated area for principal facade(s) of the house's main body massing F R O N T YA R d

Minimum distance from front property line to front face of the house's main body Porch and railing detail

Gable roof detail

71 70

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|  Neighborhoods, Towns, and Villages

53


Yellowstone Preserve livingston | montana

project type

Neighborhoods, Towns, and Villages primary client

Yellowstone Community Partners project size

586 Acres year completed

2008 reference

Kent Mitchell Yellowstone Preserve 118 Annie Glade Drive Bozeman, MT 59718 (619)379-4473 kent@yellowstonepreserve.org

Urban Design Associates worked collaboratively with Yellowstone Community Partners to design a master plan for a mixed-use community in Livingston, Montana. The 586-acre site was a former ranch with light industrial uses adjacent to the Yellowstone River. The development partner restored the quality of the surrounding landscape, capitalizing on the spectacular location. UDA’s involvement helped to guide the project through master planning, annexation, plan refinement, entitlement, and zoning variances. The preserve will be a pedestrian-friendly community based on traditional western towns. Much of the property will remain open space preserve with walking trails and natural areas. A village main street creates the heart for the neighborhoods and offers diverse uses and residential unit types from multi-family to detached single family. Rich community amenities capitalize on the proximity to outdoor recreation. The project remains true to its underlying design principles of crafting land-use patterns that are not land consumptive and enhancing sense of place and connections to the river, the mountains, and the City of Livingston.

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|  www.urbandesignassociates.com


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Neighborhoods, Towns, and Villages