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Justice for Trayvon: 100 City Vigil

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August 2013 ● urbancny.com

State Fair 2013

The crowd began gathering as a trickle that turned into a stampede by the noon hour as cars and people converged on the Federal Building plaza. It was time for the Syracuse version of the Justice for Trayvon 100 City Vigil. The Rev. Kevin Agee of Hopps Memorial CME Church spoke with the press articulating what many in the community were feeling. “You should have no right to pursue somebody without reasonable cause that the persons involved in criminal activity,” Agee said. “The people have come together here this afternoon to fight for justice for all black and

Community

Mary Jackson celebrates 100th p. 6

The Hall Monitor

Segregation in Syracuse

p. 3

Editorial

What not to wear 2013: Mirror, mirror on the wall

p. 3

Health

See vigil, page 9

T

George Clinton

he 2013 edition of the New York State Fair is about to begin. We’ve assembled some of the cultural highlights and basic visitor information including some diversity on their visit to the second largest fair in North America. Entertainment This year Chevy Court is has entertainment diversity with entertainers; Salt N Pepa, Clinton and Parliament

Les Rivikin of Florida,”This is for my grandkids.”

See fair, page 4

Back to school means getting your shots in order p. 2 Serving Upstate urbanBERSANI JEWELRY BERSANI JEW

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2 August 2013

urbanCNY

Health News

Back to school means getting your shots in order We all need immunizations (also called vaccines or shots) to help protect us from serious diseases. To help keep our local community safe, Syracuse Community Health Center, Inc. is proudly participating in National Immunization Awareness Month. August is National Immunization Awareness Month. It is the perfect time to promote immunizations and remind family, friends, and coworkers to get caught up on their shots. Immunizations (or vaccinations) aren’t just for babies and young kids. We all need shots to help protect us from serious diseases and illness. Everyone over age 6 months needs a seasonal flu shot every year. Here are some other shots people need at different ages:

Young children: Children under age 6 get a series of shots to protect against measles, polio, chicken pox, and hepatitis. Preteens: All 11- and 12-year-olds need shots to help protect against tetanus, diphtheria, whooping cough, and meningitis. Doctors recommend that boys and girls also get the HPV vaccine to protect against the most common cause of cervical cancer. Adults: People age 65 need a one-time pneumonia shot. Talk to your doctor or nurse about which shots you and your family need. Shots can prevent infectious diseases like measles, diphtheria, and rubella. But people in the U.S. still die from these and

other vaccine-preventable diseases. It’s important to know which shots you need and when to get them. Everyone over age 6 months needs a seasonal flu shot every year. Other shots work best when they are given at certain ages. Here are some general guidelines: • Children need a series of shots from birth to age 6. • Pre-teens need recommended shots at age 11 or 12. • All adults need a tetanus booster shot every 10 years. Talk to your doctor or nurse to find out which immunizations you need. For more information, visit Syracuse Com-

munity Health Center, Inc. at one of our 15 convenient locations or call us at 315-476-7921. Remember It’s important for children to get their shots on schedule. This message is brought to you by Syracuse Community Health Center, “your healthcare home of choice!” For more information call us at 315-476-7921 or visit on the web at schcny.com.

Community News

English calls on Hogan to tell Syracuse voters if he will be Republican nominee Published monthly by: URBAN CNY Kenneth Jackson Editor and Publisher (315)807-9022 Jennifer Wing Designer Walt Shepperd Senior Editor Send mail c/o Eagle Media 2501 James St., Suite 100 Syracuse, NY 13206 For advertising and editorial: (315) 422-7778 (315) 434-8883 -- Fax kjackson@urbancny.com Printed by: Community Media Group LLC 2501 James St., Suite 100, Syracuse, NY 13206 No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission. The opinions expressed herein are not necessarily the opinions of Community Media Group LLC or Eagle Newspapers.

Hogan Has Repeatedly Dodged Questions from the Press, Community, and Democratic Committee Members as to Whether or Not He Will Accept the Republican Nomination for Mayor Onondaga County Democratic Committee Chairman Mark J. English has sent a letter to Syracuse Common Councilor and mayoral candidate Patrick J. Hogan urging him to publicly announce to voters whether or not he will accept the Republican nomination for Mayor. “I am asking you this simple question: Will you agree to accept the decision of our primary voters if they choose Mayor Miner or will you ignore their wishes and run as a Republican should you lose the primary,” asked English in his letter. “This is not a very difficult question to answer, but you seem to be having a great deal of trouble responding to it.” Hogan has been campaigning against incumbent Mayor Stephanie A. Miner in a primary challenge but has admitted to conversations with Onondaga County Republican Chair Tom Dadey about the election and the potential for accepting the nomination of the Republican Party. A copy of English’s letter appears at right

July 17, 2013 Hon. Patrick J. Hogan Common Council Member, 2nd District 212 Bryant Avenue Syrac us e, Ne w York 13202   Dear Pat: I am writing to you in my capacity as chairman of the Onondaga County Democratic Committee. You are asking Democratic voters to ignore their committee’s wishes and put aside an endorsed, successful, incumbent mayor by Patrick J. Hogan asking them to vote for you. I am asking you this simple question: Will you agree to accept the decision of our primary voters if they choose Mayor Miner or will you ignore their wishes and run as a Republican should you lose the primary?  This is not a very difficult question to answer, but you seem to be having a great deal of trouble responding to it. The primary process is a good way to deal with intra-party differences, but it can also cause great stress and expenditure of the party’s resources.  It should not be undertaken as a tactic in cahoots with the opposing party to weaken our own party and divide our voters in November. Pat, you owe a great deal to the Democratic Party and I think our voters are entitled to know before they vote in the primary. Let the voters know your true intentions.   Sincerely, Mark J. English Chair Onondaga County Democratic Committee


urbanCNY

Opinion Segregation in Syracuse Racist preconceptions still exist, and they’re in our backyard In her twangiest Manhattan accent, comedienne Jackson Joan Rivers used to begin her shtick by saying, “Can we talk?” And talk they did during the George Zimmerman trial. There they were, television trial experts—drips under pressure—sitting in Brady Bunch-style talking cubes, bantering back and forth about race, fear and the boogie man. “Lions and tigers and blacks, oh my!” My goodness, sweet Jesus! It was pearl-clutching time when the president of the United States in an unscripted session talked about race and the feelings emanating from the African-American community. He talked about something he knows personally: being black in America. It was so poignant to hear the president of the United States reach into my brain and pull out things I had long tried to forget. Growing up in Syracuse, being black sucked. When we were kids we were taught boundaries. We were told where we could and couldn’t go. We were taught how to shop in stores when you’re constantly being watched. In my family, we were taught to get a receipt and a bag. If the store owner refused to provide the bag or receipt, we were instructed to get our money and come right on home. Whenever we brought anything into that house, we’d better have a receipt and bag. At that time, it was common for black kids to be accused of stealing, so the children in my family were taught how to be consumers. One Saturday morning, my mother went to National Shoes on Salina Street downtown. She waited and waited while the saleswoman attended to white customers. After a while, she asked why she hadn’t been waited on, and the woman said something about “serving n*****s.” My mother filed a complaint with the now-defunct Onondaga County Human Rights Commission, and the woman was fired. In 1979, my parents purchased a home on the East Side of Syracuse, slightly past Le Moyne College. One afternoon, a man came to the house, and my mother answered the door. The salesman said, “May I speak with the lady of the house?” He thought she was “the help.” As my friends and I came of age, we naturally wanted to check the city’s disco scene. Everyone had to show identification at the door. If you were black and not a Syracuse University athlete, chances are you wouldn’t get in. In the city of Ithaca, I could go anywhere, and yet when I was home from college, my friends and I could not enjoy a night on the town. That wasn’t so long ago— 1970s through the 1980s—but in Syracuse, blacks had to go to their own places. It was entertainment segregation.

Ken

The Hall Monitor

Whites were free to enter the trendy clubs whenever they wanted. We’d often stand in line at a local club and see the discriminatory nature of the admittance policies. While the IDs that had worked for us last month were no longer accepted, whites would stroll right in, no questions asked. Clubs such as Night Deposit were busted in a local television sting that caught the club apparently discriminating against African-Americans. A group of us went to the local NAACP and were told, “We have more important things to think about than you dancing at a disco.” It’s no coincidence that none of us now carry an NAACP membership card. After becoming an adult, I obtained my first professional job at Kemper Insurance. The company went on an extensive hiring spree, adding dozens of African-Americans to its workforce. On the first day, a co-worker said to me, “I wish Kemper hired black people who knew about insurance instead of blacks off the street.” She was soon fired. While at Kemper, I decided to go to lunch one day at a nice place on Warren Street. I wore a tie and just felt kinda professional that day. As I entered, I was asked, “Are you here for the bus boy job interview?” I simply replied, “No, I want to be seated.” I was invisible. It didn’t matter what my education was or how I dressed. I was labeled from the moment I walked in. Talk about stereotypes, while I was director of development at the New York State Fair, a staff member once asked me, “Are you the new parking attendant?” You’d think that the election of an African-American president would improve things. But no, it has gotten worse. I was with a company under contract when the election of Barack Obama spurred hate-laced internal email blasts. I received a series of missives via company email stating, “The financial crisis we face has been caused by black people getting houses they can’t afford.” I’d respond with data to refute those claims, but after two weeks of online abuse, I went to the boss and said, “Make it stop.” These were Syracusebased managers generating this demeaning misinformation. At the Dollar Store examining merchandise while two employees were making sure I wasn’t stealing, out of the corner of my eye I could see a couple snatching items off the shelves. Someone shouted, “Hey!” The employees who were focused on me had to run to the door, but by then it was too late. The couple fled with the merchandise. Sometimes the real me still remains invisible. In June, I was at OCM BOCES to attend an Access Computer Software class. The person at the information desk took one look at me and asked, “Are you here for the GED class? It’s right down the hall.” Thanks so much. Have a nice day.

August 2013

3

Editorial

Mirror, mirror on the wall Urban CNY’s annual guide to what not to wear

It’s that time of year when the temperature goes up and the clothing comes off and we’re obligated to publish our annual “What not to wear” editorial. The editor doesn’t pretend to be an expert in haute couture – top fashion, for those of you who don’t speak French – but in this era of individuality we must bust on the freakish frocks and those who stand guilty of hair and clothing abuse. The city of Syracuse and Onondaga County should consider replenishing their dwindling revenues by hiring Fashion Police. Can’t you see it? “Excuse me, miss, but I have to give you a ticket.” A stunned mall shopper replies, “But why, officer?” He takes a deep breath, pulls out a standard issue instrument and shows the offending person all the proof he needs. “Look into this mirror, you can see for yourself.” Some women have gone overboard piling on yards of hair. You can imagine some poor creature running around bald so that everything she needs – lipstick, cell phone, makeup – can be stored in her ’do. Here’s a hint, ladies: if a bird attempts to nest on your head, you have purchased too much hair! Fellas, you don’t get off easy. If you haven’t done a sit-up in 17 years and the closest you’ve come to a sixpack is Keystone Lite, put your shirt on. This is not your backyard. And if you are over 40, sporting earrings makes you look like an unemployed pirate. “Arrrrgh! Ahoy, mates!” And then there are the children. Parents, unless you want some old “coot” staring at your kids’ butt, don’t put sayings and slogans on your children’s behinds – people of all types will read the text, some more closely than others. On every closet door, this maxim should be mounted: “If it doesn’t fit, you must toss it.” Clothing has been abused by excessive tugging, pulling and unmitigated stretching to the point where, if you listen closely, you can hear some people’s clothes speak, “Let me go…I’m about to pop!” Perhaps the next high-tech invention will be the “Mirror-Mirror” app for your iPhone or tablet. Look into the lens and simply ask, “Mirror, mirror on the wall, should I wear this frock at all?” Whenever you see celebrities on TV or magazines photographed in undeniably dysfunctional clothing, don’t you mutter out loud, “What were they thinking?” And muttering turns into a chuckle. Just imagine producing an Academy Award-winning short film where the space aliens attack America. Earthlings, in their panic to escape, are eaten like crickets, and the first to go are those with clothing that’s either so tight that they can’t run or so loose that they fall down as creatures gobble up the human prey with reckless abandon. In the end, the last people on earth have sensible shoes and clothing that allowed them to escape when they were told, “Run for your lives!” Think about it.


4 August 2013

urbanCNY

Fair Funkadelic, Chubby Checker, and The Cab Calloway Orchestra. Additional entertainment can be found in Pan-African Village, Iroquois Village and throughout the fairgrounds. Advance Sale Tickets Av a i l a b l e n o w t h r o u g h Wednesday, August 21st only. One-Day Advance Sale Tickets are available for $6.00, a savings of $4.00 off the regular one-day admission price. Available at the State Fair Box Office or retail locations (see list below). Six-Day Frequent Fairgoer Admission Books are available for $30.00, a total savings of $30.00 off the regular six-day admission price. Available only at the State Fair Box Office. Discount Strates Shows Midway Ride FunCards are available for $14.00, a savings of $10.00 off the regular price! You get 48 credits per card. All rides require four or more credits nysfair.org/yourfair-visit/best-bets-bargain-book/” The Best Bests Bargain Book, Sponsored by Tully’s Good Times, has 100 of the best deals at the State Fair totaling well over $3,000 in valuable coupons! Save on things to eat  & drink, things to buy, and things to do… available for $4.00, a savings of $1.00 off the regular Fairtime price. FunCards and Bargain B ooks are available at these locations: Kenneth “Babyface” We g m ans – Edmonds” a l l Ne w Yor k state locations Price Chopper – all New York state locations Tops Friendly Markets Green Hills – Syracuse Nojaim Bros. – Syracuse Special Fair Days Strates Midway Ride-All-Day Program Days Visitors c an buy $25 wristbands that give them full access to the Midway & Kiddieland rides for the entire day! Available for  six  days… T h u r s d a y, Aug.  22,  Friday, Aug. 23,  Monday, Aug. 26, Tuesday, Aug. 27, Wednesday, Aug. 28 and Thursday, Aug. 29. Wristbands will be available at any Strates ticket booth on these days. Veteran’s Day – Thursday, August 29

From page 1 in 2001. It features an eternal flame, flag poles with bricks of all the wars at its base and stones for each branch of the ser vice with individual bricks placed from the service branches. The 9/11 Memorial honors a l l t hos e t hat Active duty military personnel and lost their lives veterans are admitted free on this day in the Septemwith proper credentials – military ID or ber 11th terrorist discharge papers. attacks. Unveiled Native American Day – Friday, Auat the 2002 Fair, gust 30 the Memorial is Native Americans receive free admis- lo cated b etween sion on this day. the two phases of Student’s Day – Friday, August 30 the Veterans MeStudents 16 years old and under ad- morial. mitted free on this day 2013 EMPIRE Gospel Weekend THEATER PerforJoin us Aug. 24 and 25 for the Fair’s mance traditional Gospel Weekend of uplifting Harriet May Mills Art & Home music and joyful voices at the Talent Center Showcase stage. The New York State Thursday, August 29 Fair Youth Gospel Choir, 11:00 AM • 1:00 PM Tim Rogers and the Fellas 4:00 PM • 7:00 PM and other groups will help The Media Unit preskeep the music flowing all ents ‘The Way It Is Now’ weekend long. A n or i g i n a l mu s i c / Iroquois Indian Village theatre performance exCome learn about and ploring attitudes on teen celebrate the culture and dating. heritage of the original Chevy Court New Yorkers at the Iro12 Days of  free enterquois Indian Village. You Zendaya tainment is scheduled for can experience every day the Stan Colella Stage at the traditional music, dance, crafts and Chevy Court for the 2013 New York customs of the Iroquois. This section State Fair. Two shows a day will of the Fairgrounds has been dedicated be featured, all free to Fairgoers to Six Nations programs since with your Fair admission. The 1928. lineup provides a wide-ranging Pan-African Village mix of musical talent from Located between the Cen- country to nostalgia to ter of Progress Building and today’s popular music. the Art and Home Cen- Salt-n-Pepa ter, you can come to Aug 22, 2013 • 2:00 the Pan African Village PM @Chevy Court • Free to learn about New with Fair Admission York’s African-AmerShow Time 2:00pm ican history while you George Clinton and listen to music with Parliament Funkadelic African roots, taste Aug 23, 2013 • 8:00 PM Af rican and C arib- @Chevy Court • Free with bean inspired food in Fair Admission the food court sponShow Time 8:00pm sored by Total Care, sip Zendaya southern-style lemonade Aug 24, 2013 • 2:00 PM and browse booths filled @Chevy Court • Free with with ethnic items. Fair Admission Veterans and 9/11 MemoShow Time 2:00pm rial Kenneth “Babyface” Located in front of the Edmonds” Horticulture Building, the August 25, 2013 • Veterans Memorial held 2:00 PM @Chevy Court its opening at the 1999 • Free with Fair AdFair and was expanded mission The Cab CalloChubby Checker Salt-n-Pepa

The Fifth Dimension way Orchestra Aug 26, 2013 • 2:00 PM @Chevy Court • Free with Fair Admission Show Time 2:00pm Chubby Checker Aug 27, 2013 • 2:00 PM @Chevy Court • Free with Fair Admission Show Time 2:00pm The 5th Dimension The group, featuring original member Florence LaRue Aug 28, 2013 • 2:00 PM @Chevy Court • Free with Fair Admission Show Time 2:00pm


Community News

urbanCNY

August 2013

5

TMBC Annual Outdoor Service and Picnic held Tucker Missionary Baptist Church held their outdoor service and annual picnic at the Willis Carrier Recreational Facility, Sunday, July 28, 2013. While the day was rainy it didn’t damper the spirit of the congregation as they moved their worship service beneath the covered pavilion. Rev. Dr. Leslie J Johnson, Jr. leader of the church located at 517 Oakwood Ave. recently celebrated his 18th anniversary.

CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE: Dilcy Hall, Mary Jackson and Carolyn Womack enjoying the TMBC Annual Church Service and Picnic; Charles Adams, Rev. Eddie Holmes, and Rev. Jeffel Mike at the TMBC Annual Church Service and Picnic; Mother Elizabeth Mann, Mother Wylene Bass, Mother Lula Foy and Rev. Dr. Leslie J Johnson II .


6 August 2013

urbanCNY

Community News Mary Jackson, Tucker Missionary Baptist Member Turns 100: Church “family� held birthday celebration on Aug. 3 On her 98th Birthday Mary Jackson arrived at church on the back of a Harley-Davidson motorcycle. The lively and impeccably dressed Jackson turned 100 Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013. The Tucker Missionary Baptist Church family hosted a birthday party for Ms. Jackson at Tucker Missionary Baptist Church 515 Oakwood Ave. Rev. Dr. Leslie J. Johnson II is the pastor. Politicians, friends, well-wishers from all walks of life gathered to honor Ms. Jackson on her birthday along with various proclamations was a letter from President Obama. When interviewed and asked, “What do you recall as the highlight of your 100 years?� Ms. Jackson’s response, “Dr. King’s Dream of white children and black children walking hand in hand playing together, I see that today�. Another highlight for Ms. Jackson is her 14 years at Dunbar Center, emphasizing, “Education is important and we must tell children that. Education is the key�. This was also a farewell party as Ms. Jackson relocated to the south last week.

Deacon James Edwards, Jr. Mary Jackson and Pastor, Rev. Dr. Leslie J Johnson II as Mary Jackson is honored at Tucker Missionary Baptists Sunday August 4th Service.

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8 August 2013

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Community News

Sheet Metal Workers Recruit Apprentices Syracuse, NY (July 29, 2013) – The Sheet Metal Workers Joint Apprenticeship Commit-

tee of Syracuse, Local Union #58, will conduct a recruitment from August 5, 2013 through

July 7, 2014 for four sheet metal worker apprentices, State Labor Commissioner Peter M. Rivera announced today. Applications can be obtained at the Local Union #58, 301 Pulaski Street, Syracuse, NY from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on the first Monday of every month, excluding legal holidays, during the recruitment period. If the first Monday falls on a holiday, the application may be picked up on the second Monday of the month from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. The Committee requires that applicants: ✓ Must be at least 18 years old. ✓ Must have a high school diploma or general equivalency diploma (G.E.D) as recognized by local authorities, plus one year of algebra, Math I, or first year of high school Regents math. ✓ Must be physically able to perform the work required as determined by a signed

affidavit submitted by applicant. This work may include: - Working at extreme heights or on ladders. - Lifting heavy materials 50 to 75 pounds. - Standing for long periods and crawling about in confined, cramped spaces in awkward positions. - Working outdoors on noisy construction sites in various kinds of weather conditions, such as rain, snow, and wind. - Wearing self-contained breathing apparatus, hard hats, and safety glasses. For further information, applicants should contact their nearest New York State Department of Labor office or Local Union #58 at (315) 472-4411. Apprentice programs registered with the Department of Labor must meet stanSee aPPRENTICES , page 11


urbanCNY

Vigil brown people in this country to ensure that travesties such as what happened not only in the case in the case of Trayvon Martin… the people are gathered here today to ensure this travesty isn’t repeated.” Our nation’s laws should not “allow people to take the law into their own hands and claim self-defense,” the pastor said, and he continued with a more positive message about the cultural divide. “We must encourage people to have relationships between races. When you don’t see people of color and the only images of people of color you see are on the news or a sitcom, then naturally you’re going to live in fear. “ By the time speeches began the crowd had grown to more than 200 people comprised of a rainbow of citizenry and causes. Propelled by events from Sanford, Florida to proliferation of Stand Your Ground Laws in 19 states, the event was attended by Central New Yorkers focused on the death of Trayvon Martin and the verdict in the George Zimmerman case. Organized by the National Action Network led by Al Sharpton, the Justice for Trayvon 100 City Vigil is now focusing on citizen-inspired action to change Stand Your Ground Laws that remain in place in 19 states. Voting rights, electoral erosion caused by the Supreme Court and local police citizen relationships was on the minds of many in the crowd as they cheered each speaker. A particularly emotional moment occurred when Mother’s Against Gun Violence leader and Syracuse Common Councilor Helen Hudson invited all those in attendance who’d lost a child to gun violence to come forward. Hudson was joined by six women who represented a fraction of those victims of black-on-black crime. Many have stated that the black community remains silent on this issue, but the

August 2013

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From page 1

The need for ‘vetting’ By Ken Jackson

Rev. Agee speaks with the press about the march and issues that impact the community. Syracuse protest paid special attention to the problem. These are the images conservative news outlets like Fox News doesn’t show. Not only was the George Zimmerman verdict discussed, but local issues such as jail conditions were on the table. This was an orderly presentation of grievances along with participation of black and white, youth and older people, families, children, retired hippies, concerned citizens representing themselves and folks from the LBTG community. Capturing the frustration and

anger were signs supplied by Socialists declaring, “The System is racist.” A Syracusan visiting from Florida -Les Rivikin -- held his home-made sign proclaiming “I am Trayvon.” Rivikin is concerned about6 future generations. “This is for my grandkids,” he said. “I participated in the marches in West Palm Beach, Florida where I now live.” He emphasized his pride in his grandchildren because they were of different races. This could be a turning point in our national discussion on race. The discussion will continue on August 24, the 50th Anniversary of Dr. King’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech. Bus trips from across the country are being planned as I type. The last time there was this much chatter within the black community was when a man from Chicago had a notion that he could gather One Million Men in a massive gathering in Washington D.C. LEFT: Graphic for the local march. BELOW: Protestors pause for prayer before starting speeches

In my studies of the history of the civil rights movement, I’ve been amazed at how activists managed to endure so much abuse directed at them by those who hated them. They endured by displaying Christian love at the protest marches. They weren’t shouting about white people. King used the words of the Constitution to turn a mirror on America: “Somewhere I read about the freedom of speech and freedom of assembly.” Every speech during that time was vetted (reviewed by organizers to insure continuity of message) so that they were all on the same page. If the ideas were clearly articulated, no one could destroy their messages. Behind the scenes battles raged over what would or would not be included in a major protest event or speech. Everyone was seemingly on message when from the podium we heard shouts of “Black Power, Black Power, Black Power.” All of a sudden a well-directed march went terribly off script. “All of you who’ve moved to the suburbs to be away...” Oh, no! It’s the“those of you who moved, you’re part of the problem”- syndrome. The speaker went on to chastise blacks who’d moved to the suburbs. The tone was angry; suddenly the peaceful ambiance was shattered with what tends to divide us – Race. No one wants to be chastised for where they’ve chosen to live. The most notable civil rights protests in history had one thing in common. They were not focused on anger or even race. It was conditions that John Lewis, Jessie Jackson and others protested. All speeches were vetted. This assured that a march or an organized protest didn’t turn into a mess. One speaker apparently hadn’t read much King. If he had, he would have known, as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. once stated, “No one wins in a dog fight.”


10 August 2013

urbanCNY

Church News

The Pathway of Peace

In Touch Ministries Read Philippians 4:6-7 All of us have responsibilities—whether regarding work, family, community, or church—and we may rightly feel some concern about how to carry out these commitments. When our natural cares get out of balance, the result is anxiety. Though Paul faced an inordinate number of trials (2 Cor. 11:23-28), he was able to say, “Be anxious for nothing.” He understood that anxiety reveals a lack of faith—it’s not possible to be worried while fully trusting God. Fretfulness also takes a toll by draining energy and dividing the mind. Besides that, disproportionate apprehension prevents effective service to the Lord by keeping one’s focus self-centered rather than God-centered. To keep concerns in balance, we must present our requests to God (Phil. 4:6), who is ready, willing, and totally sufficient to handle every care we bring Him. We do this by . . . • Prayer. The Greek word implies worship and appreciation for God’s attributes, not some panicky thought tossed His way. • Supplication. Our cry of humility conveys total helplessness and dependence upon almighty God. • Thanksgiving. We are to approach God without blame or complaint, but with gratefulness that He will ultimately use the difficulty for our good, as He has promised (Rom. 8:28). Philippians 4:7 says that when we bring God our requests in this way, the result will be His wonderful, inexplicable peace. Realizing this, we should learn to go to Him first—not as a last resort.

National Gospel Music Workshop of America (GMWA) ‘Rocked!’ Cincinnati, Ohio was the right place in which to be, as members and supporters from across the country gathered for the 2013 National convention. The GMWA, founded by the late Rev. James Cleveland, lived out the vision as the place “Where Everybody is Somebody”. There were nightly musicals representing coast to coast singers (soloist, mass choirs, mime, Daily Bread (Pastors), record industry, church ministries, renowned artists, academics, exhibitors, Radio Announcers…..just name it. It was there. The numbers may have been down as compared to some of its previous convention, but the outcome was clear that GMWA, “rocked”. It renewed our spirits to see various organizations united to support the work. The representation and support from the Thomas A. Dorsey convention, Music and Arts/ Edwin Hawkins, John P. Key and many others exhibited unity and inspiration. Bishop Albert Jamison, Chairman of the GMWA Board of Directors, Rodena Preston, sister of the late Billy Preston reiterated that more is yet to come as we plan at the March Board of Directors planning meeting, March 2014 in Los Angeles, California for its next convention in Atlanta, Georgia. The Fourth Annual Collegiate Night, Dr. Joan

Hillsman, Chairperson, will be held in March at the Board Meeting. Participation is open to all colleges and universities with gospel choirs. Please visit the website for information at gmwanation.org. Summer/Enrichment Activities and Offerings at JHMN Joan Hillsman’s Music Network, Inc. (JHMN), will be sponsoring several activities, Harriet Tubman City-wide Essay/Contest and presentations relating to the national for. This year marks 100 years since her death. For more information, contact Dr. Hillsman at jhillsman@twcny.rr.com. JHMN is now casting for the Gospel Musical, “The Story of Christmas”. Singers, musicians, dancers and arts related participation is welcomed, inquire at jhillsman@ twcny.rr.com. The Syracuse Chapter of the Gospel Music Workshop of America, SGMWA, will open the Chief ’s baseball game with the Star-spangled Banner, Sept. 3. Come on and join us, inquire at jhillsman@ twcny. rr.com. Music Enrichment at all levels (piano, vocal coaching, gospel techniques, theory, and movement) is available by registering with JHMN. Summer Enrichment classes are at no charge! Space is limited.

Dr. Joan Hillsman


urbanCNY

August 2013

11

Salt City Road Warriors Make Donation of $30,000.00 to the Upstate Medical Foundation

Monday, July 29, 2013 members of the Salt City Road Warriors presented their $30,000.00 donation to the Upstate Medical Foundation. In January 2013, the Salt City Road Warriors, comprised of 50 members who compete in endurance running events, pledged to raise money to help fund research to find a cure and improve the lives of victims of Ovarian, Pancreatic cancer and stroke. The monies were raised through several fundraising events; contributions made by friends, family and local businesses; and personal donations made by team members. Founded by Maureen Clark (who is also the coach for the organization), the Salt City Road Warrior’s mission is to improve lives, strengthen our communities, and cure diseases through endurance training. The Salt City Road Warriors have made donations of more than $85,000.00 to the Upstate Foundation for the past three consecutive years.

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August 2013  

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