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Robinson remembered Syracuse Chiefs pay homage; new movie recalls the man who broke baseball’s color line

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By Russ Tarby or the tenth year in a row, professional baseball officially celebrates Jackie Robinson Day again on April 15, and the hometown Syracuse Chiefs invited kids ages 6 to 12 to attend that evening’s game for free. To earn the free ticket, all the kids had to do was submit a drawing of Jackie in action. Jack Roosevelt “Jackie” Robinson broke baseball’s color line by becoming the first black major-league player when he suited up for the Brooklyn Dodgers on April 15, 1947. More than 26,500 fans – including an estimated 14,000 African-Americans – passed through the turnstiles at Ebbets Field that day to see the Dodgers face the Boston Braves. Robinson played first base and scored a run as the Dodgers won, 5-3. Starting in 2004, Major League Baseball began honoring Robinson by deeming the date “Jackie Robinson Day.” His accomplishments have been celebrated every April 15 at Major and Minor League ballparks across the United States. Before establishing a holiday in his honor, baseball also took the unprecedented step of retiring his uniform number 42 throughout See Robinson, page 2

April, 2013 ● urbancny.com

Community

Black cat incident recalled Syracuse players taunted Robinson By Russ Tarby

No word yet on how the new Jackie Robinson biopic, 42, will depict the infamous “black cat incident” that supposedly occurred at Syracuse’s MacArthur Stadium during Robinson’s 1946 season with the Montreal Royals. The 1950 film The Jackie Robinson Story presented a watered-down version in which two fans try to taunt him with a black cat, and Robinson walks over to them, takes the cat into his dugout and pets it. In both of Robinson’s own autobiographies – My Own Story (1948) and I Never Had it Made, (1972) – he remembered, “Syracuse rode me harder than any other city in the circuit. They were tough on me both on the field and in the stands.” He recalled an incident in which a Chiefs player threw a live, black cat onto the diamond and shouted, “Hey, Robinson, here’s your cousin!” The umpire called time out until the frightened cat had been carried off the field, Robinson wrote, but here’s where his memory locates the incident not

Roberts helps secure funding to rehab infrastructure

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Appointment

Syracuse Commission for Women at Work

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Editorial

The gun is an unsettling icon p. 3 of American culture The Hall Monitor

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2 April 2013

urbanCNY Robinson

Published monthly by: URBAN CNY Kenneth Jackson Editor and Publisher (315)807-9022 Jennifer Wing Designer Walt Shepperd Senior Editor Send mail c/o Eagle Media 2501 James St., Suite 100 Syracuse, NY 13206 For advertising and editorial: (315) 422-7778 (315) 434-8883 -- Fax kjackson@urbancny.com Printed by: Community Media Group LLC 2501 James St., Suite 100, Syracuse, NY 13206 No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission. The opinions expressed herein are not necessarily the opinions of Community Media Group LLC or Eagle Newspapers.

the sport. Now, on Jackie Robinson Day, every professional baseball player in America pays tribute to Robinson by wearing his number 42 on that day. “It’s just awesome to remember him throughout the game of baseball by having everyone wear his number on this occasion,” said Chiefs second-year manager Tony Beasley. “You don’t get to wear No. 42 anymore, so it’s a special memory and a special day. He meant so much to the game. And the way he carried himself with dignity and respect, he deserves this.” This year, Hollywood is also jumping on the Jackie Robinson bandwagon with the April 12 release of 42, a feature film biography starring Chadwick Boseman as Jackie and Harrison Ford as Branch Rickey, the Dodgers executive who brought Robinson to the big leagues and changed baseball forever. Directed by Brian Helgeland (L.A. Confidential and Mystic River), the Robinson biopic was produced by Warner Bros. and Legendary Pictures. In 1950 after his first three seasons in Brooklyn, Robinson portrayed himself in a major motion picture called The Jackie Robinson Story co-starring Ruby Dee as his wife, Rachel. Three television movies were later made about him, A Home Run for Love (1978), The Court-Martial of Jackie Robinson (1990) and Soul of the Game (1996). Robinson, who won the Rookie of the Year Award in 1947 and later was named the National League’s Most Valuable Player, spent 10 seasons with the Dodgers and helped his team win the World Series in 1955. He retired with a lifetime batting average of .311 before the 1957 season and was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1962. Last year in Syracuse on the 65th anniversary of Robinson’s first major league game, longtime local news anchorwoman Jackie Robinson (no relation to the ballplayer who died in 1972)

From page 1 threw out the ceremonial first pitch after Syracuse Police Chief Frank Fowler introduced her to the crowd. Syracuse’s Jackie Robinson was the first African-American anchor to break the color barrier at NBC3 radio. In preparation for 2013’s Jackie Robinson Day, the Syracuse Chiefs asked kids to “Draw Jackie in Action,” pictures to be displayed at NBT Bank Stadium during the 6 p.m. game against the Buffalo Bisons on Monday, April 15. Each student who submitted an entry received one free ticket to attend the game to see their work and the other entries on display at the ballpark. The contest deadline was March 22. A large-than-life image of Robinson and his number 42 adorns the left-centerfield wall at Syracuse’s NBT Bank Stadium. The Chiefs – the top farm club of the Washington Nationals – will again be managed by Virginia native Tony Beasley who spent four seasons as third-base coach for the Pittsburgh Pirates and the Nationals. The Chiefs play their 2013 home opener at 2 p.m. Friday, April 12, versus the Lehigh Valley IronPigs. While the Chiefs fared rather poorly last season, Syracuse fans still relished the ballpark experience as the stadium welcomed a new concessionaire – Ovations Food Services which cooks “everything fresh” – and unveiled a new 30 feet high by 55 feet wide digital scoreboard. Sixteen home games are scheduled at NBTS in April, including a rare double-header against the IronPigs starting at 2 p.m. Sunday, April 14. Field-level ticket prices range from $9 to $20, while upper-deck seats cost $8, and $4 for kids and seniors. Parking costs $5 per vehicle; 474-7833; syracusechiefs.com.

COVER PHOTO: A scene from 42, the new Warner Bros. film starring Chadwick Boseman as Jackie Robinson.


urbanCNY

Opinion The Syracuse Chiefs Honor Jackie Robinson: We’ve Come a Long Way!

Syracuse Chiefs

Manager Tony Beasley returns to lead the Syracuse Chiefs for the second year in a row.

Ken Jackson

Despite our city’s abolitionist past, here in Syracuse we’ve endured a rocky road to equality. Our area played an important role in the Underground Railroad and Freedom Trails and Syracuse is known for freeing a fugitive slave, a proud moment memorialized by “The Jerry Rescue” monument in the heart of Syracuse, Clinton Square. Change in American society moves at a snail’s pace, but that being said, let’s remember that the humble snail eventually moves forward. One change leads to another. Once people realize that the world around them is changing, their own attitudes change, slowly but surely. In the area of sports, Syracuse has been exposed in books and movies as a place where racism festered. The first half of the 20th century was an era when African-American baseball players were banned from America’s major leagues. College football didn’t escape the scourge of racism as Syracuse University’s Ernie Davis discovered. Films document portions of the lives of these black athletes who struggled for acceptance in what was an all-white world. Syracuse University’s Ernie Davis was a gifted running back from Elmira, the first African-American athlete to win the Heisman Trophy. Davis is the subject of the 2008 Universal Pictures movie biography The Express, based on the biography Ernie Davis: The Elmira Express, by Robert C. Gallagher. The Syracuse Chiefs community-owned baseball club has become an instrument of change, building a new stadium and displaying evidence of the team’s history in the facility’s lobby. Among the displays at the stadium is a team photograph of the Syracuse Stars (a very early version of the Chiefs) from the late-1800s. Among the players in the picture are two of the three African-Americans then playing in the International League. And now, here in the 21st century, the Chiefs are led by an African-American manager, Tony Beasley, now in his second year at the recently re-branded NBT Bank Stadium. The ball club has enhanced its efforts reaching out to the general community for support of the team. The recently announced plans for Jackie Robinson Day, April 15, is an example as to just how much change has occurred locally in the venue of sports. Starting in 2004, Major League Baseball began honoring Jackie by deeming the date “Jackie Robinson Day.” His accomplishments have since been celebrated in both major-league and minor-league ballparks across the United States. It was a bright day for baseball when Jackie made the majors. Here’s hoping the sun shines here at our stadium on April 15.

The Hall Monitor

April 2013

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Editorial

The gun is an unsettling icon of American culture

Was there ever a time in our history when guns weren’t part of our American culture? As television debuted some 60 years ago, we were enthralled with getting the bad guys in epic TV shows such as The Untouchables about the gangsters who thrived during the Prohibition era. We moved into westerns like Gunsmoke, Big Valley, High Chaparral, with their heroes, “independent Americans out on the open range.” Let’s face it, we’ve always been The Wild Wild West. Depending on your age and television viewing habits you had to watch at least one gun-themed show. Fast forward to recent years and CBS -- the most-watched network -- had CSI: The Original, CSI: Miami, CSI: NY, Criminal Minds, and the FBI-inspired Numb3rs. Each of these programs portray so many shootings, they had to have killed at least 50 people between these shows in a single week. Maybe the Ghost Whisperer allows CBS to bring the shooting victims back for more work in front of the cameras. The Star Wars franchise was nothing more than a western in space with lasers, light sabers, the force and of course Yoda. How many Wizards were created at Hogwarts School of Witchcrafts and Wizardry in the Harry Potter series? If a particularly bad element needed to be zapped -- zing! poof! gone! -- much neater than gunfire. As video games become more realistic, you can now sit in front of a 50-inch screen and systematically mow down an entire village. Choose any advanced weaponry, the scene, gender and characteristics all in an interactive game, and all in high-definition. And until recently American athletes participating at the Olympic Games wore cowboy hats to symbolize the culture of the United States of America. You see, we’re all cowboys in a culture that hasn’t changed since the shootout at high noon in the middle of Main Street, Dodge City. That will never change.

Black cat

From page 1

in Syracuse but at Montreal’s old Delorimier Stadium. “Following this incident, I doubled down the left field line and when the next player singled to center, I scored. Passing the Syracuse dugout, I said to one of the players, ‘I guess my cousin is pretty happy now.’” Chiefs historian Ron Gersbacher believes that the black cat incident occurred when the Chiefs played against the Royals in Montreal, and baseball box scores bear him out. On Wednesday, Aug. 7, 1946, the Chiefs were playing a game at Delorimier Stadium when Robinson walloped a double and scored a run as the Royals overwhelmed the visitors, 9-4. There’s no record of Jackie smacking a two-bagger to left during games played at MacArthur Stadium that year, so Gersbacher’s probably right. Regardless of where it happened, however, the black cat incident still stands as a vivid and dramatic example of the kind of abuse directed at Robinson by intolerant fans and ballplayers alike. Fifty years after the fact Chiefs second baseman Garton DelSavio told Post-Standard columnist Sean Kirst that his white teammates – several of whom hailed from the Deep South – “called Robinson some of the foulest names he’d ever heard, the worst things you can scream at another man.” In fact, Chiefs catcher Dick West told Kirst that before Robinson’s first atbat at MacArthur Stadium on April 24, 1946, “Our whole bench was hollering at him, and he looked down at me and said, ‘You got some players from the South.’” West, who was from Kentucky himself, recalled, “I looked up and said, ‘I don’t feel sorry for you. You can go to hell.’” So the hostility was putrid and plentiful, but the Chiefs kept the cat in the bag until they came to Canada that summer.


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urbanCNY

Health News April 20-27 is Infant Immunization Week Mobile market delivers Your children are at risk if they have not been immunized against 14 vaccine- preventable childhood diseases. They could become ill with diseases like whooping cough, the flu and measles. Children younger than two years old are also at a higher risk for serious complications if they become ill. April 20-27 is National Infant Immunization Week. This annual observance aims to improve the health of children two years old or younger by reminding parents to immunize them against vaccine- preventable childhood diseases. Before age two, all infants can and should be vaccinated against 14 preventable childhood diseases like whooping cough and measles . When children are not immunized, they may become ill and cause widespread outbreaks of disease. In recent years, New York State has had outbreaks of measles and pertussis, also known as whooping cough. Measles is the most contagious of the vaccinepreventable diseases. It has a knack for finding those who have not been vaccinated . The worst year for measles in the last decade nationally was 2011, when 222 cases were reported. Health officials warn that the disease can be dangerous. In New York State in 2011, there were 7 cases of measles.

In 2012, New York State and the United States experienced the largest pertussis outbreak of the last 50 years. This occurrence reminds us how important it is for all New Yorkers to be properly immunized with vaccines containing pertussis. We join the New York State Health Department in encouraging parents to get all their infant’s vaccines and get them on time. To find out what vaccines your child needs and when, ask your health care provider or scan the QR Code below to view the New York State Department of Health’s Recommended Immunization Schedule. These vaccines may save your infant’s life. For more information about vaccines, childhood diseases and National Infant Immunization Week, call your health care provider at Syracuse Community Health Center, Inc. at 315-476-7921, your “Healthcare Home of Choice.”

The Farm Fresh Mobile Market operates yearlong to provide fresh vegetables and fruits at affordable prices. The Farm Fresh Mobile Market brings fresh produce to locations where people live, work, and play. The goal of the FFMM is to increase access t healthy foods in high need area. The FFMM is held in several locations and offers healthy vegetables and fruits as well as education, samples, and food demonstrations at select sites. For more information about upcoming FFMM locations visit: ongov.net/health or call Creating Healthy Places at 4353280.


Community News The Syracuse Commission for Women at Work

The Syracuse Commission for Women (The Women’s Commission) works diligently planning programs to promote the community. This organization was founded in March, 1986 by Mayor Thomas G. Young who proposed to establish a Commission for women to serve as an advisory body to him, and requested the Common Council adopt a resolution in support of the program. The membership consist of (11) members appointed and serve at the pleasure of the Mayor. The members shall not be paid. The MissionThe Syracuse Commission for Women is an advisory body to Dr. Joan Hillsman was one of the the Mayor whose purpose is to realize the rights of women of women appointd to the comall ages to equal opportunity and participation in the affairs mission. of the community; to ensure women of all ages freedom from discrimination based on gender and to assure them the benefits of equal opportunity and the full utilization of their talent to promote their educational, health, economic and social well-being. The membership shall be selected from among individuals who are residents of Syracuse who are committed to the goals of the Commission, and are (2) year terms or more. The currently, the 2012-2014 Commission for Women works in collaboration with Mayor Stephanie Miner for the benefit of the Syracuse Community. This year’s project is a “Career Exploration Workshop Series� (Career Shadowing), will introduce Middle School girls to local women in various professions. The Women’s Commission also recently hosted the “2013 Woman of the Year Award� Ceremony. The award was presented to Daryl Files. “The Woman of the Year Award� is intended to recognize “an unsung heroine� who has made a difference in her community, and enhanced the lives of the citizens of the “City of Syracuse.� The Commission will continue to engage in projects in our area. The 2012-2014 Women’s Commission appointed by Mayor Stephanie Miner are: Peggy Chase, Kristi Eck, Victoria Coit, Nancy Keefe Rhodes, Alice Honig, Mary Alice Smothers, Linda Donaldson, Rita Paniagua, Pat Body, and Dr. Joan Hillsman.

National Collegiate Night in Dallas, Texas By Dr. J. Hillsman, National Collegiate Chair The Gospel Music Workshop of America (GMWA) held its Annual Planning Meeting in Dallas, Texas, March 12-16th. The GMWA is a national organization for the gospel music industry, performers, academic scholars, music ministries, fledgling artists‌.you name it! This organization met to formulate plans for the National GMWA which will be held July 20-27, 2013 in Cincinnati, Ohio. Check out the website at gmwnational.org. The National Collegiate Division is chaired by one of our own, Dr. Joan Hillsman. Colleges and Universities from across the country usually perform at the nightly musicals during the Board Meeting, for schools are usually closed during national convention time. This year’s collegiate night participants included Bowie State University (Bowie, Maryland), Wheaton College (Wheaton Illinois), Central Texas Colleges, Arkansas University and other participants. Next year during the GMWA Board Meeting, colleges will perform in Los Angeles, California. This is a wonderful opportunity for colleges to network, perform for the public and each other, gain knowledge of the cultural aspects of gospel music heritage in an academic and community setting. The Syracuse (SGMWA) chapter will present its annual Spring Concert at Hendricks Chapel on campus, Friday, May 3, 2013 at 7PM, no admission, and will feature two local colleges that have been inducted into the Collegiate Division in the Syracuse area. They are Onandaga Community College, Lemoyne College and SUNY Cortland. Other colleges in the area are scheduled as well. The public is invited. For further information on “Collegiate Night: Gospel Goes to Collegeâ€?, contact Dr. Hillsman, Syracuse Chapter of GMWA at jhillsman@twcny.rr.com.

Gospel Music Workshop of America (SGMWA) Annual Spring Concert

Syracuse chapter of the Gospel Music Workshop of America (SGMWA) will partner the 3rd year in its Annual Spring Concert to be held at Hendricks Chapel on Syracuse University Campus, Friday, May 3, 2013, 7 PM, Admission Free. The Concert is open to the public and will feature Spoken Word, Poetry, Dance, and Collegiate Gospel Choirs, and other talented groupsof the city. The SGMWA is open to membership of all ages. Contact, Dr. Joan Hillsman, Chapter Representative and organizer of the group at (jhillsman@twcny.rr.com).

urbanCNY

April 2013

Assemblymember Sam Roberts helps secure funding to rehabilitate infrastructure “For the first time in five years, the 2013-14 state budget includes a $75 million increase for the Consolidated Local Street and Highway Improvement Program (CHIPS). This vital funding will go a long way to rehabilitate infrastructure while strengthening our economy and creating good-paying local jobs. “Central New Yorkers deserve safer and more reliable roadways and bridges, but many local governments can’t afford to make necessary repairs and upgrades. This investment will take the burden off of municipalities and save taxpayer money in the future.� A full breakdown of CHIPS funding is available here: governor.ny.gov/assets/documents/CHIPS-Funding-Breakdown.pdf

Grants available for new windows, doors, siding & porch repair You may be eligible for a grant to remove lead from your property if:

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Call Onondaga County Community Development

435-3558 www.ongov.net/cd

Joanne M. Mahoney County Executive

Bob DeMore DirectorEQUAL

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6 April 2013

urbanCNY

Events

Point of Contact April 2013 Point of Contact presents a weekly poetry event staging four voices from its newest poetry collection, Corresponding Voices, Vol. 6 Every Thursday of April at 6PM Point of Contact will host a poetry reading followed by a reception and dialogue with the poets, commemorating National Poetry Month. APRIL 4 JOSEFINA BAEZ Josefina Baez is a performer, writer, educator, and theater director. Born and raised in La Romana, Dominican Republic, Baez eventually moved to New York in the early 70s, which is where she currently resides. In April 1986, Baez founded Ay Ombe Theatre and is the present Director of the company. Some of her published work through Latinarte Publisher include: Dominicanish (2000) and Comrade, Bliss Ain’t Playing (2013), Yolayorkdominicanyork (2011), Dramaturgia Ay Ombe I & II (2011), and Como la una Como uma (2011). Her work is multidisciplinary in context and trans-cultural in scope. Baez is also the creator of Performance Autology, a practical and inclusive artist work methodology. APRIL 11 CYNTHIA CRUZ Cynthia Cruz is a poet; Hodder Fellow in Poetry at Princeton University. Author of Ruin (Alice

Tommy Davidson among comedians to appear at Funny Bone Comedy Club The following comedians will appear at the Funny Bone Comedy Club , 10301 Destiny USA Drive, Syracuse, NY 13204: Tommy Davidson (top right) April 12 - 14 at 7:30 and 9:45 p.m.; Ralph Harris (below April 18 (7:30 p.m.), April 19 -20 7:30 and 9:45 p.m., April 21 (7:30 p.m.); and DL Hughley (bottom) May 3 and 4.

James Books, 2006) and The Glimmering Room (Four Way Books, 2012). APRIL 18 PAULA JIMENEZ Poet, psychologist from Buenos Aires. Publoished work includes La mala vida (2007), Ni jota (2008), and Espacios naturales (2009). APRIL 25 ANNIE MARSHALL An up-and-coming poet, originally from Gloucester, Massachusetts. She is a 2012 Syracuse University graduate with a degree in biology. CRUEL APRIL 2013 POETS ARE FEATURED IN POINT OF CONTACT’S NEW POETRY COLLECTION Corresponding Voices, Vol. 6 edited by Pedro Cuperman


urbanCNY

Events

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Maffei announces congressional art competition Winner’s Art to be Displayed at the United States Capitol Rep. Dan Maffei (D-NY) announced he is encouraging local high school students to participate in this year’s Congressional Art Competition. The winning artist from New York’s 24th Congressional District will have his or her artwork displayed at the U.S. Capitol for one year and will be recognized both in the district and at an awards ceremony in Washington, DC. “Each day, members of Congress and thousands of visitors to the Capitol from across the country will pass by and admire the winning Central New York high

It’s Spring at Bersani’s! See what’s in bloom

school student’s artwork,” said Rep. Dan Maffei. “I look forward to seeing the impressive artwork submissions from Central New York students this year and to welcoming the winning artist to our nation’s capital.” Maffei’s office has contacted schools throughout the 24th Congressional District to encourage participation in this year’s competition. The Congressional Art Competition is open to all high school students in New York’s 24th Congressional District. Submissions are due by April 26, 2013 and will be judged by a local

panel of art professionals. Artwork can be delivered to any one of Maffei’s district offices for submission to the contest. District Office Locations for Submission: Syracuse Office, 100 North Salina Street, 1 Clinton Square, Syracuse, NY 13202 Auburn Office, 24 State Street, Auburn, NY 13021 Oswego Office, 13 West Oneida Street, 2nd Floor, Oswego, NY 13126

BERSANI JEWELRY

217 South Salina Street, Downtown Syracuse • Mon-Fri 10-5:30 & Sat 11-4 • 315.472.6172

Primary Health Care Centers 1. Main Office, 819 S. Salina Street 2. SCHC East, 1938 E. Fayette Street 3. SCHC West, 603 Oswego Street 4. SCHC South, 1701 South Avenue 5. LaFayette Family Health Center

School Based Health Care Centers 7. Dr. Weeks Elementary School-Based Health Center 8. Dr. King Elementary School-Based Health Center 9. Westside Academy at Blodgett School-Based Health Center 10. Delaware Elementary School-Based Health Center 11. Fowler High School-Based Health Center 12. Franklin Elementary School-Based Health Center 13. H.W. Smith Elementary School-Based Health Center 14. Grant Middle School-Based Health Center

Satellite Locations 15. Southwest Community Center 16. Ross Towers 17. Rescue Mission

For more information call us at 315-476-7921 or visit us at www.schcny.com


8 April 2013

urbanCNY

Events

‘AWEsome’ Computers Computers highlighted in Central Library program Wednesdays, March 30 through May 8, 6:00 pm

New at OCPL City Branches this year are exciting new computer systems designed to help advance early literacy skills in children ages 2-10. The state of the art systems are safe, stand alone computers that are not connected to the Internet and offer age appropriate award winning educational and fun games for children in the circular areas of reading, math, science, social studies, writing, arts and music. The computers are available for use by children during the open hours of the city branch libraries. However, Central Library is pleased to announce its continuing 8 week Pizza and Early Literacy Story Time Programs. Every Wednesday at 6:00 pm from March 20 - May 8 join in at Children’s World on the fourth floor of Central Branch Library for traditional story time programming combined with educational computer games designed to promote early literacy in children ages 3-5 and free pizza and juice! The games are fun and entertaining with

recognizable children’s characters such as the cast of sesame street, Dora the Explorer and Diego from Nick Jr. However, the games also emphasize the five main skills of early literacy: talking, singing, writing, playing and reading. By developing these skills parents and caregivers are ensuring a great start to their Childs launch into the world of early literacy. Pizza and Early Literacy Story time is only open to parents and caregivers with children ages 3-5. Space is limited so pre-registration is requested. To register contact Matthew Mac Vittie at (315) 435-1900, matthew.macvittie @ onlib.org or stop in to Children’s World during regular Central Branch Library hours. Children’s World is located at Onondaga County Public Library Central Branch at 447 South Salina Street, Syracuse NY 13202, onlib.org. This programming is supported by funds from the New York State Library Family Services Grant Program.

Nazheer Green, age 4, of Syracuse, using an AWE computer..


urbanCNY

Events

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Onondaga County Public Library April Events Beauchamp Branch Library 2111 S. Salina St. Syracuse, NY 13205 435-1940 FOR CHILDREN: Funwork Homework Help Tuesdays, April 9, 16, 23 and 30 3:00-5:00 pm Get help with homework and have fun with Mrs. Hayden. Free! Wii & Game Fun Fridays, April 5, 12, 19 and 26 3:00 pm Test your skills on the Nintendo Wii and enjoy an assortment of games. And while you’re waiting to play the Wii, enjoy a range of different board games. Ages 6-12 SPRING BREAK: Mini Beach Craft Monday, April 1 2:00 pm Create your very own miniature beach scene using dough sand and a jelly ocean! Painted Sea Shells Tuesday, April 2 2:00 pm Work on creating a colorful, artistic sea shell with paint and glitter. Storytime & Ocean Craft Wednesday, April 3 10:00 am Enjoy a fun-filled ocean storytime for Toddlers and Pre-School age children. And once the stories are done, the children will create their Sweet Sand Art. Ocean in a Bag & Sweet Sand Art Wednesday, April 3 2:00 pm With a range fun supplies (like hair gel!), create your own “ocean” to take home. Plus, using crushed cereal, make sweet smelling sand art. Colored Sand Jars Thursday, April 4 2:00 pm PLEASE SIGN-UP @ Beauchamp Library Each child will get the opportunity to make their own layered sand jar sculpture. Call 435-3395. Spring Movie Thursday, April 4 5:00 pm Enjoy the family film Big Miracle. Cooking-Up Literacy: Splash into Spring Friday, April 5 2:00 pm PLEASE SIGN-UP @ Beauchamp Library—Space is Limited The AWE National Award Winning program Cooking-Up Literacy is having a special Ocean themed Cooking Class. A wonderful combination of reading, math, cooking, and eating for children to enjoy. Ages 5-13yrs. Please sign-up at Beauchamp Library 435-3395. FOR ADULTS: One-on-One Computer Training Set up a one-on-one appointment at Beauchamp Library to learn the basics of using a computer, including the Internet

& Microsoft Word. Please contact Paschal Ugoji at 435-3395. GED Classes @ Beauchamp Branch Monday-Thursday 9:30 am – Noon (No Classes April 1-5) Free study sessions designed to help those who are interested in obtaining their GED. Must Sign-Up. Contact Pat Booker 435-6376. Sankofa Piecemakers Quilting Group Saturdays, April 6, 13, 20 and 27 10:00 am Beauchamp Branch Library is the home of Sankofa Piecemakers where they meet every Saturday in a friendly supportive atmosphere to learn new quilting techniques and to practice traditional ones. Betts Branch Library 4862 South Salina St. Syracuse, NY 13205 435-1940 APRIL ART EXHIBIT: Decoupage by Tyrone Henry FOR CHILDREN: Storytime Thursday, April 4, 11, 18, and 25 10:30¬ am A lively mix of stories, songs, and rhymes make this a special time for you and your child. Story times are a fun way to help your child develop skills they will need to be ready to read. Earth Day Craft Monday, April 22 3:00 pm Make an Earth Day Craft from recycled materials in the children’s area. Bedtime Stories Wednesday, April 24 6:45-7:15 pm Visit the library on your way to bed and Miss Anne will read you stories. Come in your jammies if you like! Stories are selected for children between 3 to 6 years of age but all are welcome. Plant a Flower Tuesday, April 2 10:00 am Start spring early; plant a flower. Children ages 6-12. Younger children may attend with a parent to assist. Wii and Board Games Wednesday, April 3 2:00 pm Play Wii or board games in the Betts community room. Lego Extravaganza Thursday, April 4 2:00 pm Bring your Legos to the library and create! Poetry Reading Friday, April 5 2:00 pm April is National Poetry Month. Open Mike Poetry reading for kids. Read a poem of your own or someone else’s. FOR FAMILIES: Family Movie: Wreck-It Ralph Saturday, April 6 2:00 p.m.

Enjoy Wreck-It Ralph in the Betts Community Room with your friends and family. Rated PG Cooper’s Hawk Taxidermy Mount Sunday, April 7 2:00 pm SUNY ESF students and staff will be preparing a Cooper’s Hawk taxidermy mount at the Betts Branch Library for the Council of Park Friends Nature Center (Clark’s Reservation State Park). All ages are invited to attend this unique demonstration. FOR ADULTS: Senior Social Friday, April 19 2:00 pm Felt napkin holder craft- You’re welcome to bring your own felt if you have a special color scheme in mind. We will also have supplies. Please sign up. Betts Book Discussion Tuesday, April 16 10:00 am You are invited to the community book club, and to be part of the stimulating conversation! Step away from your usual reads and join us for April’s discussion on False Convictions by Tim Green. National Library Week Saturday, April 20 1:00 pm Betts Branch Library is pleased to honor Laura Jane Tracy for almost 30 years of service to the Betts Branch Library. Mrs. Tracy will receive the National Library Week Volunteer Award—an award given to a person who promotes and supports Betts Branch Library. Everyone is invited. Refreshments will be served. Hooks And Needles Saturday, April 6, 13, 20 and 27 9:30-11:00 am Saturday mornings – a time to chat, knit, crochet, and share ideas in a casual and friendly environment. All are welcome Monday Musicals Betts Branch is showing glorious movies from Hollywood’s musical era. We will be featuring Bob Hope and Bing Crosby movies in April. See your favorites on the big screen, as they were meant to be seen! • Road to Morocco Monday, April 1 2:00 pm • Road to Singapore Monday, April 15 2:00 pm Robert P. Kinchen Central Library The Galleries of Syracuse 447 South Salina St. 435-1900 APRIL“ART EXHIBIT” Art Exhibit by Tom Hussey Auburn artist Tom Hussey’s exhibit will include landscape and figurative renderings in oil, acrylic and pastel. FOR CHILDREN: Spring Break Drop-in Craft:

Paper Plate Umbrellas Monday, April 1-Saturday, April 6 During Library Hours Have fun creating your own paper plate umbrellas. This is a perfect rainy day craft during Spring Break Cartooning Workshop for Beginners With J.P. Crangle Wednesday, April 3 2:00 pm Learn the basics of cartooning. Presentation and workshop will help you get started in creating your very own cartoon/ comics. Children under the age of 8 must be accompanied by an adult. Pizza & Early Literacy Story Time Wednesdays, April 3, 10, 17 and 24 6:00 pm Join us for an 8 week series of Early Literacy Programming which will include Story times, physical activities and AWE educational computer activities for children ages 3 to 5 years old. Traditional story times combined with AWE (advanced workstations in education) `digital learning stations give children a fun and engaging experience. The AWE systems take pride in emphasizing the five main early literacy skills which include: Talking, Singing, Writing, Playing, Reading. There will be FREE pizza and juice! YogaKids® Saturday, April 20 11:15 am YogaKids® offers an interdisciplinary approach to learning that utilizes yoga practices and poses. FAMILY MOVIE: Recent 1st Run Movie Saturday, April 20 1:30 pm Based on the best-selling novel by Yann Martel; a young Pi Patel, overcoming a cataclysmic shipwreck, finds himself stranded on a lifeboat with the only survivor, a ferocious Bengal tiger named Richard Parker. 2012; Rated PG, FREE. FOR ADULTS: Join the Tuesday Page Turners! Tuesday, April 9 5:30-6:30 pm Central Library’s book club for adults meets the second Tuesday of each month. We will be discussing A Visit From the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan. Call 315.435.1900 with any questions. Recent 1st Run Movie Thursday, April 25 9:00 am On November 4, 1979, Iranian militants stormed the American embassy in Tehran and captured dozens of American hostages, sparking a 444 day ordeal. There’s a little-known footnote to the crisis: six Americans escaped and a mid-

level agent named Antonio Mendez devised an ingenious yet incredibly risky plan to rescue them. 2012; Rated R, FREE. Job Resource Assistance Drop-in Tuesdays, April 2, 9, 16, 23 and 3o 1:00-3:00 pm Receive help with online job searching, resumes, creating profiles and more. No appointment necessary. Space is limited and available on a first come, first seated basis. Call 315.435.1900 with any questions. Free One-on-One Basic Computer Instruction Thursdays, by Appointment Only April 4, 11, 18 and 25 1:00-2:00 pm Learn how to do basic computer tasks in a Windows environment, set up E-mail, or navigate the Internet! Free; Call 315.435.1900 to register or for more details, www.onlib.org Employability Success Series: Interactive, professional, FREE workshops for students and job-seekers. 4 Part Series, March 6 – April 24 Sponsored by Bryant & Stratton College •What’s in Your Toolbox? Sharpening Your Skills for the 21st Century Wednesday, April 10 1:00-2:00 pm Learn to prepare yourself to meet the demands of today’s competitive workforce. •Resume and Interviewing Wednesday, April 24 1:00-2:00 pm Learn the key components of a solid resume and the do’s and don’ts of a successful interview. Petit Branch Library 105 Victoria Place Syracuse, NY 13210 435-3636 APRIL ART EXHIBIT: “Time Stands Still” Art Exhibit by Joan Applebaum, Windy Hill Studio Her inspiration comes from her surroundings; the changing seasons in Upstate New York, lively city festivals and the lovely old architecture that makes this area unique. Art Reception Saturday, April 6 2:00-4:00 pm Th3 – The Third Thursday: Syracuse’s Citywide Art Opening Thursday, April 18 5:00-8:00 pm Petit is Th3’s newest venue! The mission of Th3 is to promote the visual arts to the public by providing a common date and time for visiting member venues at no charge on the third Thursday of every month See library, page 10


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Events

April 2013 - ArtRage Calendar Listings Films:

Tuesday, April 2, 2013    7pm    Free to the Public Gifford “What If…” film - Fixing the Future (2012) (72 min) Directed by Ellen Spiro 505 Hawley Ave., Syracuse, NY 13203    (315) 218-5711 or artragegallery.org.

In Fixing the Future, host David Brancaccio, of public radio’s Marketplace and NOW on PBS, visits people and organizations across America that are attempting a revolution: the reinvention of the American economy. By featuring communities using sustainable and innovative approaches to create jobs and build prosperity, Fixing the Future inspires hope and renewal in a people overwhelmed by economic collapse. The film highlights effective, local practices such as: local business alliances, community banking, time banking/hour exchange, worker cooperatives and local currencies. Partnering organizations for the spring “What If…” Film Series are Alchemical Nursery, Baltimore Woods Nature Center, Cooperative Federal: Syracuse’s community development credit union, Montessori School of Syracuse, The New School, Northside UP, Slow Food CNY, the Syracuse Area Beekeepers Club and the Syracuse Real Food Cooperative. THE “WHAT IF…” FILM SERIES - In collaboration with the Rosamond Gifford Foundation, ArtRage Gallery will screen films depicting community efforts to improve their communities and the world. The spring series of three films will begin in March and run thru May 2013. Films were selected by a committee of community members and are shown twice at different days and times followed by a facilitated discussion. All films are free to the public. No reservation is required.

Tuesday, April 16, 2013    5:30pm    Free to the Public Gifford “What If…” film - Play Again (2010) (80 min) Directed by Tonje Hessen Schei 505 Hawley Ave., Syracuse, NY 13203    (315) 218-5711 or artragegallery.org.

One generation from now most people in the U.S. will have spent more time in the virtual world than in nature. New media technologies have improved our lives in countless ways. Information now appears with a click. Overseas friends are part of our daily lives. And even grandma loves Wii. But what are we missing when we are behind screens? And how will this impact our children, our society, and eventually, our planet? At a time when children play more behind screens than outside, PLAY AGAIN explores the changing balance between the virtual and natural worlds. Is our connection to nature disappearing down the digital rabbit hole? Partnering organizations for the spring “What If…” Film Series are Alchemical Nursery, Baltimore Woods Nature Center, Cooperative Federal: Syracuse’s community development credit union, Montessori School of Syracuse, The New School, Northside UP, Slow Food CNY, the Syracuse Area Beekeepers Club and the Syracuse Real Food Cooperative. THE “WHAT IF…” FILM SERIES - In collaboration with the Rosamond Gifford Foundation, ArtRage Gallery will screen films depicting community efforts to improve their communities and the world. The spring series of three films will begin in March and run thru May 2013. Films were selected by a committee of community members and are shown twice at different days and times followed by a facilitated discussion. All films are free to the public. No reservation is required.

 Saturday, April 20, 2013    8pm    $5 Suggested Donation Rediscovering World Cinema: NINOTCHKA (1939) 505 Hawley Ave., Syracuse, NY 13203    (315) 218-5711 or artragegallery.org. Directed by Ernst Lubitsch with Greta Garbo and Melvyn Douglas.

Famed continental director Ermst Lubitsch joins forces with Hollywood legend Garbo in this  ”perfect blend of deiicate fliration and political saitre” (Time Out New York). Garbo shines as a stern Soviet envoy who is sent to check on comrades working abroad, and who means business — – until she discovers the charms of Paris, and more.  You’ll find out what was meant by the Lubitsch Touch in this acclaimed film, Oscar-nominated for Best Picture, Actress, Screenplay.  Awards: Best Director:  NY Film Critics Circle. Top Ten Films: National Board of Review.

Thursday, April 25, 2013    7pm    Free to the Public Gifford “What If…” film - Play Again (2010) (80 min) Directed by Tonje Hessen Schei 505 Hawley Ave., Syracuse, NY 13203    (315) 218-5711 or artragegallery.org.

One generation from now most people in the U.S. will have spent more time in the virtual world than in nature. New media technologies have improved our lives in countless ways. Information now appears with a click. Overseas friends are part of our daily lives. And even grandma loves Wii. But what are we missing when we are behind screens? And how will this impact our children, our society, and eventually, our planet? At a time when children play more behind screens than outside, PLAY AGAIN explores the changing balance between the virtual and natural worlds. Is our connection to nature disappearing down the digital rabbit hole? Partnering organizations for the spring “What If…” Film Series are Alchemical Nursery, Baltimore Woods Nature Center, Cooperative Federal: Syracuse’s community development credit union, Montessori School of Syracuse, The New School, Northside UP, Slow Food CNY, the Syracuse Area Beekeepers Club and the Syracuse Real Food Cooperative. THE “WHAT IF…” FILM SERIES - In collaboration with the Rosamond Gifford Foundation, ArtRage Gallery will screen films depicting community efforts to improve their communities and the world. The spring series of three films will begin in March and run thru May 2013. Films were selected by a committee of community members and are shown twice at different days and times followed by a facilitated discussion. All films are free to the public. No reservation is required.

Events:

Wednesday, April 17, 2013     6:30 - 8:30pm    Free to the Public Readings/Performances on Identity 505 Hawley Ave., Syracuse, NY 13203    (315) 218-5711 or artragegallery.org.

Join young people from the Q Center, The Dance Theater of Syracuse, local poets Mary Slechta, Rachel Guido deVries, Omanii Abdullah, storyteller Vanessa Johnson and musicians for an evening of performance art: poetry, music and dance. A special event surrounding the current video project at ArtRage about Identity. Thursday, April 18, 2013    7pm     Free to the Public Artist Talk with Sandra Stephens 505 Hawley Ave., Syracuse, NY 13203    (315) 218-5711 or artragegallery.org. Meet the artist of the current exhibition, Rationalize & Perpetuate, a video installation by Sandra Stephens.

Friday, April 19, 2013    7-10pm    Suggested donation $25- $500 (but no one will be turned away) Fundraiser for the Davis-Putter Scholarship Fund 505 Hawley Ave., Syracuse, NY 13203    (315) 218-5711 or artragegallery.org.

An event to Support Student Activism, featuring Anne Braden: Southern Patriot (1924-2006) film showing. You’re invited to this special evening to support the 50th anniversary of the DavisPutter Scholarship Fund. The Fund has been supporting student activists for over 50 years and our grantees have been at the forefront of virtually every major progressive social movement.  They are artists, scholars, people’s lawyers, political prisoners, and organizers on the frontlines.  Studentdriven movements have been at the center of social change and our grantees have been integral to this work for peace and justice. You will hear from a current grantee from SUNY Binghamton, Matt Birkhold, and have the opportunity to see the recently released documentary Anne Braden: Southern Patriot. Martin Luther King hailed civil rights leader Anne Braden as “eloquent and prophetic” in his 1963 Letter from the Birmingham Jail. Anne and Carl Braden were early members of the Board of the Fund, and remained so for the rest of their lives.  We celebrate their commitment to the Fund and to the struggle for peace and justice. Wine, cheese, and hors d’oeuvres will be served.

Library from 5-8 p.m. Enjoy this month’s art exhibit and light refreshments. FOR ALL AGES: Game Afternoon @ Petit Fridays, April 5, 15, 19 and 26 3:00-4:30 pm Come to Petit to play your favorite board games! Drop in any time 3-4:30 p.m. Bring a friend! Children of all ages welcome. Shannon Wurst Saturday, April 13 2:30 pm Join us for this family show by folk artist Shannon Wurst. An award-winning singer/songwriter from Arkansas, Shannon offers

From page 9 engaging original songs, reflecting a love of nature and keen observations of life. Her album, “Green and Growing: Roots Music for Eco-Kids,” was released in 2011. All ages welcome. FREE! FOR TEENS: Petit Rocks! Teen Blog Calling all teens! Petit Branch Library has started a blog specifically for teens, and we want you to be a part of it. Blog about books, movies, music and more! This is a wonderful way for you to communicate with other teens and with the library. If you want to be a contributor either visit the Petit Rocks!

(http://petitrocks.wordpress.com) permissions page, or stop into the library to pick up a permission form. Even if you don’t want to create your own posts, be sure to check out the blog. FOR ADULTS: Poetry @ Petit Saturday, April 20 2:30 pm Join local poets, writers and musicians as they celebrate National Poetry Month with readings and performances at Petit Branch Library. All are welcome to participate in an open mic following the scheduled performers. Refreshments will be served.

Book Discussion Group Thursday, April 18 6:30 pm The Petit Branch Book Discussion Group will discuss The Marriage Plot by Jeffrey Eugenides. Our next meeting is scheduled for Thursday, May 16, at 6:30, when we will discuss The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz. Refreshments served. New members are always welcome and no registration required. For more information call 435-3636. “Gardens, Buffalo Style” with Carol Bradford Saturday, April 27 2:30 pm

Buffalo is renowned for more than wings, beef on weck, and the Bills. The inspiring public and private gardens are showcased in Western New York’s annual “National Garden Festival,” five weeks of garden walks, talks, and special events which runs from June 21 to August 4 this year. The city gardens featured the last full weekend in July on “Garden Walk Buffalo” are imaginatively designed and well planted, with quirky personal touches that have to be seen to be believed. Carol didn’t tour all of them last year—there were several hundred—but made a good effort and took many photos to share

and enjoy. Carol Bradford is a garden writer, photographer and speaker who loves to travel. Her Syracuse garden has been completely reworked six times in 30 years. She has been the garden columnist for The Post-Standard and a contributing writer for other regional publications. She volunteers for Cornell Plantations, Cornell Cooperative Extension, and the Finger Lakes Partnership for Invasive Species Management. For additional Onondaga County Public Library events and information see their website: onlib.org.


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April 2013

Church News Wow! Your Pastor Is Only Human! Share faith Christian Ministry blog From the perspective of a pew, the pastor may look alright. He acts confidently. He preaches eloquently. He shakes hands firmly. He smiles warmly. He is the ideal pastor. But is everything really alright? Among many pastors today, there lurks a danger. It is a danger that rarely surfaces, but which nonetheless eats away at the inner life of the pastor. This danger is the drastic disconnect between his personal life and his public persona.

Toppling the Pedestal: Pastors Are Not Infallible

Very often, pastors are viewed as the pinnacle of Christian perfection. Sure, they might slip up from time to time, but they live a put-together life. They are called a “man of faith,” or a “man of God,” bestowing upon them a status that looms far above that of ordinary people. This is, of course, an unhealthy way to view pastors — as infallible angels of light, sent from on high to bless us with an holy aura. But the real problem begins when the pastor takes this expectation upon himself, and forces a public persona to match, when his personal life is understandably different. He’s tired, but he can’t show it. He’s discouraged, but he can’t cry. He’s tempted, but he can’t confess. He’s lonely, but he can’t admit it. He’s burned out, but he’s got to keep going. Basically, he’s human, but he’s not supposed to act like it. He’s somehow above that. He’s got to continue putting on the act, going through the motions, and draining his soul dry. In his private life, he may try to numb the pain, but it’s there. In his public life, he continues to put on the Christian show.

Bringing Back Authentic Leadership

Who’s to blame for this pastoral blight? The pastor? The people? Satan? God? The problem is a collective one — one in which we all share the blame. Thankfully, however, the problem has a solution. The solution is one in which we all must participate. The pastor and people must work together to help their leadership do the following:

•Serve from faith, not fear of man.

When a pastor builds a privacy fence around his inner self, he conducts his ministry out of fear. He’s afraid of what people will think if he somehow lets go for a moment. Instead of fear-driven activity, the pastor should reconnect with faith — a far more reliable engine of ministry.

•Admit faults, not hide them.

All of us have faults. Even pastors. Pastors should not feel like they have to hide their faults. The effort to hide just one fault can lead to the pastor’s attempt to hide all kinds of other potential faults — whether they are truly faults or not. He will begin camouflaging real and imagined faults, leading to a dichotomy between his public persona and his true private self.

•Express weakness, not cover it up with busy activity.

Often, when we feel weak, we attempt to mask the weakness with a flurry of activity. Frenetic Christian service is sometimes the opiate of an empty spiritual life. Haphazard activity for Jesus replaces the true weakness, weakness in which we are to glory (2 Corinthians 11:30; 2 Corinthians 12:9). We derive a false sense of Christian strength when we deny our weakness, filling the gaping crevice with a host of feel-good Christian duties. God wants weakness. He repudiates self-sufficiency (2 Corinthians 3:5). The pastor, of all people, is most prone to this danger. His calling, after all, is spiritual activity. Yet we must all admit that we’re weak. All of us. And we should be. And that’s okay.

•Expose brokenness, not put up a front of holiness. Christians are broken people (Psalm 51:17).

Brokenness is the posture of repentance. Brokenness is surrender. And even pastors…no, especially pastors, are to model this brokenness. Brokenness is not some cowering, retreating, slithering show of inferiority. Brokenness is confident humility in the face of an infinite God. When we expect shows of holiness from our pastor instead of allowing their brokenness, we set them up for hiding their personal life and putting on a public persona. All of this requires humility on the part of the pastor. It requires patience and love on the part of the people. This requires a supportive leadership team who themselves are free to be open, broken, authentic, and real. We want to be people who are whole, restored, hopeful, and joyous. This can’t happen when we’re living two lives. This can’t happen in our assemblies unless we are intentionally loving our leaders enough to let them serve in authenticity. We live in a community of faith. None of us, not even our pastors, should be looked to as infallible pillars of strength. As a community of faith, we place our faith in God, not our leaders. Let us keep “looking to Jesus, the founder and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is seated at the right hand of the throne of God” (Hebrews 12:2).

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April 2013