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Contents

SPRING 2019

Departments MEMBERSHIP

Member Spotlight: Brian Loman PAGE 61

In the Scene: Event Photos PAGE 68

Business Success PAGE 72 SPORTS

Rules of Golf Modernization PAGE 18

New in Golf Club Technology PAGE 22

Golf On Your Terms... PAGE 26

TrackMan PAGE 28

2019 PGA Championship PAGE 32

Features

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The Three Day Weekend

Experience the country one weekend at a time through three-day trips to some of the greatest cities in the world.

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A Flight Through History

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Rolling into Spring

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Going Green at UCC

The Club and its members have been witness to a lot over its long history.

“When do I start? Is it too early or too late to begin tuning up my lawn?”

The Club was awarded the proud distinction of becoming a Certified Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary.

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A Down Home Classic

The five standards that make bourbon so unique.

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Meet Your Chefs Get to know the people behind the scenes who carefully craft every delicious dish you have here at UCC.

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Stay Healthy With Us

A quick guide to the healthy foods served at UCC.

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A Beginner's Guide to Soccer

Here is what you need to know about English soccer to get started.


SPRING 2019 | WWW.UCC1922.COM URBANA COUNTRY CLUB | URBANA, ILL.

Manager’s Welcome

GENERAL MANAGER Scott Szymoniak scott.szymoniak@ucc1922.com

HEAD PGA GOLF PROFESSIONAL Kevin R. Hildebrand kevin.hildebrand@ucc1922.com

EXECUTIVE CHEF Noe Rodriguez noe.rodriguez@ucc1922.com

MARKETING & SALES Carissa Nelson carissa.nelson@ucc1922.com

MEMBER & GUEST RELATIONS Amber Talbott 4

amber.talbott@ucc1922.com

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT & MEMBERSHIP Tyler J. White tyler.white@ucc1922.com

GROUNDS SUPERINTENDENT Scott White scott.white@ucc1922.com

CLUB ACCOUNTANT Thomas Riley thomas.riley@ucc1922.com

DESIGN GROUP Robb Springfield Jose Galue Isaac Mitchell Lily Stanicek

Office: 217-344-8670 Golf Shop: 217-344-8673 Dining Room: 217-367-8449

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his past October I had the privilege of traveling to London with six of your fellow UCC members for some golf, Fulham soccer and Jaguars football. While the entire trip was incredible, what stands out was the opportunity we had to play Royal St. Georges, host of the 2020 Open Championship. We were asked to play in groups of two, so Cody Alterman and myself set out to take on this historic, revered golf venue. The weather was perfect, greens pure and I hit 12 of 14 fairways which kept my walk fairly direct. But what I remember most about the day, was that for four hours there was no stress, worry or thoughts of the outside world. My playing partner and I got to enjoy each other’s company while we took in the beauty of the seaside links. Golf bonded us in a way no other sport can. The world we live in today can consume the human spirit if you entertain the tidal wave of information available at our fingertips. In order to balance the noise with quiet time, I challenge every UCC member to maintain both physical and mental health by engaging

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deeper in the great game of golf. We have three PGA Professionals that are ready, willing and able to introduce you to the game in a very subtle way—a way that is neither stressful nor intimidating. It is golf on your terms and at your pace. Most importantly, we will teach you how to use the game of golf as an escape from everyday life, whether you have one hour, four hours or 30 minutes to devote. While golf is a game of skill, do not use that as a barrier or excuse not to try it. One of my favorite quotes comes from the legendary University of Oregon track coach and co-founder of Nike, Bill Bowerman: “If you have a body, you are an athlete.” Profound and inspiring. I hope to see you amidst the green grass, basking in the sunshine, searching for your inner-athlete on our Tom Bendelow-designed gem. I am confident that, once you experience the highs and lows, you’ll agree that there is no better place to be.

SCOTT SZYMONIAK GENERAL MANAGER


ALL THE CLUB INFO AT YOUR FINGERTIPS!

LOOK UP YOUR FELLOW MEMBERS TO GET IN TOUCH WITH THEM.

VIEW UPCOMING EVENTS AND ADD THEM TO YOUR CALENDAR.

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VIEW YOUR STATEMENT. VIEW HOURS AND LOCATION. CONTACT SPECIFIC STAFF MEMBERS.

DOWNLOAD THE UCC APP TODAY! QUESTIONS? EMAIL CARISSA.NELSON@UCC1922.COM

CHECK OUT THE MOST RECENT BREAKFAST, LUNCH AND DINNER MENUS.


O F F I C E

H O U R S

Sunday – Monday Closed Tuesday – Friday 9am – 5pm Saturday 10am – 4pm

C L U B H O U S E

H O U R S

2019 Spring Hours

Monday Club Facilities Closed Golf Course Available for Walking After 12pm Tuesday – Saturday Lunch 11am – 3pm Tuesday – Saturday Dinner 5pm – 9pm

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Sunday Breakfast/Lunch 9am – 1pm Limited Menu 1pm – 7pm

G O L F

S H O P

Tuesday – Friday 7:30am – 7pm Saturday – Sunday 7am – 7pm

P O O L

H O U R S

Tuesday – Sunday 11am – Dusk * All new hours begin May 1st

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Activities Calendar A P R I L

M A Y

J U L Y

April 13th UCC Apparel Showcase

MAY 12TH Mother's Day Brunch

July 4th Flag Tournament

April 17th Ladies Golf Kick-Off Dinner

JULY 5TH Independence Day Celebration JUL. 05. 2019.

APRIL 20TH Easter Eggstravaganza

4–9pm

May 26 Memorial Day Party th

May 27 Stars and Stripes Tournament th

April 21st Easter Brunch

May 28 CLUB CLOSED th

April 22nd & 23 rd Golf Course Aerification

Independence Day Celebration. SAVE THE DATE.

July 19th UCC Comedy Night July 20 th Women's Invitational July 27th Twin City @ UCC

J U N E

Club Cowboy

June 1st One Day Member Guest

A U G U S T

June 8th Music on the Patio

August 3 rd Flag Tournament

May 4th Kentucky Derby Party

June 16th Father's Day Parent/Child Tournament

August 10 th & 11th Henry L. Green & Betsy Downs-Kimpel Club Championship

May 5th Cinco de Mayo Breakfast

June 27th, 28th, 29th Men's Invitational

August 10 th Music on the Patio

M A Y MAY 2nd Men's Golf Kick-Off Dinner May 3 rd TrackMan Unveiled

May 11th Fitting Day

August 25th Couples Club Championship August 30 th TUMS Pairing Party


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CARE

YOU DESERVE

in the community you love Raising a family is rewarding and challenging. At OSF HealthCare, we understand the health and well-being of your family is your biggest concern. At our new Urbana location, OSF Medical Group – Family Medicine, our team partners with you to ensure your child’s well-being and your peace of mind. Our team of providers combine expertise, experience and energy to offer seamless coordinated care. From infancy to toddler and teen, you can count on OSF Medical Group – Family Medicine to provide the extraordinary care your family deserves. To schedule an appointment, call (217) 337-3865. OSF Medical Group – Family Medicine 1405 W. Park St., Ste. 206 | Urbana osfhealthcare.org/familymed UCC1 9 2 2 . CO M I S P R I N G 2 0 1 9


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9AM - 2PM RESERVATIONS REQUIRED


E X P E R I E N C E

T H E

W O R L D

UCC-Style T R A V E L O P P O R T U N I T I E S A R E B E N E F I T O F Y O U R M E M B E R S H A N D W H A T B E T T E R W A Y T O G O F Y O U R H O M E T O W N T H A N T I T W I T H Y O U R F E L L O W M E M B

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Aside from access to premier golf and fine dining, one of the main reasons people join a country club is for the enjoyment of networking, socializing and creating relationships with like-minded individuals. Similarly, people join travel groups to experience the world with those who share the same traveling interests. Lucky for you, UCC not only provides you with the perks of being a country club member, but also acts as a travel group, giving you unique travel opportunities that only members can experience. You and a group of members can take your love for golfing, dining and networking and grow your relationship with each other across the world on a trip only UCC has to offer.

A I P , E T O U T O D O E R S .

with Mr. Khan’s sports teams, schedule tee times, book hotels and communicate the information to the entire membership so that everyone was aware of this great opportunity to travel the world. Travel agencies make traveling extremely easy, and one of the goals of UCC traveling is for the planning to be as simple as possible for the members. Once the plane landed in London and phones were turned back on, members were waiting for a call from Randall, the week’s personal driver and trip advisor. From the airport to the hotel, the hotel to breakfast, lunch, dinner and anywhere else,

This past year, through a UCC-organized seven-day journey across the pond, seven members and two staff went on a trip of a lifetime to London. They played golf at multiple Top 50 courses in the world, watched a Premier League English football match (Fulham vs. Bournemouth), watched the 2018 Super Bowl Champs play the Jacksonville Jaguars and had many other great European experiences. To make the member experience as simple, yet spectacular, as possible, all of this began with planning and preparation by UCC staff members to align travel schedules UCC1 9 2 2 . CO M I S P R I N G 2 0 1 9


Once arrived, some practiced their short game while others toured the traditional clubhouse. Like every day though, when the tee time approached, everyone put their personalized golf ball into the hands of one member where he/she blindly tossed the balls over their head to land on the green. Whoever’s two balls were closest to one another would be partners for the day of golf. Spouses would play with other spouses, and the week of intermingling, networking, and relationship building began. Alternating playing groups to walk 18 holes with somebody new each day helped them not only learn who could and couldn’t putt, but also helped them connect on a personal level with every person who made the long trek overseas. Although the trip consisted of great golf, the first three days were designed to consist of golf in the morning and having the entire afternoon left for whatever members were interested in. After an English beer that is. Following three days of golf, you might think the group would be ready for a break. However, sore hamstrings and tight calves were not going to hold them back from seeing Buckingham Palace and Windsor Castle, going on Jack the Ripper Pub Crawls and watching live European and American football matches. To find out more about this amazing trip, you will have to consult a member who made the journey. Or, make the decision to join a group on one of UCC’s future endeavors. It will certainly be one for a lifetime.

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Randall had it taken care of. He knew the best restaurants in town, the closest pubs to grab a brew and the quickest routes to the courses. From there, memories and experiences were up to the group to create. After dropping the group off at the hotel, Randall let them know he would be waiting outside at 11am to drive them to their first tee time at Sunningdale Golf Club. The 30 minute trek seemed short with all the laughs and jokes on the drive there.

KEEP AN EYE OUT IN 2019 F O R E M A I L S , FA C E B O O K POSTS, AND FLIERS AROUND THE CLUB FOR UPCOMING O P P O R T U N I T I E S T O T R AV E L WITH MEMBERS…YOU DON’T WA N T T O M I S S O U T !

One of my favorite parts of traveling on the UCC trips is getting to know new members, or members who we have seen over the years but for one reason or the other, have not gotten to know very well. On these trips, Scott and Kevin coordinate events and activities for everyone involved whether it is golf, dining, hanging at the pool or adventuring around the area. All of this brings us together on a more intimate level. It is easy to just wave at people at the club, but now I am able to stop and ask about their families, grown children, pets or lives. With our children all having their own lives, it makes UCC family to us.

– Barb Burch Rogers


The Three-Day Weekend

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xperience the country one weekend at a time through three-day trips to some of the greatest cities in the world. Whether it’s riding a bull in the Stockyards of Fort Worth or viewing Chicago from the top floor of the Willis Tower Skydeck, you need to experience your country and a 40-hour work week can’t slow you down. You can hop on a quick flight or take a short drive on Friday, enjoy golf, dining, and sightseeing throughout the weekend and head back just in time before the work week starts again on Monday. Doesn’t seem possible at first, right? However, through the pleasantly smooth UIUC-Willard Airport and easily accessible ClubCorp facilities, traveling is not only simple but affordable too.

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So, what if the weekend is quickly approaching? It’s not too late to ditch your Friday night happy hour plans and book a Friday afternoon direct flight from Willard to DFW. You’ll be in Dallas within a few short hours of leaving your house in Central Illinois. There are multiple options to choose from, but some of the easiest that come to mind are Dallas/Fort Worth, Chicago, Indianapolis and Atlanta. You will spend less than three hours traveling to each of these places, can potentially dine for free up to four times in each city, and play complimentary golf. Not to mention, you will be playing at courses that have rich golf history, have held multiple PGA events and you will be eating at certain dining venues that you won’t see anywhere in Central Illinois. For example, you could dine at the Metropolitan Club on the 67th floor of Willis Tower in Chicago or golf at The Los Colinas Country Club in Irving, TX, host of the Volunteers of America North Texas Shootout several years in a row. Do something different with your weekend and call the Clubline, your personal concierge, to make a reservation or tee time or find out more about these great cities. 13

Laura and I just joined ClubCorp in November and we've already had several complimentary meals at the club restaurants in Chicago and St. Louis. We are planning to go to Indianapolis to eat there in a few weekends, and even booked a long weekend vacation to Charleston, SC and will eat a complimentary meal there! Having the option to eat at the ClubCorp restaurants has incentivized us to go on more adventures and experience different cuisine. I can't wait 'til it warms up and I can explore ClubCorp's network of complimentary golf courses all within a few hours away.

- J o ey A n t h o ny


JUL. 05. 2019.

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Independence Day Celebration. SAVE THE DATE. UCC1 9 2 2 . CO M I S P R I N G 2 0 1 9


UCC APPAREL SHOWCASE SATURDAY, APRIL 13th 1-3pm Come shop the latest men’s and women’s apparel and accessories from our top brands at our one-day-only event!

EP PRO ZERO RESTRICTION IBKUL DONALD ROSS


The Club and its members have been witness to a lot over its long history. Have a seat at the UCC bar and travel through the years with us.

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he Urbana Country Club was built in 1922 and, through its years, witnessed the height of Prohibition, the fall of the Great Depression, the devastation of WWII, and its own tragedy in the Country Club Fire. Over time the cocktails, the clothing and even the UCC building has changed, but the bar has always been the gathering place for UCC members. So, if you will, close your eyes and imagine walking into UCC in 1922... With Duke Ellington playing in the background, there are men in their three-piece suits and cap-toe Oxfords sitting with ladies in their flapper dresses and headbands. The bar is alight with conversation. The women sip on a Gin Rickey or a Bees Knees and the gentlemen, taking after Al Capone, drink The Southside. Golfers in their knickers, shirt with ties and a V-neck sweater are sitting with their group drinking Highballs or a Sidecar. It’s January 17th​, 1922 and Prohibition is in full effect. Many conspiracy theories surrounded the Club and how it retained alcohol — everything from getting liquor from a bootleg house on the corner of Country Club Road and Division to being served soda and the gentlemen using their own flasks to fill the drinks. Some even think that the gardeners and the service staff could have been depended upon to have bottles in the tool shed for reasonable prices. Doctors were able to write prescriptions for alcohol and one theory is that is what UCC did back between 1922–1933, as many members were doctors. It’s January 1933 and the members of the Club are milling around the bar discussing Bonnie and Clyde as they were making their crime spree throughout Texas and in Oklahoma, Arkansas, Iowa, Missouri, Louisiana, Illinois, Ohio and New Mexico. With Bing Crosby playing in the background, the ladies in their mid-length dress belted at the waist and tilted hats are enjoying their Bronx cocktail made popular by the Thin Man movies. Men are seen getting out of their Ford Coupes wearing trench coats and twotoned shoes. And, over it all, is the shadow of the Great Depression. The Great Depression was in effect from 1929–1933. With farmers becoming foreclosed on, Urbana was the first to print its own orange and blue money in the denomination from 10 cents to five dollars.

They did this in order to pay teachers, city employees and general workforce. The money was only to be used in Urbana and was only in circulation until banks reopened and could be redeemed for U.S. currency. The Urbana Country Club was one of the businesses during this time that accepted this type of currency. As we jump into 1940, WWII is in its second year. Men between the ages of 21 and 45 were all required to register for the draft. Now that bathtub gin had run its course, a variety of liquor was beginning to be used in recipes. Members started ordering brandy, rum, applejack, tequila and bourbon. Men in their Zoot Suits were seen ordering the Sidecar, named after the motorcycle sidecar, a great mix of brandy, cointreau, and lemon juice. Women’s fashion was based on the glamorous life in Hollywood as well as the cocktails. The French 75 made famous from the movie Casablanca was the top drink at UCC during this time. The ladies love the perfect blend of gin, simple syrup, lemon juice and topped with sparkling wine. Stepping into the 1950s, the “Happy Days” economy was booming, it was the end of the Korean War and the Baby Boom was huge. It’s June 17th, 1954 and the Country Club is booming with members enjoying a Manhattan or Cuba Libre, all watching the US Open that was televised nationally for the first time. That year Ed Furgol won his only major title over the defending champion Ben Hogan and clinched a one stroke victory over Gene Littler. After the broadcast, the members danced to Danny and The Juniors song, “At The Hop”, during their very own Sock Hop. Bands played late into the evening, not knowing what tragedies the next decade would bring. Moving over to 1960, John F. Kennedy was elected as the 35th​President of the United States. It was said that JFK was a fan of cocktails and beer, in particular, a new import called Heineken. Trendy drinks that took off at the Country Club included Daiquiris, Bloody Mary’s and, of course, Heineken. On November 22nd,​ 1963 members were enjoying a late lunch when at 1:38 pm Walter Cronkite informs a shocked nation that President John F. Kennedy had died. Silence and tears filled the Country Club on that horrific day.

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But 1963 wasn’t the only tragic year. It’s May 2nd​, 1968 and more than 100 people are attending a Law Day dinner in the Banquet Room around 8pm. The bar was full with people drinking gin martinis and scotch on the rocks, when a man came out and asked for someone to call the fire department — the building was on fire. The fire started in the kitchen and spread throughout the building. The building was a total loss, but thank goodness everyone escaped without injury. The Club was then closed for a few years to rebuild.

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It’s 1971 and The Grand Reopening of the Clubhouse has the members out in full force. Women in their floppy hats and short skirts and men with mock turtle necks and cardigan sweaters line up at the bar getting ready to enjoy the special drinks of the evening which includes a Harvey Wallbanger, Sloe Gin Fizz or a Singapore Sling. The new building is smaller than the original Club. The L-shaped bar located in the north corner of the dining room contains only six bar stools. The dining room also doubles as the banquet room with the Golf Shop separate so you have to go outside to access it. In 1975, Jack Nicklaus won his fifth Masters and the members tried to be just like Jack, a favorite among the golfers, and shoot a minus 12 while drinking beer.

The 90s brought us the show Sex and the City and with its popularity so was the popularity of the Cosmopolitan. Just like the show, it was the top seller at the Club as well. Along with other popular martinis the Apple Martini, the Espresso Martini and the French Martini made their own mark in history. In early 1999 the board members OK'ed a second renovation. The changes included a new patio, a larger bar and a new grille room. As we make our final trip thru time, we go to the year 2000. Our club is under the first of two renovations in this decade. This didn't stop the members from coming in and taking a peek at the work in progress. The members walked around with Mike's Hard Lemonade, mojitos or just a single malt scotch. In 2008, the Club was purchased by Shad Khan and the second renovation began. This time the whole club was gutted and the beautiful dark wood rustic accents and pictures of past members were added. The larger bar is a popular place to meet for happy hour or to have a drink before dinner. You can see members sitting at the bar sipping on Moscow Mules, a glass of their favorite wine or one of the great bourbons we have to offer. So next time you come into the club, stop by the bar and have one of the many cocktails or wines that we have to offer. Enjoy great company and make history here at the Urbana Country Club.

Old

Fashioned

As we travel to the 80s, Ronald Reagan is President and the first two years of this decade are defined by a painful recession. This didn't stop the members from enjoying their Club, though. The younger members are decked in their preppy style, men in their light colored pants, bright shirts and dark blazers and the ladies wearing above the knee skirts, polo button down blouses with a sweater tied around their neck. They put a new trend on cocktails, the most popular being a Long Island Iced Tea, The Blue Hawaiian and The Alabama Slammer. White Zinfandel topped the list of wine alongside Bartles and Jaymes wine coolers. UCC1 9 2 2 . CO M I S P R I N G 2 0 1 9


JUNIOR CAMP 19

Starting June 4th through August 2nd Cost: $550 per child (member discounts apply)

8 week program Tuesday-Friday from 9am-12pm

Camp Includes: Fitness, Tennis, Golf & More

Contact the Golf Shop to register


SPORTS

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Rules of Golf Modernization Get u p t o d a t e o n t h e re ce n t m a j o r ch a n g es t o t h e Ru l es o f G o l f.

One of the major topics in golf lately is the Rules of Golf. Like all sports, technology has exposed many things that need updating. Spectators watch much more closely, and high definition televisions with slow motion allow us to see things we couldn’t in the past. Along with that, times are changing and it was time for a “Rules Modernization”. The new Rules of Golf has only 24 Rules, which is down significantly from the previous 34. In addition, the Rules of Golf book consists of a simpler writing style with more examples to explain the rules and how they work, includes pictures to aid in the rule understanding, embraces technology and even includes the purpose of each rule. With this being said, let's take a look at some of the major changes to the Rules of Golf.

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Ball Played from Green Hits Unattended Flagstick in Hole Under the previous set of rules, if a player made a stroke on the putting green and the ball hit the unattended flagstick that was left in the hole, the player received a penalty stroke.

Encouraging Prompt Pace of Play Under the previous set of rules, rule 6-7 provided only that “undue delay” was prohibited and that players must follow any pace of play guidelines if established by the Committee.

Under the NEW Rules of Golf, Rule 5.6 will encourage prompt pace of play by recommending that a player should make a Under the NEW Rules of Golf, Rule 13.2a (2) states that there stroke in no more than 40 seconds after the player is able will no longer be a penalty stroke if a ball played from the put- to play without interference or distraction, and Committees ting green hits a flagstick left in the hole. The player will have should adopt a Pace of Play Policy (rather than only saying the choice whether to have the flagstick removed or left in. they may do so). In addition, a new Rule, 6.4, will expressly allow playing out of turn in match play by agreement, and for Reason for Change: Generally, to help speed up play. There are stroke play, will affirmatively allow and encourage players to numerous cases where players in the past have needed to wait play out of turn in a safe and responsible way to save time or for someone to attend the flagstick if they have had a long putt for convenience. and could not see the hole. It should also help speed up play for short tap-ins. Reason for Change: To increase pace of play.

Time for Search Before Ball is Lost Under the previous set of rules, a player had five minutes to search for their golf ball before it had to be treated as “lost” and a one-stroke penalty was assessed. Under the NEW Rules of Golf, Rule 18.2 states that the time for a ball search will be three minutes before the ball becomes lost. Reason for Change: To increase pace of play.

“Maximum Score” Form of Stroke Play Under the previous set of rules, a player had to hole out on every hole or else was disqualified. Under the NEW Rules of Golf, a player’s score for each hole may be capped at a maximum set by the Committee. This will allow the player to not be disqualified, but to simply take the maximum score for the hole. Reason for Change: By allowing a player to not be disqualified for taking the “maximum score,” pace will improve and golfers who feel discouraged to compete because they may get a very high score on one or two holes will participate more.


Concept of “Penalty Areas” to Supersede “Water Hazards”

Under the previous set of rules there were water hazards (typically marked yellow) and lateral water hazards (typically marked red), which were intended to have water flowing. Under the NEW Rules of Golf, “Penalty Areas” may include areas that do not necessarily contain water. There will still be red and yellow “Penalty Areas.” The option to take relief on the opposite side of a red penalty area has been eliminated.

Touching Loose Impediments or Ground in Penalty Areas and Bunkers Under the previous set of rules, players were not allowed to test the condition of a water hazard or bunker, ground their club in a water hazard or bunker, as well as move loose impediments in both water hazards and bunkers.

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Under the NEW Rules of Golf, a player will be allowed to touch or move loose impediments and touch the ground with their hand or club in a Penalty Area at any time (Rule 17). In a bunker, players will be allowed to touch or move loose impediments, but are still not allowed to touch the sand in a bunker in making a practice swing or in grounding the club prior to the swing (Rule 12.2).

O t h e r N ew Ru l es ›› If any player causes his/her or another competitors' ball to move on the putting green, there is no longer a penalty stroke. ›› If a player’s ball on the putting green moves before their stroke is made, it must first be determined if the player caused it to move, or if wind, water or other natural forces caused it to move. In the event that the player caused the ball to move, the player must replace the ball with no penalty stroke. If natural forces cause the ball to move, it must be played at its new spot. If the ball is lifted and replaced on its original spot and again is moved, it must always be replaced on its original spot regardless of what caused it to move. ›› A player may repair almost any, “damage on the putting green, including ballmarks, shoe damage, indentations from a club or flagstick, animal damage.” The player must not unreasonably delay play. ›› The use of Distance-Measuring Devices is allowed, however, a Committee may adopt a local rule prohibiting such use (i.e. PGA Tour). ›› If a player’s club accidentally hits the ball more than once during a single stroke, there will be no penalty and the ball will be played where it comes to rest. ›› There will be no penalty if a ball hits the player who made the stroke, their caddie or their equipment unless it is deemed to have been deliberately positioned to act as a backstop and potentially deflect his or her ball. ›› The procedure for dropping a ball is simplified so that the only requirements are that the ball be let go from knee height, the ball falls through the air and does not touch any part of the player’s body or equipment before it hits the ground. ›› Relief for an embedded ball, one that comes to rest it its own pitch-mark, is allowed anywhere in the “general area” except when embedded in sand. This allows players to take relief in the rough for a ball that is embedded.

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GATHER YOUR TEAM & SUPPORT FOLDS OF HONOR! Join UCC as we support Folds of Honor at the 2019 Charity Golf Outing. This year’s event will be held on Wednesday, September 11th at the stunning Urbana Country Club and will feature a four-person scramble with a shotgun start. We are extremely proud to be partnering with Folds of Honor this 2 3 year. They provide educational scholarships to the spouses and children of fallen or disabled service members. This awesome charity organization does exceptional things for the families of those who have sacrificed so much and we are honored to be supporting them!

Get more information, sign up, or sponsor a hole by contacting, Golf Shop golfshop@ucc1922.com (217) 344-8673


SPORTS

W H A T ’ S

N E W

I N

Golf Club Technology 24

When it comes to golf clubs, the most common questions are, “Do I need the newest model and do I need to get fit?” Simple answer that everyone has heard throughout life is, no, you don’t need either of those. But if you are looking for the best results, it is a must. New golf clubs come out very frequently, most companies now have a structured 18-24 month life cycle for their equipment. Approximately every two years they are coming out with something new. Does this mean that every two years you will gain significant distance? Absolutely not. One of the most common features new equipment targets is straighter ball flights. This is a challenge as we also keep in mind maximum distance. There are answers to both, but getting the perfect combination is what keeps companies continuing to improve equipment.

is in the club is important. A huge breakthrough in the wedge design came two years ago when Bob Vokey designed his new Titleist wedge to have “progressive center of gravity”. What does this mean? Depending on the loft of the wedge—he makes them from 48–62 degrees—the optimal ball flight is different and thus the center of gravity must vary. In the past, all wedges had the same center of gravity. Now, they vary based on the club.

An even more frequently changing piece of equipment can be the shaft of the club. From graphite to steel, the technology in shafts have changed drastically and is constantly improving. What is important is to find the correct shaft for your unique swing. Everyone is different, however the Launch Angle and Spin Rate that is optimal does not change. The club and shaft that successfully results in those numbers can be drastically different from person to person. There is no simple answer Increased distance can come in numerous ways. Making the that says this is a standard ladies’ set, this is a standard men’s club face thin can increase the ball speed and overall distance. set, this is a standard senior set, etc. Companies have deemed But keep in mind that we do not want the face to be so thin it “standards” because those are what they’ve found many peowill crack, as some avid golfers may have seen already. Some ple will fit into, however, they are not right for everyone. This companies have focused on aerodynamics at different times is why getting fit is essential. An expert fitter and/or PGA with the thought being; if we make the club more aerodynam- Professional will help determine what is right for your swing. ic, golfers will swing it faster and thus the ball will go farther. Shafts range in weights and stiffness and many more characMakes sense, right? Adjustability is another large player in golf teristics, so figuring out the optimal fit is essential. club design and new equipment these days. Being able to put But just to get you started, we’ve put together a list of the newdifferent weights in different areas of the club to adjust ball est technological breakthroughs in the golf club market. Study flight dependent upon the individual can help increase both distance and direction. We have seen those capabilities change up, analyze these innovations against your own weaknesses over the years and every company does it different. How much and strengths and bring all that info to your next club fitting weight is in the toe compared to the heel of the clubhead is im- to find the club that fits best for your needs. portant for forgiveness. Where the center of gravity, or COG, UCC1 9 2 2 . CO M I S P R I N G 2 0 1 9


TITLEIST TS DRIVERS An ultra-thin face provides faster ball speeds and increased forgiveness. To see the difference, put a 917 Driver next to a TS Driver and run your finger across the face where the grooves are. You will find that the new TS Driver does not actually have grooves, they are just laser etched on for appearance. The face is that thin. The refined crown and face thicknesses create Titleist’s lowest center of gravity ever for higher launch and lower spin resulting in more distance. And new head shapes have helped increase clubhead speed alongside lighter shafts for improved performance and again, more distance.

PING G410 DRIVERS Moveable weight enables players to create three different custom center of gravity locations to control the players’ ball flight how they desire. The new T9S+ precision-machined forged face undergoes a patented heat treatment process, creating a thinner, hotter impact area for maximum flexing and increased ball speeds. Dragonfly Technology and a streamlined shape help reduce drag in the downswing for increased clubhead speeds. This club is 15 percent more forgiving over its 2018 predecessor and six percent above leading competitors.

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PING G410 IRON A more flexible, free moving face amplifies ball speed for greater distance and higher max height. Increased perimeter weights concentrated in the toe and hosel increase MOI eight percent for more forgiveness and consistency. The club is also more visually appealing with 10 percent less offset allowing for a shorter blade length and greater forgiveness than any iron its size.

TAYLORMADE M5 & M6 DRIVERS Speed Injected Twist Face features a revolutionary face curvature that has been engineered to deliver straighter shots on off-center strikes while maintaining high ball speeds. The redesigned Inverse T-Track allows players to position weights for their desired launch conditions to adjust ball flight and forgiveness. 26

An aerodynamic, all-carbon sole creates discretionary weight to allow for 46 grams of mass to be placed low and back to increase forgiveness and high launch conditions.

TAYLORMADE M5 & M6 IRONS With a more compact face structure, Speed Bridge strengthens the iron structure and enhances energy transfer to give players a unique blend of power, forgiveness and workability. This club features the fastest thru-slot Speed Pocket which creates faster ball speed, even on a miss hit. And tungsten weighting in the toe helps achieve maximized power and forgiveness without sacrificing soft feel. UCC1 9 2 2 . CO M I S P R I N G 2 0 1 9


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FITTING 1-5pm

Come shop the latest men’s and women’s golf equipment and technology from our top brands at our one-day-only event!

DAY

SATURDAY, MAY 04th

SATURDAY, MAY 11th


SPORTS

KEVIN HILDEBRAND HEAD PGA GOLF PROFESSIONAL

28 ZACH CANFIELD PGA GOLF PROFESSIONAL

SCOTT SZYMONIAK GENERAL MANAGER & PGA GOLF PROFESSIONAL

Our responses to life’s challenges are often what defines us as humans. How we react to adversity, handle stress, demonstrate integrity and perform under pressure will predict how successful one is in living a balanced, healthy life. But how do you prepare for such challenges when the world we live in can be so unpredictable? How will you react when things do not go according to plan? Where is the place you go to create the environment needed for your mind and body to align in harmony, thus achieving clarity for any situation? We believe that the game of golf provides the canvas for you to test your resolve and acts as an escape from the everyday. We believe that golf accepts all and considers anyone who has a body to be an athlete. We believe that, regardless of where you are on the spectrum of ability and experience, golf will help to create a better version of yourself. Whether it has never crossed your mind to try to smack a ball with a club, or you are vying for millions at the game’s highest level, U Golf is your place for the guidance necessary to achieve personal fulfillment. For something that is so simple in its complexity, we strive to break down barriers and personalize your journey to achieve your desired outcome. This is golf on YOUR terms. Our 40+ years of experience in helping with players, from brand new all the way to PGA Tour winners, have led us to look at game improvement holistically and strategize how to best position our clients to enhance their relationship with the game. We apply proven principles, whether they be in swing mechanics, club fitting, playing strategy, physical fitness or sport psychology, in order to

simplify your intentions and perform at your peak level. Our services are divided into three segments – Begin, Enjoy and Thrive – in order to efficiently align goals and expectations. Your engagement level is completely at your discretion, however we know through past experience that, the deeper you engage with the game, the more you learn about yourself and how you can handle the everyday battles. Although U Golf has been developed over years of observing and coaching people of all abilities, it is very much a forward-focused and modern interpretation of a century-old sport. U Golf exists to break down barriers, defy stereotypes, dispel myths and fight perceptions based on old viewpoints of a great game. At the same time, we always honor history and learn from the past in order to shape our future. With U Golf we want to create a new normal – one that is inclusive, positive and supremely rewarding. The game of golf has enhanced our lives in ways we could never have imagined. It has provided us with an unending journey to fulfillment, one that drives us everyday to not only be better golfers, but better people as well. It has brought us here, to Urbana Country Club, to share our experience, expertise and passion for the great game of golf with you. We are certain that whether you just need a nudge to BEGIN, guidance on how to better ENJOY, or a deeper connection with the game to THRIVE, we have the tools to assist you on your journey.

U GOLF UCC1 UC U CC1 C1 9 2922.2CO . CO MMI SI PFA R ILL N G2 021081 9


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ONLY AT


SPORTS

TrackMan

N E W I N N O VA T I O N S F O R A M O R E T E C H N O L O G I C A L L Y A D VA N C E D G A M E .

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OVER THE LAST 25 YEARS, GOLF EQUIPMENT TECHNOLOGY HAS GONE T H R O U G H M A J O R C H A N G E S , A N D H O W T H AT T E C H N O L O G Y I S U T I L I Z E D A N D A F F E C T S T H E G A M E H A S G R O W N D R A S T I C A L LY. F O R E X A M P L E , I T WA S I N T H E 1 9 9 3 M A S T E R S T O U R N A M E N T T H AT WA S T H E L A S T T I M E A M A J O R C H A M P I O N S H I P WA S W O N W I T H A “ P E R S I M M O N ” W O O D . E Q U I P M E N T H A S C O M E A L O N G W AY S I N C E T H E N . A N D O N E O F T H E B I G G E S T C H A N G E S I N T H E T E C H N O L O G Y O F T R A C K I N G P L AY E R P E R F O R M A N C E A N D I M P R O V I N G CLUB FITTING IS THE INTRODUCTION OF THE TRACKMAN SYSTEM.

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Both avid and casual golfers have begun to hear the word TrackMan used frequently; whether it’s on TV, while surfing one of the many golf websites or asking experts about golf clubs and golf instruction. The details of TrackMan can be confusing, so here is an attempt to break down some of the numbers and uses. But first and foremost, it is important to know that this machine is a Doppler tracking system. When used in an outdoor setting, the system will actually track the entire flight of the golf ball from start to finish. Some other launch monitors might track the initial 10 to 20 feet of the ball flight and predict the rest using calculations and algorithms, but TrackMan will actually track the golf ball all the way to landing on the ground.

to as Smash Factor. For example, if a player swings the club 100 mph, the ball can travel up to 150 mph. Smash Factor is a commonly used term in club fitting. When fitting drivers, the goal is to get that Smash Factor as close to 1.5 as possible to maximize distance. Does the mean every golfer is capable of that? Absolutely not. The other thing Ball Speed can guide us towards is centeredness of contact. If a player does not hit the ball in the center of the club face, the ball does not go as far. This is a factor of a lower Ball Speed.

Continuing along the club fitting terminology, there are three other very important numbers to understand. Spin Rate. This is the rate at which the ball is spinning. Different The most introducFACE ANGLE +0.2 from some other tory numbers most deg SPIN RATE launch monitors, people hear and unCLUB SPEED BALL SPEED 8252 TrackMan cal83.7 derstand would be 97.2 rpm mph mph culates one Spin Distance numbers Rate. You might and Club Speed. hear some peoWhen watching ple talk about the PGA Tour, you back spin comwill see and hear pared to side commentators talk spin. Challenge about how far the yourself to think players hit their about that. Can a shots, which is calball of any kind culated by the use spin in differof TrackMan. Club ent directions at Speed is also a pretthe same time? ty understandWhat scientists able number. This will tell you, and is how fast the club thus the deteris moving at immining factor for pact. Common sense TrackMan, is that here would say that balls spin in one the faster the club EASY ALIGNMENT DUAL RADAR AUTO LEVELLING direction on one head speed, the faraxis. So, what ther the ball will can Spin Rate tell go. This is partially you? When fitting for any clubs there are optimal Spin Rates true, however, there are other factors to consider that we will for maximized distance and ball flights. This optimal number get into as well. for a driver is typically between 2500–3000 rpm. Again, not Ball Speed is how fast the golf ball itself is moving. The fasteveryone of all skill levels will be able to achieve this, but that er the club head is moving, the higher the ball speed and thus is the range that will optimize distance with a driver. When the further the ball goes. Ball Speed can tell us a lot more, fitting for irons, the optimal Spin Rate is going to be the iron however. There are legal limits regarding the speed the ball number multiplied by 1000 (i.e. a six-iron should spin 6000 can travel. USGA Rules regulate that a ball cannot travel fast- rpm). A common quote you might hear someone say is, “that er than 1.5 times the Club Speed—this number of 1.5 is referred

UNLEASH YOUR POTENTIAL

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is ballooning”. When a ball “balloons” that typically means the ball is spinning too much and you can almost see the ball rise as it flies through the air. This causes a major decrease in distance. Typically too low of spin is not the case, but in the chance that it is, this would cause a decrease in distance because spin is needed to keep the ball in the air.

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Launch Angle and Land Angle are the other two important club fitting terms. Launch Angle is the angle between the ground and the initial launch of the golf ball. This number should be between 11–14 degrees. Most commonly, club fitters are working to increase the launch of the golf ball for players. With this in mind, next time you are getting fit or hitting on TrackMan, open your mind to the possibility of using a driver with a higher loft. As you think about the flight of the ball, there is also an angle at which the ball is descending and hitting the ground—this is call Land Angle. This number can be extremely important and isn’t discussed enough. Land Angle is going to effect the amount the ball will roll once it hits the ground drastically. If the ball is coming it too steep, say a 50 degree Land Angle, the ball is not going to roll very much and the overall distance will be shorter than its maximum. On the contrary, if the ball is landing too shallow, say a 25 degree Land Angle, the ball will roll more but did not carry its full potential so the overall distance will be shorter than its maximum. An optimal Land Angle would be between 35–40 degrees.

If you can understand all of those numbers, you will have all the basic knowledge needed when it comes to club fitting. Helping you understand them deeper and even talking you through those numbers is what a PGA Professional and Club Fitter is there to do for you. Another use of TrackMan that most people don’t even know is out there is related to the teaching aspect. Although not right for everyone, this piece of technology can be a great deal of help in teaching and practicing for certain people. Important terms to understand from a teaching aspect to help improve your game would be Club Path, Face to Path, and Attack Angle. These three terms will tell you everything you need to know about your swing as the golf ball is struck. Club Path is going the be the angle at which the club is traveling when it strikes the ball. Golfers in the past have heard sayings such as “over the top” or “steep” or “shallow” or “under the plane” but might not know exactly what that means or how to really tell if they are doing one of those things. This is where TrackMan comes into play with the Club Path calculation. If you think about a straight line being drawn from the golf ball to the target, that line is deemed as ZERO in the TrackMan world—everything to the right of it is a positive number and everything to the left of it is a negative number. This does not change

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for a right or left handed golfer, you just need to change how you think about things. Regardless of how you swing the club, ideally the Club Path will be plus or minus two or less. This means that the club is entering the ball fairly straight on. If the club enters at a higher number, this will cause directional challenges. For ease and because the majority of people are right handed, we will refer to numbers in the sense of a right handed golfer. Most commonly golfers will be “over the top” or “steep” as referred to earlier. This might show on TrackMan as a -10 degree Club Path. When we see this, this is an instant challenge that needs to be addressed. When the club is entering at such an angle, two things are affected: initial ball flight direction and curvature during the flight. Typically a -10 Club Path will cause the ball to initially start left and curve to the right, commonly known as a “slice” for a right handed golfer. In turn, if we can decrease that number, or get it closer to ZERO, the ball flight will straighten out and we will hit it closer to the intended target. Similarly with direction, Face to Path is an extremely important number in the teaching and ball flight world. This is the angle the face is at in relation to the path of the club at impact. Again, negative numbers are to the left and positive numbers are to the right. Numbers within two degrees here would be very good as well. What is important to understand, however, is that if our Club Path number is higher that an ideal two degrees, our Face to Path number will need to be higher as well to make the ball end at an intended target. This would be a term called “zeroing out”. For example, if my Club Path is a negative four, I will probably want my Face to Path to be a positive four. What you will see as the numbers increase like that is more curvature of the ball flight, thus resulting in shorter distances and more potential for offline shots. The last instructional term to keep in mind would be Attack Angle. This is the angle in which the club is entering the ball in relation to the ground. With this number, the ZERO line would be the golf ball sitting on the ground. If the club is entering on a downward angle it would be a negative number and if the player is hitting up on the golf ball at impact it would be a positive number. An ideal number for Attack Angle

actually fluctuates based on the club being used. For drivers, an ideal Attack Angle is close to zero if not a positive number. To hit the driver the farthest, you will need to hit up on the ball. Take Bubba Watson for example, known as one of the longest hitters on Tour, his Attack Angle with Driver is commonly between five and seven degrees. When we hit down on the ball, or have a negative Attack Angle, this increases spin and the ball flies shorter. A negative Attack Angle is important with irons and wedges. These clubs we must hit down on the ball to make solid contact, and how much we hit down is the factor to pay attention to. Another common term avid golfers may have heard in the past is being “too steep”. This can cause larger that normal divots, less than optimal contact and inconsistency. If the Attack Angle is above negative five, it is important to keep that in mind. An ideal Attack Angle is between two and four degrees for most golfers. With all of this terminology and information on TrackMan, it is still encouraged not to try to do any of this on your own. Whether looking to get fit for new clubs or improve your game, do so with a PGA Professional. Understanding these numbers will help you follow what they are analyzing. With the amount of different numbers just discussed, however, it can get very confusing where to even begin. This is why a PGA Professional is so important. They will help guide you in the right direction. They will also analyze other numbers not even discussed to determine where to start and what is most important to address first, second, third and so on.

MARK YOUR CALENDARS! TRACKMAN UNVEILING AT U C C W I L L B E H E L D O N M AY 3 R D !


SPORTS

WHO TO WATCH AT THE

2019 PGA Championship T H E 2 0 1 9 P G A C H A M P I O N S H I P, H E L D O N M AY 1 6 - 1 9 A T B E T H PA G E B L A C K I N F A R M I N G D A L E , N Y, I S S H A P I N G U P T O B E A M U S T - S E E . C H E C K O U T S O M E O F T H E T O P P L AY E R S T O K E E P A N EYE ON THIS YEAR WHO MIGHT JUST BRING HOME THE WIN.

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ethpage Black has a history of hosting major championships in the past, however, this will be the first time the public golf course located in Long Island, New York will host the PGA Championship. Most recently, the Black Course at Bethpage State Park hosted the 2002 and 2009 U.S. Opens won by Tiger Woods and Lucas Glover. Bethpage is notorious for its difficulty and has the famous sign on the first tee reading “The Black Course Is An Extremely Difficult Course Which We Recommend Only For Highly Skilled Golfers”. This was always fitting for a U.S. Open, in which the USGA typically sets the golf courses up to be difficult, with Even Par being a good score. Will it play that way in 2019 as the host of a PGA Championship, though?

One thing that won’t change is the length of the golf course, most recently in 2009 playing almost 7,500 yards at Par 70. “The Black” has shown to be set up for longer hitters in the past and it will stay that way even as the host of the PGA Championship. Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson have always seemed to play well and you can expect to see them near the top of the leaderboard again in 2019. But can either of them pull of a victory? Let’s look to some other options for players who might be fitting for a victory at the 2019 PGA Championship at Bethpage Black.

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BROOKS KOEPKA Let's kick things off with the guy coming off a year with TWO major championship victories. And they came at the US Open and the PGA Championship. He has now won consecutive US Opens and seems to be bringing his best game in the biggest of events. His game should set up well for “The Black” with his length and power. When playing well, he hits long off the tee and knocks it close from there. Especially if the scores are low this year, you can count on seeing Brooks near the top.

Jordan Spieth

Jon Rahm

DUSTIN JOHNSON As one of the longest drivers of the golf ball on Tour, he is a perfect fit to win at Bethpage. He has proven that he can win a major championship having won the U.S. Open at Oakmont C.C. in 2016. He has seemed to fair best at the U.S. Open in the past, another reason Bethpage might be just the place for him to win his first career PGA Championship.

JON RAHM Another long driver of the golf ball, Rahm has a great game that could pick up his first ever major championship at the PGA Championship in 2019. In 2018, just his second year on the PGA Tour, he rose all the way to 2nd in the Official World Golf Rankings and has six times in his two seasons. He has played in all eight major championships the past two seasons, missed three of eight cuts but also finished 4th in two of the majors in 2018. Has he settled into the PGA Tour and the major championship field having been on tour for two seasons now? “The Black” would be a nice place to pick up his first major victory and would fit his game well.

JORDAN SPIETH In search of his first PGA Championship and the career Grand Slam, can Spieth pull it off at the difficult Black Course? Having already won a US Open, this should set up as the ideal fit for Jordan to win his first PGA Championship at a course that has typically hosted the US Open in the past. Unlike a lot of the other top players at the moment, Spieth is not one of the longer hitters on Tour. His driving distance average consistently ranks around 100th on Tour. This is a factor that could make Bethpage

Brooks Koepka

a tough venue for Spieth. For him it comes down to how hot his putter will get that week. He is coming off a year in which he did not win a single tournament, so Spieth may be due for another major victory.

Dustin Johnson

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JUSTIN ROSE The defending FedEx Cup Champion is definitely a name worth mentioning. Although he has only won one major championship in his career, he has proven he is worthy of the number one spot in the Official World Golf Rankings. The other thing he has that no one else currently on Tour can claim is an Olympic Gold Medal. To really establish his name with some of the other top players currently on Tour, though, he could use another major championship victory.

Justin Rose


Rolling int W I T H

Y O U R

H O M E

L A W N

they are very difficult and labor-intensive to use and will not give you the results you are looking for.

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H

omeowners can struggle with spring lawn maintenance coming out of the winter months. Timing is always a concern, and you often hear, “When do I start? Is it too early or too late to begin tuning up my lawn?” Every season is different and it’s difficult to put a physical date to starting your normal spring maintenance. But one hurdle to focus on that is a little more time sensitive is how to fix a bumpy lawn.

All of these plans can and will work if timed correctly. The secret is to watch the forecast and monitor your lawn as the ground begins to thaw out and the ground begins to firm. Please note you don’t want to roll too early. You need to make sure all the frost is out of the ground before rolling, otherwise you can damage the root system below. If you wait too long and the spring is dry, you may not ever have a large gap to roll your lawn. It’s a real balance to schedule when to roll, and the longer you wait the more difficult it becomes to time. If you happen to wait too long, sometimes you’ll find, if you have a small .25” rain event, the following day is the best day to roll. You also want to avoid a lawn that is too soft because you can do more damage than good. It’s tricky and often difficult to find time to schedule when to roll with all your work and life responsibilities.

Throughout the winter the ground freezes and thaws repeatedly. This can cause small pockets to raise and your lawn then becomes very bumpy. These bumps will become more noticeable when you begin mowing weeks later and, depending on the timing of your first cut, it’s usually too late to successfully smooth your lawn. All soils are different and some soils are more susceptible to heaving and becoming bumpy than others. If you have a history of a bumpy lawn, there’s a good chance this will be an annual issue. It’s best to start making a plan early and start monitoring your lawn if this has been an issue. The best way to smooth an uneven lawn is by using a roller. You can hire this practice out through your local lawn service, rent a small one to two-ton roller and trailer from a local equipment rental store or you can purchase a tow behind if you have a lawn tractor. They do make hand push rollers on the market, but it's not recommended to use them because UCC1 9 2 2 . CO M I S P R I N G 2 0 1 9


to Spring T I PS F R O M T H E P R O S In reality it’s a simple job, but here’s a few tips to give you the best chance of success.

Try to roll your lawn in mid-April as a rule of thumb, March is often too wet and weather in May firms up your soil quicker and it’s often too late.

The best roller option seems to be renting a small one or two ton asphalt roller at your local equipment rental place. Talk to your neighbors and split the rental fee and combine lawns for easier rolling and keep the cost down. The rental is usually around $100/day.

If you stay on an annual rolling program, you will need to begin an annual aerification program as well to avoid soil compaction. Too much rolling will affect the health of your lawn and will not allow for proper soil drainage. When hiring rolling out through a contracted lawn service, don’t hesitate to cancel if your lawn seems too firm. If you have the option of watering the night or day before rolling, it’s well worth the time and effort. You’ll be much more successful and happy with the results.

If a contactor suggests the only way to smooth your lawn is by starting over with a new lawn, get a second opinion. There are usually better, less aggressive and cheaper options than starting over.

If your lawn is on the firm side, water your lawn slightly for 15–30 minutes and then roll.

Roll in two directions or more. Hit those trouble areas multiple times if needed.

In severe cases, a good aerification combined with rolling may be needed.

While there is no foolproof solution, a properly planned lawn rolling can definitely eliminate most of your issues. If you stay committed and get on an annual program of aerification and rolling, you’ll really begin to see, not only a smoother lawn, but a healthy more vigorous stand of turf.

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FIND ALL NEW 1857 FOOTJOY STYLES IN THE UCC GOLF SHOP! Call 217-344-8673 for more info. UCC1 9 2 2 . CO M I S P R I N G 2 0 1 9


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very day out on the Urbana Country Club property there are countless deer, foxes or even great horned owls roaming through the trees and along the paths. It’s peaceful and everything seems to be in balance with nature as the golf course provides a safe sanctuary for wildlife away from the busy streets of Champaign-Urbana. Everyone at the club takes a lot of pride in their work on the golf course, and the groundskeeping department in particular reached a new milestone last fall. This past October, Urbana Country Club was awarded the proud distinction of becoming a Certified Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary. This program dates back to 1991 when Audubon International, with the support of the United States Golf Association, launched the Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary Program for Golf Courses (ACSP). Although the program has been around for 28 years, only 13 percent of all the golf courses have become certified. And now UCC is too. UCC started pursuing certification over two years ago and now it is the only golf course in Champaign-Urbana to have this honor. Most people will notice the logo on a scorecard or an Audubon sign at a club with this distinction, but most people do not fully conceptualize what the certification means and the efforts taken to become an environmental focused facility. It’s not as simple as throwing up a few birdhouses, creating native areas and filling out some paperwork. It’s a commitment to developing, maintaining and growing your environmental efforts at the Club in all areas, from the clubhouse to the golf course. The true vision of the program is to create a healthy culture at your facility and continue to make efforts to improve on an annual basis. UCC1 9 2 2 . CO M I S P R I N G 2 0 1 9


The whole process starts with measuring, evaluating and reporting your facilities environmental efforts and establishing a baseline to work from. There are five sections to complete including Wildlife and Habitat Management, Chemical Use Reduction and Safety, Water Conservation, Water Quality Management and Outreach and Education. Each area is very focused on ensuring you understand what is expected to move your facility forward and to practice the best efforts possible. We already operated with an agronomy program developed with sound IPM practices in mind. IPM or Integrated Pest Management means we are making pesticide application decisions based on acceptable thresholds and weather data. We make decisions with the environment in mind, and therefore we are not just blindly making applications. This certification starts with those principles in mind and then takes it to the next level, broadens it and identifies your weaknesses. You don’t have to be perfect in all areas, but you have to identify your weakness and make a continued effort to improve your facility. It doesn’t matter if you are a high-end club or a low budget public facility, all courses have the ability to become certified if they are willing to do the work. The ACSP program provides educational resources, a structured framework and a set of environmental standards that help golf courses respond effectively to the challenges of maintaining an environmentally sound golf course. Great! Of course we want to be environmentally friendly, but why take the time to be certified? In order to be successful in our efforts at the Club, you need to be able to set goals and be able to measure your efforts. The ACSP programs provides us with the framework needed and pushes us to do more than the minimum. There is proven data to support why the importance of becoming certified is worth all the time, effort and money to complete.

WH AT’S GOO D FO R TH E ENVI RON M ENT IS GOO D FO R TH E COU RSE . A .C.S. P. PA R T I C I PA N T S U RV E Y R E S U LT S:

• 75% reduce pesticide costs. • 82% reduced pesticide use. • 89% improved cultural control methods to decrease the need for chemical use. • 89% conscientiously choose native plants when landscaping. • 50% increased the amount of shoreline vegetation. • 99% reported that playing quality has remained the same or improved.

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The certification goes much deeper than making your country club environmentally friendly. Over the past two decades, Golf Course Superintendents have been known as leaders in making environmental contributions to communities. The days of the Caddyshack image of Bill Murray as the uneducated greenkeeper out trying to kill gophers on the golf course are long gone, thankfully. Today, Superintendents are a strong group of leaders in the agronomy industry. They are not only educating the local community, but are active in moving positive legislation forward at the state and national level. Over the past few years, the news has been filled with GMO and Glyphosate health concerns, which are real problems. We all want to make sure everyone is not only safe, but that the decision makers also have all the correct data as restrictions are discussed. New proposed regulations endanger some of the products we use on the turf side of the agronomy industry. Restrictions in parts of the UK for 2019 will dramatically impact the turf conditions at golf courses. And there are real concerns at some facilities which no longer will be allowed to use fungicides. Thankfully the efforts the GCSAA (Golf Course Superintendents Association of America) and grassroots programs have been out front of the matter and have been able to educate our politicians before it’s too late.

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Local efforts are more important than ever, and Audubon Certification only strengthens UCC’s place in the community and provides the knowledge needed to support maintenance programs. There is also a large waterway called the Saline Drain Way which splits the golf course in two and impacts parks and other green spaces downstream. Having the Drain Way was the one single biggest reasons behind the pursuit to become an Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary. The canal usually

floods annually and UCC can heavily impact the ecosystem of the waterway by practices on the golf course. It’s important for the DNR, the City of Urbana and our surrounding neighbors to understand that UCC is conscious of efforts here at the Club. Some of the items to keep in mind in regards to the water management side of the certification include the following: •

Potential pollution of groundwater and surface waters.

Use of water resources for irrigation.

Degradation or loss of natural shorelines areas.

Potential effect of golf course activities on the canal.

Pesticide buffers and the maintenance of shorelines.

As the golf course evolves through normal maintenance practices and course renovations you will see additions to the character of the property. Think of the golf course as a living laboratory or ecosystem which it is always changing. The goal is to identify areas to focus efforts toward improving the out-of-play areas to only accent and define the golf course. These areas will not impact your golf game in a negative way, but instead they will highlight the authentic golf experience we are creating. These areas are important and will also reduce maintenance and create savings which we can move to other areas for improvement.

• Among the top five reasons people play golf is: it puts the golfer in touch with nature". • 90% of golfers believe in the need to protect the environment.

• 92% use pesticides with lower toxicity levels. • Average increase of 22 acres of wildlife habitat per course. • 66% reported that golfer satisfaction has improved. • 34% reported that golfer satisfaction has remained the same.

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• Enhance wildlife habitats on existing golf courses. • Recognize golf courses as important open spaces and credit those participating in environmental projects. • Educate the public and golf community about the benefits of golf courses and the role they play relative to the environment and wildlife. • Protect, stabilize and restore our shorelines.

Water Conservation is also a key focus of the process. As the water level of the Great Lakes comes into question more every year, the Club’s water usage has now been put under a microscope and recorded to the state. This past season our facility used 14.6 million gallons of water, which was a dramatic increase from the 8-9 million average. The season was longer and there was more stress to the turf, but it’s important to monitor. Laws which have been common on the West Coast will eventually filter toward the Midwest. Reducing irrigated turf acreage and promoting strong vigorous turf and newer turfgrass variety is a main focus. Strong turf can handle the stresses of Central Illinois summers and requires much less water. Which in turn saves on wear and tear on the irrigation system, saves money and provides better playing conditions. Over time you can change the culture of the turf by using strong cultural practices and reduce watering up to 60 percent. Outreach and education is the last area of focus here. It’s important to create a story to tell the community and educate students of why golf is great and there is more to the Country Club. UCC can make all the necessary changes on property to promote a strong attention to their environmental practices, but sharing their story and educating their membership and staff of the importance of the matter is just as vital. One person or one club is not the solution and the knowledge gained should be passed to others.

This will be the third year with honey bees on the UCC property. The honey bees were the focus of the project for certification. Honey bees are known to be very sensitive to pesticides while also being one of the most vital parts of the world’s ecosystem. We need bees to pollinate crops for food and without them we would be in trouble. Colony numbers have dropped dramatically throughout the world, from 21.5 million to two or three million. It’s scary and governments around the world have focused resources to help understand the reason why and to help restore the colony numbers. One reason believed for the decline in number is because of the use of glyphosate or Round-Up in agriculture. The idea has all but been debunked, but nevertheless, it’s been important for Golf Course Superintendents to assist in the restoration of honey bee colonies and show Round-Up is not a concern for bee health. We want to show that the products applied to the golf course are not affecting honey bees only a few yards away, which is very positive for everyone to see.

there are programs to certify your home, local school or business with the Audubon? It is a great challenge for you all to do a self-assessment or audit of your home and/or business and see what you could be doing better. In return, you may find monetary savings, but the real reward is in knowing you are doing what’s best for the environment. Every little bit helps. If you’re interested go to www.auduboninternational.org to find more information.

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FOR A WHISKEY TO BE CONSIDERED BOURBON IT MUST MEET FIVE BASIC QUALIFICATIONS:

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Contrary to popular belief, bourbon does not have to be produced in Kentucky, although 95 percent of all bourbon is. At any given time there are approximately 7.5 million barrels of bourbon in the state of Kentucky, with a population of 4.3 million—nearly two barrels for every one person! Despite the concentration, there are several distilleries across the United States producing quality, true to form, bourbon. A few of them reside right here in Illinois—the closest to us being Black Dog Distillery in Plainfield.

Perhaps no more specific a rule does any liquor in the world follow than rule number two of bourbon distillation. For around fifty-five to sixty seconds, the inside a barrel made only of 30 to 34 staves of white oak trees is incinerated to create a permanent and flavorful char. A clear liquid, which cannot yet be called bourbon, when poured into this barrel, enters its first stage of maturation. Throughout its time in the barrel, the whiskey will absorb into the wood and out once again, taking with it flavors of the oak as well as the char. This practice is rumoured to have originated when Elijah Craig, a Baptist Minister and native Kentuckian, wanted to transport his whiskey from one side of the state to another but the only barrels he had were once used to store fish and pickled vegetables. In order to get rid of the smell and taste he burned the inside of the barrels before pouring the whiskey in, laying the foundation for what would become an immensely popular spirit.


Bourbon is often made of a mash of corn, wheat, barley and rye. To be considered bourbon however, the mash must be over half corn. The measure of the other ingredients is not insignificant though, as they affect the final taste of the bourbon. Basil Hayden’s is an example of a bourbon with a higher rye content creating a sharp, spicy flavor, making it a prime candidate for sweeter cocktails like the Manhattan. Maker’s Mark has a high wheat content, leading to a more mellow flavor and is often taken straight or on the rocks. There is a huge range of bourbons on the market with a wide range of taste profiles. Of course length of time in the barrel, proof and a host of other factors ultimately affect the taste of the final product as well.

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As the mash is heated, sugar inside the mixture is consumed by yeast and becomes ethanol. The ethanol, with a much lower boiling point than water, evaporates and then is condensed again to become a clear liquid: alcohol. If distilled too long, the liquid will lose the flavor of the mash and become of higher alcohol content. The limit set on bourbon is to preserve the natural flavor of the whiskey and the barrel. Once taken off the still, water is added to the liquid to further bring down the proof. The water dilutes the sugar and alcohol and helps facilitate the movement of the whiskey in and out of the oak. Once the bourbon is to be taken out of the barrel, water is often added once more to bring down the proof further. The scientific reasoning behind this is because the sugar and acid chains that flavor the bourbon stick to the water molecules and not the ethanol. There is a lot of judgment in the whiskey community toward people who add ice or water to their bourbon. Some people think it ruins it all together. The truth of the matter is that water just changes the flavor of the bourbon and releases different elements. Different levels of water, even after the bourbon leaves the bottle can rearrange the chemical makeup of your glass of whiskey, changing the flavor with every drop. A quote from third generation Buffalo Trace employee, Freddie Johnson, puts to rest the stigma quite well: “Whether it’s a flick of water, two flicks of water, one ice cube, two ice cubes, chilled, poured over ice…the right way to drink bourbon is just the way you like it.”

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This rule comes from a period after Prohibition known as the “Rectifier era”. This was a period in which former bootleggers and grocers were putting onto the market cheap and poorly made whiskey and calling it bourbon. They would add rubbing alcohol and other chemicals to bypass the distillation process and add tobacco to “rectify” the color. People were actually dying from the fake bourbon and this prompted action from actual distilleries. Colonel E.H. Taylor of OFC & Carlisle Distilleries (which would later become Buffalo Trace), along with several other master distillers, championed the Bottled in Bond Act. The act set standards for what bourbon had to be – beyond even the five rules aforementioned. Approved bottles would be given a seal so that consumers knew when they were buying the real thing and when they were being duped. Today, however, some of these rules have become outdated by other laws and modern practices and very few bourbons today can be considered Bottled in Bond. With all of these qualifications in mind, it’s clear that the real beauty of bourbon lies in its complexity. It is the product of dozens of relationships; the relationship between the soil and the oak tree cut down for wood, the wood and the staves pieced together into a barrel, that barrel and the flame, the char produced and the clear liquor that enters. The flavor then further depends on where that barrel sits in which distillery, where the distillery rests in the country, how the weather affects that region and that building, how long those elements last and how long the distiller exposes it to those elements. Every piece, every process and every small seemingly meaningless detail plays an important part in the production of the American spirit that eventually fills our bottles and then our glasses.

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Bar Ordering Guide A quick guide to bartending terminology to always get what you want. At the Urbana Country Club our mix of members is extremely unique. One thing they all have in common, though, is that they know what they want. But what happens when you’re standing at the bar and you know what you want, but you don’t know how to say it? This bar ordering guide consists of terminology and explanations designed to make sure that never happens.

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Shaken

Stirred

The 007 classic. This describes a liquor drink that is poured over ice in a cocktail shaker with another liquor, a liqueur or any variety of mixers and shaken. This slightly dilutes and chills the cocktail, often making it more palatable and smooth. Fun Fact: According to the books, Bond took his martini this way because it would make any poison rise to the top and he’d know he was in danger.

A liquor drink that is poured over ice in a stirring glass or cocktail shaker with another liquor, liqueur or mixer and stirred with a bar spoon. The effect on the drink is the same as shaking, but there are no ice chunks left in the liquid that makes it back into the glass, resulting in less dilution. Often, mixed drinks on the rocks will be given a quick stir to blend all the different elements together.

Straight Up Tall & Double On the Rocks Neat A liquor drink that is shaken or stirred with ice and then strained into a martini glass. There is a myriad of different cocktails that can be served up or on the rocks and our bartenders are trained to ask you which way you prefer. As they get to know you they’ll ensure that you always get your drink the way you like it.

Same thing, right? Nope, not the case. A double means double the liquor and can be ordered tall or short. A tall simply implies the normal liquor pour (a generous two ounces at UCC) but in a taller glass, adding more of the mixer. Hard day at the office? Have a double tall. Really hard day at the office? Have a double short.

There’s an apocryphal story about the origin of this phrase that claims Scotsmen used to chill their drinks with rocks from the river. More than likely, the term came from the “rocks” of ice that would be chipped off of a larger block to make cubes. These cubes would be added to a liquor or liquor mixture to cool it down and dilute it just a touch. On the rocks means liquor or a mixture of liquor, liqueur or sweetener over ice.

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Neat refers to unmixed liquor, served without ice or being chilled. Straight from the bottle to the glass.


Straight

Twist

Typically refers to a liquor drink being served straight up or up. Although, this is incorrectly used in place of neat. Generally, if you order a whiskey straight, the bartender will have enough wherewithal to know you probably don’t want it shaken over ice and strained into a stemmed glass. However, if it’s in the middle of a rush and that bartender’s switch has been flipped into automatic, a gin or vodka ordered straight may end up as an extra dry martini. Again, UCC bartenders are trained to ask for clarification.

A strip of the rind of a lemon (or other citrus fruit) that is twisted to release essential oils and then served in or on the rim of a glass. Typically this is a common garnish of martinis and other stemmed cocktails. Our members know that enjoying a meal or drink is much more than just the taste. It’s the presentation, the smell, the process. This garnish is the perfect way to experience your drink before it ever touches your taste buds.

Dirty Dirty is used to describe a drink that is mixed with about a quarter ounce of olive brine prior to shaking or stirring. An olive garnish is also typically assumed. Extra dirty or Filthy just mean more olive juice.

Dry

martini – 101

Dry means there is very little vermouth. A normal martini will be about a 3:1 ratio of vodka/gin to vermouth. A dry martini will be more like a 6:1 ratio. That doesn’t mean more vodka/gin, just less vermouth. Extra dry could also be used to order a martini with even less vermouth or perhaps a vermouth splashout. A splash-out is a tiny bit of vermouth swirled around the glass and then dumped before straight vodka/gin is shaken and strained into the glass.

Wet

Perfect

A martini made with additional dry vermouth. Here you will see a 2:1 ratio of vodka/gin to vermouth. If you’re a fan of vermouth, this is the way to go. If you want your drink extra wet or soaking we can oblige with perhaps a 1:1 ratio, or half and half.

A martini made with equal parts dry and sweet vermouth. The 3:1 ratio will be utilized here also. Where you would normally receive one part dry vermouth, you now get one half parts of both dry and sweet vermouth to the gin/vodka before shaking or stirring. Simple, balanced, perfect.

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FESTIVITIES 50

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Mission Hills Country Club Rancho Mirage, CA

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Enjoy 18 holes at Rolling Green Country Club followed by dinner at The Metropolitan, located on the 67th floor of Willis Tower. Book your overnight accommodations for a preferred rate at the historic Drake 5 1 Hotel before taking friends to enjoy another round at Ravinia Green Country Club.

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*Benefits are subject to the benefit terms and conditions, which may be found on clubcorpnetwork.com. Membership application or conversion form required, and membership is contingent on successful completion of the Club's enrollment process. All offers are subject to availability. Other restrictions may apply. See Club for details. © ClubCorp USA, Inc. All rights reserved. 1018 CB


Meet your Chefs John Schreyer L I N E

C H E F

HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN AT THE CLUB?

18 YEARS AT U C C

I started in 2001. A friend of mine was the chef at the time and he wasn’t happy with his pizza guy. He knew I ran a pizza shop for several years so he gave me a call.

BEST COOKING TIP FOR HOME COOKS? Don’t be afraid to get out there and try different things. Really try a little bit of everything so that you know what you like.

FAVORITE DISH TO MAKE? I’ve really started loving making the bread at the Club. It’s something new that I’ve just learned in the last year. 52 52

ANY TIPS FOR MAKING BREAD AT HOME? You need a good, hot oven, but steam is really the secret to great bread. It helps keep the bread soft but makes a nice crispy crust.

MOST CHALLENGING DISH TO MAKE? Steaks are the hardest one. Trying to figure out temperature by feel—it takes a lot to really learn it. I had done it at home some, but not in a restaurant setting.

FAVORITE DISH TO EAT? I’m a huge breakfast guy. Something simple like biscuits and gravy is the perfect comfort food.

CRAZY KITCHEN STORY? One time with a previous chef, we had two parties going on and all the power in the entire building went out. We still had the ovens because they’re gas, so we were cooking by flashlight. All of a sudden the chef ran in to grab the fire extinguisher out of the kitchen—in the middle of the power outage, a guest had also managed to light one of the bushes outside on fire with a cigarette.

FREE TIME HOBBIES? I’m a giant sci-fi nerd. I love all sci-fi, good, bad or cheesy. I also enjoy building and upgrading computers; it’s something that I’ve taught myself over the years.

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W E S AT D O W N W I T H S O M E O F T H E C H E F S AT U C C T O L E A R N M O R E A B O U T T H E TA L E N T B E H I N D T H E C U I S I N E . G E T T O K N O W T H E P E O P L E B E H I N D T H E S C E N E S W H O C A R E F U L L Y C R A F T E V E R Y D E L I C I O U S D I S H Y O U H AV E H E R E A T U C C .

Noe Rodriguez E X E C U T I V E

C H E F

SOMETHING PEOPLE MAY NOT KNOW ABOUT ME? I actually have a background in business administration and accounting. It was my first job after I finished school. That background comes into play a lot as an Executive Chef, knowing what it takes to be successful on the business side of the kitchen.

10 YEARS AT U C C

WHAT’S YOUR PROCESS WHEN CHOOSING INGREDIENTS? Whenever I go to the market, they ask me what I’m looking for and I always say, “What’s good?” I don’t go in with a list. I survey to see what’s the best of the best and build my menu around that.

WHAT’S YOUR PROCESS RUNNING THE KITCHEN? Everything that we do makes an impact on the numbers. I lead my team by understanding what is coming in and what we have to work with. It’s actually a lot like meal planning at home. I’m strategic in every decision that I make in the kitchen, and I’m willing to run the numbers one minute and jump into the kitchen the next. I think of the back of the house as a whole seamless operation.

WHAT DO YOU LIKE TO DO IN YOUR FREE TIME? Soccer is my main hobby—I have played my whole life. I also enjoy exploring other restaurants to keep learning.

BEST COOKING TIP FOR HOME COOKS? Whatever you cook, cook it with passion and heart. Understand who you are cooking for. It will make you feel good to focus on them.

MOST CHALLENGING DISH TO MAKE? Fried chicken. As you cook the fried chicken the temperature goes in through the grease. It makes it healthier to steam it first and bread it second. You get all the flavor, not as much of the greasy flavor and it’s healthier.

FAVORITE DISH TO EAT? Lasagna and enchiladas are my favorite. My wife makes the best lasagna. The smell of the cheese, tomato and garlic is amazing.

CRAZIEST KITCHEN STORY? I was working in a kitchen that had an extremely old stove and one day it caught on fire. Not what was cooking on the stove, but the entire stove itself just went up in flames. All the guys in the kitchen were pouring salt on it to try to put it out and it was the biggest mess to clean it up once the fire was out.

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Obdulio Escobar E X E C U T I V E

S O U S

3 YEARS AT U C C

C H E F SOMETHING PEOPLE MAY NOT KNOW ABOUT ME? My wife and I started and operated two different restaurants in the Champaign area: Milo’s and Escobar.

WHAT WAS THE BIGGEST DIFFERENCE IN COMING TO THE CLUB? The range of different dishes that we make—everything from high-end Tomahawk steaks to hot dogs. I had actually never cooked a hot dog in my life before I started here. I had eaten them, but never cooked them. Working at the Club has really increased my range of dishes.

BEST COOKING TIP FOR HOME COOKS? Start with the right ingredients and the right equipment. The top of the list is a good oven range, preferably gas because it will perform the same every time. Or get a really good grill and go outside.

FAVORITE DISH TO MAKE? 54

It used to be the upside down pizza at my restaurant, and I also really like to do a lot of wrapping with filo doughs.

MOST CHALLENGING DISH TO MAKE? I think that would have to be a rack of lamb. To cook a rack of lamb really well you need a convection oven and you need the exact right size to get it to turn out right. I’ve found that between 14 oz. and 16 oz. is the perfect size for it to cook perfectly juicy and sweet.

FAVORITE DISH TO EAT? I’m simple. Rice and beans and homemade tortillas are my favorites. I also really love salads.

CRAZIEST KITCHEN STORY? I had been simmering a pot of stock for about 24 hours and I asked one of the guys in the kitchen to strain the stock before he started reducing it to make a demi glaze. He walked straight to the sink with the pot and dumped the stock down the drain and kept the bones and handed those back to me. As soon as he saw my face, he said, “Oh, you didn’t want the bones, did you?!" 24 hours of work was down the drain in a second!

FREE TIME HOBBIES? I love reading cookbooks—they really inspire me. My favorites right now are Asian and Caribbean cuisines. They actually have a lot of similarities that you wouldn’t immediately guess.

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Justin Quiñones L I N E

C H E F

HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN AT THE CLUB?

2 YEARS AT U C C

A year and a half. Jay, who also works here, is my friend and he brought me here.

WHAT YOU’VE LEARNED FROM WORKING AT THE CLUB? The biggest thing I’ve learned is about beautiful plating. Not just cooking the food, but how important presenting the food is.

FAVORITE DISH TO MAKE? The clam chowder is my favorite because it was the first UCC dish that I learned how to make.

MOST CHALLENGING DISH TO MAKE? The steaks we prepare because of the different temperatures and getting it just right. It’s very hard to distinguish how done a steak is just by looking, but you improve at it. Every day you get better.

FAVORITE DISH TO EAT? I really love tacos. That was a new food to me when I started here. I really love exploring new foods and trying new things.

CRAZY KITCHEN STORY? I don’t have one. Luckily nothing crazy has happened here yet!

FAVORITE THING ABOUT WORKING AT THE CLUB? It’s like a family to me. Every day I come to work here I’m learning new things and everyone is a great mentor for me.

FREE TIME HOBBIES? I love playing basketball as much as possible.

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TRAVEL BAGS 57

Find them in the UCC Golf Shop! Call 217-344-8673 for more info.


Stay Healthy With Us 58

A quick guide to the healthy foods served at UCC.

I

t’s not just the golf, tennis and fitness keeping you healthy here at the Club, it’s the dedication to natural healthy food from the kitchen as well. Here at the Urbana Country Club, our culinary team is constantly researching to develop new healthy (and delicious) dishes. We are choosing from fresh, natural ingredients in order to provide quality meals for our members that also serve to benefit their wellbeing. Let’s run down a few ingredients that are staples in the UCC kitchen and how they can be essential to healthy eating.

OILS AND DRESSINGS All our dressings are house made utilizing high quality olive oil and vinegar. Olive oil in particular is a essential ingredient to many UCC dish-

es. It’s an ingredient that has been studied for years for its health benefits, and it has become a go-to for including necessary dietary fat to dishes without making them unhealthy. Extra-virgin olive oil is primarily 73 percent monounsaturated fat which can reduce inflammation and is resistant to the high heat needed for cooking. In addition, olive oil has a huge amount of antioxidants that can lower your risk of heart disease. It has also been seen to lower the risk of strokes and type 2 diabetes, as well as fight Alzheimer’s disease and rheumatoid arthritis. It also, unlike other fats, isn’t connected to weight gain or obesity. The trick to getting all these health benefits though is to make sure you’re getting pure extra-virgin olive oil, like what you would get at UCC, and not one that has been cut with other oils.

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SEAFOOD Fish and seafood are another one of those foods that is surprisingly healthy for you. The seafood served at the club is low in fat and cholesterol. It is also an excellent source for protein, omega-3 fatty acids and other vitamins and minerals, including iodine and Vitamin D which many are deficient in. Fish is also been linked to reduced risk of heart disease, stroke and autoimmune disorders. Looking for maximum health benefits? Stick to fatty fish (salmon, trout, tuna, etc.) to maximize your intake of omega-3 fatty acids and other nutrients.

BREAD First and foremost, the bread used in the UCC kitchen is made daily in house to ensure it is made without harmful preservatives. We are also integrating sourdough as a staple in our dishes due to its health benefits over other types of bread. Sourdough has a lower pH than other breads, which helps absorption of nutrients like potassium, phosphate, magnesium and zinc. It also contains lactic acid bacteria (also present in products like yogurt) that promote a healthy gut and digestion. In addition, the fermentation process degrades the gluten in the bread so that the overall content is much lower than normal breads, making it easier to digest for people sensitive to gluten.

FRUITS AND VEGGIES People who eat more vegetables and fruits as part of an overall healthy diet are likely to have a reduced risk of some diseases, like cardiovascular disease and obesity. Most vegetables are naturally low in fat and calories and none have cholesterol (sauces or seasonings may add fat, calories and/or cholesterol). Vegetables in particular provide vital nutrients for health and maintenance of your body, including potassium, dietary fiber, folate (folic acid), vitamin A and vitamin C. Diets rich in potassium may help to maintain healthy blood pressure. Vegetable sources of potassium include sweet potatoes, white potatoes, white beans, tomato products (paste, sauce, and juice), beet greens, soybeans, lima beans, spinach, lentils and kidney beans. Dietary fiber from vegetables, as part of an overall healthy

diet, helps reduce blood cholesterol levels and may lower risk of heart disease. Fiber is also important for proper bowel function, and helps reduce constipation and diverticulosis. In addition, fiber-containing foods, such as vegetables, help provide a feeling of fullness with fewer calories.


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Pomegranate, Orange, Papaya & Kiwi Green Salad SERVES 6-8 INGREDIENTS SALAD: 6 cups mixed salad greens 2 cups fresh peeled orange slices 2 cups fresh peeled papaya slices 4 kiwis, peeled and sliced 3/4 cup pomegranate seeds

DRESSING: 1 1/2 teaspoons white wine vinegar 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon pepper 1/8 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes 1/4 cup olive oil

DIRECTIONS: 1. For dressing; combine vinegar, salt, pepper, and red pepper flakes in small bowl. Whisk in oil. 2. Wash greens and blot dry with paper towels or use a salad spinner to remove excess water. Chill until ready to serve. 3. Just before serving, toss greens with three tablespoons dressing. Arrange on a serving platter. Alternate orange, papaya, and kiwi slices over greens. 4. Drizzle with remaining dressing. Sprinkle with pomegranate seeds.

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B OY U L C WB O C 7.19 2 . 7

( Y E E - H AW )

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MEMBERSHIP

In 1979, teacher and coach Lyle Loman started writing life insurance as a way to subsidize his income. He found out it was lucrative so, two years later, he bought an insurance company in Broadlands. Brian Loman, Lyle’s son, decided he wanted to stay close to where he was raised so he left his job at Kraft and decided to join his father in the business. It was 2005 when Lyle decided to sell the business to Brian. Brian decided to establish a contingency plan and added auto insurance into the business. Shortly after, Brian partnered with his friend, Ron Ray and the name Loman-Ray was born. Brian extended his business to Newman and then acquired Miller Voight Insurance and Real Estate, Callaway and Associates and Funk Insurance. Today, Loman-Ray has offices in Newman, Villa Grove, Sidney, Broadlands, Tolono and Champaign. They represent over 13 companies. Brian excelled at serving the needs of teachers, farmers and even horse racers. He saved them money and built personal and trusted relationships. Brian is licensed in Life, Health, Property and Casualty insurance and Loman-Ray offers Home, Auto, Farm, Health, Medicare and Commercial Insurance.

M E M B E R

S P O T L I G H T :

Brian Loman

Brian has a big heart and loves to donate locally. Elks Kids Care, Athlete of the Week scholarships and Wounded Warriors are just some of his favorite local charities. Brian lives in St. Joseph with his son, Blake, and his daughter, Madigan. In his free time, you can catch him in the summer hanging out on his boat on Lake Shelbyville and in the winter, in his gym outside of St. Joe, called The Sports Crib, playing pickleball. He even got a few teams over the winter to have a pickleball league!

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A Beginner's Guide to

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Soccer Soccer’s popularity in the United States continues to rise faster than ever before. And that’s even with all the criticisms that there is too much “diving” or “flopping” (the act of faking a foul or injury to gain a free kick), that no professional sporting event should ever end in a tie and that most casual viewers find Einstein’s Theory of Special

Relativity less complicated than offside penalties. But with Mr. Khan’s Fulham Football Club climbing the ranks in England, arguably the most competitive soccer country in the world, there has never been a better time to jump on the bandwagon. Here is what you need to know about English soccer to get started.

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Cu p P l a y :

D OM E S T I C COM PE T I T I O N S English soccer is divided into many different levels, or tiers, of competition. The Premier League, consisting of 20 teams, is at the top of the tiered structure, followed by the Championship, League One and then League Two, each consisting of 24 teams. These 92 teams are the most elite in English soccer. There are as many as seven additional tiers, but those details go way beyond the scope of this guide.

League Play: Each individual league will participate in a yearlong points race to determine a champion. Using the Premier League as an example, throughout the year the 20 teams will play every other team in their league twice (38 matches), one match in each team’s home stadium. A win will gain the team three points, a draw receives one point and zero points are awarded for a loss. At the end of the season, the team with the most points is crowned the year’s League Champion.

P ro m o t i o n a n d Re l e g a t i o n: At the end of each season, the three teams in each division with the lowest point totals are dropped, or relegated, to the next lower league, while the three top performers in each league are promoted up to replace the relegated teams.

During the year, teams will also compete in a variety of other season-long competitions outside of League Play. The most prominent of these in England is the FA Cup. The FA Cup remains the oldest national soccer competition in the world and is open to the top-10 levels of English soccer. Upwards of 800 teams will participate in single-elimination knockout rounds until only one team remains.

I NTE R NAT I O NAL COM PE T I T I O N S Outside of domestic competitions, some clubs will participate in international leagues throughout the year as well. For England, there are two main European competitions clubs will partake in annually: Champions League and Europa League. These leagues present some of the most exciting matches, as it is the only opportunity to watch the top soccer clubs from one country compete with those of another country.

U E FA C h a m p i o n s L e a g u e: The most prestigious soccer league in the world. Qualification is only eligible to the top-division clubs from the most competitive countries. For England, only the top four point-earning teams from the Premier League will qualify for the following year’s Champions League. Each country has slightly different means of qualification, but the result is a field consisting of the best 32 clubs in Europe competing for the most sought after trophy in all of sports. Regular contenders for this title include, but are not limited to, Spanish clubs (Real Madrid, Barcelona, Atletico Madrid), English clubs (Chelsea, Manchester United, Liverpool, Manchester City), Italian clubs (Juventus, Inter Milan, Napoli), German clubs (Bayern Munich, Borussia Dortmund), amongst many others from all over Europe.

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U E FA E u ro p a L e a g u e: This league is almost identical to the Champions League in every aspect, but the field of clubs consists of those that barely missed qualifying for Champions League. It is still a highly competitive league and prestigious competition, second only to the Champions League.

Format:

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A re a o f P l a y : Pitch dimensions can vary significantly from stadium to stadium, but must fall into a length range of 100-130 yards and a width range of 50-100 yards. A ball is deemed to have travelled out-of-bounds when the entirety of the ball is outside of the boundary line.

S co r i n g :

Both competitions begin with 32 teams randomly placed into Points are scored when a team advances the ball into the oppoeight four-team groups. These groups will follow a double nent’s goal. Contrary to American Football, the entirety of the round-robin format, where each team will play every other ball must cross the line in order to be deemed a goal. team in the group twice (one home and one away match). Wins will receive the club three points, draws receive one point and zero points for losses. The top two teams from each group will advance to the knockout stage of the competition. In this stage, teams compete in two matches (one home and one away match) F o u l s: of aggregate scoring. The team with the most goals after two Most fouls result from a referee determinmatches will advance to the following round. If the score is ing that a player committed a dangerous tied after the two matches, the team challenge for the ball, impeded a player’s with the most away goals will adprogress, handled the ball, delayed play or vance. If they are tied on away goals, disrespected another player or referee. Based the match will continue into 30 addion the severity of the offense, a player may tional minutes of play. After this exbe shown a yellow card (typically resulting tra time, ties are decided by a penalty from a cynical or intentional foul), or a red shootout. The only exception to the card (serious offense or second yellow card) format in the knockout stages is that which leads to a player being thrown out the championship match consists of of the game and suspended for followonly one game played at a predetering games. mined location.

RU LE S Te a m M a ke u p: 11 players a side consisting of one goalkeeper and, based on strategy, a mix of defenders, midfielders, and forwards. Teams are allowed to bring an additional seven players to utilize as substitutes, but only a maximum of three substitutions can be made throughout the match.

Length of Play: Matches consist of two 45-minute halves of continuous play with a 15-minute halftime break. Additional time, also known as stoppage or injury time, will be added to the end of each half to account for any time lost due to injury, substitutions or other various incidents. Based on the type of competition, overtime, known as extra time, or penalty shootouts may be required to determine a winner. UCC1 9 2 2 . CO M I S P R I N G 2 0 1 9


20 Ways to Sound Like a Soccer Fanatic: Refer to games as matches.

“Skill,” “quality,” and “class” are all ways to describe great play.

Call it the pitch, not the field. “Worldie” refers to phenomenal play. “Great ball” means nice pass. “Nice touch” means a player has controlled a particularly difficult pass or situation well.

“Clean sheet” refers to a team not allowing a goal against them. An “Equalizer” is the game-tying goal.

“Set piece” is a free kick or corner kick. “Gaffer” is the team manager. “Derby,” pronounced darby, refers to a local rivalry match; e.g. Fulham vs. Chelsea (West London Derby) or Liverpool vs.Everton (Merseyside Derby).

“Skipper” is the captain, which can vary game-to-game.

“Always rising” commonly refers to a shot that sails over the crossbar.

“On the front foot” is a team moving forward with momentum, opposite of a team “sitting on their heels,” “absorbing pressure,” or “parking the bus”.

“Against the run of play” refers to a team that scores and takes the lead when the other team has been clearly dominating or “asking all the questions”. “Hat trick” is 3 goals in a game by one player; a “brace” is 2 goals. A “challenge” refers to an attempt to tackle or stop a player. “Boots” are shoes or cleats and "kits" are the full uniform worn by players.

67 Ways to describe a powerful shot include ”howler,” “screamer,” or “ambitious,” if taken from long range. “Clear the lines” means to get the ball out of an opponent’s potential scoring position.


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In The Scene

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T H A N K S F O R A L L T H E M E M O R I E S !

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Business Success

THREE TIPS FROM NIRALEE PATEL, RESIDENT DIRECTOR AT MERRILL LYNCH WEALTH MANAGEMENT IN CHAMPAIGN.

BUILD A STRONG NETWORK OF POSITIVE THINKING PEOPLE OUTSIDE OF WORK

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It is so important to surround yourself with people outside of work from various ages and areas of expertise. Throughout the years, the encouragement, support and perspectives from my outside network have been invaluable. Drawing from your network and their unique experiences in business can provide insight that you may not be able to get from someone who is your peer or a part of your organization.

PASSION & PURPOSE Life is too short to spend it doing something you do not enjoy. A key ingredient to business success is that you must have a passion, desire and drive for the work that you are doing and the people you are helping.

ADAPTABILITY TO CHANGE The business environment is always evolving and changing. Along with that, you must have an open mind to changes and be able to adapt as they come. In my profession, financial markets, client needs and goals are changing year after year. Most of the time these things are unexpected. Being able to anticipate possible changes and keeping an open mind when they happen are key to overcoming those challenges.

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U GOLF Begin yourUCC1 golf 9experience 2 2 . CO M I S P Rthis I N G spring. 2019

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