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UQ PLANNING RESEARCH journal

SCHOOL OF GEOGRAPHY, PLANNING AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

uq.edu.au/gpem


This booklet is a collection of selected research projects completed by members of the 2012 Bachelor of Regional and Town Planning graduating class. The program focuses on sustainability

Research within The School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management is focused on tackling the big issues including: • Climate change and adaptation • Sustainable livelihoods • Marine and coastal processes and management • Sustainable cities • Conservation and natural resource management Please contact The School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management or the research staff directly to discuss any issues of interest. Ph: +61 7 3365 6455 Fax: +61 7 3365 6899 Email: gpem@uq.edu.au

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The School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Contents Resources Boom Rural towns in transition: What does their future hold?

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“Best Practice” regional planning for resource communities: An examination of Queensland’s approach.

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Neighbourhoods The MPE public realm in transition: Did the grass use to be greener?

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The pattern of tree cover in Brisbane’s suburbs: Does planning have a role to play?

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Old buildings, new pasts: Planning for the adaptive reuse of heritage buildings in Queensland.

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Neighbourhood planning and public participation: The effectiveness of community consultation.

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Environment The significance of surface water infrastructure design for environmental outcomes. 9 Sustainability of the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games 2018.

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Land use planning in environmentally sensitive coastal areas: Bribie Island as a coastal gateway.

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Land use planning for coastal hazards: A case study of Holloways Beach, Cairns.

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City Cycle Understanding the relationship between perception and adoption patterns of public bikeshare programs.

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Understanding the dynamics of bikesharing programs and the factors contributing to their use.

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How can effective City Cycle public transit integration be achieved in Brisbane?

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UQ Bachelor of Regional and Town Planning

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UQ School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management

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For more great resources follow us on Twitter @UQ_gpem

LinkedIn http://bit.ly/gpemlinkedin

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Resource Sector Impacts on the Future Liveability of Rural Towns: A Surat Basin Case Study Penelope Honey Supervisor: Dr David Wadley

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Contact the author: penelope.honey@uqconnect.edu.au Resource booms have been a common occurrence in Australia, punctuating the country’s history since European settlement. In the past many towns were built specifically to service the mining industry. The extraction of resources in established agricultural regions served by existing towns is a more recent phenomenon and introduces complex interactions. A number of these towns are currently at tipping point, faced with uncertain futures, with various degrees of dependency on the volatile resources industry. An extensive literature review revealed that much attention has been given to the common social, economic, and environmental impacts, experienced by rural communities in resource regions. Literature focused heavily on the negative impacts associated with transitional workforces and acute population growth, such as low housing affordability and availability, fly over effects and loss of community character. However, the collective impacts experienced by a single rural community as a result of resource development, both positive and negative, have received very little literary attention. Furthermore, the long term future of these towns as resource development continues is yet to be explored. This research paper aims to determine how the function and liveability of rural servicing towns has changed as result of acute growth in the

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Available online

http://bit.ly/penelope4008 resource sector. It also develops a probable scenario for the evolution of the town between 2012 and 2030. The town of Chinchilla, in the Surat Basin, was selected as the case study community for this research project. A land use analysis and targeted semi-structured interviews with key community stakeholders were undertaken to gain a comprehensive understanding of key impacts and changes that have occurred in the town. A scenario development process based on key assumptions relating to the resources sector, economic and population growth was undertaken to develop a picture of Chinchilla in 2030. Results indicated substantial change in the function and liveability of Chinchilla. The primary function of Chinchilla has changed from a traditional rural servicing centre to being the hub of the burgeoning Surat Basin coal seam gas industry. Key changes to liveability included the declining availability of critical services, loss of traditional local business, decreased housing affordability, loss of traditional town character and improvements to convenience retailing. However, it is seen through the development of a time phased scenario that by 2030 Chinchilla will have evolved into a mature agricultural mining community, expected to exhibit greater economic diversity, a more demographically and culturally diverse community and a revitalised built environment.


“Best Practice” Regional Planning for Resource Communities: An Examination of Queensland’s Approach Frances tanwan Supervisor: Dr Tiffany Morrison

Contact the author: frances.tanwan@uqconnect.edu.au

Available online

http://bit.ly/frances4008

Resource extraction, while heralded for the economic benefits it provides, is coming under increasing scrutiny in the literature, media and policy arenas, for the pressure it is placing on the social, economic and environmental systems of resource communities. While there is a plethora of literature that illustrates the state of resource regions, there is no panacea for the removal of impacts. The economic significance of resource regions, however, has led the scholars and governments to question the best approach to planning to ensure the sustainability of communities, management of impacts and protection of the resource extraction industry to allow its continued contribution to the state and national economy. Regional planning is being heralded as the fundamental planning medium for achieving sustainable outcomes for resource regions, through comprehensive and collaborative planning processes that match the scale of pressures, impacts and resources that society seeks to manage, and provision of appropriate guidance, mechanisms and strategies for doing so. Despite the recognition of the value of regional planning there is currently a deficit of fundamental research that is a “best practice approach” in responding to regional planning in resource communities. This thesis entailed the construction of a “best practice” framework for regional resource planning, to investigate the overarching question; ‘to what extent does the current regional planning approach in the Surat Basin and Bowen Basin reflect “best practice” regional planning for resource regions? The research took a strong formative evaluative approach, applying the “best practice” framework as the primary evaluative instrument, and using qualitative data methods and analytical triangulation. Just as the primary purpose of formative evaluative research is to improve, this thesis has focused on determining the appropriateness and potential success of regional planning in the case study regions in order to improve the approach and deliver the sustainable outcomes promised from regional resource plans identified in the literature. The results from this thesis centre on the key learnings from evaluating the two case study region’s regional planning approaches against the “best practice” framework. The thesis provides recommendations for improvement to the regional resource planning approach in Queensland, and also makes a significant contribution to the development of an international best practice framework for regional planning in resource communities.

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The MPE public realm in transition: did the grass use to be greener? Rhiannon west Supervisor: Ms Laurel Johnson

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Contact the author: rhiannon.west@uqconnect.edu.au Master planned estates (MPEs), or master planned communities as they are increasingly called, present both a form of development and a mechanism of development delivery that is increasingly influencing the suburban landscape, in Australia. MPEs are typically large-scale, privately delivered, multi-phase developments that combine residential and complimentary land uses, and include the provision of social and physical infrastructure. The paper follows a line of research that investigates the question, ‘what are the public realm implications of transitions in governance from private to public in master planned estates in South East Queensland?’ The creation of suburban environments like that of MPEs involves an interaction between private market actors, such as property developers, with public actors, such as local and state governments. While collaboration and partnerships between public and private actors are facilitated through the delivery of MPEs, diverging objectives have the potential to create issues that may manifest in both physical and social spaces. The thesis provides a retrospective examination of the management transition process that took place at Forest Lake in South East Queensland with an aim of documenting the process and investigating any issues that may have been experienced by stakeholders. Particularly, the thesis is focused on the effects of transition upon elements of public realm such as open space, lakes, landscaping, playgrounds and other publicly accessible facilities, as these elements are often originally provided by developers as a physical mechanism for assisting in community creation and feature prominently in marketing material. Research has taken the epistemological perspective of critical realism teamed with basic qualitative research methods and triangulation of information sources. Recommendations centre on key learnings from the Forest Lake case-study and offer suggestions around a new model for governance transition.

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The Pattern of Tree Cover in Brisbane’s Suburbs: Does Planning Have a Role to Play? Claire Daniel

 Dr Tiffany Morrison 

Supervisor: Prof Stuart Phinn

Contactthe author: claire.f.daniel@gmail.com The purpose of this study is to examine patterns of tree cover on private residential lots in Brisbane in relation to development age and increasing density of built form, to determine whether planning should play a more active role in the protection and promotion of tree cover on private property. A tree cover analysis was conducted using GIS software and a 2010 tree cover spatial dataset produced by Brisbane City Council. Multiple Regression Analysis (MRA) was conducted to measure the relative contribution of various socio-economic and physical variables to the prediction of percentage residential area tree cover in Brisbane Statistical Local Areas (SLAs). An Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was then used to investigate the differences between current mean tree cover for parcels developed for detached housing in different periods in Brisbane’s history. A separate analysis was then undertaken for parcels with infill residential development. The second component of the study involved a policy analysis of local planning and tree protection mechanisms in relation to international best practice criteria and examples.

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http://bit.ly/claire4008 It was found that dwelling density, slope and median residential development age were the most important in the prediction of private residential tree cover across Brisbane’s SLAs, with socio-economic variables displaying a smaller, but also significant, relationship with tree cover. ANOVA analyses show that tree cover decreases significantly with modern development. No significant difference in tree cover was found between detached dwellings developed through subdivision of established residential lots and other detached dwellings in greenfield developments; however, tree cover on sites developed for multi-unit dwellings was found to be much lower. The policy analysis found that, except in special circumstances, trees are considered very late in the planning and development process in Brisbane, if at all, contrary to best practice as outlined in the literature. This research provides the first quantitative measures for the effects on residential tree cover of changes in Brisbane’s planning and development. This data provides an evidence base for future planning decisions and recommendations from international examples for directions that could be taken.

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Old Buildings, New Beginnings: Planning for the adaptive reuse of heritage buildings in Queensland Sarah Everson Supervisor: Ms Laurel Johnson

Contact the author: sarah.everson@uqconnect.edu.au

Available online

http://bit.ly/sarah4008

This paper explores the role of planning systems in promoting and/or inhibiting the adaptive reuse of heritage buildings and how the conservation of valued built form can increase social and cultural benefits to communities. Key informants and focus groups provide an insight into the relationship between the built heritage and its contribution to the social and cultural identity of two Queensland communities, Warwick and Ipswich. Social and cultural identity assists in the creation of dynamic places which, in turn, work to define the ‘character of a place’. Ipswich, a Regional Activity Centre, and Warwick, a Rural Service Centre, are experiencing very different effects of population growth and urban sprawl. However, they both boast a large number of heritage listed buildings that are recognised in the city centre as being of state heritage significance. The adaptive reuse of a heritage building as a strategy of Environmentally Sustainable Development is a growing process that has come about due to strong community desire to conserve the built heritage in an area. Therefore the planning decisions made in regards to the preservation of heritage buildings need to ensure that conservation and reuse of built areas is upheld and reflects the intent and outcomes of the planning systems and associated policies. The planning systems in Warwick and Ipswich and their effectiveness in promoting adaptive reuse of heritage buildings are examined. A thorough document and policy analysis of the 2012 Southern Downs Planning Scheme and the 2006 Ipswich City Council Planning Scheme provides an insight into the documents’ accessibility for planners, architects, builders, heritage advisors and other stakeholders such as consultative committees and community members. The Warwick and Ipswich cases highlight the enabling and constraining planning provisions and other planning tools that enable regulatory and policy protection of heritage buildings through adaptive reuse. These enabling factors will provide recommendations which are applicable to other local governments in Queensland, as well as national and international contexts.

Neighbourhood Planning and Public Participation: the effectiveness of community consultation Sean Yeong Wei Chin Supervisor: Assoc Prof Greg Brown

Contact the author: sean.chin@uqconnect.edu.au

Available online

http://bit.ly/sean4008

This research aims to evaluate the community consultation component of Brisbane’s Neighbourhood Planning Program with SherwoodGraceville Neighbourhood Plan as a case study. The neighbourhood plan generated media attention as community members openly protested against the plan, calling into question the legitimacy and quality of public participation in the planning process. The evaluation of the public participation process for the Sherwood-Graceville Neighbourhood Plan was completed by surveying participants in the planning process to determine their perceptions and attitudes towards the consultation process based on their personal experience. The quality and effectiveness of the public participation process were measured using evaluation criteria from the public participation literature. A participant engagement index was also developed to measure the level and depth of engagement by participants that may influence their subjective evaluation of the public participation process. Results from the study show that public participants did not establish trust in the planning process as a result of participation. Participants did not feel empowered, did not believe they influenced neighbourhood planning decisions, and believed the process was driven by politic concerns. However, participants did find consultation meeting locations to be convenient and believed that participants involved in consultation were representative of the Sherwood-Graceville community. The findings suggest that the neighbourhood planning process failed to achieve an effective consultative process. At the core of this research is the question about how much planning control can be devolved to the neighbourhood planning process as Brisbane attempts to achieve its goals as part of the long-term, integrated plan for the South East Queensland region. Is public participation in the neighbourhood planning process that symbolizes democratic participatory ideals inherently irreconcilable with regional and state planning needs?

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The significance of surface water infrastructure Design for environmental outcomes. Amy Mieklejohn Supervisor: Assoc Prof Ron Johnstone

Contact the author: amy.mieklejohn@uqconnect.edu.au This paper examines the ability of Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) to produce environmental outcomes in terms of catchment health within South East Queensland, Australia. WSUD is increasingly being promoted in Australia as the means to achieving a sustainable water supply whilst mitigating stormwater’s influence upon the natural environment. Previously, WSUD has been identified within Australia as providing a sustainable and cost effective approach to water management; meeting stormwater objectives of reducing peak flow and runoff volumes whilst improving quality of stormwater leaving the site. Despite its endorsement as the sustainable path forward, WSUD’s influence upon receiving waterways’ health is unknown. Water and dependent ecosystems and services are connected at a variety of levels which are not boundary defined and as such, sustainability methods must address this complexity. Consequently, the ability of WSUD to contribute to the maintenance of these ecosystems must also transcend boundaries and be effective at the multi scale required of it. Considering South East Queensland’s diverse climate and predicted population growth (exemplifying pressures on already degrading ecosystems), the identification and demonstration of an effective sustainable water management system within this region is crucial. This papers aims to demonstrate WSUD’s effectiveness beyond a development site scale. This will be achieved through the analysis of water quality health at three urban catchments with differing catchment design within South East Queensland. Through examining the changes to water quality indicators along the length of the catchments, WSUD’s influence upon water quality at a catchment scale will be demonstrated. A review of current knowledge surrounding WSUD and ecosystems is undertaken, highlighting the study’s contribution within the relevant field of literature with specific reference to urban planning. Site selection, adopted methods and findings of water quality health from the three urban catchments is then addressed. The importance of these findings within the realm of urban planning will also be illustrated. Through this examination, the effectiveness of WSUD implementation in contributing to environmental outcomes at a catchment scale (and by extension a sustainable water supply) will be demonstrated.

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Sustainability of the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games 2018 Available online

http://bit.ly/sally4008

Sally Prowd Supervisor: Dr Sebastien Darchen 

Contact the author: sale6@tpg.com.au The aim of this paper is to identify how the three dimensions of urban sustainability have been incorporated into infrastructure proposed for the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games to be held in 2018. It examines three diverse infrastructure including the Athletes Village, Light Rail line, and Carrara Sports and Leisure Centre, and how urban sustainability themes are captured in their conceptualisation phase. The Gold Coast, and in particular the three specific infrastructure, has been used as a case study in order to investigate the sustainability rubric associated with a Commonwealth Games host city. The methodology included selecting criteria to define sustainability and its dimensions. Primary data collection was undertaken via conducting semistructured interviews with key stakeholders in order to gain insight into the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games project and the Gold Coast itself. The aim was to identify similarities and differences among stakeholders, which would then be used to thematically assess the sustainability of the infrastructures. The main findings include the social, economic and environmental challenges faced by the Gold Coast and the individual infrastructure studies, as well as the extent to which these sustainability principles were considered into initial conceptualisation of the infrastructures. Importantly, the stakeholder interviews displayed prominent themes associated with each aspect of sustainability and the associated criteria. The findings demonstrate the dominant challenges and benefits of incorporating sustainability into a host cities infrastructure. The defined criteria of sustainability used for this research provides a framework for both pre and post Games assessment of host cities and their infrastructures. The case study highlights the difficulties and benefits of sustainable approaches, and offers recommendations for further improvements to host city’s’ sustainability. The distinct lack of research regarding the Commonwealth Games, and the ever increasing prevalence of the multi-dimensional sustainability ideal gives rise to the need for a definitive criteria of sustainability that can be used practically to assess pre-Game intentions. Furthermore, the pre-Game discussion of the Gold Coast offers the chance for improvements before the event, and gives a valuable comparison for any literary work that is conducted post Games.

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LAND USE PLANNING IN ENVIRONMENTALLY SENSITIVE COASTAL AREAS: BRIBIE ISLAND AS A COASTAL GATEWAY Morgan Castle Supervisor: Dr Ann Peterson

Contact the author: morgan.castle@uqconnect.edu.au With the inevitable nature of population growth and trends associated with sea-change lifestyles, the environmentally sensitive coastal areas of Australia are subject to ongoing degradation and development pressure. In order to provide for this projected increase, the recently amalgamated councils of South East Queensland are required to collectively provide a total of 754 000 new dwellings by 2031 (DIP 2009). This thesis explores land use planning in environmentally sensitive coastal areas. Using Bribie Island as a case study, the paper analyses the perceptions of a number of stakeholders (government representatives, residents, business owners and tourists) in relation to the future development of a large parcel of land on Bribie Island, a coastal area characterised as a ‘coastal gateway’. Key stakeholders were either surveyed online or interviewed in order to analyse

their perceptions relating to aspects surrounding Bribie Island as a ‘coastal gateway’ and planning on Bribie Island. The data were analysed in order to identify relationships among and between the key stakeholders. Results from the online surveys and interviews suggested significant support for parkland or recreation space (on average 80% across the stakeholder groups), as well as health and education facilities (average 30% respectively) on the case study site. Having said this, a significant diversity of responses was evident when participants were asked what should be developed on the case study site. The unique nature of coastal areas minimises the validity of prescriptive planning. The thesis sets a basis for future studies regarding planning in environmentally sensitive coastal areas by drawing on the ‘coastal gateway’ as a specific coastal growth setting.

Land use planning for coastal hazards: a case study of Holloways Beach, Cairns Rachel Ovenden Supervisor: Dr Ann Peterson

& Dr Iraphne Childs

Contact the author: rachel.ovenden@uqconnect.edu.au Land use planning is a critical tool for reducing losses in life and property during a natural hazard event. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change places an imperative on adaptation in the ‘hotspot’ region of Far North Queensland (FNQ), which is likely to experience more severe cyclones and an increased storm tide risk in Cairns by 2050. The destruction wrought by Cyclone Yasi on FNQ communities has highlighted how the preparation of Sustainable Planning Act 2009 compliant planning schemes represents an opportunity for local government to pursue a pragmatic approach to improving the resilience of development on the frontline of the coast. At the helm of this new planning frontier is Cairns Regional Council (CRC); a jurisdiction characterised by extreme environmental dynamics and a legacy of settlement on the low-lying Northern Beaches. The research examines the effectiveness of Queensland’s planning system in enhancing the disaster resilience of coastal settlements to the likely future impacts of more severe tropical cyclones. The research method comprises a single case study design

Available online

http://bit.ly/rachel4008 at Holloways Beach, Cairns. Field trip observations contextualise the environmental and built form characteristics of the Holloways Beach settlement, which are used to magnify the effectiveness of Queensland’s current policy positions regarding land use planning in hazardous coastal areas. To achieve this, evaluation criteria are developed and applied to relevant State and local planning instruments to ascertain key strengths and weaknesses in the planning framework’s regulation of development on storm tide prone land at Holloways Beach. An analysis of interview responses from experts in the coastal hazard planning field, and the CRC Planning Scheme Project Manager and Local Disaster Coordinator, expand upon the evaluation to highlight the institutional arrangements that frame the implementation of statutory planning instruments geared for disaster risk reduction. The corroboration of findings demonstrates deficiencies in Queensland’s approach to land use planning for coastal hazards, and the potential for its future manifestation in enhancing the disaster resilience of vulnerable coastal settlements.

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Understanding the Relationship between Perception and Adoption Patterns of Public Bikeshare Programs. Joshua Forrest Supervisor: Ms Laurel Johnson 

Contact the author: joshua.forrest@uqconnect.edu.au

Available online

http://bit.ly/joshua4008

Public bikeshare (PBS), or short term bicycle rental at unattended stations, has been advocated as an innovative and institutionally profitable active transport solution with the potential to alter travel behaviour and resolve the myriad of transport planning problems afflicting urban environments (DeMaio, 2009; Bachand-Marleau et al., 2011; Shaheen et al., 2011). Despite growing research and the increasing proliferation of global PBS programs (PBSPs), still, “little is known about the users of the systems and their motivations” (BachandMarleau et al., 2011: 2). Five primary PBSP research streams exist: (1) The history, development and evolution of PBSPs; (2) investigating best-practice PBSPs; (3) PBSP catchment areas; (4) PBSP bike distribution; and (5) multi-modal travel behaviour and PBS. “While perceived barriers associated with cycling behaviour appear to play an important role in the decision making process, no studies to date have solely focussed on investigating individuals’ perceptions of barriers to cycle commuting” (Bekkum et al., 2012: 478); and “existing research investigating the role and impact of bicycle sharing schemes … is sparse” (Murphy and Usher, 2011: 2). Cursory research has been undertaken to analyse PBSP barriers that are “part of a larger framework of attitudinal and/or environmental correlates” (Bekkum et al., 2012: 478); but no specific study concurrently explores perception issues and PBSPs. The thesis will contribute to the transport planning discipline by researching the influence of public perception on PBSP adoption patterns. There is significant originality and value in studying and documenting the relationship between perception and PBSP adoption. This thesis has academic and practical merit with a scope directed at improving end-user PBSP acceptance: “understanding how individuals perceive attributes of innovations … can be leveraged to enhance adoption”; (Haggman, 2009: 386; Antioco and Kelijnen, 2010; Talukder and Quazi, 2011). The thesis will redress literature gaps by understanding user perception of PBSPs and subsequent travel behaviour responses and will be a distinct modification to the literature by researching PBSP users and not the programs themselves.

Understanding the

Benjamin Freese

dynamics of bikesharing

Contact the author: s4178794@student.uq.edu.au

programs and the factors contributing to their use.

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Supervisor: Dr Jonathan Corcoran

Often operating as part of a city’s public transport system, the premise of bikesharing is sustainable transportation, with many initiatives aimed at increasing cycle usage, improving the problem of ‘first-’ and ‘last-mile’ connections to other transit modes and lessening the environmental impacts of transportation activities. On October 1 2010, Brisbane City Council launched CityCycle – the first major bikesharing


How can effective City Cycle public transit integration be achieved in Brisbane? Anthea Shivas Supervisor: Dr Derlie Mateo-Babiano 

Contact the author: anthea.shivas@uqconnect.edu.au Bike share programs have evolved over the last 30 years to become the latest phenomena in inner-city transport modes. Currently in the case of Brisbane, the program is yet to experience wide success. The project’s aim is to gain a better understanding of people’s impression on the City Cycle scheme to potentially achieve effective City Cycle public transit integration in Brisbane.

Additionally tools such as locational mapping, site audit evaluations, observational user-counts, evidence based matrix scoring and Likert scaling will provide further analysis of the collated data. Important initial findings include: Strong user dissatisfaction with the utility of the City Cycles from users/non-users of the scheme, and additionally a greater need for improved transport infrastructure planning.

To operationalize, it aims to gather face-to-face questionnaire survey data from local residents of Brisbane on their influences of using the City Cycle system. This shall be done in person on popular Bikeway paths in inner-city Brisbane. An online survey will also be undertaken to capture a different set of users and non-users of the City Cycle scheme.

The outcomes of these surveys will provide a case study approach of behaviour patterns of users and non-users of City Cycle. This information is a crucial component to identifying the relationships of the strengths and weaknesses of the City Cycle system as well as opportunities for public transit improvements. This research provides a strategic framework for planners and government policy makers to market the importance of this sustainable mode of transportation and deliver increased alternative mobility choices to the public.

In order to address to address the main research question of City Cycle becoming a viable public transit option, the following objectives will be addressed: •

Relationships between what people think of the City Cycle Scheme

How these impressions relate to people’s use and/or lack of use of this program

 ow can public perception and utility of City Cycle H infrastructure be improved

program in Australia – as an integral part of its plan to ease congestion and parking pressures in the inner city. Since its inception, CityCycle has seen a number of changes specifically aimed at increasing the program’s user base and furthering Brisbane’s bikesharing ‘evolution’. The purpose of the research is to gain a better understanding of the CityCycle program’s user base, by investigating the extent to which relevant factors affect bikesharing perception and ridership. Particularly, the thesis focuses on the bikesharing potential of predominantly residential areas of Brisbane. Screening criteria including land use characteristics, Socio-Economic Indexes for Areas (SEIFA) scores and usage data of the CityCycle network are used to

The results of this research are intended to inform and yield options for determining how City Cycle can be considered an integral process to grow cycling as a mode of transport and culture. The research will contribute to identifying patterns and travel behaviour demands of adopting and retaining high City Cycle patronage use now and in the future.

identify three case study locations. These include CityCycle stations in New Farm, South Brisbane and West End. Research is undertaken by administering surveys to residents within a 200 metre catchment of each case study location, covering key themes such as use and perception of the CityCycle program, a self-assessment of cycling competence and human capital variables of income, education and occupation. Recommendations are drawn from the key findings of these surveys and offer suggestions to better facilitate the realisation of social, environmental and health-related benefits attributable to bikesharing programs.

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The School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management at The University of Queensland is at the forefront of cutting-edge research into the widely debated issues confronting us today. It is a vibrant and multidisciplinary School boasting world class facilities and staff.

Bachelor of Regional and Town Planning The Bachelor of Regional and Town Planning program at UQ prepares students to be leaders in the planning field and is accredited by the Planning Institute of Australia. Many of SouthEast Queenland’s planning firms are headed by graduates of the UQ program. The UQ program focuses on sustainability with key planning elements centred around the topics of land-use planning, urban design, economic development, planning practice, infrastructure planning, resource management, transport planning and planning law. Lecturers have a strong understanding of planning theory in practice and work in conjunction with guest lecturers from industry to ensure students have access to real-life case studies straight from the professional sector. Field Experience

During each year of the program, students undertake a planning project, which allows them to work with industry, government and community partners on developments in South-East Queensland. International Opportunities

UQ planning students also have the opportunity to participate in specialised courses in Vietnam and Hong Kong. These focus on the development of cities and urban areas and the key issues facing different developing and developed regions globally. Research Projects

In the final year, there is the opportunity for high achieving students to undertake an in-depth, supervised individual research thesis to extend their expertise in a specialist area of planning. This booklet showcases some of their work. More information about UQ for International Students, including the study environment, links to estimated living costs, refund policies, support services, information for students with families, and your legal rights as an international student can be found at: http://www.uq.edu.au/international-students Please contact the School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management or the supervisors directly to discuss any issues of interest. Ph: +61 7 3365 6455 Fax: +61 7 3365 6899 Email: gpem@uq.edu.au

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The School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Multifaceted research projects are undertaken at The School investigating a spectrum of issues, from managing the population boom in SouthEast Queensland to assisting poverty reduction in South-East Asia. Governments, agencies and industry across the globe draw on the knowledge and practical skills of The School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management staff to help solve contemporary problems. Students at The School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management are able to concentrate on their areas of research interest and work on projects of national and international significance in a unique interdisciplinary environment. A strong research culture exists within The School and the sharing of ideas between staff and students across disciplines is encouraged. The School provides leadership and support for its research staff and we will ensure that as a student with us you will have access to supervisors, mentoring programs, excellent resources and professional development initiatives. Scholarships Research students can apply for a number of scholarships. Please visit the UQ Scholarships website: www.uq.edu.au/grad-school/scholarships-and-fees for more details. Examples of current Research Higher Degree projects can be found at www.gpem.uq.edu.au/student-projects Contact Please contact The School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management at postgrad.gpem@uq.edu.au if you are interested in undertaking a research higher degree, or if you have any enquiries. Alumni Profiles of successful graduates can be viewed at www.gpem.uq.edu.au/profiles

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General EnquirIes The School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management AUSTRALIA 4072 Phone +61 7 3365 6455 Fax +61 7 3365 6899 Email gpem@uq.edu.au Twitter @UQ_gpem Web www.gpem.uq.edu.au

Text pages printed on recycled paper

Photo 1 on title pg credit to Dr Jeremy Bourgoin; Photos 2, 6, 7 on title pg credit to Dr Donovan Storey; CRICOS Provider No:00025B

Photo pg 10 courtesy of Gold Coast Tourism; Photo pg 11 Dr Chris Roelfsema; Photo pg 13 credit to Sharon James. All other images purchased, public domain or property of UQ. Design by Sharon James.

UQ Planning Research Journal  

A collection of research projects by final year Bachelor of Regional and Town Planning Students at The University of Queensland

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