Page 1

upstater FA L L 2015

Live like a local.

WE LOVE

FIELD-to-GLASS COCKTAILS AN D HAVI NG

F OR

FARMERS NEIGHBORS HIGH SPIRITS

28 B I K E L I K E A Y O G I 36 W E E K E N D I N H U D S O N 46


FA L L 2 0 1 5

1


DREAMING OF YOUR UPSTATE LIFE?

Imagining an Upstater lifestyle…

BE. HERE. NOW.

engage with REALTORS © who get it

westwoodrealty.com We’ve been guiding dreamers for over 40 years with our knowledge, experience and exceptional client service.

Start searching today at WestwoodRealty.com

WOODSTOCK 845.679.0006

KINGSTON 845.340.1920

NEW PALTZ 845.255.9400

STONE RIDGE 845.687.0232

WEST HURLEY 845.679.7321

WestwoodRealty.com 2

upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

Serving the Hudson Valley Region


K C E B E N R HI

EAT

SHOP

EXPERIENCE

• Aroi Thai • Bread Alone • Calico • Cinnamon Indian Restaurant • Gaby’s Mexican Cafe • Gigi Trattoria • Le Petit Bistro • Liberty Public House • Market St. • Osaka • Pete’s Famous • Pizzeria Posto • Rhinebeck Bagel • Samuel’s • Terrapin • The Local • The Shelter

• Cabin Fever Outfitters • Darryl’s • Dorrer Jewelers • Floral Fantasies • Haldora • Hammertown • Hummingbird Jewelers • Hundred Mile • Merriweather’s • Oblong Books & Music • Paper Trail • Pegasus Footwear • Periwinkles • Pure Mountain Olive Oil • Rhinebeck Antiques Emporium • Rhinebeck Artist’s Shop/Atwater Gallery • Rhinebeck Department Store • Sawkille Co. Furniture • Sharp Images Photographic • Spruce Design & Decor • Sunflower Natural Foods Market • Tulip • Waddle n Swaddle • Winter Sun & Summer Moon

• Allure Aveda Salon & Spa • WhistleWood Farm Bed & Breakfast • Betsy Jacaruso Studio & Gallery • Clear Yoga • Dr. Tom’s Tonics • FACE Stockholm • Fiber Flame Studio • Haven Spa • Hudson Valley Pottery & P.A. Gibbons Studio • IZLIND Integrative Wellness Center • Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome • Omega Institute • Rhinebeck Farmer’s Market • Rhinebeck Area Chamber of Commerce • Satya Yoga • Upstate Films

EnjoyRhinebeck.com

STAY

Find us on: FA L L 2 0 1 5

3


CU STO M WO O D F LO O R I N G, PA N E L I N G & B E A M S S I N C E 1 9 95

4

MILL: PINE PLAINS upstater / u p s t a t e r . c o m

|

S H O W R O O M : B R O O K LY N

|

THEHUDSONCO.COM


Only Lindal . . . warm modern bespoke homes relaxed healthy environments personalized for site and self efficiency and predictability unmatched experience caring local service

. . . the preeminent prefab

New York area independent representative

Atlantic Custom Homes, Inc. 2785 Route 9 PO Box 246 Cold Spring, NY 10516 Info@LindalNY.com LindalNY.com HudsonValleyCedarHomes.com Tel:845-265-2636

FA L L 2 0 1 5

5


CONTENTS

TABLE of

upstater FA L L 2 0 1 5

54

Ashokan Reservoir

A Weekend in the Catskills Photo by Matt Petricone

FEATURES

22

9 New Hudson Valley Restaurants

28

High Spirits

36

Bike Like a Yogi

46

A Weekend in Hudson

54

A Weekend in the Catskills

64 66 70 6

upstater

FOOD + DRINK

12

44

4 creative ex-NYers who’ve made it here Story by Karen Angel / Photos by Caylena Cahill FOOD + DRINK

Tracing Hudson Valley hooch from field to glass Story by Jennifer Gutman / Photos by Caylena Cahill JOURNEY

A Hudson River cycling trip Story by Jeffrey Simms / Photos by Karen Pearson WEEKENDER Chillin’ in the Hudson Valley’s bastion of urban chic Story by Brian PJ Cronin / Photos by Matt Petricone WEEKENDER

THIS & THAT

HV PORTRAITS

10

MISSION STATEMENT

Exploring the mountains’ diverse “neighborhoods” Story by Kandy Harris / Photos by Matt Petricone

11

CHECK OUT OUR TEAM

REAL ESTATE

12

HOW TO SPOT A TRANSPLANT

A former NYC restaurateur’s New Paltz compound Story by Kandy Harris / Photos by Deborah DeGraffenreid

18

IN PRAISE OF THE MASON JAR

40

MAP: CYCLING UP THE HUDSON

59

WEEKEND GIVEAWAY CONTEST

61

BEHOLD THE APPLES

68

FLOW CHART: TINY HOUSES

80

Front cover: Paul Maloney of Stockade Tavern crafts an Absinthe Suissette.

LAST LOOK

Photo by Caylena Cahill

Wined and Dined

OFF THE GRID

The Big Deal with Tiny Houses

An experimental family farm Story by Peter D. Martin / Photo by Deborah DeGraffenreid AT HOME

Working for the Weekend

Redecorating a house in 36 hours Story by Paul Smart / Photos by Steffen Thalemann / u p s t a t e r.c o m

14

LISA PADOVANI + PAOLO REBAUDENGO

20

AMBROSIA PARSLEY

44

LEON VEHABA

52

TIM REINKE

62

DINA FALCONI


CONCEPT to COMPLETION DESIGN to CONSTRUCTION Home Remodeling | Interior Design | Kitchens | Bathrooms | Additions & Decks Finished Basements | Saunas & Steamrooms | Cabinetry | Countertops Sinks & Faucets | Hardware & Lighting | Flooring | Tile | Linens & Textiles

Shop Rhinebeck R H I N E B E C K D E PA RT M E N T S TO R E

ACCESSORIES for the HOME Organic Sheets, Towels, Bedspreads, Duvets, and Pillows Beautiful Custom Belfast Bay Shades Murchison-Hume organic cleaning & personal products

8 6 - 8 8 Mi l l Hi l l R o a d , Wo o d sto ck , N Y EvolvedInteriors.com 845.679.9979

Beacon Robert Irwin Chelsea Excursus: Homage to the Square3

Sites

1 East Market Street Rhinebeck, NY 845.876.5500 rhinebeckstore.com

Dia:Beacon 3 Beekman Street Beacon New York 845 440 0100 www.diaart.org

Affiliates

FA L L 2 0 1 5

7


feed your obsession.

your real estate-obsessed best friend

upstater.com


THE ONLY

Game Town SO LD

SO LD

IN

Farm 31

Farm 30

Olivebridge, NY - $480,000 3 Beds, 2.5 Baths, 6 Acres,2,800 SF

SO LD

SO LD

Kerhonkson, NY - $450,000 3 Beds, 2 Baths, 7 Acres, 1,800 SF

Farm 33

Rhinebeck, NY - $650,000 5 Beds, 3.5 Baths, 7 Acres, 3,200 SF

Ranch 9

Narrowsburg, NY - $385,000 3 Beds, 2 Baths, 5 Acres, 2,000 SF

www.thecatskillfarms.com

FA L L 2 0 1 5

9


EDITORIAL

u

EDITOR

Susan Piperato susan@luminarymedia.com ART DIRECTOR

Jason Cring jcring@luminarymedia.com PROOFREADER

Barbara Ross

CONTRIBUTORS

THIS MAGAZINE IS D EVOTE D TO LIVI NG A

BALANCED LIFE LIVING IN HARMONY

THOSE WE SEE

THOSE IN

WE CHOP

WE SHOVEL

BUT WE DON’T LET IT K E E P U S F R O M

WE LIKE

AUTUMN LEAVES TAKI NG OU R

DOGS SWIMMING AN D HAVI NG

STONE HOUSES TH E 2007

FARM DISTILLERY ACT FOR

LIVE LIKE A LOCAL / u p s t a t e r.c o m

CHAIRMAN

David Dell Upstater is a project of Luminary Publishing.

ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT & SALES ADVERTISING EXECUTIVE

Maryellen Case mcase@luminarymedia.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Robert Pina rpina@luminarymedia.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Ralph Jenkins rjenkins@luminarymedia.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Anne Wygal awygal@luminarymedia.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Nicole Hitner nhitner@luminarymedia.com

ADMINISTRATIVE DIRECTOR OF EVENTS & SPECIAL PROJECTS MANAGER

Samantha Liotta

OFFICE MANAGER

Peter D. Martin BOOKKEEPER

Molly Rausch

DIGITAL

FARMERS NEIGHBORS

10 upstater

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Brian K. Mahoney

Mario Torchio mtorchio@luminarymedia.com

LAUGHING AT OURSELVES KICKI NG TH ROUG H TH E

CHIEF EXECUTIVE

Amara Projansky

& THE ONES WE HAVE

EVE N WH E N TH E SNOW HAS LOST ITS R OMANTIC LUSTE R

WE APPRECIATE IRONY

Amara Projansky & Jason Stern

Julian Lesser jlesser@luminarymedia.com

EVERY DAY OUR PAST YET TO MEET WE RAKE

PUBLISHING FOUNDERS & PUBLISHERS

AN D

WITH

TH E

NATURE SEASONS PEOPLE

Peter Aaron, Karen Angel, Caylena Cahill, Brian PJ Cronin, Deborah DeGraffenreid, Roy Gumpel, Jennifer Gutman, Kandy Harris, Carolita Johnson, Peter D. Martin, Karen Pearson, Matt Petricone, Anne Pyburn Craig, Fionn Reilly, Jeffrey Simms, Paul Smart, Sparrow, Steffen Thalemann, Pauline Uchmanowicz

DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL STRATEGY

Teal Hutton teal@luminarymedia.com

PRODUCTION PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

Daria Erdosy ads@luminarymedia.com PRODUCTION DESIGNERS

Mósa Tanksley Kerry Tinger

LUMINARY MEDIA 314 Wall Street, Kingston, NY 12401 (845) 334-8600 | fax (845) 334-8610 luminarymedia.com All contents © Luminary Publishing Inc. 2015 For extended coverage of the upstater lifestyle, join us at upstater.com. Upstater was founded in 2011 and acts as a guide for living, buying, renting, and vacationing in upstate New York. Our writers have hearts, mortgages, and legacies in the Hudson Valley.


CHE C K O U T O U R

TEAM LOOK FOR CONTENT BETWEEN ISSUES FROM YOUR FAVORITE CONTRIBUTORS AT upstater.com.

Brian PJ Cronin lives in Beacon with his son, three cats, and the occasional wayward bat. In addition to writing for Upstater and other publications in New York City and the Hudson Valley, he somehow finds the time to serve as the editor of Hudson Valley Parent magazine, and tackles the occasional 16-mile solo hike across the spine of the Catskills. (If you are a bear, please note that Brian is not delicious in any way, shape, or form.) upstater.com/contributors/brianpjcronin

Carolita Johnson grew up in New York City and spent 12ish years in Paris earning a master’s in modern letters and linguistics and having fun researching early nuns’ hygiene, before moving back to New York. She’s contributed cartoons to The New Yorker since 2003. She is also a storyteller, illustrator, and writer, whose self-illustrated essays have appeared in The Hairpin, Scratch, Cosmo, and The Toast, as well as her personal webcomic, Oscarina. Her latest project is a memoir with the working title “Happily Often After.”

VISIT US upstater.com

FOLLOW US

facebook.com/upstater instagram/upstater #upstater

CONTACT US ideas@upstater.com

upstater.com/contributors/carolitajohnson

Roy Gumpel’ s photographs were featured in the National Geographic Explorer film Route 66: The Mother Road, and his most recent photo credits include the Wall Street Journal, Travel & Leisure, Hudson Valley, and Saratoga Living. He frequently shows his work at Kingston’s RUBYgallery. He also makes “WoodstockLamps,” a line of sconces created from Catskills hardwood, and is an EMT with the Woodstock Rescue Squad and a volunteer firefighter.

REA DER’S

SURVEY TAKE OUR READER’S SURVEY FOR A CHANCE TO WIN:

Messermeister Meridian Elite Bread Knife

upstater.com/contributors/roygumpel

Jennifer Gutman lives and writes in New Paltz. She has a master’s in English literature that many have claimed to be useless, but which she finds inexplicably useful every day. When granted the opportunity, she attempts to facilitate “aha!” moments for 18-year-olds in writing classrooms at SUNY New Paltz. Her grandfather’s name is Gibson, which might explain her predilection for briny gin and cocktail onions.

PRESENTED BY:

bluecashew Kitchen Pharmacy Rhinebeck, NY www.bluecashewkitchen.com

upstater.com/survey

upstater.com/contributors/jennifergutman

FA L L 2 0 1 5

11


u

AN UPSTATER’S TRANSITION

B Y C A R O L I TA J O H N S O N

HOW T O S P O T A R E C E N T

UPSTATER TRANSPLANT

Carolita Johnson is a Kingston-based cartoonist whose work appears in The New Yorker.

12 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m / re l o c a t i n g

KNOW S YOU UMM E R 2 YOU 0 1 5 WANT TO. NEW CONTENT EVERY 12 WEEK AT

upstater.com/relocating


Let’s meet in

COLD SPRING a non-profit organization

promoting the arts in

Shop. Dine. Explore. explorecoldspringny.com

beacon for

more than

a decade Facebook.com/BeaconArts.org @BeaconArts #2sat #beaconny

Photo credit: Michael Turton for Philipstown.info/The Paper

Used Cars - Land - Nails - Bongos - Fly Swatters - Live Bait

g’s Pretty Good Pub u o D

Revolutions Fomented Uprisings Quelled Governments Run Wars Fought

Pianos Tuned

Software Verified Wells Drilled Tigers Tamed

LOCAL FOODS & CRAFT BEER 54 Main Street, Cold Spring NY

The Gift Hut

86 Main St, Cold Spring, NY Come visit us Fri, Sat, Sun 10am to 6pm

Unique Gifts • Jewelry • Home Decor • Toys • Games & Puzzles A great selection of Eco-Friendly, locally made, and USA made products. FA L L 2 0 1 5

13


photo by Roy Gumpel

LISA PADOVANI COSTUME DESIGNER + PAOLO REBAUDENGO STONEMASON HOMETOWN: Huntington, West Virginia, and Poughkeepsie (Padovani); Turin, Italy (Rebaudengo) LIVED IN HUDSON VALLEY SINCE: 2003 MOVED TO HUDSON VALLEY FROM: The East Village (which is still Lisa’s primary residence) HOW THEY MET: “Paolo was visiting a mutual friend of mine,” says Padovani. “I believe we were set up unknowingly because it was a dinner party for 12”—at Al Di La Trattoria in Brooklyn—“and he was the only one sitting at the table when I arrived, even though I was a half-hour late. He was so nervous that he stood up too quickly and hit the table with his legs, and all the silverware and glasses fell over and created a real racket. When everyone in the restaurant turned around to see what was going on, he became embarrassed and sat down too quickly, hitting the table with his legs and creating the same racket again. It was pretty charming, so I decided to sit next to him.” It makes perfect sense that a couple composed of an award-winning costume designer, known for her attention to historical detail, and a traditional Italian stonemason, known for his appreciation of indigenous architecture, would end up in Kingston. “The history here is definitely one of the things that attracted us,” says costumer Lisa Padovani, whose many accolades include Emmy nominations for her work on runaway-hit historical TV shows like “Boardwalk Empire,” “Mad Men,” “Oz,” and, most recently, “Gotham,” as well as films like I’m Not There, Party Monster, The Notorious Bettie Page, and the 2006 Oscar-winner The Departed. Her husband, Paolo Rebaudengo, runs the local masonry firm Piedmont Stoneworks, named for the region in the Italian Alps where he learned his craft. “I’d actually gone to Arlington High School in Poughkeepsie,” Padovani says. “So I already knew the Hudson Valley was a beautiful area with lots of historic places.” For the past decade, the couple has owned an 1802 stone farmhouse nestled into a picturesque hollow on South Wall Street, a winding, countrified stretch of road between Kingston’s storied Uptown and Rondout districts. “It’s pretty funky, with low tin ceilings that date from a 1902 renovation—originally, the owners would have kept their animals downstairs, partially for their own warmth,” says Padovani. She stays at the couple’s East Village apartment at least five days a week

14 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

for work, while Rebaudengo lives upstate full-time, visiting her in the city whenever he can. “We wanted to be somewhere that was a little bit country, but not too country,” says Padovani. “Being able to walk to restaurants and shopping was something we would miss, so it’s great to be somewhere where you can do that.” The house’s construction appealed to Rebaudengo, who was a professional volleyball and rugby player in Italy before studying under master stonemason Federico Turinetti. “It’s basically the same type of construction as the old stone houses in the mountains where I grew up,” he says. “I’ve added a patio and some other things, but we haven’t changed it much.” The biggest lures to Kingston for the couple were its convenient proximity to New York and its thriving arts scene. “We love that Kingston’s been attracting artists that run the full gamut,” Padovani says. “Painters, writers, musicians, sculptors—we’ve met all kinds of really creative people living here. But I do wish it would realize its potential in terms of making commercial property rentals more accessible, so that it could be following the leads of places like Hudson or Rhinebeck more quickly—I still see a lot of empty storefronts around here.” Perhaps Kingston, would do well to follow in the footsteps of Nucky Thompson, the lead character of “Boardwalk Empire.” “He would immediately start shipping liquor up the Hudson, and probably put in a boardwalk, rides, sideshows, and casinos to attract tourism,” Padovani muses. “Steve Buscemi [who played Nucky] actually does have a house up here, so there is a six-degree connection.” But Kingston’s lingering sluggishness aside, Padovani says she and Rebaudengo love their place in the Hudson Valley. “Even though I’m still in the city most of the week, at this point, the bulk of my and Paolo’s friends are up here,” she says. “And most of them are New York expats, just like us.”—Peter Aaron NEW CONTENT EVERY WEEK S U M CREATIVE M E R 2 0 1CLASS. 5 14 AT

upstater.com/arts


FA L L 2 0 1 5

15


JOIN US FOR A DAZZLING EVENING JOIN US FOR A DAZZLING EVENING HIGH ABOVE THE HUDSON RIVER AT THIS HIGH ABOVE THE HUDSON RIVER AT THIS FAVORITE HUDSON VALLEY EVENT! FAVORITE HUDSON VALLEY EVENT! HONORING SALLY MAZZARELLA & DIANA GURIEVA HONORING SALLY MAZZARELLA & DIANA GURIEVA LIMITED RESERVATIONS LIMITED RESERVATIONS

WALKWAY.ORG/SSN WALKWAY.ORG/SSN

Elevate your brand.

A BOUTIQUE AGENCY OF CREATIVES AND STRATEGISTS DRIVING RESULTS FOR LOCAL, NATIONAL, AND GLOBAL BRANDS

Servicing the marketing needs of thousands of businesses for over 20 years, Luminary Media, headquartered in Kingston, NY, is a combination of bright young creatives and seasoned business professionals.

DIGITAL STRATEGY WEBSITE DEVELOPMENT BRAND DEVELOPMENT GRAPHIC & WEB DESIGN EVENT PRODUCTION BUSINESS STRATEGY

LUMINARYMEDIA.COM

16 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m


u SUBSCRIBE

FEED YOUR OBSESSION Don’t miss an issue.

Here are two ways to secure your next issue:

1

Information is Power.

Sign up today to get the inside scoop and receive an email of locations where you can pick it up for free!

We’re all over this big city — you never know where we’ll turn up next.

2

Reader Insurance.

Sign up to receive it via mail. $25 per year for 4-issue direct delivery.

SUBSCRIBE TODAY. VISIT US AT

upstater.com/ subscribe

FA L L 2 0 1 5

17


u

OBJECTIFIED

S T O RY B Y P E T E R D . M A RT I N / I L L U S T R AT I O N & I N F O G R A P H I C S B Y J A S O N C R I N G

IN PRAISE OF THE MASON JAR Here’s to you, mason jar: vessel of verity, purveyor of potables,

container of comestibles, collector of collectibles, pickler of garden vegetables. Our demands on you grow daily. Always acquiescent, you adapt unbegrudgingly to our every inclination. Iced coffee? Definitely. Flowerpot? Sure thing. How about wine? Whatever, fine. Into the oven for a little loaf of bread, a solitary cupcake, even an individual pizza? Yes, indeed. We’ve seen you inverted, posterior perforated, ensconcing strings of Edison light bulbs. We’ve seen you chilled, filled with sapid spirits, and slid down the bar, teeming with captivating cocktails. Your arrival portends that all will be artisanal. So, sweet symbol of handcraftedness, majestic monument to the memorable, here’s to you.

18 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m


bout it AAllll bbbo All bAll bouut i boubtbout itt it t it All b bout it

All b

EAL EAL APP APP APP SSEAL S APP EAL MAS MAS S EAL MAS APP MAS SMAS MAS S APP EAL

POPULARITY CHART Y Y TTYYT Y I T RRI I R I Y R I T R A A A T A L A UULLU L R I U L U PP P L A P P O PPOOP OP U P O P O P

Estimated Estimated Estimated Estimated Estimated Estimated current level current current level level level current levelcurrent level ofofcurrent ofpopularity popularity popularity of popularity of popularity of popularity

OF CONE CONE OFOF OF CONECONE OF CONE CONE OF BACKLASH BACKLASH BACKLASH BACKLASH BACKLASH BACKLASH

1980 19801980 19801980 1980

GRANDMAS

84,276 84,276 84,276 NUMBER OF HITS ON ETSY.COM RETRIEVED WHEN SEARCHING FOR “MASON JAR”

it

it

2010 20102010 20102010 2010

Over

MOST IT: MOST MOST INTO INTO IT:IT:INTO IT: MOST MOST INTO IT:INTO

LOCAVORES LOCAVORES LOCAVORES LOCAVORES MOST IT: MOST MOST INTO INTO IT:IT:INTO IT: MOST INTO IT: LOCAVORES MOST MOST INTO IT: INTO GRANDMAS GRANDMAS GRANDMAS LOCAVORES GRANDMAS GRANDMAS MOST INTO IT: GRANDMAS 2040 20402040 20402040 2040

OOv OverOvveeerr iitt it r it

MOST IT: MOST MOST INTO INTO IT:IT:INTO IT: MOST MOST INTO IT:INTO LOCAVORES LOCAVORES LOCAVORES LOCAVORES MOST IT: MOST MOST INTO INTO IT:IT:INTO IT:LOCAVORES MOST INTO IT: MOST MOST INTO IT:INTO GRANDMAS GRANDMAS GRANDMAS LOCAVORES GRANDMAS MOST INTO IT: GRANDMAS

Over

Unin

itiate d UUnniinniti UninUni itiaatted itianteitia ed d ted Unin itiate d

MOST IT: MOST MOST INTO INTO IT:IT:INTO IT: MOST MOST INTO IT:INTO

MILLENNIALS MILLENNIALS MILLENNIALS MOST MILLENNIALS INTO IT: MILLENNIALS MILLENNIALS

DATA

TIME SPENT SCROLLING TO THE END OF A MASON JAR PINTEREST PAGE

CASE STUDIES

Deeper Dish Pizza

Hipster Double Down

Jump-the-Shark Moment?

Do you find pizza by the slice too easy to consume? Stuff your favorite jar with dough, sauce, cheese, and basil. Bake.

Get a pour-over coffee attachment for your mason jars so you can act even hipper than your neighborhood barista.

In 2013, 7-Eleven unveils a novelty slurpee cup complete with mustache straws and the aftertaste of corporate appropriation.

FA L L 2 0 1 5

19


photo by Fionn Reilly

AMBROSIA PARSLEY SINGER-SONGWRITER HOMETOWN: Reseda, California LIVES IN: Phoenicia LOCAL INFLUENCE: Parsley’s recent solo debut, Weeping Cherry, is “named after a big cherry tree at the bottom of my road. But also did you know that kamikaze pilots often painted cherry blossoms on their planes? So, in honor of my friends who were kamikaze pilots, it felt right.” Singer-songwriter Ambrosia Parsley is best known for the spooky noir of Shivaree’s 1999 hit “Goodnight Moon.” And her new solo debut, Weeping Cherry, was fueled by, as she puts it, “conversations with dead people.” But Parsley insists that creating music is fun. “I always sang and wrote songs, for as far back as I can remember,” Parsley says, but Shivaree was her first band. “I met [keyboardist] Danny McGough at a party in 1997 and [guitarist] Duke McVinnie just happened to be crashing on Danny’s couch at the time,” she says. “We wrote three songs together right away and suddenly we had a band. But, really, Shivaree was always more of a collective than a band per se, with members coming and going and different people playing on different songs on the records.” The band moved to New York City in 1999 upon signing with Capitol for I Oughtta Give You a Shot in the Head for Making Me Live in This Dump. Among the set’s tracks was “Goodnight Moon,” which got picked up for use in a watch commercial in Italy, leading to platinum sales of the disc there, and gold sales in France and Portugal. The band went on to accrue a following in Europe’s “wine-drinking” countries. “Goodnight Moon” later made its way into the series “Dawson’s Creek” and was tapped by Quentin Tarantino for Kill Bill: Volume 2. (A version of the song appears in Silver Linings Playbook.) In 2004, Parsley took a yearlong gig on Air America Radio’s “Unfiltered,” a show hosted by Rachel Maddow, Public Enemy’s Chuck D, and Parsley’s friend, the comedian Lizz Winstead. The segment, called “Ambrosia Sings the News,” ran for nearly 50 episodes. “It was crazy and a lot of

20 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

fun,” Parsley says. “My husband and I would get all the newspapers, go to a coffee shop, and I’d write [the songs] up. It was the Bush years and there was no shortage of material—and it all happened to rhyme.” Shivaree’s fourth album, 2007’s Tainted Love: Mating Calls and Fight Songs (Zoe Records), a collection of tunes about abusive artists like Phil Spector, Rick James, and Ike Turner, was recorded while Parsley was pregnant with her son Lucius. By then, the band felt it had run its course. “I hated being in videos—I’d much rather play Scrabble with my bandmates,” she says. “Plus, yeah, it took me a minute to adjust to my new life as a mother.” So Parsley pulled the plug on Shivaree and settled into motherhood. She and her husband, who works in music publishing, commuted between New York and their Phoenicia farmhouse, which sits above the Esopus Creek. Upstate, she continued writing songs and recording. “Ambrosia’s vision as an artist is really unique, I think,” says former Shivaree member Chris Maxwell, who relocated from New York City to West Saugerties in 1998. “She comes at it from more of a literary angle, rather than just being a straight songwriter. Her songs are these cool little stories.” Eleven such bittersweet story-songs form Weeping Cherry, which was supported by a successful PledgeMusic campaign. The album was released in France in 2013. The year of its making was fraught with the losses of several family members and friends, including ex-Shivaree drummer George Javori, whose funeral at sea is memorialized in the poignant “Catalina.” “With this album I just wanted to make something really pretty,” says Parsley. “But, more than anything, I want people to think about the dead friends I’m singing about. That’s what makes them present for me. It’s what makes them live again.”—Peter Aaron NEW CONTENT EVERY WEEK S U M CREATIVE M E R 2 0 1CLASS. 5 20 AT

upstater.com/arts


Lewis Hine, “The Swimming Hole”

Upstater.com

FA L L 2 0 1 5

P R O M OTI O N

LET’S GET LOST B Y M AT T P O N D

Getting away is about reconnecting with ourselves, forgetting the rest of the world. It’s about getting lost. And what I’ve found is that Upstate New York in summer is one of the most subtly epic places to fling oneself—or to flop. It’s the getaway beyond getaways, so much so that I chose to get away forever and live here. Still, when an idea is heralded as supreme, spaces tend to shrink. If you head up to Overlook this summer for a brush with the solitude of nature, you’ll doubtlessly encounter herds of other hikers who are looking for the same solitude. Where do you go to get away from the goers and the goners? In this struggle to have a small peace of mind, where is the one simple slice? upstater.com/lets-get-lost

FROM THE BACKYARD... A SEASON OF FIRSTS

SO YOU THINK IT WOULD BE FUN TO PUT YOUR HOUSE ON AIRBNB?

BY ANN HUTTON

BY ALLISON MARCHESE

Like documenting a baby’s initial steps—her shiny single tooth, her barely discernable utterances—one can get caught up in a garden’s firsts. First edible-pod peas. First salad of the season. First cucumber—the one you didn’t notice hidden under the foliage until it swelled up to gargantuan size—but never mind. It still tasted crisp and refreshing.

So this past spring I spent a lot of time with friends who kept saying, “You have such a big house. Why don’t you put it on Airbnb?” This is the kind of thing that quickly starts to sound like your mother asking, “You’re so thin—why don’t you eat more?” Inevitably, you say to your mom, “Because I’m not hungry.” Well, that’s what I did for a long time with my nagging friends. Until about mid July, when I guess I got hungry.

upstater.com/from-the-backyard-a-season-of-firsts

upstater.com/so-you-think-it-would-be-fun-to-put-your-house-on-airbnb

MY BIG GAY HUDSON VALLEY WEDDING

THE LOST RONDOUT IS SITTING IN A WAREHOUSE IN MIDTOWN

B Y H AY N E S L L E W E L LY N

B Y G R E G G S WA N Z E Y

Who knew? Who would have ever in a million years imagined I would be the one to propose? Yet there I was, a year ago, on bended knee. When we began this journey 19 years ago, marriage was never an option. While some may have dreamed of marriage, the reality was: “It ain’t gonna happen. You cannot marry.” Therefore, the thought never crossed my mind. On December 19, 2015, 19 years to the day we met, Gary and I will be married. The wedding ceremony will be in our home with 24 friends we cherish. Our home, filled with antiques, our three Scottish terriers, and my beloved books.

Have you seen Lynn Woods and Stephen Blauweiss’s film Lost Rondout: A Story of Urban Removal yet? It’s a documentary relating the impact of Urban Renewal initiatives in Kingston. In the late 1960s, hundreds of buildings were torn down in Kingston’s downtown Rondout district in a federally funded urban renewal project. Thankfully, someone was there just ahead of the wrecking ball when the Rondout was being “removed.” upstater.com/the-lost-rondout-is-sitting-in-a-warehouse-in-midtown

upstater.com/my-big-gay-hudson-valley-wedding FA L L 2 0 1 5

21


9

u

FOOD + DRINK

S T O RY B Y K A R E N A N G E L / P H O T O S B Y C AY L E N A C A H I L L

NEW HUDSON VALLEY RESTAURANTS

The Schatzi’s burger: an 8-oz. Pat LaFrieda chuck steak and short rib blend, topped with crispy pork belly, melted cheddar, and Schatzi’s sauce, accompanied by a potato pancake.

Along with its growing fame as a food producer, the Hudson Valley has become a magnet for restaurateurs eager to put their personal stamp on the farm-to-table movement. Not that long ago, the local diner or bar was often the best option in most towns for eating out. Today there’s a healthy array of eateries covering virtually every cuisine and putting their own creative, locally sourced spin on it—whether it’s Garden House’s eggplant carpaccio or Frogmore Tavern’s pastrami tacos. There’s greater emphasis on setting, too. As the competition has heated up, so has the focus on polished décor and outdoor seating, with enchanting patios increasingly common. From Southern comfort to rustic charm, here are some of the most interesting newcomers to the Hudson Valley dining scene. 22 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

1 GASKINS

Comfort food has found a new mecca in the Columbia County hamlet of Germantown: Gaskins. Veterans of Brooklyn standouts Diner and Marlow & Sons, Nick and Sarah Suarez have brought urban chic to country dining. The restaurant space is airy, sleek, and rustic all at once—the marble-topped bar is offset by roughhewn wooden tables. Gaskin’s connection to local farmers is strong—the Suarezes source from 20 farms, including Hearty Roots, Common Hands, and Montgomery Place Orchards—and it shines through in their simple fare. Heirloom tomatoes are tossed with peaches, basil, and chorizo. Fried chicken is served with slaw and honey-butter hot sauce. Mussels and clams are roasted in the wood-fired oven and served with potatoes. Shishito and pardon peppers are coated with sea salt and lemon. Gaskins has a well-developed cocktail program and a list featuring small-batch natural wines. There’s a small deck on the street for al fresco dining.

2 Church Avenue, Germantown / (845) 537-2107


Gaskins sources from 20 local farms for its stunning and straightforward fare.

Claire Gallagher and Chris Williams of Rock and Snow.

Gaskins’ fish tacos are made with fried Atlantic pollock, spicy mayo, onions, jalapeños, radishes, and cabbage.

3 SCHATZI’S PUB & BIER GARDEN Gaskins’ marinated heirloom tomato salad, featuring peaches, basil, and crispy chorizo.

Gaskins’ Nick and Sarah Suarez bring urban chic to country dining.

Looking for a little slice of Bavaria? Schatzi’s is the closest you’ll come in the Hudson Valley. This pub serves up five types of German sausage, from an Andouille with spicy cheddar to a slow-smoked pork-and-beef brat. Or try the schnitzel—instead of the traditional red cabbage, it comes with a sweetbraised purple-cabbage aioli, a creative twist that characterizes many of Schatzi’s dishes. With 15 tap lines—11 dedicated to craft beer and four to German beer—there’s plenty of good cheer flowing here. Take a jaunt on the Walkway Over the Hudson, then plop yourself under an umbrella on Schatzi’s bluestone patio with a Hefeweizen and a warm Bavarian pretzel with creamy homemade beer cheese.

202 Main Street, Poughkeepsie / (845) 454-1179

2 ROUGH CUT BREWING CO.

Brothers Jesse and Bart Cummings closed Oscar restaurant in the tough economy of 2011, but in June they reopened in the same location with a can’t-miss concept: a brewpub that serves delicious, inventive food, along with plenty of inexpensive bar options. The duo teamed up with homebrewer/ carpenter Kayne Konecny, who gave the space an artful rustic-industrial makeover and concocts ambrosial beverages (for example, Pomme d’Orange Belgian Tripel with orange blossom honey and homemade candy sugar). Chef Bart Cummings douses steak in rich sauces like green peppercorn and brandy cream, and tops his tasty lamb burger with figs, red onion, and feta.

5945 Route 44/55, Kerhonkson / (845) 626-9838

4 MAYBELLE’S

Opened about a year ago in a space once occupied by an Art Deco soda fountain, Maybelle’s retains many period touches, including chevron-style mirrors and light fixtures. The food here is equally artful and emphasizes farm-fresh ingredients (as does co-owner Jamie Parry’s Milan outpost, Another Fork in the Road). Among the playful savory-sweet combinations are carrot salad roasted in coffee with Thai basil pesto, and pan-seared scallops with English peas, pea tendrils, blackberries, and shiso. The homemade mozzarella with warm bread and olive oil is simple but inspired. For now, Maybelle’s is BYOB with a liquor license pending, but it plans to serve a smoky black lager and other interesting artisanal beers.

355 Main Street, Catskill / (518) 719-1800 FA L L 2 0 1 5

23


5 FROGMORE TAVERN

Bacon meatballs over sweet tomato chutney with fresh Parmesan shavings from Prohibition River.

The new rooftop patio is reason enough to check out Frogmore Tavern. The sleek pine patio and bar seat 65, neatly doubling the restaurant’s capacity. Inside, Frogmore—note the frog figurines above the door—has the dark good looks of an English pub, but save for a nod to the U.K. with its ultra-rich Scotch eggs, the menu smacks of Southern comfort food. Here you’ll find BBQ shrimp and grits, poutine with fried chicken livers and crispy pork belly, and house-smoked pastrami tacos with pickled jalapeño—as well as many other freshly smoked meats. If these dishes don’t fill you up, pile on a side of hush puppies or a bowl of dirty rice.

63 N. Front Street, Kingston / (845) 802-0883

Frogmore’s new rooftop bar and deck.

6 GARDEN HOUSE

Opened last summer by the owners of Rosendale’s popular Big Cheese deli, Garden House takes the concept of community gathering place one step further with a huge outdoor garden—the centerpiece of which is a wood-fired oven that produces such delicacies as goat cheese pizza and grilled red snapper. Chef Naheda Hamdan, a Dubai Hilton alumna, is Jordanian, and her Middle Eastern influence permeates delectably seasoned dishes like the kofta kabob with parsley, garlic, onion, and freshly whipped lemon-garlic sauce. Among the numerous satisfying vegetarian plates is a roasted half eggplant with chopped tomato smothered in tahini. In cooler months, the restaurant’s cheery farmhouse-style interior makes for an inviting refuge.

4 Hardenburgh Lane, Rosendale / (845) 658-3131

The Garden House in Rosendale offers Midde-Eastern-influenced dishes and an array of satisfying vegetarian plates.

Animals roam free at Buttermilk Falls Inn & Spa.

24 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

Frogmore’s Caption tk. Scotch eggs nestle into crisp-fried andouille sausage or chickpeas, with house mustard sauce.


Authentic Barbecue & Comfort Food with a Modern Twist OleSavannah.com | 845-331-4283 Historic Rondout Waterfront Dining FA L L 2 0 1 5

25


Wood-fired pizza with a mediterranean flair at Garden House in Rosendale.

7 COMMUNE SALOON, SHINDIG, 8 and TINKER TACO LAB 9

Woodstock’s revitalization is in full gear, with new eateries popping up around town, and the Bearsville Complex’s renovated courtyard open for business, complete with food service and fire pit. Overlooking the courtyard, the new Commune Saloon serves up tasty, seasonal small plates, such as grilled Black Horse Farms asparagus with Dijon vinaigrette and cured egg, and exquisite craft cocktails like the pickled ramp martini. Just down Tinker Street is Shindig. The tiny storefront eatery is packing in locals and tourists alike with its modest prices and modern takes on comfort food. The mac and cheese offers a rich blend of Gruyère, fontina, béchamel, truffle oil, and a Parmesan bread-crumb crust—for just $10. Steps away from Shindig, Tinker Taco Lab is breaking new ground with its authentic Mexican street tacos and tamales. Owner James Jennings makes his cheese, cream, pickled vegetables, and tamale and taco dough in-house. Be sure to try the best-selling pork-belly confit taco with jalapeño jam.

COMMUNE SALOON 297 Tinker Street, Woodstock / (845) 684-0367 or (845) 810-1480 SHINDIG 1 Tinker Street, Woodstock / (845) 684-7091 TINKER TACO LAB 54h Tinker Street, Woodstock / (845) 679-8226

HUNGRY FOR MORE? NEW CONTENT EVERY WEEK AT

upstater.com/food–drink

26 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

Woodstock’s revitalization is in full gear, with new eateries popping up around town.


PUT YOUR BEST FACE FORWARD. SKINCARE AT ITS BEST

w w w. m a r l e n e w e b e r. c o m

751 Dutchess Turnpike. Poughkeepsie, NY 12603

THE PANDORICA

A Doctor Who themed restaurant in the heart of Beacon with an eclectic menu of intergalactic comfort foods.

New England’s Largest Selection of Natural Edge Slabs and Burls

165 Main Street, Beacon, NY 845 831 6287 closed tuesdays

thepandoricarestaurant.com

Up to 50% Off Select Lumber Slabs

H A N D C R A F T E D C O C K TA I L S FA R M F R E S H L O C A L C U I S I N E R I V E R S I D E S E AT I N G | W E D D I N G S

Berkshire Products

8 4 5 · 2 5 5 · 4 1 5 1 2 0 G RI S T M IL L L A N E GA R D IN E R , N Y 1 2 5 2 5

FA L L 2 0 1 5

27


u

FOOD + DRINK

S T O RY B Y J E N N I F E R G U T M A N / P H O T O S B Y C AY L E N A C A H I L L

HIGH SPIRITS Tracing Hudson Valley Hooch, from

Field to Glass

The Absinthe Suissesse, a classic New Orleans brunch cocktail, as prepared by Paul Maloney, owner, Stockade Tavern.

28 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m


Seventy-four years after FDR signed the Cullen-Harrison Act—

T H E C O C K TA I L P R O C E S S

1

2

a precursor to the 21st Amendment—an act was introduced that’s been no less revolutionary for New York State spirits-makers. The 2007 Farm Distillery Act made it infinitely easier for microdistilleries to become viable businesses, even despite strict requirements, like using at least 70 percent New York raw agricultural material. In fact, this caveat has helped to define the hyperlocal spirits being produced in the Hudson Valley. Famous lush H. L. Mencken once proclaimed the martini as “the only American invention as perfect as the sonnet”—a form where creativity thrives within a set structure. And within the bounds of state law, the stuff being mashed and aged, stirred and strained in the Hudson Valley is pure poetry. Here are seven of the best local distilleries and seven of the establishments utilizing their spirits to create liquid lyricism.

11 Add raw egg white to shaker. / 2 Add syrup to shaker. 3 Add cream to shaker. / 4 Add absinthe to shaker. 5 Dry shake: Important! Must shake before ice is added, in order to emulsify the egg. / 6 Crush ice, and add to shaker. 7 Shake again. / 8 Pour and serve. / 9 Enjoy! 3

4

5

6

7

8

9 FA L L 2 0 1 5

29


“The quality of what comes out of the still is determined by the quality of what goes into the still.”

T H E D I ST I L L AT I O N P RO C E S S

DELAWARE PHOENIX DISTILLERY You’ve heard the myth: Absinthe is dangerous. It made van Gogh cut his ear off. Though rebounding as a popular spirit, the anise-based liquor carries some baggage. “They don’t understand the history of the spirit, how it was consumed by millions of ordinary people in France from the 1860s through World War I,” says Cheryl Lins, owner and distiller at Delaware Phoenix Distillery in Walton. After absinthe was relegalized in the U.S. in 2007, Lins revived the oft-misunderstood spirit by using 18th-century European distilling methods. Her absinthes brighten many a pre-Prohibition-era cocktail at Stockade Tavern in Kingston, including the Absinthe Suissesse, a traditional New Orleans brunch tipple with orgeat (an almond syrup), fresh egg white, and whole cream. Stockade co-owner Paul Maloney instructs, “Empty contents, ice and all, into a double-rocks glass, put on some Kid Ory, sit on your porch with your Suissesse, and think of New Orleans.”

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Delaware Phoenix Distillery 144 Delaware Street, Walton / (607) 865-5056 Stockade Tavern 313 Fair Street, Kingston / (845) 514-2649

STILL THE ONE DISTILLERY “The quality of what comes out of the still is determined by the quality of what goes into the still.” This is the maxim of Still the One Distillery’s Ed Tiedge, a former Marine officer and Wall Street bond trader. Tiedge got his start in spirits with his Comb Vodka, which is made by distilling mead, a traditional honey wine. Tiedge’s ingredients R&D continued with Still the One’s 287 Single Malt Whiskey, which is made with beer from the nearby Captain Lawrence Brewery. Though the idea sounds unconventional, it follows a sound logic. “Whiskey starts by making beer,” says Tiedge. At Hive Living Room in the Westchester Renaissance Hotel, bartender Ted Aiello uses Still the One’s 287 Single Malt Whiskey, along with its Westchester Rye Whiskey, to create The Westchester Cocktail—surely not your average Manhattan.

Still the One Distillery 1 Martin Place, Port Chester / (914) 217-0347 Hive Living Room + Bar 80 West Red Oak Lane, West Harrison / (914) 694-5400

ORANGE COUNTY DISTILLERY What do you get when you introduce new farm-distillery legislation to a fifth-generation vegetable grower? Sugar beet vodka. Run by partners John Glebocki and Bryan Ensall, the field-to-bottle distillery, founded a year ago, grows, harvests, malts, mashes, and distills all of the products used to make its spirits on premises. “The earth where it grows does transition,” says Glebocki of the sugar beet vodka. “Its earthiness and sweetness is not added later.” In addition to their corn whiskey, bourbon, and gin cocktails, their signature sugar beet vodka cocktail is served at their barn amidst Goshen’s black dirt fields. The Courkat features vodka, muddled jalapeño, a splash of lime, and ice, shaken until frothy and topped with sparkling lemonade. Like a summer salad in a glass—that’ll get you buzzed.

1 Newly sourced grain arrives. / 2 Grain is loaded into mixer. 3 Grain is mixed with water and ingredients at high temperatures. / 4 Mixture is sent through cooling system and temperature is brought down prior to adding yeast, which ferments the concoction into alcohol. / 5 Contents are moved into stills. / 6 Distillation occurs in stills, where waste is separated from final product. / 7 Solution is barreled and aged for months. / 8 Bottling!

Orange County Distillery 19 Maloney Lane, Goshen / (845) 651-2929

Pictured: Tuthilltown Spirits distillery in Gardiner.

30 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m


H U D S O N VA L L E Y W I N E S

Built on the foundation of a turn of the century winery, Stoutridge strives to make wines that represent the true flavor of the region, without the use of chemicals, pumps or filters. The winery is state of the art, implementing concepts of sustainablity, biodiversity and energy efficiency.

|

naturally made

Open year-round: Friday - Sunday 11am-6pm 10 Ann Kaley Lane, Marlboro, NY 845 236 7620 W W W . S TO U T R I D G E . CO M

CELEBRATING HUDSON VALLEY FOOD, FARMS, & BEER

845.485.BREW 289 MILL STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE

WWW.MillHouseBrewing.com FA L L 2 0 1 5

31


Head barman Darren Joseph has created a fleet of elegant cocktails featuring Tuthilltown’s increasingly varied product line.

Tuthilltown’s Hudson Whisky, freshly bottled.

TUTHILLTOWN SPIRITS The cute, stout bottles of Tuthilltown’s Hudson Whiskey line make them ideal for a bar’s front-row display, but at $45 for a 375 ml bottle, the international brand was being left off of many local cocktail menus. “Now that we’ve been around for 10 years, we’ve managed to get the cost down, and we’re passing it along,” says Ralph Erenzo, co-founder of Tuthilltown Spirits. Erenzo’s referring to the release of a new 750 ml bottle for $50— only $5 more for double the volume. Next door, at the Tuthill House, head barman Darren Joseph has created a fleet of elegant cocktails featuring Tuthilltown’s increasingly varied product line, like The Ginger Snap, which features Half Moon Orchard Gin, egg white, fig and ginger jam, rosemary simple syrup, and fresh lemon.

Tuthilltown Spirits and House 14 Grist Mill Lane, Gardiner / (845) 255-1527

BLACK DIRT DISTILLERY Black Dirt Distillery, an offshoot of the established Warwick Valley Winery & Distillery in the heart of Orange County’s black-dirt region, has introduced a boozier descendant of its classic Doc’s Apple Cider. Made from 100 percent Jona Gold apples and aged in a mix of charred oak and Black Dirt Bourbon barrels, Black Dirt Apple Jack has developed a niche demand among the Hudson Valley’s cocktail community. “We have the only bottled-in-bond apple jack that’s been released in New York,” says co-owner Jeremy Kidde. “It has to be aged at least four years, bottled at exactly 100 proof, and distilled in the same year by the same distiller.” James Brown, restaurant and beverage manager of The Garrison, takes Black Dirt’s high standard of quality to the next level with his house cocktails, which include the Black Dirt Bourbon with Warwick Valley Sour Cherry Cordial, Carpano Antica, and Chocolate Bitter Truth, served up.

Black Dirt Distillery 114 Little York Road, Warwick / (845) 258-6020 The Garrison 2015 Route 9, Garrison / (845) 424-3248

HILLROCK ESTATE DISTILLERY Hillrock Estate is a sustainable enterprise in the truest sense of the word. “We’re growing everything in our fields, harvesting the grain, malting it at our malt house, and doing all of the distilling here,” says owner Jeff Baker. The field-to-glass operation recognizes that terroir isn’t limited to the world of wine. “There’s a real profile of clove and cinnamon that comes across in our whiskeys,” says Baker. “It seems to be something that’s stamped into our fields.” Hillrock’s solera-aged bourbon (made by a historic European method of fractional blending and aging) is a favorite among the Hudson Valley’s cocktail elite. “We are lucky to have Hillrock so close to us producing whiskey of incredible quality,” says Jim Buhs, bar manager at 52Main in Millerton. For his next cocktail menu, Buhs will include the favorite Sazarec recipe of Hillrock’s master distiller, Dave Pickerell, featuring Hillrock Rye and Creole bitters.

Hillrock Estate Distillery 408 Pooles Hill Road, Ancram / (518) 329-1023 52Main 52 Main Street, Millerton / (518) 789-0252 HAVE A DRINK WITH US. NEW CONTENT EVERY WEEK AT

upstater.com/food–drink

32 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m / fo o d – d r i n k

Tuthilltown’s Ginger Snap features Half Moon Orchard Gin, egg white, a fig, ginger jam, rosemary simple syrup, and fresh lemon.


10N Chestnut Street, Beacon

TAS T I N G ROOM HOURS Fri

4-8 pm ' Sat 2-8 pm ' Sun 2-6 pm

www.DenningsPointDistillery.com

FA L L 2 0 1 5

33


DENNING’S POINT DISTILLERY Karl Johnson of the new Beacon-based distillery got his start distilling components for rocket fuel. “Different end result, but the process is somewhat similar,” says his wife, Susan, chief brand bum. Karl grew up on a 6,000-acre farm, where he studied barley breeding under his father, so it’s no wonder that New York State-grown grains and herbs are the main event in his spirits—from the White Rye Whiskey, an interpretation of traditional moonshine, to the new Maid of the Meadow Vodka, which incorporates wild Hudson Valley herbs and honey. “The bottles they put out are gorgeous,” says Aleah Carlson, bartender at The Roundhouse in Beacon, where she serves up one of her newest concoctions: The Gin and Juice pairs Denning’s Grain 9 Gin with fresh-squeezed grapefruit juice, sweet vermouth, simple syrup, and three Luxardo cherries.

Denning’s Point Distillery 10 N. Chestnut Street, Beacon / (845) 230-7905 The Roundhouse 2 E. Main Street, Beacon / (845) 765-8369

Bottle containing the grains that compose Denning’s Point Distillery’s Beacon Bourbon: 75% Corn, 15% Rye, 10% Malt.

CRAFT COCKTAILS + HUDSON VALLEY + FALL EVENT BE THERE. Check Upstater.com this October for more details.

34 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m / fo o d – d r i n k


Where Design Meets Nature Architect Built Homes Starting At $765,000 2 Hours From NYC

www.hudsonwoods.com • (212) 233-9187 • @hudsonwoodsny

SCIENTIST SOCIAL WORKER

NETWORK SPECIALIST PUBLIC RELATIONS

COUNSELOR

ACCOUNTANT

ENTREPRENEUR NURSE RESEARCHER

TEACHER PHYSICAL THERAPIST Mount Saint Mary College

What’s your dream?

Join us for an Open House this fall! msmc.edu/visit • 1-888-YES-MSMC FA L L 2 0 1 5

35


u

JOURNEY

36 upstater

S T O RY B Y J E F F R E Y S I M M S / L E A D P H O T O B Y K A R E N P E A R S O N / I L L U S T R AT I O N S B Y L I B B Y VA N D E R P L O E G

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m


FA L L 2 0 1 5

37


S

o this past July, I biked the entire length of the Hudson River—340 miles—from Battery Park in Lower Manhattan to Henderson Lake in the Adirondacks, where the river begins. I’m a dedicated runner, but only a part-time cyclist, and I’ve never taken on a physical challenge of this magnitude. I’m approaching the ride as a type of yoga—off the mat. In Sanskrit, “yoga” means “union”—and this journey is wholly about forging a deeper connection to the natural world and myself. No single cycling route follows the Hudson directly, especially further north, where the river shimmies to the west and begins its crooked journey into the Adirondacks, so I’ve plotted my route as close to the river as possible. 

DAY 1: MANHATTAN TO BEACON (80 MILES)

The trip begins at Battery Park on a Monday morning. Coming along for the ride is my longtime friend Mike Mowery, from Silver Spring, Maryland, who I’ve known for 25 years. He’s the perfect partner. We’ve lived, traveled, and run races together, and he’s savvier about cycling and gear. I’m a low-tech guy: Basically, I’m going to get on my bike and ride it until the wheels fall off. I’ve been training for months. Nothing’s going to stop me. We push off at Manhattan’s southern tip and ride along Battery Park’s under-construction multi-use paths to the start of the Hudson River Valley Greenway, which is, surprisingly, nearly empty, and head north for 11 miles along Manhattan’s West Side. The George Washington Bridge and the Palisades loom in the distance. Cars speed along the Henry Hudson Parkway not far away. Although we’ve yet to leave the city, I already feel nature’s restorative power: My thoughts float past like the clouds overhead.  In the Bronx, we head to Van Cortlandt Park’s 240th Street entrance, and onto the Old Putnam Trail, 1.5 miles of packed dirt along the western edge of Van Cortlandt Lake. We pass 13 pedestals of different types of stone, erected by Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt as an experiment to see which type weathered slowest and was therefore acceptable for the building of Grand Central Station. (In the end, Indiana limestone won for its cheapness, not its durability.) At the Westchester County line, the “Old Put” becomes the 7.5-mile, steadily inclining South County Trailway. Huge rocky outcroppings and lush greenery provide shade. Near Mt. Pleasant, the path crosses the Saw Mill Parkway and becomes the 22.1-mile North County Trailway, passing through Briarcliff Manor and Ossining.   In the Hudson Highlands, breathing gets tough. I switch gears, literally and figuratively—deepening my inhalation as I climb Route 202, looking west across the river at sprawling, rugged Bear Mountain. Unencumbered by the trials of daily life, I’m free to connect with my surroundings. Like a yogi reaching for a pose that was once out of reach, I’m propelled forward with each exhalation. The last 10 miles, up Route 9D from sweet little Cold Spring to artsy, urban Beacon, are hard, but worth it. The Hudson looks like it goes on forever. The Highlands rise jaggedly from the glassy water. This is why I’m out here: to experience fully where I live. 

DAY 2: BEACON TO KINGSTON (50 MILES)

After spending the night at my home in Beacon, we head to the Dutchess Rail Trail. The real trip begins today. We follow the paved trail for 13.4 miles to the Walkway Over the Hudson, a former railway bridge, which is bustling with lunchtime visitors. On the west side of the river, we pick up the Hudson Valley Rail Trail, a charming four-mile path from the hamlet of Highland through Black Creek Wetlands Complex to New Paltz, passing occasional abandoned railroad cars and former rail stations. It’s downhill into New Paltz for lunch, then we hit the 23.7-mile Wallkill Valley Rail Trail and head north to the historic Rosendale Trestle Bridge. Built in 1872, the 940-foot bridge-turned-lookout sits 150 feet above the Rondout Creek, offering views of Rosendale (a quirky village that thrived as a 19th-century cement-making center), Joppenbergh Mountain (whose dolostone was mined to make cement, and which, oddly enough, was coated in Borax, a powdered soap, in 1937 for a summertime ski-jump competition), and the world-famous rock climbing of the Shawangunk Ridge, marking the end of the Appalachians.  Suddenly, the skies open. We hustle along the trail’s remaining 11 miles and into Kingston, arriving soaking wet and covered in mud. We’re camping tonight in the Hudson River Maritime Museum’s barn. We drop quarters into the barn’s pay showers before heading out to find dinner. 

The 1.28-mile-long Walkway Over the Hudson, operated by the New York State Parks System, isn’t just the longest elevated pedestrian bridge in the world—it’s also a popular meeting place, thanks to its waterfront elevator, a proliferation of bars and restaurants opening near its eastern entrance, and community celebrations like Starry Starry Night on October 2, featuring local dining, wines, craft beers, and fireworks.

38 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m


Kitchens Designed for Cooking

Festivals FALL SALE

ends 10/3 extended delivery available call or see website for details

www.markjamesandco.com

845.834.3047

COME PLAY IN AUTUMN!

There’s Nothing Common About Our Core. High Meadow is a dynamic, progressive, independent school for children from 12 months - 8th grade. Come see us for yourself. Discover, play, listen & learn at our beautiful campus in Stone Ridge.

OPEN HOUSE! 10:00am - 1:00pm Sunday, Oct. 18 highmeadowschool.org High Meadow School 3643 Main Street Stone Ridge, NY 845.687.4855

HARVEST FESTIVAL

FREE

SUNDAYS THRU SEPT 27 LIVE WELL, BE WELL YOGA FESTIVAL

SEPT 12

THE WINE FESTIVAL E X T R A O R D I N A RY C U S T O M J E W E L RY 2 3 8 W A R R E N S T R E E T, H U D S O N , N Y

2 1 2 . 6 2 5 .1 6 5 6

Celebrate one year at Beartoberfest! Saturday, October 24, 11a.m.-5p.m.

OCT 03

THE CRAFT BEER FESTIVAL

OCT 10

HOLIDAY MARKET

DEC 05-06

FREE

TICKETS AND INFO AT BETHELWOODSCENTER.ORG Free admission, family-friendly activities, and raffle drawings throughout the month of October. 1 BASTEN LANE, KINGSTON, NY

| 845-687-6441 | TheDenofMarbletown.com

Download

Our APP

200 HURD RD, BETHEL, NY 12720 Bethel Woods Center for the Arts is a not-for-profit cultural organization that inspires, educates, and empowers individuals through the arts and humanities.

FA L L 2 0 1 5

39


40 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m


SUMMER 2015

41


The Hudson River Valley Greenway, founded in 1991, is a network of multi-use trails on both sides of the Hudson River, creating scenic byways. The Greenway includes New York City and 13 counties—Albany, Bronx, Columbia, Dutchess, Greene, New York, Orange, Putnam, Rensselaer, Rockland, Saratoga, Ulster, and Westchester—with Washington County trails currently under construction.

DAY 3: KINGSTON TO ALBANY (75 MILES)

We cross the Kingston-Rhinecliff Bridge early, under cloudy skies. The river is calm, but I’m not. I’m increasingly uncomfortable in my saddle and my gloved hands are numb as we head up Route 9G past Bard College and Tivoli and into Columbia County’s farm country. After heading back west across the shiny steel, cantilevered Rip Van Winkle Bridge, lunch in Greene County’s beachy town of Athens is rejuvenating, but by late afternoon I’m drawing on reserves again, while Mike is nursing a sore Achilles tendon. We’d planned to ride 10 miles off course to camp at John Boyd Thacher State Park in Voorheesville, 15 miles south of Albany, but we’re too spent to appreciate that the park is home to one of the richest fossil-bearing formations in the world. Instead, we follow Route 32 into the capital, to stay at a friend’s house in downtown Albany, giving us a break but maintaining the integrity of the ride.

DAY 4: ALBANY TO LAKE GEORGE (75 MILES)

After 10 hours of sleep, we push off on the Mohawk-Hudson Bikeway, both feeling better in all respects. The 86-mile trail meanders along a former barge canal connecting Green Island, Cohoes, and the Mohawk River, and includes both on- and off-street riding. When we reach the town of Wilton, on the outskirts of Saratoga Springs and the place where Ulysses S. Grant died after completing his memoirs, the scent of pines and the sudden appearance of long, steep, curvy hills tell me we’re nearing the Adirondacks. Business, so to speak, is picking up. We’ve got dozens of hills to climb between now and tomorrow. Ascending the first one, I think back wistfully to the Hudson Highlands—it’s a whole new ballgame up here. My thighs ache, sweat pours into my eyes and over my handlebars, and I’m moving so slowly it feels like I’m simply balancing my bike in place.  We stop to refuel with an early dinner—give me the works!—in Lake Luzerne, where the Hudson squeezes into a narrow gorge and spills down Rockwell Falls. We’ve got 20 miles left to ride today. The afternoon drizzle turns into a steady evening rain, but I don’t care. My goal is in sight, and I’m inspired to see new places. We pass through Lake George village and coast two miles north to Hearthstone Point Campground, located right on the lake, where we’ll spend the night. 

DAY 5: LAKE GEORGE TO HENDERSON LAKE (60 MILES)

I’m so sore and exhausted that my pedaling no longer fully registers. We go 15 miles before stopping for breakfast in Warrensburg, where the bistro owner gives us complimentary cookies and grapes for the final ride. Back on the empty road, we head through pine forests, rustic towns, and farmland, climbing the never-ending hills to the sound of songbirds. By late afternoon, we reach Tahawus, a historic mining town. Two miles left! The Hudson shimmers through the trees. After passing the Upper Works, a dilapidated 19th-century iron-smelting plant, we pull into a parking lot and dismount for a short hike through the woods to Henderson Lake, named for one of the plant’s founders. Henderson Lake sits 1,800 feet above sea level on the side of Mt. Marcy, New York State’s highest point, and is fed in turn by a small tarn farther up the mountain—Lake Tear-of-the-Clouds, at 4,293 feet. The lake was discovered in 1872 but was named much earlier by Native Americans for its height and ever-present misty shroud. From there, the water flows to Lake Henderson via three tributaries: Calamity Brook, Opalescent River, and Feldspar Brook. While Lake Tear is indisputably the Hudson’s true source, it can only be reached by a treacherous climb that’s wet and muddy year round, making Lake Henderson the Hudson’s most accessible source. The lake is surrounded by thick forest, like a well-kept secret. Today ,it’s still and dark blue. Mike and I wade slowly into its cool, soothing water. Mission accomplished! After having climbed hill after hill, each one seeming that much harder than the one that came before it, I realize that I tackle these same “hills” every day. Some I conquer with ease. Some I struggle with. Others beat me down until I can barely move. Life is no different than these hills, and remaining calm and focused through the challenges on this trip means I can keep going in life, in all circumstances, as well. For now, I float on my back, grateful, as I stare high into the bright blue Adirondack sky. For more information on biking the Hudson, check out Jeffrey Simms’s website, HudsonThruBike.com, and visit Upstater.com/weekending.

INSPIRATION. NEW CONTENT EVERY WEEK AT

upstater.com/weekending

42 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m


GEORGE

COLE

Auc tioneers

TO BUY...TO SELL...

or just for the fun of it.    .

R e s i d e n t i a l • A g r i c u lt u r a l Commercial • Industrial Small/Large Estates Liquidated A p p r a i s a l s • Fa s t R e s u lt s !

(845) 758-9114 G W. C  R B. M

Auctioneers & Appraisers of George W. Cole Auctions Inc., Member of NYSAA & NAA • N. Broadway (Rte. 9, next to IGA), Red Hook, NY • 845-758-9114 FIND UPCOMING EVENTS AT WWW . GEORGECOLEAUCTIONS . COM

©Fernando LoPez

81 Huguenot Street, New Paltz, NY · (845) 255-1889 · huguenotstreet.org

An Education as Unique as Your Child Monthly Introductory Sessions for Prospective Parents. Don’t miss our Fall Fair on October 10!

gmws.org/fallfair FA L L 2 0 1 5

43


photo by Roy Gumpel

LEON VEHABA FARM MANAGER, POUGHKEEPSIE FARM PROJECT HOMETOWN: Brewster LIVES IN: Kingston MOVED TO THE HUDSON VALLEY: 20 years ago, from Davis, California PET PEEVE: “The Hudson Valley could use a better public transportation system, since everything is so spread out. You really need to have a car to get around up here.” FAVORITE ASPECT OF THE HUDSON VALLEY: “The open space, the natural beauty, and going to other farms to pick produce we don’t grow at Poughkeepsie Farm Project—blueberries in the summer, apples in the fall, and cherries in the spring.” FAVORITE DAY OF THE WEEK: “Fridays are really satisfying workdays for me. Starting at 6:30am, I walk the fields with the five other farm workers on staff, and we make observations and discuss what needs to be attended to. Then we do some random activities, like weeding or whatever is needed. After that, we harvest the crops, wash them, and put them in the cooler so they’re ready for distribution.” It was inevitable that Leon Vehaba would become a farmer. “My dad is Israeli and worked on a kibbutz—my family has a picture of me hanging out in a strawberry field when I was four months old,” he says. So farming “is something I’ve been interested in since a really early age. I guess I was attracted to working in agriculture because it’s such a diverse field.” After growing up in Brewster, New York, Vehaba studied sustainable development at Boston University and sustainable agriculture at the University of California’s Santa Cruz and Davis campuses. But Vehaba isn’t your typical upstate farmer. Most farmers work and live far beyond the confines of cities, but not him. As farm manager of the Poughkeepsie Farm Project (PFP), located near Vassar College, he’s part of a new breed of socially conscious, urban agriculturalists. Founded in 1999, the community-supported agriculture project raises 13 acres of produce annually, trains future farmers, and offers subsidized shares to low-income families as well as hands-in-the-dirt educational programs for young, inner-city-school students. Last year, PFP raised over 150,000 pounds of food—27,000 pounds of which were donated to needy local families.

44 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

“Besides providing free, fresh food and interacting with the community, we’re helping preserve open space in the City of Poughkeepsie and maintaining the farming culture in the Hudson Valley at large,” Vehaba says. “And we’re teaching and spreading that culture to the next generation: In 2015, we hosted over 2,000 kids from Poughkeepsie and their families, who came to pick their own crops and see the farm.” When he goes home at night after a long day of sowing crops within the city limits, it’s to another urban area. Vehaba and his wife, Tracy Lerman, a communications manager at farm and food advocacy organization Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Working Group, make their home in downtown Kingston’s historic Rondout district, and Vehaba makes a “not at all soul-sucking” 35-minute commute between his house and PFP. “Actually, the Rondout doesn’t really feel overly urban to us,” says Vehaba, who lives in a Victorian house perched high above the waterfront. “We have a really nice backyard with great landscaping—I just finished setting up a beehive back there.” Vehaba’s favorite crops include basil and oregano, along with the custard-fleshy native Hudson Valley pawpaw fruit and bitter greens like chicory and radicchio. “Most of my and my wife’s interests revolve around food,” he says. “So we like getting together with friends on weekends to prepare meals using the crops I’ve harvested during the week.” Does he ever miss California? “Sometimes,” says Vehaba. “I still have a lot of friends out there. But I’m really happy here. There’s such natural beauty, it’s a great community, and we have family nearby. Besides, the off season, in the winter, is the perfect opportunity to take trips to warmer places.”—Peter Aaron NEW CONTENT EVERY WEEK S U M CREATIVE M E R 2 0 1CLASS. 5 44 AT

upstater.com/farming


Sophisticated. Sustainable. Uniquely Artistic.

Distinctive Hudson Valley design. Residential and commercial.

DAVID BORENSTEIN ARCHITECTS AND BUILDERS

50-80% OFF FAC TO RY C A S H & C A R R Y O N LY

|

S E C O N D S 5 HANNA LANE BEACON, NY

W W W . N I C H E M O D E R N . C O M / U P S TAT E R

INTERNATIONAL DANCE CENTER TIVOLI NY

OCTOBER 10TH 12PM-6PM

KAATSBAAN

davidborensteininc@gmail.com ■ 845.758.6080 architectdavidborenstein.com

the Hudson Valley’s cultural park for DANCE professional performances creative residencies black-box dance theater on a 153 bucolic acres Extreme Ballet® Fall Performance Season 8 companies September 26 to December 4, 2015 25th Anniversary Gala November 14

WWW.KAATSBAAN.ORG

photo: Gregory Cary, ABT principal dancer Daniil Simkin at Kaatsbaan

FA L L 2 0 1 5

45


u

WEEKENDER

S T O RY B Y B R I A N PJ C R O N I N / P H O T O S B Y M AT T P E T R I C O N E

A

WEEKEND in

HUDSON

Warren Street in Hudson strongly resembles certain parts of Brooklyn, but don’t say that to the locals.

W

here will I go?” former Talking Heads front man David Byrne asked in an essay published in the Guardian in 2013, lamenting the decline of New York City’s formerly vibrant creative class. The essay—titled “If the 1% Stifles New York’s Creative Talent, I’m Out of Here”—continued, “Join the expat hipsters upstate in Hudson?” To which this city of 7,000 on the banks of its namesake river would surely reply: “Come on up! We have a bookstore that’s also a bar!”

46 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m


Wandering on Warren Street.

Okay, so maybe Hudson is sick to death of being compared to Brooklyn (seriously, don’t even bring it up), but it’s hard not to wander along the main drag of Warren Street, peeking inside its many galleries and cafés, without remembering a time when you could order a good cup of coffee and a croissant in Park Slope, plunk down a $10 bill, and get change back. So head north and enjoy this former whaling city on its own numerous merits.

FRIDAY EVENING

For those born-and-bred New Yorkers who never bothered to learn how to drive (or people who’ve lived there so long they’ve forgotten how), Hudson is still within reach. Amtrak makes it from Penn Station to the western end of town in about two hours. Right near the train station is the cavernous Basilica

A full dose of bucolic splendor combined with urban chic. Hudson (110 South Front Street), a performance space located in a 19th-century factory that offers film screenings, gallery showings, visits by such critically acclaimed bands as Godspeed You! Black Emperor, and the annual Basilica Soundscape Festival each fall. Just north of the station is Waterfront Park, which is the best place from which to view the Hudson-Athens Lighthouse. Following this full dose of combined bucolic splendor and urban chic, call a cab from Pronto Taxi (518-8229500) or Hudson City Transport (518-8228880) and head into town.

FRIDAY NIGHT

Check in at The Barlow (542 Warren Street), a boutique hotel conveniently located in the center of downtown, and head out to dinner. Several of the local restaurants have downstate connections. Beloved Manhattan institution Mexican Radio has had a vibrantly colored outpost at 537 Warren Street for years. Grazin’ (717 Warren Street), a farm-to-table restaurant in an old diner highlighting sustainably grown food and grass-fed-and-finished beef, recently opened a branch in Tribeca. And chef Zak

FA L L 2 0 1 5

47


Innovation and exactitude are everything at Fish & Game.

Mexican Radio was among the first New York restaurants to move to Hudson.

Pelaccio, formerly of the boundary-smashing Fatty Crab, has brought his innovative touch to Fish & Game (13 South 3rd Street), featuring an ever-changing locavore menu anchored by homemade charcuterie.

SATURDAY MORNING

Before a morning of hard-core antiquing comes coffee. So, to steel up for the hunt, head to Patisserie Lenox (504 Warren Street) for some of the Hudson Valley’s best cappuccinos and French pastries. There are plenty of vintage finds along Warren Street, but to cover the most ground the quickest, set up a base camp at the 300 block and check out Hudson Supermarket (310 Warren Street), The Hudson Mercantile (318 Warren Street), Furlong (320 Warren Street), and Warren Street Antiques (322 Warren Street).

SATURDAY AFTERNOON

Most people don’t come all the way up to Hudson for pizza—at least not until they try Bonfiglio & Bread (748 Warren Street). Hudson, at some point during any visit, is all

48 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

Half Moon Bar offers outdoor imbibing until the weather turns cold.

Wash it down with a local craft brew and a book of Jane Jacobs essays. about shopping. Try FACE Stockholm for skin care (401 Warren Street), Finch: Life Curated for vintage and modern furnishings (613 Warren Street), and jewelry at Geoffrey Good Jewelry (238 Warren Street.) Or pick up a new bag to fill at the European-design clothing store De Marchin (620 Warren Street). Then wash it down with a local craft brew, a book of Jane Jacobs essays, and a “Goodnight Moon” T-shirt at Spotty Dog Books & Ale (440 Warren Street). Books, beer, musical performances, and readings! Why would anyone ever want to leave?

SATURDAY EVENING

But leave, one must, because eventually hunger always strikes. Grab a seat at The Crimson Sparrow’s indoor patio (746 Warren Street) and enjoy chef John McCarthy’s—a former disciple of Wylie Dufresne at wd-

50—take on Japanese cuisine shot through with French highlights and buoyed by locally grown ingredients.

SATURDAY NIGHT

There’s only one way to end the evening: by dancing all of those newly accumulated calories away. Hudson’s live music scene is bustling enough that, for years, every August the city supported its very own music festival— the largest free outdoor music festival in the entire state. Get a taste of it by popping into such bars and venues as Club Helsinki Hudson (405 Columbia Street) and Half Moon Hudson (48 South Front Street) to experience local bands that play everything from experimental soundscapes to confessional folk to swinging Americana to down-and-dirty rockand-roll. Breathe it in deep and don’t stop rocking until they kick you out.


Beers and book browzing at Spotty Dog.

FA L L 2 0 1 5

49


SUNDAY MORNING

Coffee. Stat. Café La Perche (230 Warren Street) will start Sunday off right with a good cup and breads baked in an oven that the owner brought over from France. Once you can open your eyes fully,hit the gallery scene. Carrie Haddad Gallery (622 Warren Street) paved the way for the revival of Hudson’s art scene when it opened its doors back in 1991. BCB Art (116 Warren Street) features contemporary artists, but it’s been known to have a Warhol or a de Kooning lying around. The Limner Gallery (123 Warren Street) is a reliable bellwether of what’s to come: It opened on East 10th Street in the ’80s as the East Village art scene took off. Then its owners moved to Chelsea as that scene took off. Limner is now in Hudson, along with acclaimed Time & Space Ltd. (434 Columbia Street), an experimental theater/cinema/gallery and venue for classes and public lectures in the arts and politics that’s been going strong since 1973. Meanwhile, world-famous performance artist Marina Abramovic is repurposing a 33,000-square-foot former indoor tennis center to house the nonprofit Marina Abramovic Institute as “a high temple to long-duration work in performance and other arts,” as the New York Times put it. So if the presence of such luminaries doesn’t prove that Hudson’s art scene is on the cusp of something big, well, then… nothing ever will.

SUNDAY AFTERNOON

Knowing now what the future of American art looks like, go ahead and step back into the past. Hail a cab and head out of town to Olana (5720 Route 9G), the historic home of Frederic Edwin Church, one of the major figures of the Hudson River School of painters. Olana’s 250-acre estate features not only Church’s home and plenty of his works but also an impressive collection of artifacts from his travels around the world. And the estate’s five miles of hiking trails offer stunning views of the valley, the river, and the Rip Van Winkle Bridge. Sitting on one of the many rustic wooden benches stationed at the trail’s scenic viewpoints, watching the sun dip low over the river and rolling fields, is the perfect way to bring a weekend in Hudson to a contemplative close.

An art show at Time & Space Ltd.

Frederick Church’s moorish estate, Olana.

PLAN YOUR WEEKEND ESCAPE. NEW CONTENT EVERY WEEK AT

upstater.com/weekending

50 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m


Freshlyade Handm in the

Hudlsleoyn Va

The Division Street Grill restaurant & caterers

Your answer for extremely natural skin and hair care products, freshly handmade in small batches in the Hudson Valley of New York State.

26 North Division Street • Downtown Peekskill • In The Artist District

Live Entertainment Friday & Saturday Evenings Visit our Website For Schedule

Lunch & Dinner Daily Brunch Sundays • Closed Tuesdays On or Off-Premises Catering Available Celebrating 17 Years Downtown

914-739-6380

www.divisionstreetgrill.com

soaps • lotions • creams • salves scrubs bath soaks • essential oils and more...naturally! Available At

3 CHARLES ST, STE 4, PLEASANT VALLEY • 845-635-4087 • OPEN MON-FRI WELLNESS RX 10 OLD ROUTE 213, HIGH FALLS, NY ADAMS FAIRACRE FARMS RTE 44, POUGHKEEPSIE; ROUTE 9W, KINGSTON; ROUTE 300, NEWBURGH; ROUTE 9, WAPPINGER LILY BOUTIQUE 24 TINKER ST, WOODSTOCK, NY

DERMASAVE LABS

Customized Gift Baskets Available. We ship anywhere in the US! Call 1-800-277-7099

www.HudsonValleySkinCare.com FC_ad_ChronogramUpstater_Layout 1 8/6/15 4:15 PM Page 1

2015 FilmColumbia FilmColumbia

FilmColumbia FilmColumbia Festival Chatham/Hudson/10.20–10.25.2015

FA L L 2 0 1 5

51


photo by Roy Gumpel

TIM REINKE SALOONKEEPER HOMETOWN: Rowland Heights, California MOVED TO HUDSON VALLEY FROM: Midtown Manhattan LIVES IN: Beacon WORKS IN: Peekskill FAVORITE CULTURAL GENRE: Film noir. “Start with Double Indemnity. One of the early ones, and some of the best dialogue ever put on camera. That movie sets the standard for the genre.” FAVORITE THINGS ABOUT UPSTATE LIFE: “The river, the landscape, and abundant fresh food.” LEAST FAVORITE THING ABOUT UPSTATE LIFE: “Taking the 1:50 a.m. out of Grand Central and waking up in Poughkeepsie.” Born in Chicago, Tim Reinke moved to the San Gabriel Valley at age nine and grew up as a California kid, eventually studying film at San Francisco State. “I made a few music videos and found myself working in an office in downtown L.A.,” he says. “Not what I wanted to do with my life.” So he moved to New York. “I had a hard time finding a job in [film],” he says. “I worked as a bartender, and I guess I was just in the right place at the right time and met the right people.” Reinke bartended at the Blind Tiger Ale House on Bleecker Street, one of Manhattan’s earliest craft beer bars, discovered a passion for saloonkeeping, and became a part owner. “New York City was good to me,” he says. “It’s a town that chews up and spits out a lot of people.” In 2007, he and his then-wife, actress Brandy Burre—best known for her work on HBO’s The Wire—and their infant son Henry vacated their fifth-floor Midtown walkup for a Beacon house. Commuting to the Blind Tiger meant 15-hour workdays, so Reinke and the Blind

52 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

Tiger Team, John Sharpe and Bryan Delaney, decided to open a gastropub on Peekskill’s Main Street. Birdsall House opened in 2010, winning raves for its “serious beer program,” as per Westchester magazine. People liked the bar’s craftily curated taps and blend of oldshoe comfort and hip bliss. Reinke had a hit on his hands. Simultaneously, a daughter, Stella, arrived, and Burre began working on a documentary about balancing parenthood and career. During the making of Actress, the couple’s relationship fell apart. (One NewYorkTimes.com commenter called the film an “agonizing tale of a father.” Reinke’s take on having cameras around then? “It sucked.”) Meanwhile, Reinke and team joined forces with two more partners and opened Gleason’s, now another beloved Peekskill fixture. “Birdsall House is more of a tavern; Gleason’s is more of a restaurant, but it’s still a bar—the bar is the first thing you see when you walk in,” Reinke says. “A great bar is like a family that includes staff and customers. Most of my favorite people I’ve met in a bar. It’s the same in Manhattan or Peekskill: A great place is a great place, no matter where it is.” These days, Reinke only travels to Manhattan for fun. “I was over city living, ready for a change of pace, although I’ll always love Manhattan and the Tiger,” he says. Upstate, his favorite thing to do is go fishing with his kids. “I now have access to great fishing holes only minutes away,” he says.—Anne Pyburn Craig


presents

n e n e e e w o w n o o n r o h r C Ch E R A M T NI GH reet st r on wall

Nurturing living connections... early childhood through grade 12 Situated on a 400-acre Biodynamic farm in New York’s Hudson Valley, Hawthorne Valley’s integrative Waldorf curriculum helps young men and women grow academically, artistically, and socially into the creative individuals needed in today’s complex world.

ST ON −B S P KIN G t s 1 3 T C s a t u r d a y, O

DANCE PAR T Y us i c m e v li

Day and Boarding Programs • Accepting Applications 518-672-7092 x 111 info@hawthornevalleyschool.org WALDORF SCHOOL | www.hawthornevalleyschool.org 330 County Route 21C, Ghent, NY 12075 | 518-672-7092 x 111

2

r

l st

3

al 23 w

gston

kin eet,

n.com BSPKingsto

.com

ramevents

− chronog

#chronoween

Coming October 16-18 www.BurningOfKingston.com

A weekend-long celebration of American history, bravery, sacrifice and resilience. Kingston, New York

FA L L 2 0 1 5

53


u

WEEKENDER

S T O RY B Y K A N D Y H A R R I S / P H O T O S B Y M AT T P E T R I C O N E

Peekamoose Restaurant in Big Indian prides itself on having a “silly name” but offering “serious food.”

CATSKILL WEEKEND GETAWAY ENTER TO WIN. Check page 59 for more details.

54 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m


A

WEEKEND in the

CATSKILLS T

Colonial Motel in Kerhonkson.

he Catskills are bigger than they seem, so when people refer to the famed area, they often mean wildly different places, miles apart. The famous Borscht Belt, for example, is but one of three “neighborhoods”—located in the southern Catskills, its environs stretching from the Overlook Mountain Wild Forest down through lower Ulster County and into Sullivan County. (Think: dilapidated old resorts and lake communities.) Meanwhile, in the northern Catskills, in Greene County, Hunter Mountain reaches up into to Windham Mountain, Elm Ridge Wild Forest, and down into Schoharie County. (Think: swimming holes and skiing.) Finally, there are the western Catskills, extending from northwestern Greene County to Delaware County, nearly to the Pennsylvania state border. (Think: farms and the Delaware River.) Conquering those combined 5,892 square miles in one weekend is next door to impossible. But sampling all three “neighborhoods” in three days is feasible and fun—although a car is imperative, despite the proliferation of Trailways bus stops in various Catskills towns. Any road trip to the Catskills is well worth it, particularly in the fall, when the colors become dreamy shades of red, orange, and gold.

Any road trip to the Catskills is well worth it, particularly in the fall, when the colors become dreamy shades of red, orange, and gold. FA L L 2 0 1 5

55


Ice cream at Mama’s Boy in Phoenicia.

Biblio Barn in Margaretville offers new and used books.

FRIDAY AFTERNOON

Arrive at the Village of Roxbury in Delaware County, in the western Catskills, and check into the quirky, stylish Roxbury Motel (2258 County Route 41), with its on-site spa. Rooms vary from approximately $90 for a single in the off-season to $695 for the Archeologist’s Digs, an Indiana Jones-errific suite that accommodates six guests. Grab hearty sandwiches to go from Cassie’s Café (53535 NY-30, Roxbury), the local go-to for diner offerings, then head to Kirkside Park (Kirkside Drive, Roxbury) and follow the 14-acre public park’s meandering brook through historic properties, over Adirondack log bridges, to historic properties, including the Jay Gould Reformed Church (53837 NY-30, Roxbury). Have some time to spend back in town? Peruse the wares at Roxbury General (53538 Foute 30). Buy something with “Roxbury” printed on it to spruce up the décor back home and mystify visitors. Then lace up those hiking boots, and hit the Catskill Scenic Trail (Hard Scrabble Road & NY-30, Roxbury). The trail follows the tracks of the Ulster and Delaware Railroad, and its flat grade makes it perfect for cycling, too. Tinker Street in Woodstock is a mecca for strollers and shoppers.

OPTIONAL DETOUR FOR VIEW SEEKERS

Want to get even more rural right away? Head toward Bovina, about 40 minutes west of Roxbury, leaving time to make a couple of stops along the way toward dinner there. First stop: Woodchuck Lodge (Burroughs Memorial Highway, Roxbury). Noted naturalist John Burroughs’s house tours take place on Saturdays and Sundays, but the historic site remains open weekdays. Next stop: Plattekill Mountain (469 Plattekill Road, Roxbury). Take a chairlift ride, because there’s no better way to take in the autumn views of the Catskill Mountains than from a sky-high vantage point.

56 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

FRIDAY EVENING

In Bovina, the Brushland Eating House (1927 County Route 6) serves a seasonal, rustic meal that focuses on simple, hearty, and communal dining. Be sure to make reservations, because, despite its geographic obscurity, this place also offers a few boutique hotel rooms and is often packed. Back in Roxbury, enjoy a nightcap at Public Restaurant and Lounge (2318 County Route 41). The bar serves up festive cocktails and bar treats until 11pm Friday and Saturday.


MAKING THE RIGHT MOVE HAPPEN FOR YOU IN THE HUDSON VALLEY Specializing in Ulster & Dutchess counties: Woodstock, New Paltz, Kingston, Stone Ridge, Rhinebeck, Red Hook, Millbrook and beyond

“ Hayes was my go-to guy throughout my Hudson Valley house hunt, intuiting very quickly my tastes and preferences, and finding my family a wonderful home that fulfills a long list of my dreams. I’ll be forever thankful to him. ” —A.R. LORENZO, NYC & ULSTER COUNTY

HAYES CLEMENT Licensed Real Estate Salesperson

917-568-5226 M | Hayes@westwoodrealty.com HayesClement.com | Follow me on Facebook WESTWOOD METES & BOUNDS REALTY, LTD. 3927 Main Street, Stone Ridge, NY 12484

ENVIRONMENTALLY RESPONSIVE

Why Look At Four Walls...When You Can Look At Four Seasons!!! Come Visit Our Design Center • Six Sunrooms on Display

Come Visit Our Design Center

HIGH PERFORMANCE DESIGN BUILD www.alfandre.com

Come Visit Our Design Center Hudson ValleyHUDSON Sunrooms VALLEY SUNROOMS Hudson Valley Sunrooms Route 9WServing (just south of Kingston) the Hudson Valley Since 1984 Route 9W (just south of Kingston) Kingston, NY 845-339-1787 Kingston, NY 845-339-1787 Broadway (Rt 9W), Port Ewen, NY (just south of Kingston) Beacon, GPS: NY355 845-838-1235 Beacon, NY 845-838-1235 Kingston, NY 845.339.1787 hvsk.fourseasonssunrooms.com hvsk.fourseasonssunrooms.com Beacon, NY 845.838.1235 Creating Spaces www.hudsonvalleysunrooms.com Serving the Hudson Valley Since 1984 Serving the Hudson Valley Since 1984

ALFANDRE ARCHITECTURE and Places of Lasting Beauty

FA L L 2 0 1 5

57


Phoenicia Diner is an early morning staple.

SATURDAY MORNING

Head over to West Kill in Greene County, about 45 minutes from Roxbury, for spending Saturday night. The ultimate destination for the night is Spruceton Inn (2080 Spruceton Road), a casual, comfy mountain establishment offering kitchenette rooms (a sensible option since there are no eateries nearby). But don’t miss out on the good stuff by racing from destination to destination. Take scenic Route 28 south, with stops in Margaretville for breakfast at the popular Crazy River Café (42287 Route 28), featuring goodies baked in-house; book shopping at Bibliobarn (40 Church Street); Pine Hill (home of Belleayre Mountain) for gawking at the cool old architecture; and Shandaken at Blue Barn Antiques (Roses Brook Road) for checking out the antiques. Keep going south to Phoenicia, pausing for repast at the Phoenicia Diner (5681 NY-28, Phoenicia), a hip eatery with a high-quality diner menu (be on the lookout for Kelsey Grammer). Stop at the Mystery Spot (72 Main Street), a record and vintage clothing store that bills itself as an “antique emporium & odditorium,” where both locals and celebrities shop.

OPTIONAL DETOUR FOR VARIETY-SEEKERS

Continue south to the Ashokan Reservoir for views, and then stop at Fabulous Furniture (3930 NY-28, Boiceville) to check out local artist Steve Heller’s atomic-age creations and hand-made furniture. If you’ve still got some drive left in you, continue into Woodstock, meander along Tinker Street by car or on foot, and then head back toward West Kill to check in at Spruceton Inn. Spend the rest of the afternoon exploring Hunter and Tannersville (stopping at the local grocery for tomorrow’s breakfast items), grab a grass-fed Angus burger from Mama’s Boy Burgers (6067 Main Street, Tannersville), take in the magical fall foliage around Colgate Lake, and wander around Mountaintop Arboretum, open year-round, dawn to dusk, free of charge. If you have time, hike the short trail to the former site of the Catskill Mountain House at North South Lake, visit Kaaterskill Falls, or pick your own pumpkins and apples at Story Farms (4640 NY-32, Catskill).

58 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

Ecletic vintage goods at the Mystery Spot in Phoenicia.


Enter to Win Upstater’s

CATSKILL Weekend Getaway

UPST ATER

enter

.COM

/CATS

KILL-

online

GETA

Private Wine Tasting for 6 HudsonChathamWinery.com

2 nights and dinner at the Deer Mountain Inn DeerMountainInn.com

2 Lift Tickets at Hunter Mtn HunterMtn.com

Ski, drink, and stay in the beautiful Catskills...on us! ENTER FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN AT Upstater.com/catskill-getaway

WAY.


“Roswell or Bust” rocket ship sculpture at Steve Heller’s Fabulous furniture in Boiceville.

SATURDAY EVENING

Unwind at Spruceton Inn with a craft beer, wine, or cider at Conan’s Corner, the on-site bar. For dinner, make a reservation at Peekamoose Restaurant (8373 NY-28, Big Indian), 20 minutes away. Often touted as the best restaurant in the Catskills, Peekamoose, owned by former Gramercy Tavern-owners Devin and Marybeth Mills, offers farm-to-table fare from an ever-changing menu.

SUNDAY MORNING

Cook breakfast in the room before bidding farewell to Spruceton Inn. Proceed east to Saugerties via Platte Clove Road, which is closed from November to April, leaving time to take to the trails and spy some waterfalls at Platte Clove Preserve in Elka Park. Hang out in Saugerties for brunch at Love Bites (69 Partition Street). Enjoy the tiny restaurant’s eclectic (and extensive) selection of seasonal breakfast/brunch/

60 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

lunch fare while sitting front and center to Saugerties’ main drag, the perfect spot to plan your next great Catskills adventure.

OPTIONAL DETOUR FOR GHOST HUNTERS

Head into the southern Ulster County Catskills to Napanoch, home of the Shanley Hotel (56 Main Street), the area’s only (as far as we know) haunted B&B offering paranormal investigations. That’s right: ghost-hunting. Book an overnight stay in the reportedly haunted 19th-century inn and participate in an actual spirit hunt. Even if you don’t spend the night, you can still join the hunt at a reduced rate, but what fun is that? Don’t forget: BYOEMFM*. *Bring Your Own Electro-Magnetic Field Meter PLAN YOUR WEEKEND ESCAPE. NEW CONTENT EVERY WEEK AT

upstater.com/weekending


u

IN SEASON

S T O RY B Y A N N E P Y B U R N C R A I G / I L L U S T R AT I O N B Y J A S O N C R I N G

golden russet

macoun

snapdragon

jonah gold

spartan

spitzenburgh

honeycrisp

“It is the peculiarity of the apple that it never wearies the taste,” proclaimed social reformer Henry Ward Beecher in 1864, when every well-run home’s cool storage was stocked with bushel upon bushel. In Henry’s day, thousands of distinctive apple cultivars grew in the US.

Hudson Valley growers are rediscovering heirloom varieties that can handle low-spray techniques that supermarket apples, bred mainly for shelf life, can’t handle. So which rediscoveries should you be on the lookout for on an apple mission, whether you’re doing the picking or just the choosing? “Each individual type of apple has a season,” says Elizabeth Ryan, proprietor of Stone Ridge Orchards in Stone Ridge and Breezy Hill Orchards in Staatsburg. “Ask the grower, ‘What’s good this week?’ The later apples that hang longer tend to be a little more complex, robust, and hardy.” Ryan is a fan of the Esopus Spitzenburgh, an Ulster Countybred heirloom said to have been Thomas Jefferson’s go-to snack. Grower Eddie Clevenger of Fishkill Farms in Hopewell Junction loves his Spartans, though several varieties have a place in his heart. “A Spartan is somewhere in between a Mac and a Red Delicious. It’s a good eating and baking apple. Galas and Fujis are also really good—sweet and crisp.”

Clevenger likes Macouns for baking. The Macoun also gets a thumbs-up from Mr. Apple himself, Phillip Apple (nee Russak) of High Falls, one of the area’s low-spray pioneers. Apple points out that even mass-produced apples are, like dissolute rich kids, descended from better stock. “Modern varieties have been ‘improved’ over original types,” he says. “For example, my Macs are an old strain; not so easy to grow, but with superior flavor. The original strain of Red Delicious had great flavor—no resemblance to the cardboard ones of today.” Apple traits that have been considered unglamorous, such as russet—a roughened, brownish tinge to the skin—may conceal a flavor you don’t want to miss. “We have a type of Golden Delicious that some years is almost my favorite for a sweet one, but it’s usually covered with russet so it fell out of favor,” says Apple. “My daughter likes a heritage variety called Golden Russet.  It is very crisp and juicy,” says Steven Clark of Prospect Hill Orchards in Milton. Not every great apple is necessarily an ancient strain. Growers are excited about the Snapdragon, developed by Cornell University’s breeding program and expected to be widely available for the first time this season, and the Jonagold, another New York original. Snapdragons are descended in part from the Honeycrisp, and peak around mid-September. “When you crunch it there is a wonderful flavor sensory response that then explodes into a rainbow of flavors on your palate,” says Clark. Then there are tangy Cortlands and Winesaps... the only way to find your personal favorite may be to do your own research. And there’s no time like the present. “We’ve had a great year,” says Ryan. “Driving around, you’ll see even the old wild trees are bearing.” FA L L 2 0 1 5

61


photo by Steffan Thalemann

DINA FALCONI HERBALIST HOMETOWN: The East Village LIVES IN: Stone Ridge hamlet of Lyonsville LIVED THERE SINCE: 1998 Dina Falconi, herbalist, teacher, and author, has spent over 40 years looking for nothing less than the meaning of life. The search has brought her to master the fields of nutrition, herbal healing, and permaculture. Falconi’s ideals define the beauty of her property—a rustic utopia that developed through engaging the natural life found there. The six-acre homestead where she settled with her husband, Tim Allen, and raised their son Sam, nestles into a hillside, integrating the Arts-and-Craftsaccented farmhouse with domesticated and wild gardens, orchards, a chicken yard, stacks of firewood, natural meadows, and woodlands. Over 200 plant species thrive in the gardens, providing ingredients for the herbal formulations and body care products Falconi makes. The barn, an airy, light-filled laboratory within rough-hewn walls, is an inviting space for working with plants. Protected from sunlight, the apothecary stores rows of bottled dried herbs and handcrafted potions. Falconi’s consultations take place in a cozy office. At a central table she teaches medicinal plant identification, wild food foraging, self-treatment, and making homemade plant-based medicines, skincare products, and foods. The inclination to understand how to live well has been with Falconi since childhood. She discovered the culinary arts at age 11 when a family friend, who had cured himself of terminal illness through

62 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

healthy eating, gave the young headache sufferer an herb book. She eliminated processed foods from her diet and started cooking for herself. Her headaches and overall health improved. Falconi studied theater and dance at the High School of Performing Arts, pre-med at Colgate University, and yoga and Tamil philosophy in India before completing a degree in choreography and fine arts at Bard College, where she met her husband. Later, she completed a two-year apprenticeship with herbalist Pam Montgomery and three years of tutorials with New York-based herbal clinician William LeSassier. While reading Weston A. Price’s 1930s studies of the eating habits of extremely healthy indigenous populations worldwide, an abiding question arose: What makes a healthy person? “He asked, ‘What have healthy native people been doing for thousands of years? Obeying the laws of Mother Nature,’” she says. “It’s such a simple, beautiful message, I constantly refer to it in my life.” Falconi’s book, Foraging and Feasting: A Basic Field Guide and Wild Food Cookbook (Botanical Arts Press, 2013), encourages people to appreciate “the rhythm and step of nature, smelling, touching, and tasting the wild.” But that’s not all. “Luring people to beautiful foods becomes a way of activism,” she says. “To eat healthy, we have to become activists. As soon as food is for profit and not nourishment, food loses its sacred place in our lives.”—Pauline Uchmanowicz NEW CONTENT EVERY WEEK S U M CREATIVE M E R 2 0 1CLASS. 5 62 AT

upstater.com/farming


GLENN’S SHEDS Custom-built Firewood Sheds

With an eye for detail and the design expertise to bring it all together for our clients. Cabinet Designers invites you to LET OUR EXPERIENCE BE YOUR EXPERIENCE Your Potential * Our Passion

KITCHENS....not just a place to prepare food. It’s a place to meet, Relax and entertain Your Potential * Our Passion * Great Prices I would like the picture to be to the left of the page, the type above to be to the right of the picture layed out as you see it along with the KITCHENS....not just a place to items we sell below that. prepare food. It’s a place to meet, Relax and entertain If you can add one line under ourPotential products to Passion * Great Prices Your * Our like thefor picture be to and the left the page, read: your one stop shop forI would everything yourtohome ouroflogo and the type above to be toofthe right of the picture layed outthe as photo you seeyou it along with the information across the bottom the page as you have it in wespace sell below that. sent. I don’t want all of thatitems white above the photo that you have

Another of Glenn’s Fine Sheds Ready for Dinner

in the picture you sent to me and I’m not crazy about the color of the If you can add one line under our products to type. read: your one stop shop for everything for your home and our logo and

Free Installation

information across the bottom of the page as you have it in the photo you sent. I don’t want all of that white space above the photo that you have in the picture you sent to me and I’m not crazy about the color of the type.

Visit the web-site to see our full line of firewood sheds.

GLENNSSHEDS.COM 845.328.0447

KITCHENS....not just a place to

bath

[bath, bahth]

bath

[bath, bahth]

noun

With an eye for detail

prepare food. It’s a place to meet, and the design expertise

1. An essential part of your daily life. it all and entertain toRelax bring together for our clients. noun A washing or immersion (as in water or steam) 1. of Anall essential part yourPotential daily life.• Our Passion • Great Prices or part of theof body. Your KITCHENS....not just a place to A washing or immersion (as in water or steam) I soakbath in the bath for relaxation. [bath, bahth]Cabinet Designers invites you to of all or part of the body. prepare food. It’s a place to meet, 2. The quality state being covered with a liquid noun I soak in theorbath forofrelaxation. LET OUR EXPERIENCE

bath

[bath, bahth]

1. Anofessential part of your daily life. and 3. one the luxurious bathcovered elements offered Relax entertain noun 2. Just The quality or state of KITCHENS being with a liquid • BATHS • CLOSETS BE A washing or immersion (as inYOUR water orEXPERIENCE steam) in our locally owned full service design center, 1. of Anof essential part your daily life.• Our all or to part theof body. Your Potential PassionVOC • Great Prices 3. with Just materials one the luxurious bath elements offered • FLOORING • LOW PAINT fitofTILE any budget. Your Potential washing immersion (as in water or steam) * Our Passion IAsoak in theorbath relaxation. in our locally owned fullfor service design center, SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTS of all or part of the body. with materials any budget. 2. The quality orbath state ofrelaxation. being covered with a liquid I soak intothefit for

LET US DEFINE YOUR SPACE

3. one of the luxurious bathcovered elements offered 2. Just The quality or state of KITCHENS being with a liquid • BATHS • CLOSETS in our locally owned full service design center,

you need for• the roomshop ofVOC your dreams 3. Everything Just oneUS of the bath elements offered one stop for everything KITCHENS • BATHS • CLOSETS • TILE • materials FLOORING LOW PAINT TILE • FLOORING •SPACE LOW VOC PAINT with toluxurious fitYour any budget. LET DEFINE YOUR from to counters tiles to fixtures. in our cabinets locally owned full serviceand design center, your SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTS Everything you need thefor room of home. your dreams Established 1987 and still growing. with materials to fit anyfor budget.

Established 1987 and from stillcabinets growing. to DEFINE counters and tiles toSPACE fixtures. LET US YOUR

Everything you need forone thestop roomshop of your dreams Your for everything

LET US DEFINE • Kitchens Baths • to Closets • YOUR Tile from• cabinets counters and tiles SPACE to fixtures. your home. Everything youPaint need for thefor room of your dreams • Flooring • Low VOC • Sustainable Products from counters and tiles to fixtures. • Kitchens • cabinets Baths Closets Tile 747 Route 28 Kingston• to New York•12401 845-331-2200 • Flooring • Low VOC Paint • Sustainable Products www.cabinetdesigners.com • Kitchens •Located BathsNew •inClosets • Tile 845-331-2200 747 Route 28 Kingston York the: 12401 • Flooring • Low VOC Paint • Sustainable Products www.cabinetdesigners.com

• Kitchens •Located Baths Tile 747 Route 28 Kingston•inClosets New 845-331-2200 the: York•12401 • Flooring • Low VOC Paint • Sustainable Products www.cabinetdesigners.com

747 Route 28 Kingston New Located in York the: 12401 845-331-2200

www.cabinetdesigners.com

Located in the:

Lynn Walcutt

LMSW

INTUITIVE | PSYCHIC COUNSELOR

Life Readings to Enhance Understanding of Life Path

C R E AT E your space BUILD your home LIVE your way

Quality Custom Homes

Relationships, Home, Career, Finances, Present Influences & Future Directions

Phone readings as well as in person FOR APPOINTMENT

845-384-6787 lynn.walcutt@gmail.com

hvhomesource.com LYNNWALCUT T.COM M A N H AT TA N | H UDS O N VALLEY | PALM BEACH 4 0 YEARS ’ E X P ERIENC E

Serving the Tri-State, Hudson Valley, and Catskill Regions 2679 Route 17M, Goshen, NY 845–294–5663

FA L L 2 0 1 5

63


u

SPONSORED CONTENT

REAL ESTATE

S T O RY B Y K A N DY H A R R I S / P H O T O S B Y D E B O R A H D E G R A F F E N R E I D The luxuriously landscaped property features an authentic Dutch Barn (left) and a Stone House (right), both built in the late 18th century by David Hasbrouck, one of the first settlers of New Paltz.

WINED and DINED FORMER NYC RESTAURATEUR’S NEW PALTZ COMPOUND STILL HAS HEART

Barry Wine has always been ahead of his time. Back in the 1970s, when he was a lawyer, the fact that he possessed zero restaurant experience didn’t stop him and his then-wife, Susan, from opening The Quilted Giraffe restaurant on Academy Street in New Paltz. The restaurant’s French Nouvelle-inspired cuisine quickly made it a destination worthy of a detour. The prix-fixe menu was $9, Wine remembers, and Chateau Margaux or Chateau Lafite-Rothschild went for $3 a glass. “Those were different days,” Wine says. Eventually, in 1979, the Wines moved The Quilted Giraffe to New York City, where it flourished for serving French and Japanese-inspired cuisine prepared by an American chef, a rarity in those days. “There were no American chefs working or running luxury restaurants,” says Wine, and that sealed his fate as a pioneer in the field.

64 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

Meanwhile, back in New Paltz, the couple transformed their 18th-century property, complete with c.1797 stone house and c.1770 Dutch barn, into a country compound, where they helped usher in the American farm-to-table movement. While traveling in Europe and Japan, the Wines gathered seeds in order to grow produce for The Quilted Giraffe. “Our idea was to get things nobody else was growing,” says Wine. Fraises des bois (wild strawberries), Cavaillon melons, Japanese cucumbers, and other hard-to-find items flourished in the garden, which was maintained by a full-time gardener. After The Quilted Giraffe closed its doors in 1992, the Wines transported most of the restaurant’s furnishings to their New Paltz home, including stainless-steel walls, light fixtures, lamps, a maître d’ stand, and granite tabletops, which were installed as countertops in the Dutch barn’s modern kitchen. The house and barn, inspired by Barry”s travels, display an eclectic mix of new and old, local and foreign, and practical and whimsical. The heart of the legendary Quilted Giraffe and the role it played during the years that American cooking came of age still beats strong within the 12.5 acre compound.


The Dutch barn

The stone house pool

The stone house

The couple transformed their 18th-century property into a country compound, where they helped usher in the American farm-to-table movement.

The compound offers views of the Mohonk Preserve and famous rock-climbing cliffs of the Shawangunk foothills.

The Dutch barn living room

The Dutch barn kitchen

FA L L 2 0 1 5

65


u

REAL ESTATE

S T O RY B Y P E T E R D. M A RT I N / P H O T O B Y D E B O R A H D E G R A F F E N R E I D / I N F O G R A P H I C S B Y JA S O N C R I N G

The Big Deal with Tiny Houses

A

nyone who’s contemplating building a tiny house needs to know two things: First, tiny houses aren’t always legal. Depending on the municipality, constructing a tiny house, defined as measuring 300 square feet or less, can violate ordinances enacted to prevent slumlords from exploiting tenants. Some enterprising builders skirt the law by constructing tiny houses on trailer beds and classifying them as mobile homes (which have their own set of restrictions). Others cozy up to officials, hoping for a “don’t ask, don’t tell” arrangement, or find somewhere remote enough to avoid inspection. Secondly, living in a tiny house means getting rid of most of what you own. And yet, despite these obstacles, more and more people are designing and building tiny houses, including within the Hudson Valley, and the number of feeds for them on Instagram indicates a surging popularity. While the tiny house’s charm is obvious—who doesn’t love a miniature portico?—living full-time in one requires no small amount of lifestyle adjustments. So what’s the big deal with tiny houses? At the top of the list is cost. With a small array of solar panels, tiny houses are easy to run off the grid, eliminating utility costs. A tiny house can be built for roughly

66 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

$23,000, according to TheTinyLife.com; having one designed and built costs about $50,000. Factoring in financing, a tiny house runs about a tenth of the cost of the average home over 30 years—hence the appeal. Nobody knows the financial aspect of tiny-house living better than Rowan Kunz. For three years, she’s been blogging (RowansTinyHouse. blogspot.com) about the self-sustainable tiny home she made from a 24-foot trailer, “somewhere in Ulster County.” Her decision to build a tiny house, she wrote in 2012, was inspired by a “lack of desire for a mortgage, and the realization that I am a single 32-year-old who has had to move back into my parents’ house to finish grad school, with no real job or financial security. That can definitely have you start thinking of alternatives.” For Kunz, the tiny house “was a logical choice,” which is literally paying off: She became debt-free this summer. Yet, despite this obvious benefit, tiny-house living necessitated some big adjustments. “I gave away a bunch of stuff,” she says, and she now lives in rhythm with manually operating the utilities she depends on, like heating. Nonetheless, Kunz says, she’s adapted over time. “You change your lifestyle and just be,” she says.


IS A TINY HOUSE RIGHT FOR YOU?

*

WHAT IS MORE IMPORTANT TO YOU?

PROS

ENVIRONMENTAL FOOTPRINT

DO YOU COLLECT ANYTHING?

OR

CONS

ENVIRONMENTAL FOOT ROOM

YES

NO

DO YOU HAVE ANY KIDS?

PROMOTES CLUTTER REDUCTION

VERY LITTLE PERSONAL SPACE/PRIVACY

COULD YOU STOP?

YES NO

YES

I CANNOT

ANY DOGS?

YES

MORTGAGE-FREE

BIG DOG(S)

OR

CAT-SIZED?

MINIMAL STORAGE

NO

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE NOT BEING ABLE TO HAVE HOUSEGUESTS A BAD THING

A GOOD THING

ARE YOU GOOD AT TETRIS?

ECO-FRIENDLY

YES

NO FLUSHING TOILETS

NO

ARE YOU OPEN TO THE IDEA OF A COMPOSTING TOILET?

YES

BATH PERSON

SERIOUSLY?

OR

DIFFICULT TO COOK/ENTERTAIN

SHOWER PERSON?

EASY TO HEAT HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE HAVING VERY LITTLE PERSONAL SPACE COZY

ENCOURAGES AN ACTIVE LIFESTYLE

YES

CLAUSTROPHOBIC

NO

DIFFICULT TO WORK FROM HOME

*Do not make major life decisions based on a flow chart. For real resources on finding the home that’s right for you, visit upstater.com FA L L 2 0 1 5

67


ON • THE• MARKET BROUGHT TO YOU BY UPSTATER.COM

POSTS

Find new On the Market posts EVERY DAY at Upstater.com/on-the-market

A

t Upstater.com, we cross the line between “love” and “obsessed with” when it comes to real estate—so our On the Market posts go live every day. We scour the Internet and drive the streets to bring you the best-of-the-best houses on the market (although “best-of-the-best” is, of course, subjective). Our content runs the gamut, from “Five-Figure Fridays” (great homes under $99,000) to “More Than a Mill.” We also cover handyman specials, easy fixer-uppers, turn-key-move-in-ready homes, weekend escapes, country cottages, and grand estates.

Sprawling Staatsburg Estate 696 Centre Road, Staatsburg Houlihan Lawrence $

529,000

BEDS: 3 / BATHS: 3.5 / SQUARE FEET: 3,200 LOT SIZE: 7.1 acres / TAXES: $13,578 / MLS: 340473 When we consider the concept of “more bang for your buck,” our minds don’t immediately go to Staatsburg. The Dutchess County riverside hamlet is situated in equestrian country, and when we think horses, we think dollar signs, the kinds of dollars signs you can throw at equestrian pursuits. Not the case in Staatsburg. The rural area between Rhinebeck and Hyde Park happens to have a few good deals on the market, and this 1830s farmhouse happens to be one of them. And what makes it a deal, despite its half-million-dollar price tag? Not only does the property come with a renovated 3,200-squarefoot 19th-century farmhouse, it also has a separate country cottage resplendent with the knottiest of pine. The farmhouse retains tons of original details, such as crown moldings, built-ins, and wood accents, but also has plenty of updates in the kitchen and bathrooms. Seven parklike acres provide all the space you need for enjoying the outdoors (stream included), and that bluestone patio will make you the envy of your citified friends. Located approximately 20 minutes south of Rhinebeck. upstater.com/sprawling-staatsburg-estate

68 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m /o n - t h e - m a rke t

Once Upon a Time in a Millbrook Cottage

Historic Victorian Alert: Kingston’s Hutton House

3724 Route 44, Millbrook Paula Redmond

313 Albany Avenue, Kingston Westwood Metes & Bounds

$

345,000

$

339,000

BEDS: 2 / BATHS: 1 / SQUARE FEET: 1,345 LOT SIZE: .95 acres / TAXES: $5,638 / MLS: 338961

BEDS: 4 / BATHS: 2.5 / SQUARE FEET: 2,248 LOT SIZE: .26 acres / TAXES: $10,185 / MLS: 20153676

This 1930s cedar-shake cottage is a little slice of fairytale heaven in Dutchess County, but that’s not all. It’s also a potential live/work situation since the 1-acre property includes a fully renovated building currently used as a retail shop, complete with its own heat and air conditioning. The main two-bedroom/ one-bathroom residence comes with a fourseason glassed-in sunroom for luxuriating on warm days, as well as a fireplace for nippier nights. Hey, you know what would go perfectly here? A babbling brook! Oh, look, it’s got one. If living where we work involves a property like this, sign us up. It’s located about 10 minutes from the nearest Taconic State Parkway exit. upstater.com/once-upon-a-time-in-amillbrook-cottage

Built in 1895, the Hutton House in midtown Kingston came during the end of an architectural age. The ornate Victorian style was giving way to the more simplified Colonial Revival by the end of the 19th century, so while Hutton House still has Victorian flare, it lacks the gaudiness of its predecessors. Inside, the juxtaposition continues with splashes of fancy here and there (decorative arched windows, banister finials, dramatic bay windows, parquet floors with wood inlay), but with Craftsman-like woodworking. Fireplaces abound, and forced to choose, we’d say our favorite is the one with the green tile backsplash. The property is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and includes a walk-up attic, updated kitchen, high ceilings, and a quarter acre of land in a quiet residential street near Kingston amenities. Kudos to the current owners for the home’s immaculate condition. upstater.com/historic-victorian-alertkingstons-hutton-house

R E A L E S TA T E S E C T I O N


COUNTRY MODERN

House Crush: A Marvel of Minimalism in Columbia County 1716 County Route 7, Ancram Gary DiMauro $

835,000

BEDS: 2 / BATHS: 2.5 / SQUARE FEET: 2,000 LOT SIZE: 8.29 acres / TAXES: $8,350 / MLS: 10443

Don’t let my cluttered desk fool you. I am a Minimalist at heart. I long for empty countertops and floors free of clothes piles, but alas, such pursuits will have to wait until I retire or my teenager suddenly develops a penchant for tidying. Or both. So how does a (disorganized) closeted Minimalist soothe her longings for organization? By looking at houses like this one, of course. Behold its spotless glass, magically bereft of greasy fingerprints. No coffee stains on the kitchen counters? Count me in. And the floors. They’re so clutter-free, even the furniture is standing on its tippy-toes. Maybe someday I will finally get a chance to embrace my

Minimalist longings. Meanwhile, I’ll have to entertain myself by furtively staring at this 2,000-square-foot house of glass in Columbia County, designed by Levin/ Betts…at least until I realize the manpower involved with keeping all that glass clean. Could radiant floors, a Malm wood stove, gleaming spa-like bathrooms, and 8 acres of rolling land outside my wall of windows make up for the work to keep it clean? Um, yes. The answer is YES. upstater.com/house-crush-a-marvel-ofminimalism-in-columbia-county

CHECK OUT MORE HOT SUM M EPOSTS R 2 0 1 AT 5

69

upstater.com/on-the-market R E A L E S TA T E S E C T I O N

FA L L 2 0 1 5

69


u

WEEKENDER

S T O RY B Y PA U L S M A R T / P H O T O S B Y S T E F F E N T H A L E M A N N

WORKING for the WEEKEND A STYLISH TRANSITION IN 36 HOURS

W

hen Jessica Musumeci and David Curcurito, creative directors at Seventeen and Esquire magazines, respectively, bought their nine-year-old modern home in Stone Ridge two years ago, much about the structure and its setting pleased them. Musumeci loved the 1,800-square-foot contemporary’s open spaces and light, and the skywalk that joined the main house to a separate artist’s studio and guesthouse. Curcurito, who had owned a place in nearby High Falls, liked the landscape that surrounded the house, its open floor plan, and the low maintenance of a new house. But the inside needed to reflect the couple’s aesthetic, The couple made it a priority to get away from their hectic jobs and crowded Upper West Side apartment, so they transformed the studio spaces into separate guest quarters, allowing friends and family to visit more easily. After a year, though, Musumeci still didn’t feel she’d gotten things right. Every way she assembled her belongings seemed wrong. She relayed her aesthetic conundrum to her stylist-friend Leanne Ford Shaffer, with whom she had worked on magazine photo shoots.

70 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m /o n - t h e - m a rke t

R E A L E S TA T E S E C T I O N


Willow Realty Hudson Valley Real Estate - Ulster County Real Estate

Artfully designed with a true bohemian sophistication, Hotel Dylan parallels the easy, laid-back quality of Woodstock, and the locals who call it home. 320 Maverick Rd. Woodstock • 845.684.5422 TheHotelDylan.com

Gardiner: Spacious Colonial set on 5.8 acres. 5 bdrms, upscale neighborhood, New Paltz Schools, 10 minutes from Gardiner, New Paltz. Enjoy tiered decks and hot tub, huge finished walk-out lower level for studio, family room, office. MLS # 20152912. Asking $489,000.

Office: 33 Gibbons Lane, New Paltz, NY Laurie@WillowRealEstate.com

845-255-7666 Great Barrington Rudolf Steiner School Waldorf Education in the Berkshires

10 minutes from New York State Great Barrington, MA

gbrss.org

413-528-4015

WOODSTOCK COMEDY FESTIVAL PRESENTS

ROBERT KLEIN ! SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 TH BEARSVILLE THEATER WOODSTOCKCOMEDYFESTIVAL.ORG

FOUNDING SPONSORS

ERT KLEIN ! R E A L E S TA T E S E C T I O N

Debrah Lee Charatan DLC Realty Management

FA L L 2 0 1 5

71


“In 36 hours, we created what I now see as something very natural and organic.” Shaffer had recently revamped a schoolhouse outside Pittsburgh in a mash-up of classic rural wainscoting and pop overtones that had been featured in Country Living magazine. She has a penchant for striking juxtapositions: wicker porch furniture with 1970s leather couches and coffee tables made from old doors. “A mixed aesthetic is what makes a room feel good, even when you can’t quite pinpoint why and what that is,” Shaffer says. Shaffer suggested she and her husband come up from Pennsylvania, where their design firm, Acre Creative, is based, to work on Musumeci’s place for a weekend. Musumeci initially assumed the offer of such a grand favor was a joke. “Finally I said, ‘No, really, when should I be there?’” says Shaffer. The stylist/designer had a method that appealed to Musumeci: She would use the homeowners’ own items to redecorate. Shaffer and her husband Brad left on a Friday and were in Stone Ridge by 2am one chilly Saturday morning last autumn. By the time the Shaffers left on Sunday, the home was transformed, mostly with Musumeci’s own things. “She started pulling out my old drawings and playing with the pages of old books, and everything started to take shape like magic,” says Musumeci. Shaffer had brought just enough odd antiques and knickknacks to augment and highlight what Musumeci already had.

72 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m /o n - t h e - m a rke t

They made wallpaper in the guest room out of pages from an old atlas bought at a flea market, resurrected long calligraphic study scrolls that Musumeci had made in art school to hang in another, and pared classic old leather-and-wood furniture with a wall full of graphic blackand-white art. They stacked firewood in a wall recess and fashioned cubbies in the staircase into a cozy bar. The results are warm, more stylish than stark, highlighting the natural elements in each room. Musumeci says she immediately felt comfortable with the changes Shaffer helped her make, and comfortable with the price of well under $2,500, including paint, antiques, food, and wine. “She was brilliant in helping me figure out exactly where to place the furniture and where to hang everything so the house became more like a home,” says Musumeci. “In 36 hours, we created what I now see as something very natural and organic.”

PLAN YOUR WEEKEND ESCAPE. NEW CONTENT EVERY WEEK AT

upstater.com/weekending

R E A L E S TA T E S E C T I O N


u

REAL ESTATE LISTINGS Houses | Land | Property | Brokers

Photos by Deborah DeGraffenreid The luxuriously landscaped property features an authentic Dutch barn (left) and a stone house (right).

New Paltz Compound 102 & 104 Butterville Road, New Paltz $

2,200,000

For sale by owner (brokers protected) barrywine@eatcaviar.com | www.Mohonkfoothillsfarm.com

The stone house kitchen is ultra modern.

The 12.5-acre compound features a large pond.

A historical gem that’s been fully renovated and stylishly modernized, this 12.5-acre compound has two residences: a 2,400-square-foot stone house and a 4,250-square-foot Dutch barn—all nestled in the much desired Hudson Valley, directly across from the protected views of the Mohonk Preserve and the foothills of the famous rock-climbing cliffs of the Shawangunks. Gorgeously landscaped, with a pond, swimming pool, and two driveways, it has been owned for 42 years and meticulously cared for by its current owner. Both houses have open-plan ground floors with state-of-the-art kitchens. The barn has a walk-in refrigerator and wood-burning pizza oven, a mezzanine library, and Japanese garden. The stone house has its original fireplace and a showpiece Carrera-marble kitchen. Each of the residences has two claw-foot marble bathtubs and a double-size tumbled-marble shower. This is a once-ina-lifetime opportunity to acquire a compound bordering the Mohonk Preserve with frontage on both Gatehouse and Butterville Roads. A vacant lot, which can be used for an additional residence, studio, or horse barn, is included. The property has been featured in the New York Times and in several design magazines.

My love affair with Butterville Road. There were rabbits

hopping in snowdrifts in winter, the fragrance of lilacs and a lone goose overnighting on the flight north in spring, and songbirds, croaking frogs, and the scurry of chipmunks in summer. Picking baskets of Brussel sprouts, Japanese cucumbers, and wild strawberries to be enjoyed at the Quilted Giraffe that same night--an early farm-to-table restaurant garden—was so special. I’ve got lots of memories, but after 42 years, new opportunities and interests have opened up for me elsewhere.—Barry Wine

R E A L E S TA T E S E C T I O N

The stone house features a patio and pool.

FA L L 2 0 1 5

73


We’re Everywhere You Need Us! www.WinMorrisonrRealty.com Exclusive members of LuxuryPropertiesInternational.com RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • LAND • INVESTMENT • MULTI-FAMILY

Dinner with the Vanderbilts

This contemporary Hudson River estate has over 330’ river frontage, direct deep water access and 200’ of riparian rights. Sited on 6.9 private acres, you can enjoy magnificent views from every corner of your property. The expansive north/ south and east facing views, plus direct river access, is a rare find and much sought-after. From the moment you enter the 26’ reception hall, with its 18’ soaring ceilings, you know you are in a very special home with 6 bedrooms, 4 full and 3 half bathrooms and over 10,000 square feet of sumptuous living space. The in-ground pool and attached 3-bedroom guest quarters are simply lovely, all with breathtaking views of the Vanderbilt Mansion majestically sitting across the river. $3.5 Million

KINGSTON 845-339-1144 • SAUGERTIES 845-246-3300 • WOODSTOCK TINKER ST. 845-679-9444 • WOODSTOCK OLD FORGE 845-679-2929 BOICEVILLE 845-657-4240 • PHOENICIA 845-688-2929 • KINGSTON COMMERCIAL 845-339-9999 Serving the Entire Hudson Valley • All Offices Open 7 Days A Week

74 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m /o n - t h e - m a rke t

R E A L E S TA T E S E C T I O N


Greene County NY. Historic river towns, charming antique houses, great live/work buildings, and prices from $225,000 to $850,000. (No wonder it’s becoming the new destination for the “creative class”.)

Athens Village House & Studio $259,000 David Ludwig ❚ 518.943.7533 x11

Historic Village Charmer $225,000 David Ludwig ❚ 518.943.7533 x11

Historic Athens Queen Anne $348,500

Hannacroix Custom Contemporary $499,000

❚ Kathy Duffy 518.822.0800 x11

The Clark House $499,000

❚ Susan Barnett 518.943.7533 x13

Butterfly Farm $499,000

David Ludwig ❚ 518.943.7533 x11

❚ David Ludwig

Hamilton Clark House $479,000

Athens Second Empire $749,000

David Ludwig ❚ 518.943.7533 x11

Van Dyck House $395,000 David Ludwig ❚ 518.943.7533 x11

The Woodbine Inn $450,000 Susan Barnett ❚ 518.943.7533 x13

Tivoli NY • Hudson NY • Catskill NY • Rhinebeck NY R E A L E S TA T E S E C T I O N

518.943.7533 x11

❚ Pamela Belfor 917.734.7142

Onteora Opportunity $850,000

❚ Pamela Belfor 917.734.7142

Country Modern Farmhouse $298,000

❚ David Ludwig 518.943.7533 x11

garydimauro.com S U MFM A EL R L 2015

75


Patricia A. Hinkein Realty

Germantown Village Cape. This charming village home features a spacious living room with fireplace, an open Kit/DR with built-in corner cabinets, MBR, Den & Bath all on the 1st floor. Two guest Bedrooms & a bath on 2nd floor. Hardwood floors. Private back deck. Breezeway. Attached Garage. Full walk out basement. Easy walking distance to the village and all its amenities. $339,000

Germantown area Mid-Century Contemporary on 3.7 landscaped acres with wonderful long range easterly views. This 5 BR/3 Bath house features a LR with vaulted ceiling & fplc., an open Kit/DR, MBR suite with balcony, lower level guest quarters with a gathering room & Fplc, BR, Den & bath. Step out back to the private patio, lush gardens & inground pool. Heated 2 car garage. Central air. $449,000

Germantown 1790’s Eyebrow Colonial on 3.6 acres. Also features an early stone summer Kit with fplc, a 2 story 1800’s Barn & a shop/studio. This wonderfully preserved Centerhall features fabulous wideboard floors, spacious Kit, light filled formal DR & LR each with a working fplc, 3 BRs/2 baths, central air, & covered porch. Beautifully landscaped grounds. Walking distance of the Hudson River. $525,000

Otto’s Market, a thriving, award winning Hudson Valley business. This turnkey operation includes a 2500 sq ft bldg, inventory, fixtures & a strong track record. Built as a grocery store in 1927, the bldg was purchased in 2008 & underwent a total renovation offering a mix of everyday groceries with specialty, natural & local foods. An excellent opportunity to continue & expand this local food business. $995,000

19 Church Ave, Germantown, NY (518) 537-4888 www.hinkeinrealty.com • hinkein@gmail.com

PRISTINE 1745 HOUSE PRISTINE 1745 STONE STONE HOUSE

Gardiner, NY GARDINER, NY

$875,000.00 $875,000.00

Completely restored in 1980 with historic impeccable craftsmanship Completely restored in 1980 withdetails historicand details and includes aimpeccable unique tunnel and underground features. 2 timber peg barns, spring fed craftsmanship includes a unique tunnel and pond for recreation, magnificent Shawangunk Mountain views on 4 gorgeous underground features. 2 timber peg barns, spring fed pond for acres. Commercial/Residential ​Must see​! Mountain views on 4 recreation, magnificent– Shawangunk

gorgeous acres. Commercial/Residential – Must see! 845­255­0091 440­667­6303 mobile 1745Stonehouse@gmail.com

845-255-0091 440-667-6303 cell 1745 Stonehouse@gmail.com

76 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m /o n - t h e - m a rke t

R E A L E S TA T E S E C T I O N


The Catskills Lifestyle

VillageGreenRealty.com *according to Ulster County MLS and Columbia Greene Northern Dutchess MLS 2011-2014.

EXPLORE COMMUNITIES SEARCH PROPERTIES

villagegreenrealty.com/communities

Kingston

Saugerties

Woodstock

Rosendale

VILLAGE GREEN REALTY

20 years of finding our clients the perfect country properties has made us #1 in Ulster and Greene Counties . *

Kingston 845-331-5357 | Goshen 845-294-8857 | New Paltz 845-255-0615 Stone Ridge 845-687-4355 | Windham 518-734-4200 | Woodstock 845-679-2255

Own your own piece of the Great Northern Catskills Ski-in, ski-out; hike, kayak, fish, explore, relax in your own luxury vacation resort. For sale,“Quarter-Share” hassle-free ownership of a slope-side condo suite, at the Kaatskill Mountain Club, in the beautiful northern Catskill Mountains. 13 plus weeks a year, provides rental income and sleeps 8.

$49,000 for your slice of upstate heaven. Detailed information and photos at www.catskillmountaincondo.com 415-497-9799

R E A L E S TA T E S E C T I O N

FA L L 2 0 1 5

77


Cedar Heights Farm RHINEBECK

Southern Columbia County, New York Is Our Specialty!

Copake Lake Our House is this 7 BR, 7.5 BA, 4400 sf home sited on 3 acres. This tri-level home was designed to keep the party going, but also to allow for private spaces. Family room, work-out room, walk-in cedar closet, attached two-car garage. Balconies and decks galore. Amenities include an in-ground swimming pool, tennis court and HOA waterfront. Lake and Catskill views. Our House is being offered at $850,000. Located in Southern Columbia County, New York, this home is about 2 hours from Manhattan and 2.5 hours from Boston – nestled between the Berkshires and the Catskills. What a great location. In less than ½ hour you can be in Hudson, Chatham or Millerton, NY, or Great Barrington, MA – each town has its own distinct personality. Music, theatre, Catamount Ski Area/Adventure Park is 10 minutes away, farmer’s markets, hiking, biking, swimming, fishing – it’s all here. So much to do (or not) and so little time.

This idyllic property is the epitome of Hudson Valley charm. An A.J. Downing inspired Victorian farmhouse, 102 bucolic acres with dramatic Catskill Mountain views, 3.5-acre spring-fed lake, 6-stall barn, pastures with multiple run-in sheds, access to local horse trails and 175 apple trees which are part of Cedar Heights Orchard. Minutes to the Village of Rhinebeck, Kingston-Rhinecliff Bridge and Amtrak. Convenient to Tivoli and Bard’s Fisher Center. Offered at $2,595,000.

H.H. HILL REALTY SERVICES, INC. 845.876.8888 • hillrhinebeck.com

6408 MONTGOMERY ST., RHINEBECK, NY 12572

$225,000

Call Claudia 845.389.6283

Lindsay LeBrecht , Real Estate Broker 285 Lakeview Road, Craryville, NY 78 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m /o n - t h e - m a rke t

$1,300,000

Call Gilda 845.594.5568

Custom cabinets, radiant heat, new electric, fully insulated. Beautiful stone outcropping coupled with new masonry work. Upgrades lovingly added each step of their renovation. Kohler whirlpool, with under-counter storage in third floor bath. Builtin bookcases on second floor. Bamboo floors. The character of the old farmhouse has been tastefully restored, everything top-notch. MLS # 20153370

A gem bursting with charm and antiques, exquisite property, formerly Chestnut Grove Farm, consists of a pristine farmhouse at the end of a dead-end road nestled on 45 acres with a creek and a swimming hole, a pond with gazebo, approximately 18-20 acres of pastures, and a mountain range with panaoramic views. Barns, a mikhouse, 2-car garage, a silo and a separate 1 BR apt. MBR with FP and vaulted ceiling. Must be seen. MLS # 20153021

R E A L E S TA T E S E C T I O N


CONTACT our

ADVERTISERS

Alfandre Architecture, PC

George Cole Auctions & Realty

Mount Saint Mary College

Barry Wine

Gift Hut, The

Nest Realty Co.

Beacon Arts Community Association

Glenn’s Sheds

Newburgh Illuminated Festival

Berkshire Products, Inc.

Green Meadow Waldorf School

Niche Modern

Bethel Woods Center for the Arts

Hawthorne Valley Association

Oakwood Friends School

Birdsall House

HH Hill Realty Services

Ole Savannah Southern Table & Bar

High Meadow School

Pamela’s on the Hudson

Historic Huguenot Street

Pandorica, The

Hotel Dylan

Patricia A. Hinkein Realty

Houlihan Lawrence Real Estate

Peekskill Business Improvement District

HOUSE Hudson Valley Realty

Peggy Lampman Real Estate

Hudson Company, The

Poughkeepsie Day School

Hudson Valley Home Source

Raleigh Green Inc

Hudson Valley Sunrooms

Rhinebeck Department Store

alfandre.com / 845-255-4774

barrywine@eatcaviar.com / 917-969-9800 beaconarts.org

berkshireproducts.com / 413-229-7919 bethelwoodscenter.org / 1-866-781-2922 birdsallhouse.net / 914-930-1880

Buttermilk Falls Inn & Spa buttermilkfallsinn.com / 845-795-1310

Cabinet Designers, Inc

cabinetdesigners.com / 845-331-2200

Catskill Farms Builders

thecatskillfarms.com / 845-557-3600

Catskill Mountain Club

www.catskillmountainclub.org / 845-676-3643

Claudia Andreassen Properties candreassen@hvc.rr.com / 845-246-6414

Clermont State Historic Site friendsofclermont.org / 518-537-6622

Cold Spring Area Chamber of Commerce explorecoldspringny.com 845-265-3200

Copake Lake Realty

copakelakerealty.com / 518-325-9741

David Borenstein Architects and Builders architectdavidborenstein.com / 845-758-6080

de Marchin

demarchin.com / 518-828-2657

Den of Marbletown, The

thedenofmarbletown.com / 845-687-6441

Denning’s Point Distillery, LLC denningspointdistillery.com / 845-230-7905

Dermasave Labs, Inc.

hudsonvalleyskincare.com / 845-635-4087

Dia: Beacon, Riggio Galleries diaart.org / 845-440-0100

Division Street Grill

divisionstreetgrill.com / 914-739-6380

georgecoleauctions.com / 845-758-9114 thegifthut.com / 894-297-3786 glennssheds.com / 845-328-0447 gmws.org / 845-356-2514

hawthornevalleyassociation.org / 518-672-7092 hillrhinebeck.com / 845-876-8888

highmeadowschool.org / 845-687-4855 huguenotstreet.org / 845-255-1660 thehoteldylan.com / 845-684-5422 houlihanlawrence.com / 845-473-9770

househudsonvalley.com / 518-828-5154 hudson-co.com / 845-848-3040

hvhomesource.com / 845-294-5663

hvsk.fourseasonssunrooms.com / 845-339-1787

Hudson Woods

hudsonwoods.com / 212-233-9187

Hummingbird Jewelers

hummingbirdjewelers.com / 845-876-4585

Kaatsbaan International Dance Center kaatsbaan.org / 845-757-5106

Kingston, City of

kingston-ny.gov 845-331-0080

LAD Interiors

ladinteriors.com / 518-392-0209

Luminary Media

luminarymedia.com / 845-334-8600

Lynn Walcutt, Psychic Consultant

Doug’s Pretty Good Pub

lynnwalcutt.com / 845-384-6787

Enjoy Rhinebeck

markjamesandco.com / 845-834-3047

EvolveD Interiors & Design Showroom LLC

marleneweber.com / 845-454-5852

Film Columbia

845-255-0091

845-265-9500

enjoyrhinebeck.com / enjoyrhinebeck@gmail.com evolvedinteriors.com / 845-679-9979

MarkJames & Co.

Marlene Weber Day Spa Marybeth Majestic

Gary DiMauro Real Estate

Menla Mountain Retreat & Conference Center

garydimauro.com / 845-876-5100

menla.org / 845-688-6897

Geoffrey Good Fine Jewelry

Mill House Brewing Company

filmcolumbia.com / filmcolumbia@gmail.com

geoffreygood.com / 212-625-1656

millhousebrewing.com / 845-485-2739

msmc.edu / 888-YES-MSMC

nestrealtyco.com / 845-417-7242 newburghilluminatedfestival.com

nichemodern.com / 212-777-2101 oakwoodfriends.org / 845-462-4200 olesavannah.com / 845-331-4283

pamelasonthehudson.com / 845-562-4505 thepandoricarestaurant.com / 845-831-6287 hinkeinrealty.com / 518-537-4888

downtownpeekskill.com / 914-737-2780 peggylampman.com / 518-851-2277

poughkeepsieday.org / 845-462-7600 raleighgreeninc.com / 845-481-4550 rhinebeckstore.com / 845-876-5500

Rudolf Steiner School gbrss.org / 413-528-4015

Stewart Airport, Port Authority NY-NJ panynj.gov/airports/stewart.html / 845-838-8200

Stoutridge Vineyard

stoutridge.com / 845-236-7620

Tuthill House

tuthillhouse.com / 845-255-4151

Ulster Savings Bank

ulstersavings.com / 845-440-0391

Walkway Over the Hudson walkway.org / 845-454-9649

Westwood Metes & Bounds Realty westwoodrealty.com / 845-340-1920

White Plains Hospital Center wphospital.org / 914-681-2929

Whitecliff Vineyard

whitecliffwine.com / 845-255-4613

Willow Realty

willowrealestate.com / 845-255-7666

Win Morrison Realty

winmorrisonrealty.com / 845-339-1144

Wm. Farmer & Sons

wmfarmerandsons.com / 518-828-1635

Woodstock Comedy Festival, Inc.

woodstockcomedyfestival.org / woodstockcomedyfestival

FA L L 2 0 1 5

79


u

LAST LOOK

S T O RY B Y S PA R R O W / P H O T O P R O V I D E D “Constellation” features 17 LED lights on poles rising 40 to 80 feet above Bannerman Castle.

Stars Above the Ruins After moving to Beacon in 2007, artist Melissa McGill became fascinated by the ruins of Bannerman Castle, which appear in the windows of the Metro-North train like a medieval Flemish fantasy. The shape of “Constellation,” an installation on Pollepel Island, located near Beacon in the Hudson River, is based on the original outline of the castle, but is not a precise rendering. The project, which took almost three years to complete, launched on June 28 and will remain up until the fall of 2017. Seventeen tapered aluminum poles, each holding a single LED globe, rise above the ruins to 40 to 80 feet. Every evening, the lights are illumined, one by one, remain lit for two hours, and then fade away. This is crepuscular art, tracking the shadowy transition from day to night. “Constellation” is a trick of perspective: In the night sky, a 60-foot-high globe looks as distant as Alpha Centauri. The installation uses up-to-the-minute engineering—including solar panels and a computer program—yet points upward to the stars, which maintain the same technology eon after eon. McGill’s work is magnified by the surrounding darkness, seems larger than it is, and is cosmically persuasive. “When I met my friend Hadrian Coumans of the Lenape Center [a nonprofit organization in Manhattan whose mission is continuing the Lenape cultural presence], I told him about the project, and he said, ‘You’re making Opi Temakan!’” McGill reports. “I said, ‘What’s Opi Temakan?’ And he said, ‘That’s the White Road. The stars are the Milky Way that connects this world to the next.’”

80 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

Bannerman Castle was built in 1901 by a wealthy Scotsman who made his fortune buying up Union Army military surplus after the Civil War. Francis Bannerman VI stored his munitions in Manhattan until the city government ordered him to vacate. Finding Pollepel Island on a canoe trip, Bannerman envisaged a Scottish citadel made from concrete and brick. Although the building was perennially under construction, Bannerman and his family lived there for several years and hosted boys’ summer camps there. A fire in 1969 reduced the edifice to ruins. “Originally, I was saying that a constellation of people helped develop this project—but now it’s a galaxy!” says McGill. Many of her collaborators are local: Lighting designer Deke Hazirjian lives in Cornwall; Polich Tallix Fine Art Foundry, of Rock Tavern, installed the poles; Beacon’s Niche Modern donated the glass globes; Riverkeeper, Scenic Hudson, and the New York State Parks Department also participated. “I’m very fortunate to have some amazing poets as friends,” remarks McGill. A forthcoming book on the project from Princeton Architectural Press will include poems by Edwin Torres and Pulitzer Prize-winner Tracy K. Smith, as well as “One Today,” Richard Blanco’s poem, which was read at President Obama’s 2013 inauguration. “Constellation” will be installed until fall of 2017. To see the installaion from every angle, you must take a boat. Bannerman Castle Trust organizes boat tours and Storm King Adventure Tours provides kayak tours. A free downloadable audio tour is available at MelissaMcGillConstellation. com. Distance will profoundly affect one’s view of “Constellation.” From a kayak next to the island, you’ll probably see the globes, whereas from Newburgh they’ll look like 17 newly risen stars.

FRESH CONTENT EVERY DAY AT

upstater.com


Stewart International Airport

Neighborhood airport. World-class carriers. Conveniently located right in the Hudson Valley, Stewart’s comfortable size, modern amenities, friendly staff, and focus on customer care make getting to the airport, and flying out of it, hassle-free. Featuring services from Allegiant, American, Delta, JetBlue, and US Airways, Stewart is the easiest way to travel domestically and internationally in and out of the region. Stewart International Your neighborhood airport.


Make upstate home, this fall. Whether you’re looking to purchase an upstate getaway or thinking of a permanent relocation, Ulster Savings Bank can help! We specialize in financing of all types including: • Investment Properties • Second Homes • Construction Loans • Fixed and Adjustable Rate Mortgages • Jumbo Loans

We’ve financed thousands of properties in the Hudson Valley. Local and community focused since 1851.

NMLS# 619306

Locations throughout the Hudson Valley and on Long Island (866) 440-0391 • www.ulstersavings.com

MEMBER FDIC

Upstater Fall 2015  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you