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upstater W I N T E R 2015

Live like a local.

WE LOVE

BUILDING-our own-FIRES AN D

HAV I N G TH E

STRENGTH

I T T A K E S A V I L L A G E 20

TO D I S C O V E R WHAT WE CAN LIVE

B E E R H O O D 26

WITHOUT V I S I T C O L D S P R I N G 38


Only Lindal . . . warm modern bespoke homes relaxed healthy environments personalized for site and self efficiency and predictability unmatched experience caring local service

. . . the preeminent prefab

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WINTER 2015

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DREAMING OF YOUR UPSTATE LIFE?

BE. HERE. NOW.

We’ve been guiding dreamers for over 40 years with our knowledge, experience and exceptional client service.

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Serving the Hudson Valley Region


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TABLE of

CONTENTS 50

upstater WINTER 2015/2016

Getting Hitched

Saddle Up!

A bridal table at Art Barn at the Hill in Hudson. Photo by Jesse Turnquist

FEATURES

20 26

FOOD + DRINK

Welcome to the Beerhood

Why the Hudson Valley is leading in microbrewing. Story by Peter D. Martin / Photos by Matt Petricone

44

In for the Long Haul

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46

How the Hudson Valley feeds New Yorkers. Story by Bradley Hawks / Photos by Upstater staff

Escape-Worthy Cold Spring

48

16

It Takes a Village

38

45

4

FOOD + DRINK

WEEKENDER

Escape Brooklyn visits the winter-wonderland village. Story and photos by Erin Lindsey

A Kingston weekenders’ love story. Story by Kandy Harris / Photos by Matt Petricone REAL ESTATE

The Times They Are a-Changin’

Kingston’s evolving second-home market. Story by Kandy Harris GETTING HITCHED

Saddle Up!

How to say “I do” to a Hudson Valley barn wedding. Story by Amanda Black / Photos by Hillary Harvey and Jesse Turnquist AT HOME

Home Is Where the Art Is

The New York couple behind Kingston’s One Mile Gallery. Story by Lynn Woods / Photos by Deborah DeGraffenreid / u p s t a t e r.c o m

HV PORTRAITS

THIS & THAT

WEEKENDER

10 9

MISSION STATEMENT

14

ZACHARY LEWIS / BRAD BECKERMAN / BENJAMIN GIARDULLO

CHECK OUT OUR TEAM

10

COLD SWEAT

18

MESHELL NDEGEOCELLO

16

ODE TO FINGERLESS GLOVES

34

KALE KAPOSHILIN

36

MAP: HOW TO GET HERE FROM THERE

46

DECORA

53

FLOW CHART: BARN WEDDINGS

60

MICHAEL DRAPKIN

59

WEEKEND GIVEAWAY CONTEST

72

LAST LOOK

Front cover: New York Heartwoods’ Joe Eubanks, owner Megan Offner, Marcus Soto, and Innis Sampson. Photo by Roy Gumpel


Shop Rhinebeck R H I N E B E C K D E PA RT M E N T S TO R E

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1 East Market Street Rhinebeck, NY 845.876.5500 rhinebeckstore.com

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ALFANDRE ARCHITECTURE

Creating Spaces and Places of Lasting Beauty

WINTER 2015

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THE ONLY

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Farm 30

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Ranch 9

Narrowsburg, NY - $385,000 3 Beds, 2 Baths, 5 Acres, 2,000 SF

www.thecatskillfarms.com

6

upstater

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.com upstater

E V E R Y D AY

FALL IN THE HUDSON VALLEY: BEYOND APPLE-PICKING B Y H AY N E S L L E W E L LY N

As the leaves start to turn in the Hudson Valley, the natural landscape is transformed into nature’s canvas, accentuated by hues of gold, red, and burnt amber. Music festivals, fairs, and a variety of events pop up across the landscape. From Millbrook to Rhinebeck to Kingston to Cooperstown, the region’s appeal is endless. Perhaps this weekend, you, like many of our Manhattan friends, will decide to take a road trip up to the valley. upstater.com/fall-in-the-hudson-valley-beyond-apple-picking

FROM THE BACKYARD: THE RESILIENCY OF SOIL

6 BEAUTIFUL WHITES THAT COVER ALL THE BASES

BY ANN HUTTON

BY AMY KRANE

A local upstate farm that for decades specialized in growing sweet corn has converted to a non-profit agricultural project. The 1,200-plus-acre Hudson Valley Farm Hub provides training in “resilient” agriculture, and educates farmers and farm workers (and the public as well) in what it takes to produce diverse food crops with methods that replenish vitality to the overworked earth.

What do you want your white to do? Brighten and lighten? Its success is based on how much natural light is in the room. White walls in an area with no natural light can look dingy. It’s not the best color choice. But as a neutral backdrop for your color-filled artwork, furniture, and textiles? Sure, what colors are they? Add contrast to a room? How saturated are the other colors? See what I mean?

upstater.com/from-the-backyard-the-resiliency-of-soil

upstater.com/6-beautiful-whites-that-cover-all-the-bases

A FALL EXPLORATION INTO THE CATSKILLS’ PAST

NEW BREWERY ON THE BLOCK: HUDSON VALLEY BREWERY, BEACON

B Y U P S TAT E R S TA F F

BY KANDY HARRIS

It’s a place I’ve wanted to visit for a long time. Once a beloved Catskill Mountains resort in Sullivan County during the Borscht Belt’s heyday, Grossinger’s Resort in Liberty has fallen into a crumbling mess since its closure in 1986. Seeing what it looked like when it was open and what it looks like now isn’t difficult—a quick Google Images search gives you an eyeful. But I wanted to see it for myself. In the fall. During Halloween. Why? Because I love ruins. I love spooky things. I love the past. And I love the Catskills.

Dutchess County beer lovers, rejoice! Construction has commenced on the region’s newest brewery-in-the-making. The Hudson Valley Brewing Company, located in Beacon, will occupy 18,000 square feet of disused factory space at 7 East Main Street, and, according to a recent press release, will include a taproom, wholesale manufacturing facility, and event space. Nothing makes us happier than hearing about an old, historic building getting an upgrade into something that’s of value to the whole community.

upstater.com/a-fall-exploration-into-the-catskills-past

upstater.com/new-brewery-on-the-block-hudson-valley-brewery-beacon

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EDITORIAL

u

EDITOR

Susan Piperato susan@luminarymedia.com ART DIRECTOR

Jason Cring jcring@luminarymedia.com PROOFREADER

Barbara Ross

CONTRIBUTORS

THIS MAGAZINE IS D E D I C AT E D T O L I V I N G A

DELIBERATE LIFE CORE

VALUES

FOOD

SOURCES

CONSCIOUS

CONSUMPTION

or our MEASURED STUDY OF THE WORLD

WE GO WITHIN

WHETHER WE’RE IN A

OR OUTSIDE IN THE

MOVING SLOWLY,

PUBLISHING FOUNDERS & PUBLISHERS

Amara Projansky & Jason Stern CHIEF EXECUTIVE

Amara Projansky

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Brian K. Mahoney CHAIRMAN

David Dell Upstater is a project of Luminary Media.

ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT & SALES

Julian Lesser jlesser@luminarymedia.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Robert Pina rpina@luminarymedia.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Ralph Jenkins rjenkins@luminarymedia.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Anne Wygal awygal@luminarymedia.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Nicole Hitner nhitner@luminarymedia.com

ADMINISTRATIVE DIRECTOR OF EVENTS & SPECIAL PROJECTS MANAGER

WARM KITCHEN COLD INTENTIONALLY

Samantha Liotta samantha@luminarymedia.com

INCUBATING OUR PLANS FOR THE & WAITING FOR THE RIGHT THING TO

Molly Rausch accounting@luminarymedia.com

YEAR AHEAD SHOW UP

KNOWING IT WILL

BUILDING WARM WOOLENS our own FIRES HEATED COCKTAILS We love

AN D

HAV I N G

STRENGTH

TO D I S C O V E R WHAT WE CAN LIVE

WITHOUT

LIVE LIKE A LOCAL TH E

8

Peter Aaron, Amanda Black, Anne Pyburn Craig, Brian PJ Cronin, Deborah DeGraffenreid, Roy Gumpel, Kandy Harris, Hillary Harvey, Bradley Hawks, Erin Lindsey, Peter D. Martin, Karen Pearson, Matt Petricone, Fionn Reilly, Kirby Salvador, Phyllis Segura, Emily Sylvester, Jesse Turnquist, Jenna Woginrich, Lynn Woods

upstater

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OFFICE MANAGER

Peter D. Martin peter@luminarymedia.com BOOKKEEPER

DIGITAL DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION & DIGITAL STRATEGY

Teal Hutton teal@luminarymedia.com

PRODUCTION PRODUCTION MANAGER

Sean Hansen sean@luminarymedia.com PRODUCTION DESIGNERS

Linda Codega Kerry Tinger

LUMINARY MEDIA 314 Wall Street, Kingston, NY 12401 (845) 334-8600 | fax (845) 334-8610 luminarymedia.com All contents © Luminary Media Inc. 2015 For extended coverage of the upstater lifestyle, join us at upstater.com. Upstater was founded in 2011 and acts as a guide for living, buying, renting, and vacationing in upstate New York. Our writers have hearts, mortgages, and legacies in the Hudson Valley.


CHE C K O U T O U R

TEAM LOOK FOR CONTENT BETWEEN ISSUES FROM YOUR FAVORITE CONTRIBUTORS AT upstater.com.

Erin Lindsey and her husband, Denny Brownell, are the writers and photographers behind EscapeBrooklyn.com, a travel blog for New Yorkers who want to get out of the city for a day or weekend, or even a destination beyond. Together they are on the road four days a week finding the best lodging, dining, drinking, and outdoor activities each destination has to offer. When they’re not traveling, Lindsey and Brownell can be found in Crown Heights, Brooklyn, which they happily call home.

VISIT US upstater.com

CONTACT US hello@upstater.com

upstater.com/contributors/erinlindsey

Lynn Woods is co-director of Lost Rondout: A Story of Urban Removal, a film about a 1960s urban renewal project in downtown Kingston, where she lives and works. As a writer, she contributes regularly to Chronogram and Upstate House magazines and Ulster Publishing’s Almanac, and she is the co-author of Adirondack Style: Great Camps and Rustic Lodges, published by Universe in 2011.

FOLLOW US

facebook.com/upstater instagram/upstater #upstater

upstater.com/contributors/lynnwoods

Bradley Hawks is an awardwinning food photographer and writer based in New York City. He photographs for the Village Voice and serves as editor-in-chief of Boro, a hyperlocal magazine focusing on lifestyle, food, arts, and fitness in Western Queens. upstater.com/contributors/bradleyhawks

Jenna Woginrich blogs about life as a small farmer on her website, ColdAntlerFarm.blogspot.com, and at Mother Earth News and The Huffington Post, and she posts homesteading videos on her YouTube channel. Her fifth book, Cold Antler Farm, was published by Roost in 2011. upstater.com/contributors/jennawoginrich

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FARMING

S T O RY B Y J E N N A W O G I N R I C H / I L L U S T R AT I O N S B Y E M I LY S Y LV E S T E R

COLD SWEAT

A WI NTE R’S MOR N I NG I N TH E LI FE OF A C O R P O R AT E C L I M B E R -T U R N E D - H O M E ST E A D E R

I

run a small farm in Jackson, about an hour’s drive north of Albany, with sheep, pigs, goats, chickens, turkeys, rabbits, a cart horse, and a hawk, plus my two border collies. We are Team Cold Antler Farm, and there’s no place I’d rather be.

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You have no idea how cold a house can really be until you lift the toilet lid one morning and find a layer of ice in the bowl. That, my friends, is a cold house. But when you live on the side of a mountain in a little farmhouse heated by a woodstove, you get used to frosty bowls. You crack through the ice with a plunger, and get on with the day. There’s a whole farm outside waiting for breakfast.

These cold mornings are a far cry from a few years ago, when I awoke to hot showers and warm rooms heated by an oil furnace. But that was in a past life, when a so-called more civilized version of myself was trying to climb the corporate ladder.

I was miserable, so I left spreadsheets and Web designs for milking goats, collecting eggs, helping birth lambs, driving horse carts, and hunting deer with my father’s rifle. Now I heat my house with firewood and hope.

In winter, my days start long before sunrise when the world is still dark. There’s no overhead lighting, so I light candles and oil lamps instead.

I place my trusty Rapid Brew percolator on the cold woodstove, and get the fire going. Now the dark house is alive with orange light. Once the stove is well fed and the coffeepot starts to bubble, I can start anticipating how good my first cup will taste once I return from doing chores to my (slightly) warmer house.

Getting dressed takes a while. I don my work clothes like armor: thick, hand-knit socks and tights; underlayers, close to the skin and long in the sleeves; a hefty wool sweater; a canvas work vest; flannel-lined jeans; rubber boots; and mittens.

We make a happy parade outside—just a lady and her sheepdogs—to feed the animals in their cozy shelters. By lantern light, I offer the pigs some chow—kitchen scraps and whey from cheesemaking. If it’s really cold, they’ll stay in their hay nests until daylight for breakfast. (Pigs are as smart as you’ve undoubtedly been told.) Next, the goats, sheep, and horse get their hay, and I fill the chickens’ feeders and give the rabbits their kibble.

I head back inside carrying firewood— praying with every armful that there’s enough to make it until spring. I pull off my snowy boots, put a record on, and let music and caffeine fill me. The house smells of coffee, sweat, and wet dog—a perfume I wear proudly. Somewhere out there are people who woke up today to a warm house with tepid toilets, but would kill their cousins to start over with hay and firelight. I’ve learned to savor my gratitude the way I do my coffee.

Farming means living in the season and in the moment. Last summer feels as much like a past life as do my days commuting to an office. With too much past or future, the present becomes panic. So I settle into a fraying chair, take a long sip from my mug, and let a dog rest its head on my lap. The sun is up, the house is growing warm, and I am here.

FARM FRESH CONTENT EVERY DAY AT

upstater.com/farming

WINTER 2015

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feed your obsession.

your real estate-obsessed best friend 12 upstater

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upstater.com


Enter to Win Upstater’s

COLD SPRING

Daytrip Giveaway enter

UPSTATER.COM/COLDSPRING-GIVEAWAY

online Pamper yourself or bring friends. $700 worth of food, booze and shopping! PARTICIPATING BUSINESSES INCLUDE

The Gift Hut

Cold Spring Chamber

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The Gift Hut

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The Country Touch

Whistling Willie’s

THE

Country Touch

WINTER 2015

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photo by Roy Gumpel

BRAD BECKERMAN + ZACHARY LEWIS + BENJAMIN GIARDULLO FOOD ENTREPRENEURS Uptown Kingston could hardly be described as a food desert, with a farmers’ market, farm stands, supermarket, and several restaurants, but things are about to take yet another quantum leap with the renovation of the historic Woolworth’s building on Wall Street, built around 1930, into an as-yet-unnamed food center slated to open in September 2016. The 9,000-square-foot organic/local grocery store and 6,000-square-foot food hall will be “much like Grand Central Market in Los Angeles, with eight to 12 vendors in it,” says Zachary Lewis, one of the trio that’s putting the venture together. “There will be 17,000 square feet of food manufacturing space in the basement for the production of our own items that will be available as commissary, and commercial kitchen space that can be rented by individuals who are looking to grow their own food companies.” The main floor will be an open space, allowing shoppers to view the whole bustling layout, which will include a café and event space for culinary and food systems classes, tastings, and demonstrations. Lewis, originally from Westchester, met native Manhattan entrepreneur Bradford Beckerman while working on various projects in New York City, and their friendship grew around their shared “mad love,” says Lewis, for people, community, progressive ethics, and great, healthy food. When the two met Rosendale-raised Benjamin Giardullo, who’s the distribution manager for Hudson Valley Harvest, the principal and founder of Hudson Valley Market LLC, and the backer for Brooklyn Bullion and Sovereign Cider, the entrepreneurial trio decided to form a venture together. But first, Lewis moved from New York to New Paltz (he’s now relocating to Germantown), and Beckerman began dividing his time between a house in Kingston and his farm in Colorado. Giardullo lives in Beacon, where Lewis and Beckerman met him while researching business ventures—their asking the locals what

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they felt was missing led them to fresh local food, which in turn led them to Giardullo. And once the Kingston venture is up and running, a mixed-use project in Beacon is next. “We’ve already purchased a building in Beacon and are set to begin construction,” says Beckerman. “We’re hoping to open the Beacon location in spring 2017. It’s our intention to get to Hudson eventually, but we want to be meticulous in how fast we grow. We also have expansion plans beyond the Hudson Valley. “ Kingston, though, will be the flagship of this food foray. “Housing is still affordable [there], and people want fresh local organic good food in the kind of setting we are building—the people I meet and talk to about this project are open-arms excited,” says Beckerman. “This feels ready to happen.”  “Kingston is a fast-growing city,” says Lewis, “drawing not just young weekenders, but progressive New York City transplants who believe in localism and are adding a cosmopolitan vibe. Uptown Kingston has become a food hub filled with exceptional restaurants: Duo Bistro, Boitson’s, Diego’s, cafés like Outdated and Sissy’s, and a nightlife built around Frogmore Tavern, Stockade Tavern, which Esquire magazine rated as the fifth-best bar in America, and Backstage Studio Productions for concerts. Add the growth of the Rondout area downtown, where restaurants like Molé Molé and Dolce are, and you see the reemergence of Kingston. And the Woolworth’s building was the heart of the city from the time it originally opened.”—Anne Pyburn Craig

WE E K AT S UI N MNOVATION. M E R 2 0 1 5 N EW CONTE NT EVE RY14

upstater.com/innovators


... a winter wonderland. Luxury Resorts, Lodges, Inns, Skiing, Skating, X-Country Trails, Snow Tubing, Snow Boarding, Restaurants, Museums, Galleries, Shopping and more... you'll see it all in Ulster County, NY.

Hudson Valley/Catskill Regions

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OBJECTIFIED

S T O RY B Y P E T E R D . M A RT I N / I L L U S T R AT I O N & I N F O G R A P H I C S B Y J A S O N C R I N G

FREEDOM FROM SUPPRESSION:

FINGERLESS GLOVES Blessed be that intrepid innovator who first selectively severed the common glove, unfettering our thumbs and fingers to flourish in the open air. Lauded are those early Dickensian adopters, who declared fingerless gloves’ utility as they swept chimneys, or made such defiant statements as “Please, sir, I want some more!” Thanks to these handheld devices of fashion—available in leather, lace, felt, fleece, faux fur, Spandex, and plain old wool—never will our species be forced to choose between having warm hands OR posting to our preferred social media! Nor must we impotently rub our hands together to continue writing code, a novel, or a blog post in our underheated loft apartments! And nevermore shall we be burdened by the constant removal and replacement 16 upstater

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of our gloves as we rush in and out the doors of our charming country homes—chopping wood, building a fire, making art, pouring a drink, cooking dinner, walking the dog, watching a movie, and tossing salt on the front steps before the next snowstorm arrives sometime before dawn tomorrow. Ever the equalizers, fingerless gloves are brandished brazenly by the tragically hip, the nicotine inclined, the stalwart multitaskers, the commuters doomed to long periods behind the wheel in bad weather, the possibly arthritic, and the dwellers of drafty homes alike—providing a potent point of reference to cumulate these contrastive communities. Shiverers of the world, unite, and place function firmly over form! Unencumber thine digits, and spurn winter’s cruel incursions against our dexterity!


FINGERLESS GLOVES THROUGH THE AGES 500

TH E A G E O F A NTI Q U IT Y / P H I L O S O P HY / B L O O DY B A R B A R I A N I S M (323 BCE – 28 5 CE) 0

Carrying the torch from Greek boxers, who wrapped their hands and wrists in leather straps, Roman boxers modified the handwear by adding a metal insert, forming a glove known as a caestus.

500

TH E T YR A N N I C A L R E I G N O F FINGERED GLOVES (28 6 – 10 9 9)

This era was marked by large bonfires at which the full-fingered-gloved hordes burned anything that contradicted their plenary ideals. Fingers would not see the light of day again for nearly a millennium. 1000

TH E A G E O F P E T TI C O ATS (1100 – 18 5 0)

TH E I N F O R M ATI O N B O O M (18 51 – present)

1500

2000

Fingerless gloves gracefully re-entered the world by way of tea parties and formal portrait sittings. Dignified hand gestures nearly overtook speech as the preferred mode of communication.

Advances in technology have ushered in a new age of information. With one fingerless-gloved swipe, the world is at one’s fingertips.

CASE STUDIES

The Woodstocker

The Outlaw

The Fashionista

Hand-sewn, organic fibers hang loosely together on the hands in the carefree afterglow of a morning pottery class.

In defiance of societal conventions, bornto-be-wild fingers tightly grip to the throttle, unshackled by leather, or man.

Fearlessly walking the tightrope between vulgar and avant-garde, faux doeskin hand-wear pairs effortlessly with a faux-fur Russian cossack hat. WINTER 2015

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photo by Fionn Reilly

MESHELL NDEGEOCELLO MUSICIAN HOMETOWN: Washington, D.C. LIVES IN: Hudson MOVED FROM: New York City LIVED IN HUDSON VALLEY SINCE: 2007 Meshell Ndegeocello (Swahili for “free as a bird”) was born Michelle Johnson in 1968 in Germany. Two years later, her father, an Army lieutenant, was restationed to Washington, D.C. A fan of jazz. blues, country, and bluegrass, he duly exposed his family to all those genres. Ndegeocello’s interest in bass guitar came when she picked up the instrument that one of her guitar-playing brother’s friends had left behind. “I loved being able to jam with my brother,” she says. Meanwhile, 1980s Washington was the thriving center of go-go, a subgenre of funk. By age 20, Ndegeocello had played in three of the scene’s leading bands. After moving to New York in 1987, Ndegeocello tried out for the bass slot in Living Color and participated in the band’s Black Rock Coalition. Madonna saw her performing solo at smaller Lower East Side venues, singing her own soul-baring, R&B-based songs, accompanying herself on bass, keyboard, and drum machine, and signed her up for the Maverick Records imprint. Plantation Lullabies, Ndegeocello’s 1993 debut, a flow of funky soul, hip-hop, and dance pop, snagged the first three of her 10 Grammy nominations and bore the hit single, “If That’s Your Boyfriend (He Wasn’t Last Night).” In 1994 a music journalist friend introduced her to Midwestern singer-songwriter John Mellencamp. They immediately hit it off musically. “We just played and recorded live in the studio, and it was great,” she says. One recording, a cobilled cover of Van Morrison’s “Wild Night,” was an MTV hit, taking Ndegeocello into the mainstream, which made her head spin. “I’ve always trusted that [music] is my path,” she says. “Not to sound contrived, but after a while it was, like, ‘Look, what else do you want from me?’ I was having to give up a lot of myself.”

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She stepped off the roller coaster for a spell, reemerging in 1996 with the slinky grooves of Peace beyond Passion, followed by Bitter (1999), a beautiful, bleak breakup set, and the feverishly funky Cookie: The Anthropological Mixtape (2002). The steamy, psychedelic soul grooves of Comfort Woman (2003) might’ve made Barry White blush. Ndegeocello’s most recent recordings—Comet, Come to Me (2014), Pour une Âme Souveraine: Dedicated to Nina Simone (2013), Weather (2011), and Devil’s Halo (2009)—form a quadrilogy in which Ndegeocello strips her sound down, getting subdued and cool. Although Ndegeocello performs abroad, frequently in France, since moving to Hudson with her partner and son she’s become an active member of Hudson’s musical community, working with Vetiver drummer Otto Hauser, singer-songwriter Joseph Moore, and notorious noise band the Bunnybrains. Ndegeocello also oversees studio projects by select up-and-comers like Jason Moran and Ruthie Foster. But lately, Ndegeocello has been making music without her bass guitar. She recently joined in a housing benefit concert via laptop with her Hudson neighbors Melissa Auf der Maur and Rasputina’s Melora Creager, and accompanies herself on piano at local open mikes. “I’m in a new place now,” Ndegeocello says. “They say when you stop giving people what they want, they stop wanting you. And I understand why that is. But at the same time, when I feel like people just want the same thing from me again, I become disinterested and do something else. I’m like, ‘Yeah, that’s right, I’m changing. And guess what? I’m gonna change again.’”— Peter Aaron

CREATIVE CLASS. NEW CONTENT EVERY 18 WEEK AT

upstater.com/arts


Healthy living doesn’t need to be hard Sometimes all you need is an

ally and a plan jen i wrightson

Certified Holistic Health Coach

www.jeniwrightson.com

MAKING THE RIGHT MOVE HAPPEN FOR YOU IN THE HUDSON VALLEY Specializing in Ulster & Dutchess counties: Woodstock, New Paltz, Kingston, Stone Ridge, Rhinebeck, Red Hook, Millbrook and beyond

l et m e hel p you Find your purpose / Achieve your goals / Reduce stress Create a balanced relationship with food

“ Hayes was my go-to guy throughout my Hudson Valley house hunt, intuiting very quickly my tastes and preferences, and finding my family a wonderful home that fulfills a long list of my dreams. I’ll be forever thankful to him. ” —A.R. LORENZO, NYC & ULSTER COUNTY

HAYES CLEMENT Licensed Real Estate Salesperson

917-568-5226 M | Hayes@westwoodrealty.com HayesClement.com | Follow me on Facebook WESTWOOD METES & BOUNDS REALTY, LTD. 3927 Main Street, Stone Ridge, NY 12484

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FOOD + DRINK

S T O RY B Y B R A D L E Y H AW K S

photo by Roy Gumpel

Cut Brooklyn sources wood for its artisanal knife handles from Warwick- and Kingston-based New York Heartwoods.

IT TAKES A

VILLAGE

New York City has long depended upon the Hudson Valley for sustenance in ways that aren’t always obvious to New Yorkers. Foremost is the water that’s piped down from Ashokan Reservoir, at the foot of the Catskill Mountains. And it’s no coincidence that New York is nicknamed the Big Apple—that moniker came from the vast orchards of imported apple trees that were planted some 300 years ago by the Huguenot settler Louis DeBois, who helped found New Paltz and established a family farm in then-fledgling Flushing. Throughout the 19th century, New York’s hotels, restaurants, and wealthier residents kept their food and dairy products chilled in ice boxes courtesy of ice blocks that were cut from the frozen Hudson River each winter, stored in icehouses throughout the valley, and delivered to the city via train. Today, so much fresh produce and other foods are transported from upstate 20 upstater

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to the city that the state has established the Hudson River Foodway Corridor, an energy-efficient, intermodal transportation route utilizing barges and trains. It’s been nearly 40 years since Alice Waters began listing on Chez Panisse’s menu the names of the farms from which she procured her ingredients—a gesture that set the food industry abuzz with the farm-to-table philosophies and locavore sensibilities and helped fuel the current national conversation about the sourcing of our food. So it seems like it’s about time we heighten our awareness of the vast but often unseen connections between apple country and the Big Apple. After all, the Hudson Valley does more than feed our hungry bellies. It also subtly shapes our culture.


Chelsea Market is home to the Chelsea Creamline, which offers classic dairy treats exclusively from Ronnybrook Farm in Ancramdale.

Claire Gallagher and Chris Williams of Rock and Snow.

“Milk at its finest quality should be nearby...”

A CUT ABOVE

MILKING IT

Joel Bukiewicz, owner of the cutlery Cut Brooklyn, works hand in hand with New York Heartwoods, a Warwick- and Kingston-based sawmill and showroom, to make one-of-a-kind chef ’s knives of unsurpassed artisanal quality. New York Heartwoods owner Megan Offner sources and mills high-quality wood that’s dumped from construction sites or from diseased or dead trees, which would otherwise be headed to a landfill. “A lot of guys in my world,” explains Bukiewicz, “use exotic woods that take eons to grow and come from faraway places under who-knows-what circumstances. But with Megan, I’m able to use local wood sourced from downed trees. She saves all the gnarly cut-off parts for me, and consistently sends me the most beautiful wood I’ve ever seen.” Bukiewicz utilizes the wood to craft handles for his carbon steel blades, held in place with brass, steel, and copper mosaic pins, which he sells at his store in Brooklyn and his barn workshop in Durham. “I never knew, before Megan,” he continues, “how varied and gorgeous maple can be—the figures and shades are endless. She’s the best. The pieces I make are better because of Megan, simple as that.” Cut Brooklyn’s product range includes journeyman (all-rounder), prospect (chef’s), butcher, boning, and filleting knives priced from $350 to $650 each.

Having New York City as its primary market has been a key factor in the success of Ronnybrook Farm Dairy. Any New Yorker who visits Eataly, Whole Foods, or nearly any New York City green market is familiar with Ronnybrook’s logo: two cows showcased within a vertical white oval, which appears on the company’s artisanal-quality milk, yogurt, ice cream, and butter, not to mention the best eggnog ever to be had. “Milk at its finest quality should be nearby its consumers,” says Kate Osofsky, a third-generation member of the Osofsky family, owners and operators of the farm in Ancramdale, near the city of Hudson in Columbia County. “This way it does not need to be overly processed to travel long distances.” Over 42 New York City markets offer Ronnybrook products, with more than 100 restaurants obtaining Ronnybrook ingredients at those markets weekly. Last October, the Chelsea Creamline opened its doors in Chelsea Market, featuring a dairy counter that offers ice cream, milk, and dairy exclusively from Ronnybrook Farm. Its lunchtime classics include grilled-cheese fingers dipped in tomato soup and an all-American cheeseburger, along with chasers like ice cream sundaes, milkshakes, and old-fashioned egg creams—all of which came from an under-two-hours drive up the Taconic State Parkway.

CUT BROOKLYN / 461 Third Avenue, Brooklyn / (646) 247-9955 / CutBrooklyn.com NEW YORK HEARTWOODS / Tech City, 300 Enterprise Drive, Kingston / (845) 853-8339 / NewYorkHeartwoods.com

CHELSEA CREAMLINE / Chelsea Market (halfway along north side), 75 Ninth Avenue, Manhattan / (646) 410-2040 / CreamlineNYC.com RONNYBROOK FARM / 310 Prospect Hill Road, Ancramdale / (518) 398-6455 / Ronnybrook.com WINTER 2015

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The very limestone that built this city of skyscrapers is now the basis for one of the region’s finest whiskeys.

SOMETHING ABOUT THE WATER New York City-based inventor and aerospace engineer Daniel Prieto Preston is also a food and drink artisan. His chocolatier venture, Cacao Prieto in Brooklyn, provides fine chocolates using cacao and sugar from his family’s century-old farm in the Dominican Republic. Meanwhile, at Widow Jane Distillery, on the same premises, the straight bourbon whiskey shimmers with a rare water from the Hudson Valley. That pristine water is sourced directly from the caves of the Widow Jane Mine at the A.J. Snyder Estate in Rosendale, a tiny village in Ulster County that supplied the limestone cement for the Brooklyn Bridge, Miss Liberty’s 27,000-ton pedestal, and the Empire State Building. So the very limestone that built this city of skyscrapers is now the basis for one of the region’s finest whiskeys. Apparently, in terms of beneficial minerals, the limestone found in Rosendale surpasses that which is found in Kentucky. Cacao Prieto’s Diana Marano elaborates: “The main component of the limestone water is that it is rich in magnesium and calcium. The magnesium in the limestone reacts with the fatty esters and tannins in the whiskey to actually rearrange its chemical makeup.”

WIDOW JANE DISTILLERY / 214 Conover Street, Brooklyn / (347) 225-0130 / WidowJane.com

The tasting area at the Widow Jane Distillery in Red Hook, Brooklyn. Photo provided.

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Limestone-rich water from the Widow Jane Mine in Rosendale is what sets apart the whiskey at Widow Jane Distillery in Brooklyn. Photo provided.


farmhouse cuisine · killer cocktails · nightly bonfire 8373 State Route 28, Big Indian, NY (845) 254-6500 www.peekamooserestaurant.com

Authentic Barbecue & Comfort Food with a Modern Twist OleSavannah.com | 845-331-4283 Historic Rondout Waterfront Dining

“Each piece of artwork is going its own way; it’s our job to help it get there” -Johnathan Talbot - Artist - Class of ‘57 Students experience a challenging curriculum within a diverse community, dedicated to nurturing the spirit, the scholar, the artist and the athlete in each person. oakwoodfriends.org

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While the Fat Radish is quintessentially New York City in its hipstervore clientele, its menu depends upon 24 Hudson Valley farms and small businesses.

The eggs for the Fat Radish’s Scotch eggs with seeded mustard and cornichons are sourced from Garden of Spices Poultry Farm in Greenwich, New York.

PUB GRUB When the Fat Radish opened in a former sausage factory on a relatively obscure Lower East Side street in late 2010, most critics wondered whether it would be hampered by its location. But being off the beaten path hasn’t stopped this restaurant—a spinoff of A-list events and catering company Silkstone Events— from attracting a devoted following. A self-proclaimed “seasonal British” eatery, the Fat Radish’s white-washed brick walls, oversize mirror, candles everywhere, and scattered skylights make the space as rustic and delightful as very good pub happened upon in the midst of England’s downs on a sunny day. And Fat Radish’s space isn’t the only aspect that’s lighter than expected: Its fare, which is traditional British with more than a few twists, is delightfully flavorful, without the heaviness usually associated with pub fare. Though the menu changes according to what’s available, think: avocado toast with spicy soft-boiled eggs; Caesar salad with anchovies, bacon, and eggs; and duck-fat-fried chips with a classic cheeseburger—all of which have won rave reviews. But while the Fat Radish is quintessentially New York City in its hipstervore clientele, its menu depends upon 24 farms and small businesses located throughout New Jersey and New York State, 11 of which are in the Hudson Valley, namely: Beth’s Farm Kitchen in Stuyvesant Falls (jams and chutneys); Old Chatham Sheepherding Company (award-winning Black Sheep cheeses and yogurts); and Hudson Valley Fresh in Poughkeepsie (dairy). Produce comes from Windfall Farms in Montgomery, Garden of Spices in Greenwich, Hudson Valley Organic in Warwarsing, Paffenroth Farms in Warwick, John D. Madura Farms in Pine Island, Berried Treasures in Roscoe, and Migliorelli Farms in Tivoli.

THE FAT RADISH / 17 Orchard Street, Manhattan / (212) 300-4053 / TheFatRadishNYC.com

HUNGRY FOR MORE? NEW CONTENT EVERY WEEK AT Fat Radish’s charming pub-style white-washed brick-walled dining room.

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upstater.com/food–drink


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u

FOOD + DRINK

S T O RY B Y P E T E R D . M A RT I N / P H O T O S B Y M AT T P E T R I C O N E

WELCOME TO THE

BEERHOOD Those who brew together, stick together.

The numbers don’t lie:

New Yorkers love craft beer. Since 2011, the number of microbreweries has tripled statewide from 51 to over 200. The Farm Brewery Act in 2012 helped fuel the massive increase, with one of the most significant concentrations being in the Hudson Valley. The region is fast making a name for itself as a craft beer destination, with its closeknit community setting its beer apart. Simply put, says John Kelly, owner of The Hop in Beacon, “We have an abnormally high proportion of places that make really good beer.” 26 upstater

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A weekend afternoon crowd at Newburgh Brewery.


“Let’s work together to stick it to the man.”

Matthew Levy, Peekskill Brewery’s master brewer, at work on a batch.

“There’s a lot of growth,” says Paul Leone, executive director of the New York State Brewers Association. “And in the Hudson Valley region, brewers have really come together and are working with one another.” Tim Adams, owner of Cave Mountain Brewing Company in Windham, calls it a “brotherhood” of brewers who happily support each other. For instance, Newburgh Brewery swaps equipment and ingredients with 2 Way Brewing Company, which does the same with North River Hops and Brewing, an ale brewer and retailer in Wappingers Falls. And Keegan Ales’ Tommy Keegan says he once borrowed equipment from Captain Lawrence Brewing Company in Elmsford for such a long time that he ended up buying it. So, why all the camaraderie? Hudson Valley brewers see themselves not as competitors but as neighbors teaming up to put the region on the map. “It’s always been us against them—‘them’ being macrobrewers,” says Joe Vicidomini, vice president of Hudson Valley Craft Beer Week, a weeklong event held annually in September. “The craft brewer mentality is something like, ‘I want to make a great product, those guys over there want to make a great product. Let’s work together to stick it to the man.’” Local brewers even collaborate on beers like the cheekily dubbed Too Many Cooks IPA, brewed at Crossroads Brewing in Athens last spring by 12 Hudson Valley brewers (including Keegan Ales, Peekskill Brewery, Newburgh Brewing Company, and Cave Mountain Brewing Company). Here are nine of the many pilgrimage-worthy destinations helping define the Hudson Valley’s craft beer culture. WINTER 2015

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2 WAY BREWING COMPANY This Beacon brewer takes local to the next level. 2 Way’s Confusion beer is brewed with a proprietary yeast strain isolated from blackberries grown just across the river in Newburgh. This brew pub’s stainless steel brewing equipment is showcased by its industrial, pared-down space, making the focus on the beer very clear. Owner Mike O’Herron’s brewing process is pretty straightforward: “I think of something that I want to drink, and then I make it,” he says. To develop the special strain, which he describes as “actually very Belgian, with characteristic banana notes and a fruit-forward flavor profile,” he set up a makeshift lab in a spare bedroom. Balance is the most important factor in O’Herron’s brews, and standard-bearers like Revolution Red are no exception. The red ale is “designed for those who aren’t looking for sensory overload,” says O’Herron, and provides a malty counterbalance to the Willamette and East Kent Golding hops.

“I think of something that I want to drink, and then I make it.”

18 West Main Street, Beacon / (845) 202-7334 / 2WayBrewingCompany.com

NEWBURGH BREWING COMPANY After several years at Brooklyn Brewery, Christopher Basso joined Paul Halayko to open Newburgh Brewing Company in their hometown. Halayko is glad to be back. “There’s an allure to being a part of Newburgh’s resurgence, to being a part of that community,” he says. Located a few blocks from the Newburgh waterfront, the brewery is housed in an old brick factory building and features German-style communal seating, lots of board games, and, of course, great beer. The Newburgh Brown Ale, for the money, can hold its own against any other brown ale in the country—it’s really that good. And at only 4.2 percent alcohol, there’s no need to feel too guilty about having another one. Bonus!

Two Way’s current flight of beers.

88 South Colden Street, Newburgh / (845) 569-2337 / NewburghBrewing.com

CAPT. LAWRENCE BREWING COMPANY Owner Scott Vaccaro opened Captain Lawrence in 2005, following a dream that began in high school when he was “absolutely blown away by the idea that beer, the stuff that was the objective of many a covert mission to the local convenience store, could be brewed at home.” The brewery has made a name for itself with beers that have a characteristically American bent, like Freschchester Pale Ale. The tasting room is a destination in itself, with its laid-back atmosphere and full view of the adjacent brewing space, filled with towering vats of the good stuff. And Captain Lawrence always has something fun and unusual going on, like Stretchin’ and Belchin’ Yoga Class, a salubrious union of yoga and beer tasting that inarguably tops any contender for best embodiment of Hudson Valley culture.

444 Saw Mill River Road, Elmsford / (914)741- 2337 / CaptainLawrenceBrewing.com

CAVE MOUNTAIN BREWING COMPANY “There’s a huge camaraderie among brewers here,” says Tim Adams, owner and chef of Cave Mountain Brewing Company in the Catskill Mountains. Getting there is half the fun, with an idyllic drive through the high country to this cozy, red-painted space with wooden accents. While Cave Mountain’s operations aren’t as large as other local brewers’, Adams sees that as an asset. Doing beer in small, hand-crafted batches, he says, allows “a lot of artistic license and flexibility.” Check out this season’s Scotch Ale, steeped with mulling spices, and pair it with one of Cave Mountain’s award-winning burgers.

5359 Route 23, Windham / (518)734-9222 / CaveMountainBrewing.com

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Bros brewing out at Mill House Brewing Company.


H U D S O N VA L L E Y W I N E S

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Open year-round: Friday - Sunday 11am-6pm 10 Ann Kaley Lane, Marlboro, NY 845 236 7620

GUESTROOMS * BRUNCH * LUNCH * DINNER

CELEBRATING HUDSON VALLEY FOOD, FARMS, & BEER 10N Chestnut Street, Beacon

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invites you to experience our spirits. Tours, Tastings, and Cocktails Fri-Saturday, 12-7pm; Sunday, 12-6pm Contact us for your next private event

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845.485.BREW 289 MILL STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE

WWW.MillHouseBrewing.com WINTER 2015

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PEEKSKILL BREWERY In 2013 Peekskill Brewery relocated to a newly built four-story monument to great beer just a short walk from the Metro-North station. Its lower-alcohol-by-volume Peekskill Sour, which is highly sessionable (in brewers’ parlance, that means the capacity to be consumed at the rate of about one beer per hour) helped put this place on the map. But Peekskill Brewery is becoming equally famous for its food, including its pork belly BLT, accompanied by fried avocado and Sriracha mayo. Try it with the Wakeup Call, a coffee-pale ale featuring Ahtanum hops and Colombian coffee beans from Coffee Lab Roasters in neighboring Tarrytown.

47-53 Water Street, Peekskill / (914)734-2337 / PeekskillBrewery.com

This Manhattan couple took time out from touring Peekskill with a flight at Peekskill Brewery.

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Mill House Brewing Company grows its hops right on its own grounds.

Mill House Brewery proprietor and brew master Jamie Bishop at work.

MILL HOUSE BREWING COMPANY

KEEGAN ALES

As Poughkeepsie’s premier brewpub since 2013, Mill House Brewing Company brew masters Jamie Bishop and Larry Stock, along with brothers Chris and Daniel Crocco, have established a destination for lovers of great beer and great food alike in their masterfully renovated 1836 historic building. The new design showcases historic details. One look at the massive bar looping around sloping brick archways proves their hard work paid off. The menu includes local ingredients and house-made brews. Check out Mill House’s fish and chips, which are battered with Alpha Ale, a hoppy red ale balanced out with a strong malt backbone. But the best brew to try is arguably the amazingly rich and smooth Velvet Panda Stout.

Keegan Ales was founded in 2003 thanks to owner Tommy Keegan’s need to build “a clubhouse that I would want to hang out in.” Today, Keegan’s beers are distributed from Washington, D.C., to the Canadian border. Keegan’s unpretentious atmosphere makes it a great place to kick back, and there’s always a good chance of running into Keegan and his brewers, who like to meet their customers. Keegan’s renowned Mother’s Milk Stout retains a hint of sharpness to bring its deep, rich character into stark relief. Keegan also offers enticing draft combinations born of clandestine experiments in the taproom. For instance, mixing Old Capitol (a flavorful blonde ale) with Mother’s Milk is called an “Old Mother,” while adding Old Capitol to Hurricane Kitty (considered the definitive Hudson Valley IPA) is dubbed “Florida.” Keegan packages the combos in a Chemistry Set gift box—a 12-pack featuring its four most popular beers, ready for mixing.

289 Mill Street, Poughkeepsie / (845) 485-2739 / MillHouseBrewing.com

ROUGH CUT Rough Cut opened last June in Kerhonkson, but is already making a splash. While its rustic décor suits its off-the-beaten path location, Rough Cut’s decadent beers and local cuisine make it a destination it its own right. Its ambitious tap program features rye-based Mortise & Tenon Belgian Double; Roseability BPA, brewed fresh with rose petals; and Pomme D’Orange Belgian Tripel, brewed with orange blossom honey. The menu offers hyper-local pairings like lamb from Vly Farm in Stone Ridge and a rib-eye with a green peppercorn and brandy cream sauce. Chef Bart Cummings says his goal is to ensure that Rough Cut “is a place where people go to indulge.”

5945 Rte. 44-55, Kerhonkson / (845)626-9838 / RoughCutBrewing.com

HAVE A DRINK WITH US. NEW CONTENT EVERY WEEK AT

upstater.com/food–drink

20 St. James Street, Kingston / (845) 331-2739 / KeeganAles.com

THE HOP Although The Hop in Beacon only brews occasionally, it’s practically a church for craft brew fans, offering over 200 bottles and a regular rotation of 16 drafts, and hosting pilgrimage-worthy events. Last spring, for example, co-owners Matt Hutchins, Chris Kavanagh, and John Kelly paired 16 expertly curated taps with some of the Hudson Valley’s best local cuisine, and opened a separate room for hard-to-find retail beers. Then there’s the food. The Hop’s regular menu of smallplate, artisanal fare showcases local produce and grass-fed meats from Hemlock Hill Farm in Cortlandt Manor. Because he’s constantly being asked, “What’s really local?” Kelly stocks up on beer from locals like Crossroads and 2 Way, and brews collaboratively. The Hop’s most recent creation, with Rushing Duck Brewery in Chester, was Gimme Samoa That, a milky brown ale brewed with cocoa and toasted coconut, mimicking the flavors of the famous Girl Scout Cookie. This coming spring, The Hop’s longtime bar manager John-Anthony Gargiulo is set to open Hudson Valley Brewery in an 18,000-square-foot decommissioned factory in Beacon. If the new brewery is on par with The Hop, it’ll definitely be a game changer.

554 Main Street, Beacon / (845)440-8676 / TheHopBeacon.com

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FOR THE LOVE OF PEEKSKILL WHERE LOVERS OF FOOD, HISTORY, ART, ENTERTAINMENT & CULTURE GATHER.

EXPLORE DOWNTOWN PEEKSKILL WHERE CITY MEETS UPSTATE— FOR EVENTS, RESTAURANTS & MORE, VISIT: http://tinyurl.com/DTP-upstater

PAID FOR BY THE PEEKSKILL BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT

GIVE US THE BUSINESS, YOUR BUSINESS!

DOWNTOWN PEEKSKILL SHOPS Arthur Weeks Jewelers Bruised Apple Books Division Street Guitars DJV Jewelry Driftwood Gallery Fabric La Ideal Field Library Bookstore Flat Iron Gallery Herj’s Miscellaneous Express

Jeans Town Maria Tallerico Interiors Past & Present Party Decorations Patricio Records The Coop The Fern Tree Variedades Veronica Winzig Art Studio Quirkshop

To locate your business here, contact:

PEEKSKILL BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT

914-737-2780 peekskillbid1@gmail.com

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photo by Roy Gumpel

KALE KAPOSHILIN TECHNOLOGY INNOVATOR / COMMUNITY BUILDER HOMETOWN: Burlington, Vermont LIVES AND WORKS IN: Kingston MOVED HERE FROM: Vermont HUDSON VALLEY RESIDENT SINCE: 1995 BEST INGREDIENTS FOR INNOVATION AND COMMUNITY: “You get people together in a place like this [CatskillsConf], get them drinking some Keegan Ales and eating some local grass-fed meat, they come up with a new idea, and six months later they’ve created a new company around it, doing what they love and making the world a better place.” Community is a self-sustaining enterprise requiring people to do whatever work is necessary, day after day, to create the kind of world they wish to live in. That being said, if you’re one of the many people who’ve flocked to Ulster County to become immersed in that community, you probably owe Kale Kaposhilin a beer. Kaposhilin arrived in the Hudson Valley as a Bard College student, but after graduation, he was loathe to leave. “I didn’t want to ‘work for the man,’” he says. “We had a great community of artists here, and we wanted to do our own thing.” So he and his friends began building studios and providing resources for artists. A few years later, Kaposhilin met some younger Bard graduates doing the same thing. “We had both made a difference—we had both built studios, and we both had crews of artists as our friends,” he recalls. “So we moved to Kingston and went into business together as Evolving Media Network [EMN]. It was literally a network of media professionals who had all learned how to do business by working together, and wanted to further their own creative careers.” The EMN team has done pretty much everything digital—building websites, creating apps, producing videos, cranking out code—as well as producing live events. The firm’s diversity and drive mirrors that of Kaposhilin, who is also technical director for the O+ Festival and

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the Ashokan Center’s biannual Hoot Festival, and a board member for business booster ReThink Local. Last fall, he also organized the Ashokan Center’s first annual CatskillsConf, which he calls “a mashup of the creative lifestyle of the Hudson Valley, the educational work that has always happened at the Ashokan Center, and the technology community. So if you’re an innovator, creator, technologist, or artist, we consider all of those things to really be the same thing.” Hudson Valley Tech Meetups are yet another community-building initiative that Kaposhilin created, with gatherings in Kingston and Poughkeepsie. “So many of us work out of our homes or out of coffee shops,” he explains. “It’s a wonderful existence, but it doesn’t have a central location where people can come together and participate in something. So, at least once a month, people have a coordinated opportunity to get together. We have about 625 members signed up after only doing these for a year. It proves that there’s a really strong community up here, but right now it’s kind of invisible unless you know where to look. This gives people a place to look.” After 20 years in the Hudson Valley, Kaposhilin believes its boom is just getting started. He says he frequently meets people who have just moved here because they see the innovation taking place and realize the potential for what’s to come. “We’re flying a flag of inclusive, progressive innovation,” he says. “We want other people to come visit, as they often do, once or twice, and then think to themselves, ‘Wow, I could live here too. I’d like to help out with the YMCA garden in Kingston. I could open a business like Hops Petunia or the Brunette Wine Bar,’ or any of these awesome new places that have just opened in Kingston. The people who are coming here tend to be supportive, the kind of people who get involved. Hopefully, we can keep getting more and more of them to join the community.”—Brian PJ Cronin INNOVATORS. NEW CONTENT EVERY WEEK 34 AT

upstater.com/innovators


Admissions Open House

for high school students and families

Sunday, January 31, 2015 • 9 am Register at msmc.edu/visit or 1-888-YES-MSMC

MountSaint Saint Mary Mary College Mount College Newburgh, New York

EXCEPTIONAL

EDUCATION IN THE HEART OF THE

HUDSON VALLEY www.msmc.edu

An Education as Unique as Your Child

Nurturing living connections... early childhood through grade 12 Situated on a 400-acre Biodynamic farm in New York’s Hudson Valley, Hawthorne Valley’s integrative Waldorf curriculum helps young men and women grow academically, artistically, and socially into the creative individuals needed in today’s complex world.

Monthly Introductory Sessions for Prospective Parents. Busing available from Manhattan!

Day and Boarding Programs • Accepting Applications 518-672-7092 x 111 info@hawthornevalleyschool.org WALDORF SCHOOL | www.hawthornevalleyschool.org 330 County Route 21C, Ghent, NY 12075 | 518-672-7092 x 111

845.356.2514 www.gmws.org

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u MAP I L L U S T R A T E D B Y K I R B Y S A L VA D O R

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WINTER 2015


u

ESCAPE BROOKLYN

S T O RY A N D P H O T O S B Y E R I N L I N D S E Y / E S C A P E B R O O K LY N . C O M

COLD SPRING

ESCAPE-WORTHY

The Foundry’s famous French toast with fresh strawberries.

I

t’s no fun feeling entrapped by the city when weekends roll around. Those old-favorite brunch places, museums, and bars lose their appeal and even New York City—gasp!— sheds some of its luster. Winter weekends can feel especially oppressive: The piles of snow lining the streets become encrusted with litter and who-knows-what, and the fresh, falling snow turns to dirty slush the moment it hits the ground. If you’re over it, don’t stress. There’s an escape plan for you.

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COLD SPRING GIVEAWAY Burkelman’s mission is to “enliven the everyday”—wherever, however, and for whomever that day takes place.

ENTER TO WIN. Check page 13 for more details.

Just the right balance of small-town charm, big-city cool, and lots of fresh air. My husband and I started traveling to the Hudson Valley about four years ago, in search of fresh air and decompression. We began documenting it on the website Escape Brooklyn, writing about and photographing the best of each area we visited—including lodging, dining, drinking, and, of course, nature. Although much has changed on our website—and in the Hudson Valley—our favorite destinations remain the same. Cold Spring, just 50 miles north of New York City, is the place we recommend to people for their first trip upstate. It has just the right balance of small-town charm, bigcity cool, and lots of fresh air. In the winter, idyllic Cold Spring takes on a fairy tale

charm in the (comparatively) pristine snow, and you can cozy up at a café without a laptop in sight. The kicker? It’s only an hour away, accessible by public transit. If you’re planning your escape but wondering what to do in Cold Spring, we’ve got you covered. After a short, scenic ride up the east side of the Hudson River on Metro North, you’re dropped off right at the village’s waterfront. The Cold Spring experience begins with a short stroll up Main Street to brunch. We recommend The Foundry, famous for breakfast classics like French toast and pancakes. Once you’re all warm, fuzzy, and caffeinated, set out to explore town.

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Growler filling station

Cold Spring General Store is housed in an 1897 building and prides itself on being the kind of shop that would have existed in the village 100 years ago.

The Cold Spring General Store’s signature switchel goes down great with bourbon. Cold Spring General Store focuses on handmade and traditional American goods, from candles to soaps to apparel to moonshine.

One of our favorite ways to spend an afternoon in Cold Spring is by shopping on Main Street. Cold Spring General, which focuses on handmade and American goods for the home as well as women’s and men’s apparel, also has a little grocery, along with a growler filling station—a great amenity for craft beer-drinking locals. Don’t pass up on the store’s signature switchel (a punch of honey, vinegar, and ginger), which goes down great with bourbon. Head up the hill to Cold Spring Apothecary to stock up on the best-smelling products out there for both your medicine cabinet and your home. We love this shop’s beauty products just as much as we love the space, whose whitewashed walls are complemented by the snow outside its large windows during winter. Treat yourself by getting a facial, or warm up with one of many signature tea blends. Another gem is Old Souls, which carries supplies for the great outdoors. The homey shop is adorned with taxidermy, pennants, and vintage flags. Fashion meets function with a wide selection of highend outdoor brands like Filson and Danner, which are sold with zero hipster irony.

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Cold Spring Apothecary’s all-white decor showcases its botanical medicinal products.


Get to Know

Putnam County

Holiday Shopping in Cold Spring

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The all-red Brasserie Le Bouchon provides a warm respite on a winter’s day.

A bowl of soup at Brasserie Le Bouchon is the perfect way to end a cold day of shopping and wandering.

Last but not least, new to town and toward the top of Main Street is Burkelman, a contemporary home store and gallery. Though its eclectic, curated designer goods often come with high prices, it’s also easy to find great trinkets and small gifts that are easy on the wallet. For antiques lovers and collectors, Cold Spring is a treasure trove with no less than five antique shops, each with different specialties, all of which are worth popping into. There’s a handful of other great shops too—from Swing, a lifestyle store for kids, to the boutique-feeling Cold Spring Pet Supply. After a full afternoon shopping, take a stroll through the village’s picturesque, rambling side streets. Its quaint homes and quiet atmosphere make for a welcome respite from the crowded, noisy city. Before leaving town, head to dinner at Brasserie Le Bouchon. With its bright red walls, large booths, and candlelit tables, the restaurant is especially cozy on a cold day. Warm up once again with a cocktail and the soup du jour, or go ahead and get full—and tipsy— before returning to the train station to await your ride home.

GOT A CAR? IF NOT, CALL A TAXI! 3 DRIVE-WORTHY COLD SPRING JAUNTS • Boscobel: This stunning early 19th-century mansion in Garrison, four miles away, turns into a winter wonderland on weekends during December, with period-style holiday decorations and its gardens and grounds illuminated with candlelit paths and festive light displays. Boscobel.org •L  ittle Stony Point: An easy, one-mile loop along the Hudson River affords some of the best views in the area. Located just two miles north of Cold Spring, it’s a wonderful place to watch icebergs float down the river. LittleStonyPoint.org

PLAN YOUR WEEKEND ESCAPE. NEW CONTENT EVERY WEEK AT

upstater.com/weekending

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•M  anitoga: Design legend Russel Wright not only built a spectacular mid century modern home at Manitoga but also landscaped three trails throughout his 75-acre woodland paradise, preserved as Russel Wright Design Center in Garrison. Although the home is closed for tours in winter, the trails are lovely places to snowshoe. VisitManitoga.org


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WEEKENDER

S T O RY B Y K A N D Y H A R R I S / P O RT R A I T B Y M AT T P E T R I C O N E

In for the Long Haul

J

A KINGSTON WEEKENDERS’ LOVE STORY ames Aguiar and Mark Haldeman did what most people do when they consider buying a second home in the Hudson Valley: They talked about it. A lot.

“We would be those weekend guests, all the time, who talked about moving and getting a place and finding a place, and we never did,” explains Aguiar, the fashion director for high-end magazine publishing brand Modern Luxury. “And then, one day we decided to get a little bit more serious about it.” That was over eight years ago. All it took was falling in love with “the camper,” as Aguiar refers to the couple’s mid century modern ranch house in Uptown Kingston, to seal a deal that was already half in the making. Having spied it years before on a tour of the neighborhood, Aguiar and Haldeman, who’s the New York City regional retailing manager for clothier Paul Smith, became intrigued with the 1958 house, which resembles the coolest camping trailer ever (hence the nickname). When “the camper” finally appeared on the market in 2006, they scooped it up. “We drove down the street,” Aguiar recalls of the first sighting, “and we both looked at each other and started laughing. Intuitively, we knew that this was going to be our house.” So, like most people do, they indulged in some lofty fantasies. “Mowing the lawn was going to be our thing,” says Aguiar. “I was mowing the lawn one day, and somebody came by and said they have a service. I said, ‘Nope nope nope, we’re going to do it.’ He said, ‘That’s what they all say,’ and drove off. Two years later, we stopped mowing.”

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Purchasing the house, which was designed by William Van Benschoten, was not just the start of homeownership for Aguiar and Haldeman. It also marked the beginning of their love affair with Kingston, an affection that’s kept pace with the city’s resurgence. “At the time we moved up here, this area was quite a bit different,” says Haldeman. “It wasn’t nearly as popular as it is now.” But the couple is enjoying the metamorphosis. “It’s not that you want an area to change so the people change,” Aguiar says. “You want it to remain what drew you to it in the first place. It’s that, only better.” Both Aguiar and Haldemanwork in the fast-paced, creativity taxing fashion industry, which makes their Kingston home practically medicinal in purpose. “In our industry,” Aguiar says, “we deal with a lot of aesthetic choices, creative decisions, and lots of people. For us to come up here and relax, recharge, and put a lot of that aside, it’s very important. [Then] we go back [to the city] with more energy and enthusiasm.” Renewed energy, however, doesn’t mean that they don’t feel bummed out when they head back to Manhattan. “I manage a lot of people, and it’s my refuge, getting up here, and not having to deal with people if I don’t want to,” says Haldeman. “It’s mixed feelings going back to the city, for sure.” While they consider themselves weekenders, Aguiar and Haldeman, who also have an apartment in Park Slope, aren’t averse to making Kingston their permanent headquarters someday. “There are no nos,” says Aguiar. PLAN YOUR WEEKEND ESCAPE. NEW CONTENT EVERY WEEK AT

upstater.com/weekending


KINGSTON SNAPSHOTS

REAL ESTATE

THE TIMES THEY ARE A-CHANGIN’:

KINGSTON’S EVOLVING SECOND-HOME MARKET

I

f there’s anyone who knows the ins and outs of Kingston’s real estate market, it’s Harris Safier. For the past 38 years, the principle broker and CEO of Westwood Metes & Bounds Realty has experienced first hand Kingston’s growth from obscure Hudson Valley city to second-home mecca. After growing up in Brooklyn, Safier moved to Ulster County in 1977. He lived in Stone Ridge from 1978 to 2010, then moved to Kingston. Just a couple of years after his relocation, Kingston’s second-home market began to pick up steam. “Two realtors organized a tour of homes in Kingston for realtors from areas like Marbletown, Woodstock, and Gardiner,” Safier recalls. “The purpose was to encourage other realtors to offer Kingston as a second-home option to their clients seeking dual residency with a New York City base.”   Back then, explains Safier, second-home buyers were searching for old, rambling farmhouses on a few acres of land, far away from it all. But as buyers got hip to Kingston’s charm and historic character—and its rock-bottom property prices— they started snatching up the inventory. “Over the last few years,” says Safier, “changes in the buyer profile have brought a new vitality to the market for homes in Kingston. When you walk around Kingston these days, you see transplanted people and their babies and dogs, looking like they are thrilled to be here and a part of the scene. More and more restaurants, pubs, and ventures are popping up, not only as a result of the growing tourist traffic but also to serve the growing number of transplants who are spending most of their week living life to the fullest in and around Kingston.” But just how many transplants are starting to turn their second homes in Kingston into fulltime residences? “It is virtually impossible to cite clear statistics on the number of those who start out as primary residents and those who initially are dual residents,” Safier says. “Many start out staying at their Ulster County homes a few days of the week, and begin to increase their time here as they enjoy the lifestyle more and more,” he says. “It starts with many extending their time by getting back to the city early in the morning, rather than the night before.” So second-home owners in Kingston, be warned: When you find that you don’t mind bussing it back to the city before dawn on a Monday morning, your fate is sealed. You’re already home.—Kandy Harris WINTER 2015

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photo by Roy Gumpel

DECORA HIP-HOP ARTIST / SOCIAL ACTIVIST / URBAN FARMER HOMETOWN: None. “Newburgh is my 23rd stop. Most of [my life’s] been in Newburgh and Brooklyn, but I’ve lived in four of New York’s five boroughs, in Texas, in Puerto Rico, in Delaware County, in Warwick— all over. LIVES IN: Beacon WORKS IN: Newburgh. “Businesses used to be afraid to stay open after dark. Now we have a ward system for the council with real representation, and a great city manager, and a lot of people are dipping a toe in the water and jumping in and saying, ‘Hey! Not bad!’ I’d say there are one or two new businesses and three or four new homeowners a month. It’s getting more culturally diverse.” FAVORITE PART OF LIFE IN THE HUDSON VALLEY: “I can go from city to country in five minutes, on foot.” LEAST FAVORITE THING ABOUT UPSTATE: “The cold. A Virginia climate would work. When water starts freezing, that’s too much.” “Travel gives you an old soul,” says Decora Sandiford. He should know—he’s been on the move and writing about it since he was 13. Today, he’s renowned for both his art and his activism, and he and his longtime partner, Jennifer Loeb, are parents of a son, Samson, born in 2012. But he found his life’s path in 2001, at an open mike night at his alma mater, Orange County Community College. There, he met some boon companions, and founded the ReadNex Poetry Squad. In 2008, the quintet toured 40 cities, released an album, Social Issue (followed by The Day before Sound in 2010), and launched “Hip Hop and Poetry Saved My Life,” a youth workshop targeting multiple intelligences via multi-arts education. Today, the workshop is taught at 87 schools across the U.S. and abroad, and ReadNex’s five members consider one another family. In 2009, ReadNex played the Great Hudson River Revival, aka the Clearwater Festival, with the late Pete Seeger’s grandson, Tao. “Teaching hip-hop workshops, we hit around 100 schools in three years [as]

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the education departments of both New York State and Washington, D.C., and lots of organizations picked it up,” Decora recalls. “One was Clearwater. I started talking with Pete Seeger—he didn’t have an entourage. We just hung around the office. So did Tao. Which was how we got to be the first hip-hop act, maybe the only one yet, to perform at the Clearwater Festival.” Though Decora’s social activism is focused, he doesn’t “necessarily aim for particular targets.” He explains: “Artists are nothing more than vessels given a message to put out to the world; people will interpret a song in different ways, depending on what they need at the time.” Decora’s first solo album, Bread and Oats, came out last spring; his track “Flowers” updates in rap Seeger’s classic folksong—“Where Have All the Flowers Gone?”—and pays homage to Seeger, who died in January 2014. The album has won kudos. “Decora has set a monumental task before himself … but he does it remarkably,” writes Nathan Leigh in Afropunk magazine. “Definitely check this one out.” But music isn’t Decora’s only social change method. In 2008, he founded the Urban Farmers League to grow organic produce for Newburgh’s low-income residents. The organization has since become part of Cornell Cooperative Extension’s agricultural programing, and Decora has founded three Newburgh farms, prompting Hudson Valley magazine to include him on its “People to Watch” list in 2012. Watch, hell. Decora wants us to dance. “I stumble on the humble / So the audience can get intimate / I want people to catch this / Like a cold on a business trip,” he writes on IAmDecora.com.—Anne Pyburn Craig CREATIVE CLASS. NEW CONTENT EVERY WEEK 46 AT

upstater.com/arts


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WEDDINGS

S T O RY B Y A M A N DA B L A C K / P H O T O S B Y H I L L A RY H A RV E Y & J E S S E T U R N Q U I S T

Saddle Up! HOW TO SAY “I DO” TO A HUDSON VALLEY BARN WEDDING

There’s something very romantic about saying “I do” in a barn. Lisa and Tom enjoy their first dance as newlyweds at Owl's Hoot Barn in Coxsackie. Photo by Hillary Harvey.

The exposed wooden rafters, the sunlight peeking through the wooden slats, that rich, old musky smell that you couldn’t duplicate if you tried—it’s all there. Brides love barn weddings because they can be as rustic or as elegant as you want, says Karin Hlywiak, owner of Kingston-based Cinderella for a Day. Barns allow couples tremendous room for customization. Favor a backyard barbecue or a sit-down dinner? Either will work in a barn venue. After the music’s over, light a bonfire and roast marshmallows. Hlywiak once arranged an outdoor lounge area, complete with a projector screen, to create a drive-in theater vibe, so guests could watch movies late into the night. Although some barns’ décor includes antique cars or tractors, there’s no precious art to worry about, like at a museum venue, or a ballroom floor to avoid scratching up. “Guests relax and have fun,” says Daniel Giessinger, co-owner of Shadow Lawn in High Falls. “The setting shakes off a formality that people expect at a wedding, and that makes for a great party.”

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Natural floral arrangements at the Art Barn at the Hill in Hudson. Photo by Jesse Turnquist

Photography: Barn weddings offer amazing

Guests mingle at a post-reception bonfire at the Art Barn at the Hill in Hudson. Photo by Hillary Harvey.

photo opportunities, but weather plays a big role in making those shots unforgettable. Sure, rain can put a damper on things, but so can heat. So if you’re planning on getting hitched during the hottest part of the summer, don’t hesitate to ask about alternative locations for photo opportunities just in case the lawn isn’t at its greenest.

Power and Bathrooms: When you’re saying “I

do” in a banquet hall, it’s understood that you’ll have everything you need: enough electrical power, plenty of restrooms, and an ample kitchen. But out on the farm, things don’t come as easily. Some barns have built-in restrooms, but one bathroom won’t accommodate 200 guests. A general rule of thumb is one restroom per 35 guests. Turned off by Porta Potties? Instead, consider renting modern, elegant, heated restroom trailers.

Reception stragglers at Apple Barn Farm in Germantown. Photo by Jesse Turnquist

Cooking: The caterer can make or break a wedding. Some barns include working kitchens, but caterers also often bring their own catering tents or trailers. Figure out in advance where the caterer can get water and store ice. The caterer should also know when to bring out the cake, which could melt in the summer heat. And a buffet meal should only be presented when guests are ready to eat; otherwise, insects could get to it first. WINTER 2015

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A reception party dinner at the Art Barn at the Hill in Hudson. Photo by Hillary Harvey. 50 upstater

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Jennifer and Adam seal their vows outside the Art Barn at the Hill in Hudson. Photo by Hillary Harvey.

Breakdown: Unlike traditional urban venues,

Owl’s Hoot Barn in West Coxsackie. Photo by Jesse Turnquist

barn weddings abide by town ordinances, so things sometimes wrap up earlier. Find out when loud music has to be shut down. You can remain at the barn and have a bonfire or other nighttime activities, but some staff should stay behind to help out. Also, check with your venue about breakdown. Many couples don’t realize they have to clean up the property once the reception is over. Is there a cleanup fee...or is your caterer willing to take on the breakdown?

The Bottom Line 

Although these details sound overwhelming, barn weddings are just like any other wedding, with countless moving parts. There’s just a different set of hurdles to consider with traditional venues. When your family and friends gather for a destination barn wedding, the experience is unforgettable. From the rehearsal dinner through the weekend outings, ceremony, and reception, to the farewell brunch, your guests will be entertained, at ease, and saying, “This was the best wedding ever!”

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CONTENT EVERY WEEK52 AT SWEDDINGS. U M M E R 2 0 NEW 15

upstater.com/weddings


FLOW CHART

IS A BARN WEDDING RIGHT FOR YOU?

*

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR WEDDING STYLE? OR

CASUAL

OR

SEMIFORMAL

FANCY

HOW ATTACHED ARE YOU TO CONVENTIONAL WEDDING TRADITIONS? NOT VERY

ALL IN

DO YOU HAVE PRINCESS-RELATED ASPIRATIONS?

ARE YOU PREPARED FOR ONE OR MORE OF YOUR GUESTS SHOWING UP IN COWBOY BOOTS? GIDDY UP

HECK NO

HAY RIDES

OR

LIMO RIDES?

APPLE JACK

OR

APPLETINIS?

NO

WILDFLOWERS

OR

ORCHIDS?

DEMORALIZED BY MUDDY HEELS? INDIFFERENT

ARE YOU COMFORTABLE WITH PORT-A-POTTIES?

YES

DOESN’T EVERYONE?

SHUDDER

ELECTRIC SLIDE

GROSS

HOW ABOUT REALLY NICE ONES? MAYBE

OR

COTTON-EYED JOE?

TOLERANCE LEVEL FOR MASON JARS USED IN EVERY CONCEIVABLE WAY?

STOP IT.

HIGH

PREPARED FOR THE PERSISTENT PRESENCE OF NOT-TOO-FAR-OFF ANIMAL-RELATED ODORS? QUAINT

YES

LOW

HOW ABOUT BURLAP?

HIGH

FAINT

LOW

NO

*In actuality, this is probably a poor way to ascertain which wedding venue type is right for you. For real resources on upstate weddings, visit upstater.com WINTER 2015

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CREATIVE CLASS

S T O RY B Y LY N N W O O D S / P H O T O S B Y D E B O R A H D E G R A F F E N R E I D

FOR A KINGSTON/NEW YORK CITY COUPLE,

HOME IS WHERE THE ART IS. S

ince its opening in 2011, One Mile, the gallery and home of filmmaker Eddie Mullins and gallery owner Janet Hicks, is an icon of the Hudson Valley’s creative energy. The gallery shows some of the area’s edgiest art, often imported from New York City, and its openings, which spill out from the subterranean gallery space onto a terraced bluestone patio, are among the most vibrant.

Eddie Mullins and Janet Hicks in their living room, with art by Derek Erdman.

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Part of One Mile’s appeal is its novel setting on a narrow road that snakes along the Rondout Creek, near a row of old, mostly abandoned frame houses, in the shadow of a 100-year-old railroad trestle. When a train rumbles overhead, what could be construed as a depressed former industrial river town becomes a sublime theatrical backdrop. But another part of the appeal is Hicks, who’s cosmopolitan and stylish but whose friendliness puts visitors at ease. Despite her full-time job in New York City at Artists Rights Society, negotiating contracts and licensing deals on behalf of blue-chip artists’ estates (including Picasso, Matisse, and Warhol), Hicks’s commitment to One Mile has enriched the local art scene, as has Mullins’s filmmaking. He spends most of his time upstate, where he filmed Doomsdays, a post apocalyptic comedy released last summer that’s won praise from the New York Times, and is working on two new film projects, one a detective story, the other a western.

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1978 Bally Playboy pinball machine.

Eddie reading under FANTASY, a work by Neal Hollinger. The work on the left is by Genesis Chapman.

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Sea creatures by Andrea Mihalovic and two works on paper by Susan Minot. The police car is a mirror from the Dutchess County Fair.

Antique beams are exposed in the second-floor kitchen and living room, which are filled with original art. Hicks grew up in California, studied art history at the University of Oregon, and moved to New York in 1997 to work for an architectural theory magazine. Mullins grew up in Richmond, Virginia, studied film at New York University, and worked at ABC News. He left New York to complete a master’s in literature at Northwestern University, then was a tractor driver on a Northern California farm and a stringer and a teacher in Buenos Aires, before returning to New York to work as a film critic. In 2009, Hicks and Mullins moved in together in Park Slope and began looking for a weekend house upstate. The house on the Rondout Creek fit the bill perfectly: Formerly owned by a sculptor with a ground-floor studio, it was built in 1790—antique beams are exposed in the secondfloor kitchen and living room, which is filled with original art—but the house “wasn’t so precious that we couldn’t renovate it,” Hicks notes. WINTER 2015

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“All the things people dislike about this place were things I loved.”

Mullins and Hicks didn’t know a soul when they arrived, but a New York Times article that profiled their weekend home, and the gallery’s opening created many connections. “Having a business here has been amazing,” says Mullins. “We knew everybody very quickly by setting up shop—if you build it, they will come.” Mullins’s longtime acquaintance with Tod Lippy, editor of Esopus magazine, led to the gallery’s biggest coup: the representation of artist-photographer Mark Hogancamp, whose life was chronicled in the documentary Marwencol (which is also the inspiration for a Hollywood drama in development, starring Steve Carrell). On disability since being brutally beaten outside a local bar 15 years ago, Hogancamp creates and photographs lifelike tableaux of dolls and props he sets up in a miniature, World War II Belgian village he has constructed on his property. Taking on Hogancamp was a complex venture, given the artist’s sustained brain injuries, PTSD, and rising fame. But Hicks and Mullins take it all in stride, buying groceries and cigarettes for Hogancamp (who doesn’t drive), and taking him to New York showings of his work.

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Mullins and Hicks’s brick house on the outskirts of Kingston’s Downtown, one of the Hudson Valley’s hipper districts, may seem like an outlier, but Uptown isn’t far away. Mullins sometimes walks up South Wall Street to Stockade Tavern, stopping to visit friends on the way back or catching a cab from the Trailways bus depot. “All the things people dislike about this place were things I loved,” Hicks says. “It feels like a different century.” Compared to the din of Brooklyn, the passing trains are white noise, she notes. Someday, she’d like to purchase the dilapidated house next door to expand the gallery and show larger work. In the meantime, Hicks has her eye on a small clearing up the steep forested hill behind One Mile, which is approached by a stone staircase. “It’s a great place for us to do archery.” NEW CONTENT EVERY WEEK S U M CREATIVE M E R 2 0 1CLASS. 5 58 AT

upstater.com/arts


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photo by Roy Gumpel

MICHAEL DRAPKIN WINE MERCHANT HOMETOWN: Baltimore MOVED UPSTATE FROM: Brooklyn HUDSON VALLEY HOME: Downtown Kingston FAVORITE PARTS OF UPSTATE LIFE: “Being that cooking is an essential element of our lifestyle, having fantastic urban farms in Kingston and access to farmers doing great work in the Hudson Valley makes our lives more enriched.” LEAST FAVORITE THING ABOUT UPSTATE LIFE: “If I forget something on the grocery list, I can’t walk to my corner bodega.” From Washington, D.C., to southwestern France, to Manhattan, and on to Kingston, Michael Drapkin’s life journey has been fueled by wine. He can be found these days at Kingston Wine Co. on Broadway in Downtown Kingston’s Rondout district, clad in a traditional French serving jacket, offering education and fine libations to all comers, or at his Rondout-area home, which he shares with his wife Theresa, an artist who keeps a studio there. Why Kingston? “A combination of factors: An endless search for the perfect bricks-and-mortar retail space in New York City led us to expand our search north,” says Drapkin. “We stumbled on Kingston, thanks to the Airbnb listing Church des Artistes [on Spring Street in the Rondout]. A desire to have more space to create, in addition to the natural resources of the Hudson Valley, solidified our decision to move.” Both Drapkin and his wife have retail and hospitality in their blood, with family connections to a D.C. pharmacy, Brooklyn wine shop, and McGlade’s restaurants on the Jersey Shore. And the shop they have

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created together—with Drapkin as primary proprietor, and his wife helping out and exerting design sensibilities as needed—is winning raves for maintaining an intimate, friendly, casual feeling paired with a broad and deep expertise. “The fascinating thing about wine is how multidisciplinary it can be,” says Drapkin. “It’s been made by man for thousands of years. It holds a symbolic place in many facets of our world cultures. We approach wine with a humble fascination of its complexity yet don’t over formalize it. Wine is a quotidian element of our dinner table. Wine can be as refined or unrefined as the consumer chooses.” Drapkin sources his offerings from all around the world, with a strong preference for “farmers and makers who work hard to preserve and enrich their land for future generations.” He explains: “We have something to learn from the monks of France, who worked the vineyards of central Burgundy making pinot noir in the year 1200—it’s a long, rich, persistent agricultural process.” It’s an attitude that resonates well up here, as does the couple’s collaborative spirit. “There are lots of good vibes here,” says Drapkin. “The business organization for Downtown, the Kingston Waterfront Business Association, is a great resource of support and a vehicle of collaboration. We feel a real sense of solidarity.”—Anne Pyburn Craig

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ON • THE• MARKET BROUGHT TO YOU

POSTS

BY UPSTATER.COM

Find new On the Market posts EVERY DAY at Upstater.com/on-the-market BY KANDY HARRIS

A

t Upstater.com, we cross the line between “love” and “obsessed with” when it comes to real estate—so our On the Market posts go live every day. We scour the Internet and drive the streets to bring you the best-of-the-best houses on the market (although “best-of-the-best” is, of course, subjective). Our content runs the gamut, from “Five-Figure Fridays” (great homes under $99,000) to “More Than a Mill.” We also cover handyman specials, easy fixer-uppers, turnkey-move-in-ready homes, weekend escapes, country cottages, and grand estates.

The Hillsdale House 211 Mitchell Street, Hillsdale Gary DiMauro $

2,895,000

BEDS: 4 / BATHS: 4.5 / SQUARE FEET: 6,140 LOT SIZE: 10.46 ACRES / TAXES: $24,215 According to the old adage, “People who live in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones.” However, after seeing this stunning glass abode, located in the Columbia County town of Hillsdale, we’re considering changing it to: “People who live in glass houses are the luckiest people in the world.” Designed by F:T Architecture and built in 2009, the more than 6,000-squarefoot house is a study in using the outdoors as a design’s focal point. Its walls of windows measuring 16 feet high and 32 feet wide frame the property’s bucolic setting, which overlooks both Catamount and the Berkshires. If this house’s residents ever grow weary of its spectacular views—as if that were possible— they can decamp to the movie screening room or the sprawling second- floor master suite, featuring a spa bath, sauna, and its own balcony. For summertime, there’s an in-ground pool complete with open-air cabana and a hot tub, and an outdoor kitchen for cooking for guests. The Hillsdale House comes with over 10 acres of land, and is a mere 2.5-hour drive from NYC. It’s a modern glass paradise awaiting you. upstater.com/the-hillsdale-house

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Live/Work/Play in Uptown Kingston

Dutch Colonial Cottage Fixer-Upper in Putnam County

102 St. James Street, Kingston Potter Realty

238 Towners Road, Kent Lakes Weichert

$

335,000

$

80,000

BEDS: 2 / BATHS: 1 / SQUARE FEET: 5,600 LOT SIZE: .17 ACRES / TAXES: $9,225

BEDS: 2 / BATHS: 1 / SQUARE FEET: 900 LOT SIZE: .38 ACRES / TAXES (WITHOUT STAR): $7,402

Attention, all musicians, artists, and small business owners: This building could become your base of operations in the bustling city of Kingston. Situated in the historic uptown district, the building consists of 5,600 square feet of usable space with lots of room for storage. On the second floor is a two-bedroom apartment with hardwood floors, plenty of windows for natural light (a must if you’re a visual artist), a fully-equipped kitchen, and a dining room. There’s even a small garden area in the back of the building. The uses are legion for this mixed-use property from recording studio to art gallery to workshop to … well, let your imagination run wild. What we do know is this is an opportunity not to be missed. The City of Kingston is becoming the Hudson Valley’s new creative hub, so now is the time to get in on the ground floor. (Headsup to musicians: The property is situated next door to Keegan Ales, a popular local watering hole with craft beer and live music. You’re welcome.) upstater.com/live-work-play-in-uptownkingston

Looking for an inexpensive property within a 90-minute drive from Midtown Manhattan? The good news is, such things exist. The less-good news is, they usually need work. But maybe you’re an industrious person who isn’t afraid of a little sawdust and elbow grease. If so, check out this c.1938 Dutch Colonial in Carmel. It needs attention—although the work needed is mostly cosmetic in nature—but it includes some major updates like new windows, new siding, a new roof, and central air conditioning. The interior knotty-pine walls are in decent shape, and we love the storage shed with floorto-ceiling windows. Would we use it for storage, though? It might be too cute for that. How about a light-filled studio or workshop instead? The house is only 900 square feet, but the property includes over one-third of an acre tucked away behind enough vegetation to provide some privacy. As with most five-figure properties, this is a cash-only deal. A STAR exemption would lower the tax bill, but the home must be your primary residence to qualify. upstater. com/dutch-colonial-cottage-fixer-upper-inputnam-county

R E A L E S TA T E S E C T I O N


TRANQUIL RETREAT

Contemporary Home with Zen-like Interior in Accord 45 Raycliff Drive, Accord  Prudential Nutshell Realty $

585,000

BEDS: 3 / BATHS: 3 / SQUARE FEET: 1,900 LOT SIZE: 3.16 ACRES / TAXES: $7,764

The vivacious village of Woodstock might be down the road apiece from the sleepy rural community of Accord—about 40 minutes down the road, to be exact—but this 1985 contemporary home, located on three acres, brings that Woodstock vibe all the way over to the spectacular neighborhood of Mohonk Preserve and Minnewaska State Park. There are about a million-and-a-half features to love about this unique house, starting with its silo-shaped turret. Usually we see those cylindrical attachments on older Victorian homes, but it fits right into the exterior’s ’80s-contempo style. The interior of the home, however, has a timeless quality that feels calm and meditative. And, since we’re

big fans of food here at Upstater, we couldn’t help but get excited about the chef’s kitchen outfitted with a Garland six-burner range and a Salamander broiler right over it. The living room includes a brick fireplace with a Lopi woodstove insert; high, vaulted ceilings; and doors that open onto a bluestone terrace. Around the side of the house is a wraparound deck, and upstairs, you’ll find lots of rustic wood trim and accents and tall ceilings that make the space feel like an airy loft. Looking for Woodstock Zen with slightly lower taxes? Find it in Accord. upstater.com/contemporary-home-withzen-like-interior-in-accord

CHECK OUT MORE HOT SUM M EPOSTS R 2 0 1 AT 5

63

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The Catskills Lifestyle

VillageGreenRealty.com *according to Ulster County MLS and Columbia Greene Northern Dutchess MLS 2011-2014.

EXPLORE COMMUNITIES SEARCH PROPERTIES

villagegreenrealty.com/communities

Kingston

Saugerties

Woodstock

Windham

VILLAGE GREEN REALTY

20 years of finding our clients the perfect country properties has made us #1 in Ulster and Greene Counties*. Kingston 845-331-5357 | Goshen 845-294-8857 | New Paltz 845-255-0615 Stone Ridge 845-687-4355 | Windham 518-734-4200 | Woodstock 845-679-2255

Have it all! Country Living close to NYC.

LIVE WORK LOFT

The Lofts at Beacon is a rental community located in a 19th century textile mill along the banks of Fishkill Creek. The Lofts are breathtaking, completely remodeled live/work spaces, providing continual inspiration for the working artist.

Family compound, rental income, subdivision possible. This 10 acre parcel of land offers the buyer many options. A two story farmhouse with a 3 bedrooms, an income-producing 2 bedroom cottage, a two story barn and a 300+ foot stonewall/ retaining wall built by skilled craftsmen. Located in the Hudson Valley farming community of Marlboro, NY, ten minutes to NewburghBeacon Bridge/RT 84, Metro North in Beacon and the NYS thruway make this a prime setting for year round homeowners, weekenders and commuters. OFFERED AT $295,000

James Billesimo, Broker (845) 236-7300 x16, BillesimoOffice@AOL.com 1311 RT 9W, PO 635, Marlboro, NY, 12542

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18 Front Street Beacon, NY 12508 info@loftsatbeacon.com | (845) 202-7211 loftsatbeacon.com

R E A L E S TA T E S E C T I O N


Sexy Properties. Addictive Website.

No wonder people say we’re real estate porn. Tivoli Charmer

$319,900

Circa 1822, 2 BR/1 BA period dwelling situated in lovely village setting. Original details, wide board floors, floor-to-ceiling windows and mahogany newel post & balustrade. Center chimney brick fireplace, updated kitchen. Stylish, newly renovated BA w/ claw foot tub. Detached 1.5-story garage w/ heated ground floor studio space, laundry area.

❚ Tracy Dober 845.757.5000 x13

Ghent Country Delight $322,900

Beautiful 3 BR/2 BA farmhouse, lovingly restored and situated on 1 acre. Screened, enclosed back porch, 2-story period barn and several outbuildings. Original moldings and wide-plank pine floors, central heating and A/C, updated kitchen, new roof. Charming & comfortable year-round home for fulltimers and weekenders alike.

❚ DeWayne A. Powell 917.748.5100

Minimalist Modern

$835,000

Perched on a knoll on 8 acres overlooking the farmland of S. Columbia County in Ancram. Industrial strength exterior materials, and interior whitewashed walls and polished white concrete floors. 2 BR/2.5 BAs. Translucent walls, mix of transparent, opaque and glossy whites. Sleek kitchen w/ 20’ island. Malm woodstove, open stairwell, peaceful, lightfilled BRs. Gorgeous vistas from every room.

❚ Gary DiMauro 845.757.5000 x11

Catskill Foursquare

$335,000

Handsome design, sturdy construction and spacious rooms. 4 BR/2.5 BA, updated interior w/ radiant heated floors, oak flooring, gas fireplace, pocket doors, mudroom & laundry. Feel-good, comfy home w/ high ceilings & large windows. New roof. 1/3 acre corner lot. Quiet vintage neighborhood. Walk to Hudson River and Main Street.

❚ David Ludwig 518.943.7533 x11

Copper House

$890,000

Beautiful 4 BR/3 BA modern home on 6 wooded acres in Hillsdale. Clad in corrugated copper exterior w/ 3 skylights distributing the daylight throughout the interior. Light & airy rooms w/ views. 8’ x 24’ shelving system delineates hall and public spaces. Radiant heat, efficient boiler, recycled aluminum in the kitchen cabinets and low electric. Low maintenance retreat to enjoy the Hudson Valley.

❚ Joseph Shirk 518.822.0800 x14

Old Stockport Victorian $750,000

Impressive ca. 1860 Victorian Italianate, one of the architectural jewels surrounding historic St. John’s Church. Lovingly renovated and privately situated on its own handsomely landscaped bower w/ views of 30+ acres w/ pond. 5 BR/2 BA, high ceilings, 2 wood burning fireplaces, and screened porch, all in quiet country setting just north of Hudson.

❚ Kathy Duffy 518.822.0800 x11

Tivoli NY • Hudson NY • Catskill NY • Rhinebeck NY R E A L E S TA T E S E C T I O N

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C O U N T RY L I F E R E A L E S TAT E Your new home awaits

Southern Columbia County, New York Is Our Specialty!

Canaan, NY

4 Bedrooms | 2 Baths | 3700 Sq. Ft.

C Copake Lake Ta Da! Thus 2,910 sq. ft. Contemporary with an arts & crafts flair is ready for move-in. The main level has an open kitchen/dining/ great room, master en-suite, powder room, fireplace and deck to take in those Copake Lake views and sunsets. On the upper level there is another en-suite/flex space. The lower level has 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, & a recreation/media room. Includes 20’ waterfront. Features include 10’ high ceiling, bamboo flooring, slate counters, stainless appliances, Carrera marble counters, heated bathroom floors, soundproofing and more. Attached two-car garage. Complete list of custom features available upon request. Walk to Copake Country Club. Equal distance to Hudson, NY, or Great Barrington, MA. About 2 hours from Manhattan and 2.5 hours from Boston. We would love to introduce you to what lake living is all about.

lassic 1700’s Center Hall with fine period detail, wide board floors, formal parlors, forged hardware and 2 fireplaces. 7 plus acres of rolling fields, lovely gardens and a large barn with 4 stalls. Bring the family, bring friends, bring the animals. Rights to join the Queechy Lake association. Short drive to the Berkshires and Chatham village. A lot to love for $189,000. for more info , contact :

Linnea VanTassel 518-392-6600

COUNTRYLIFEREALESTATE.COM | 962 RTE 203, SPENCERTOWN, NY 518-392-6600 | INFO@COUNTRYLIFEREALESTATE.COM

Cedar Heights Farm RHINEBECK

This idyllic property is the epitome of Hudson Valley charm. An A.J. Downing inspired Victorian farmhouse, 102 bucolic acres with dramatic Catskill Mountain views, 3.5-acre spring-fed lake, 6-stall barn, pastures with multiple run-in sheds, access to local horse trails and 175 apple trees which are part of Cedar Heights Orchard. Minutes to the Village of Rhinebeck, Kingston-Rhinecliff Bridge and Amtrak. Convenient to Tivoli and Bard’s Fisher Center. Offered at $2,595,000.

H.H. HILL REALTY SERVICES, INC. Lindsay LeBrecht , Real Estate Broker 285 Lakeview Road, Craryville, NY 66 upstater

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845.876.8888 • hillrhinebeck.com

6408 MONTGOMERY ST., RHINEBECK, NY 12572

R E A L E S TA T E S E C T I O N


Windham Ski House

Winters. They’re not going away, so how about enjoying them?

$850,000

Contemporary 3 BR, 2.5 bath mountain retreat, beautifully crafted of wood and stone w/ glorious views of the ski slopes of Windham Mountain NY and 3 of the highest peaks in the Catskills. Spectacular indoor heated pool wing with fireside lounge and skylighted cathedral ceiling. Designed for easy entertaining: open floor plan, sunken living room w/FP, media room w/ FP, billiards room, multiple outdoor decks. Truly a superb 4-season family compound, close to the town of Windham and the slopes of Windham and Hunter ski resorts.

Real Estate Salesperson 845.489.2000 kornelia @garydimauro.com

Specialists in stylish homes in New York’s Hudson Valley.

garydimauro.com

Kornelia Tamm

POST MODERN HOME

AMAZING SUNSETS

BRIGHT AND AIRY

METHODICALLY MAINTAINED

Stylish post modern home built in 2013 in desirable Taconic Oaks. Lovely property on over an acre with cul-desac location. Two-story foyer. Nine foot ceilings and open great room. WEB# PJ1165007 EAST FISHKILL $699,000 Jill Rose Real Estate Salesperson Mobile: 914.204.0124

Meticulously maintained Germantown Contemporary home with breathtaking views of the Catskill Mountain. Walls of glass, built for entertaining – cozied up to the two-sided fireplace. Pool. WEB# PJ1173742 GERMANTOWN $660,000 Michael James Tellerday Real Estate Salesperson Mobile: 845.797.6891

Beautiful streamlined home on one of Lagrange’s most desirable streets. Completely private property. Located just one minute to Taconic Parkway. This home is a must see. WEB# PJ1179843 LAGRANGEVILLE $575,000 Nicole Porter Asociate Real Estate Broker Mobile: 845.797.5300

A rare find – Contemporary Ranch – a short walk to the FDR Nature Preserve and Hudson River Front. One-level floor plan separated by just three steps is a pleasure at every turn. WEB# PJ1180284 HIGHLAND $425,000 Richard Thomas Honovic Real Estate Salesperson Mobile: 917.407.5562

LaGrangeville Brokerage | 1325 Route 55 | 845.473.9770 | HoulihanLawrence.com Local Market Leader. Area’s Largest Global Network. PROVEN AND PROVING IT.

R E A L E S TA T E S E C T I O N

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The Right Relationships Make all the Difference

GeorGe T. Whalen real esTaTe • ES TA B LI S H ED 1925 •

A LOVELY COUNTRY HOUSE—Well designed and beautifully sited on 24 acres, minutes to the Village of Millbrook. Spacious rooms, high ceilings & floor plan conducive to gathering family & friends. 6 BRs, 4.5 baths, lovely gardens & brick patio. Oversized 2 car garage w/nanny quarters above. Sweeping lawn overlooking barn & 2 fenced paddocks. A very peaceful retreat! OFFERED AT $1,295,000

LAURA MORITZ CLASSIC MORTGAGE Mortgage Financing Made Simple Laura, a local wholesale lender, provides concierge service to her clients when purchasing a home or refinancing an existing mortgage. With 31 years of experience in the mortgage industry, Laura has the knowledge, resources, and desire to EXCEED her client’s expectations when obtaining a loan. She prides herself on her ability to communicate effectively and helps borrowers navigate through the complex process of obtaining a mortgage while securing the most competitive rates & terms!

ELEGANT COUNTRY COLONIAL—Custom built home crafted with the finest materials on 10.25 acres in the Millbrook Estate area. Stylish design & spacious, light-filled rooms. 5 BRs and 6.5 baths w/incredible details. 10’ ceilings, wood flooring, brick fireplaces, fine moldings, French doors to courtyard, Gunite pool, tennis court, waterfall, elevator, wine cellar & 4 car garage. Fabulous new barn w/4 bays. Beautiful landscaping and stonework. OFFERED AT $2,395,000

Call Laura today to find out how you can purchase the home of your dreams with as little as 3% down. Less than perfect credit, self-employed and commission based wages earners; NO PROBLEM! Dreams really can come true when you have the RIGHT banker assisting you with the process. Find out how you can have the lifestyle you and your family desires with a monthly payment that you can afford. “Yes, you can!” Let Laura Moritz show you how.

Call /text/email today for a free, no obligation consultation.

(845) 222-8270 | LMoritz@classicllc.com 68 upstater

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QUINTESSENTIAL HUNT COUNTRY FARM—Lovely estate property, situated on 79+ acres in Millbrook Hunt Country. Originally built in 1880, this is a rambling home with fabulous early details, including pine flooring, 5 fireplaces & beamed ceilings. Grounds w/stone walls, horse stable, fenced paddocks, riding ring, pool and views to Catskill Mtns. 3 BR guest cottage, 2 BR apt. over barn, garage space for 8 vehicles. One of the finest farmsteads in the Hudson Valley. OFFERED AT $2,200,000

3269 Franklin Ave. Millbrook, NY 12545 845-677-5076 • GTWhalen.com R E A L E S TA T E S E C T I O N


EXC EP T IONAL EN D UN I T

1860s VILLAGE FARMHOUSE

Rhinebeck village condo 2 blocks from the village center. CA,

unspoiled charm, modern amenities, 9 ft. ceilings, stunning stairway,

FPL, open floor plan, balcony & patio. Wonderful light, low

library, huge K, sunroom. 4.9 amazing acres w/stream frontage &

fees, walk everywhere! $229,900.

meadow. $429,900.

MAGICAL

7.8 buffered country acres, dead-end road, total privacy. Sun filled RHIINEBECK Farmhouse. Marble FPL, wood floors, 25 ft. LR, wonderful K. 20 x 40 heated inground pool. $620,000.

PA U L H A L L E N B E C K R E A L E S TA T E , I N C .

Where Experience and Hard Work Make a Big Difference CATSKILL AND HUDSON VIEWS Gracious indoor & outdoor living with 4070 SF, 2 FPLs, 2 master bedroom suites, 26 ft. living room, 3.4 acres with 3000+ SF of stone terraces with inground pool & outdoor K. $679,999.

6 3 7 0 M I LL S T R E E T • R H I N E B E C K , N EW YO R K • 1 2 5 7 2 P H O N E : 8 4 5 - 8 7 6 - 1 6 6 0 • FAX : 8 4 5 - 8 7 6 - 5 9 5 1

w w w. h a l l e n b e c k r e a l e s t a t e . c o m • i n f o @ h a l l e n b e c k r e a l e s t a t e . c o m

Patricia A. Hinkein Realty

Custom Country Home on 3.9 private acres with wonderful landscaped grounds, barn with studio, pool, pond & stream located in Germantown. House features 5 BRs/2.5 Baths, vaulted ceilings, wood floors, exposed beams, FR with hot tub & a media room/theater. Nicely set back from scenic road. $599,000

Germantown secluded Cottage on 8 park-like acres. This beautifully landscaped property features a pond & stream with a wooden bridge, a pool & pool house & wonderful gardens. The 4 BR/2 Bath house has an open greatroom with vaulted ceilings & fplc, wood flrs, wraparound deck. A wonderful private country retreat. $469,000

Milan Mid-Century Contemporary. Just renovated, stylish three bedroom home, features light filled, open livingroom/ diningroom, spacious kitchen, new baths, wood floors, private back deck, new metal roof, & attached 660 sq ft studio. On over 2.3 acres with easy access to TSP. $292,000

Germantown Variety is a modern day reincarnation of the much missed American Five & Dime. The store features antique fixtures & a carefully thought out mix of products from hardware to housewares. The 1930’s building also includes 2 fabulous loft apartments, a first floor office suite & a full walkout basement.. $995,000

19 Church Ave, Germantown, NY (518) 537-4888 www.hinkeinrealty.com • hinkein@gmail.com

R E A L E S TA T E S E C T I O N

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Willow Realty Hudson Valley Real Estate - Ulster County Real Estate

Country Condominium

For Sale

2 Bedrooms | 1 Full Bath | $110,000 This house is in a condo community of 8 homes that share 8 acres as a Home Owners Association. Own your own house and the land under it, and share the rest including the beautifully maintained common grounds. $1,165 per month includes all utilities and payment on a $90,000 mortgage. This is an excellent opportunity to live in your own house in a small community while building your equity instead of paying rent. Only 20 minutes from New Paltz, Kingston and Stone Ridge.

Office: 33 Gibbons Lane, New Paltz, NY Laurie@WillowRealEstate.com

845-255-7666

GLENN’S SHEDS Quality firewood sheds, built to last.

Capitol Improvement

Free Installation

Each shed is built on-site to suit your landscape. Visit the web-site to see our full line of firewood sheds.

GLENNSSHEDS.COM

845.328.0447

70 upstater

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R E A L E S TA T E S E C T I O N


CONTACT our

ADVERTISERS

2 Note Botanical Perfumery

Glenn’s Sheds

Murray’s Tivoli

Adage

Glorious Morning Wellness

Nest Realty Co.

Green Meadow Waldorf School

North Country Vintage

Handmade and More

Oakwood Friends School

2notehudson.com / 518-828-0915 adage-nyc.com / 518-697-5397

Alfandre Architecture, PC alfandre.com / 845-255-4774

Atlantic Custom Homes

hudsonvalleycedarhomes.com / 845-265-2636

Berkshire Products, Inc.

berkshireproducts.com / 413-229-7919

Billesimo Real Estate 845-236-7300

Birdsall House

birdsallhouse.net / 914-930-1880

Buttermilk Falls Inn & Spa buttermilkfallsinn.com / 845-795-1310

Cabinet Designers, Inc

cabinetdesigners.com / 845-331-2200

Catskill Farms Builders

thecatskillfarms.com / 845-557-3600

Charlotte Valley Farms

organiccatskillretreat.com / 607-434-5993

Chronogram

chronogram.com / 845-334-8600

Classic Mortgage

classicmortgagellc.com / 845-222-8270

Cold Spring Area Chamber of Commerce explorecoldspringny.com 845-265-3200

glennssheds.com / 845-328-0447 jeniwrightson.com

gmws.org / 845-356-2514

handmadeandmore.com / 845-255-6277

Hawthorne Valley Association

hawthornevalleyassociation.org / 518-672-7092

HH Hill Realty Services hillrhinebeck.com / 845-876-8888

High Meadow School

highmeadowschool.org / 845-687-4855

Historic Huguenot Street huguenotstreet.org / 845-255-1660

Houlihan Lawrence Real Estate houlihanlawrence.com / 845-473-9770

HOUSE Hudson Valley Realty househudsonvalley.com / 518-828-5154

Hudson Company, The hudson-co.com / 845-848-3040

Hudson Valley Distillers

hudsonvalleydistillers.com / 518-537-6820

Hudson Valley Home Source hvhomesource.com / 845-294-5663

Hudson Valley Sunrooms

Coldwell Banker Village Green Realty

hvsk.fourseasonssunrooms.com / 845-339-1787

Columbia County Real Estate Specialists

hummingbirdjewelers.com / 845-876-4585

villagegreenrealty.com

Hummingbird Jewelers

murraystivoli.com / 845-757-6003 nestrealtyco.com / 845-417-7242 northcountryvintage.com / 347-615-5528 oakwoodfriends.org

Old Souls

oldsouls.com / 845-809-5886

Ole Savannah Southern Table & Bar olesavannah.com / 845-331-4283

Patricia A. Hinkein Realty hinkeinrealty.com / 518-537-4888

Paul Hallenbeck Real Estate hallenbeckrealestate.com / 845-876-1660

Peekamoose Restaurant

peekamooserestaurant.com / 845-254-6500

Peekskill Business Improvement District downtownpeekskill.com / 914-737-2780

Peggy Lampman Real Estate peggylampman.com / 518-851-2277

Putnam County Tourism Office tourputnam.org

Rhinebeck Department Store rhinebeckstore.com / 845-876-5500

Rudolf Steiner School gbrss.org / 413-528-4015

Stewart Airport, Port Authority NY-NJ panynj.gov/airports/stewart.html / 845-838-8200

Copake Lake Realty

Kornelia Tamm, Real Estate Salesperson – Gary DiMauro Real Estate

copakelakerealty.com / 518-325-9741

garydimauro.com / 845-489-2000

Country Life Real Estate

LAD Interiors

countryliferealestate.com / 518-392-6600

ladinteriors.com / 518-392-0209

David Borenstein Architects and Builders

Luminary Media

architectdavidborenstein.com / 845-758-6080

luminarymedia.com / 845-334-8600

Denning’s Point Distillery, LLC

Main Course

Ulster County Tourism

denningspointdistillery.com / 845-230-7905

maincoursecatering.com / 845-255-2600

EvolveD Interiors & Design Showroom LLC

MarkJames & Co.

Westwood Metes & Bounds Realty

evolvedinteriors.com / 845-679-9979

markjamesandco.com / 845-834-3047

Gary DiMauro Real Estate

Menla Mountain Retreat & Conference Center

White Plains Hospital Center

garydimauro.com / 845-876-5100

menla.org / 845-688-6897

wphospital.org / 914-681-2929

George Cole Auctions & Realty

Mill House Brewing Company

Willow Realty

millhousebrewing.com / 845-485-2739

willowrealestate.com / 845-255-7666

George T. Whalen Real Estate

Mount Merino Manor

Wm. Farmer & Sons

mountmerinomanor.com / 518-828-5583

wmfarmerandsons.com / 518-828-1635

Gift Hut, The

Mount Saint Mary College

Zimmer Brothers

realestatecolumbiacounty.com / 518-697-9865

georgecoleauctions.com / 845-758-9114 gtwhalen.com / 845-677-5076

thegifthut.com / 894-297-3786

msmc.edu / 888-YES-MSMC

Stoutridge Vineyard

stoutridge.com / 845-236-7620

Tuthill House

tuthillhouse.com / 845-255-4151

Ulster County Office of Economic Development ulsterforbusiness.com

ulstercountyalive.com / 1-800-342-5826 westwoodrealty.com / 845-340-1920

zimmerbrothers.com /845-876-6363

WINTER 2015

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LAST LOOK

S T O RY B Y P H Y L L I S S E G U R A / P H O T O B Y R O Y G U M P E L

A Little Shellfish Last September, Jean Claude Frajmund opened Eco Shrimp Garden in Newburgh. The grand opening was attended by dignitaries like U.S. Representative Sean Maloney and U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand. Bringing industry to Newburgh is a notable event, and Frajmund’s aquaculture start-up is already making a splash. Frajmund, a Brazilian with French parents, began envisioning the shrimpery in 1985, when he was 16. On a hitchhiking trip around Brazil, he spent time with fishermen who walked the shoreline with their nets, catching 30 to 40 pounds of fish before breakfast. By 1980, when China began shrimp farming, there were already signs of overfishing and poor aquaculture conditions. So Frajmund began formulating a plan for ecologically sound indoor farms that echo the oceanic environment. But after more than six months of research, he realized the technology had not advanced enough. Then, in 2013, he says, “I looked into it again and saw that it was now possible.” Today there are 25 indoor shrimp farms in the U.S. Eco Shrimp Garden is the first one in New York State. “I particularly wanted to do it in an urban environment so that I could deliver to a market within two hours,” says Frajmund. Newburgh’s combination of convenient access to New York City and the prime local real estate market made it the right spot. Last year, says Frajmund, the U.S. imported 560,000 metric tons of shrimp grown in outdoor shrimp-farm ponds. Americans love shrimp, consuming almost four pounds per person per year on average, so chain restaurants endlessly promote shrimp, despite the oceans’ depleting supply. The FDA examined only 3.7 percent of foreign shrimp shipments in 2014, according to Consumer Reports. According to a 2014 New York Times report, most of the shrimp the U.S. imports comes from Latin America and Southeast Asia, where environmental and human rights

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experts have identified forced labor, hazardous working conditions, damage to ecosystems, and the use of hormones and antibiotics. Frajmund compares current shrimp-farming with factory-farmed chickens. Increased awareness about factory-farmed chicken has resulted in consumer demand for free-range, organic, and hormone- and antibiotic-free chicken. Frajmund hopes this awareness will extend to aquaculture and shrimp. “I’m part of the movement for healthy foods,” he says. Eco Shrimp Garden has eight 14’ x 4’ tanks in operation, each incubating 150 pounds of shrimp. Frajmund plans to eventually have 24 tanks. “I started seeding the tanks in April this year, and after five months, I was ready to start selling,” he says. He purchases post larval shrimp seeds of the Pacific white-leg variety—the most extensively farmed species—from pathogen-free breeding companies in Florida and Hawaii. Frajmund is waiting to receive a nursery permit from the Department of Environmental Conservation, at which point he will begin breeding the seeds himself. “For their feed, I purchase a fish protein that has no antibiotics and no hormones,” he says. Frajmund is also researching alternatives to fishmeal, like seaweed. His ponds are in an enclosed area with biosystem security protocol in place, and no chemicals are used. “My shrimp are happy!” says Frajmund. “When they jump! When they are energetic! It’s a shrimp spa.” Each shrimp is allotted a gallon of water. “How do you know when a shrimp is fresh?” Frajmund asks. “They have no smell other than the salty smell of the ocean. The heads stick on the body. They have two long antennas that you can see, and the shell is not loose and sticks to the flesh.” Eco Shrimp Garden, located at 99 South William Street in Newburgh, sells fresh shrimp every day from 10am to 5pm for $25 per pound. That’s great news because, as Forrest Gump’s Benjamin Buford “Bubba” Blue says, whether you barbecue it, boil it, bake it, or sauté it, shrimp is “the fruit of the sea.” INNOVATORS. NEW CONTENT EVERY WEEK 72 AT

upstater.com/innovators


Stewart International Airport

Neighborhood airport. World-class carriers. Conveniently located right in the Hudson Valley, Stewart’s comfortable size, modern amenities, friendly staff, and focus on customer care make getting to the airport, and flying out of it, hassle-free. In addition to its commercial services from Allegiant, American, Delta, and JetBlue, Stewart also features services for private or corporate air travelers from Independent Helicopters. All of these options make Stewart the most convenient and versatile airport in the region. Stewart International Your neighborhood airport.


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Upstater Winter 2015