Page 1

S P R I N G 2016

Live like a local.

As spring speeds up,

WE TAKE IT SLOW— THE

PROCESS OF LOOKING

MATTERS AS MUC H A S

WHAT WE FIND ALONG THE WAY.

THERE IS RAW POWER IN BEING

fully awake AND aware

OF THE UNFOLDING SEASON. SO WE

BR EAT HE

LONG AND

DEEP

I N TH E STI LL-S H IVE RY AI R,

AND GO FORTH

with wellies on.

In 1815, the Duke of Wellington invented the boot that bears his name. The era of smart casual was born.

E D I B L E I D E A L S 24

G I N U P 30

WAY D O W N I N T H E H O L E 56


BUTTERMILK FALLS INN & SPA


Where Design Meets Nature Homes Starting At $795,000 • 2 Hours from NYC

SPRING 2016 1 212.233.9187 · www.hudsonwoods.com · @hudsonwoodsny


WHITE PLAINS HOSPITAL CENTER

upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m


Only Lindal . . . warm modern bespoke homes relaxed healthy environments personalized for site and self efficiency and predictability unmatched experience caring local service

. . . the preeminent prefab

New York area independent representative

Atlantic Custom Homes, Inc. 2785 Route 9 PO Box 246 Cold Spring, NY 10516 Info@LindalNY.com LindalNY.com HudsonValleyCedarHomes.com Tel:845-265-2636

SPRING 2016

3


Choose a mortgage that gives back. Choose US.

ULSTER SAVINGS BANK $

500 Off Closing Costs

on home purchase applications received thru 5/31/2016.

NMLS# 619306

Locations throughout the Hudson Valley

MEMBER FDIC

4

(845) 338-6322 • ulstersavings.com

*Ulster Savings Bank will give a credit of $500 toward closing costs at closing. Customer pays for all other fees and services. Eligible mortgages include owner-occupied and second home purchases. Offer applies to home purchase applications received between 3/1/2016 - 5/31/2016 and must close by August 1, 2016. Not valid for pre-qualifications, refinances, home equity products, construction loans or mortgage applications received prior to upstater / u p s t a t e r . c o m 3/1/2016. Offer may not be combined with any other offers or discounts unless otherwise noted. Offer may be withdrawn at any time.


CATSKILL FARMS BUILDERS

SPRING 2016

5


We plan to make your day special Complete event planning for your important day.

LUMINARY WEDDINGS

LuminaryWeddings.com 6

upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m


Outdoor Adventures Outdoor Adventures

Get to Know

Putnam Get to Know County Putnam County

Constitution Marsh Audubon Center and Sanctuary Constitution Marsh Audubon Center and Sanctuary

PUTNAM COUNTY TOURISM OFFICE

Family Fun Family Fun

Tilly Foster Farm Tilly Foster Farm

HistoricPlaces Places Historic

Boscobel House and Gardens Boscobel House and Gardens

Come County Come Play Play in in Putnam Putnam County www.VisitPutnam.org www.VisitPutnam.org

SPRING 2016

7


CONTENTS 24

upstater SPRING 2016

Food + Drink

Edible Ideals

Harvesting garlic at Soul Fire Farm in Grafton. Photo supplied.

FEATURES

24 30

FOOD + DRINK

Gin Up

A classic spirit gets back on the map. Story by Peter D. Martin

52

Farmlife among Friends

62 upstater

54

Five food businesses put personal values into their products. Story by Karen Angel

Peekskill: Exploring an Anomaly

56

20

Edible Ideals

44

53

8

FOOD + DRINK

WEEKENDER

A village toes the line between urban/edgy and country. Story by Brian PJ Cronin / Photos by Pamela Ashley Pasco

A couple finds a mid-century ranch house in rural Hillsdale. Story by Kandy Harris / Photos by Deborah DeGraffenreid REAL ESTATE

Fixing to Stick Around

Affordable fixer-uppers abound in Hillsdale and Millerton. Story by Kandy Harris UPSTATE UPDATE

Way Down in the Hole

New York City’s water system gets a makeover—upstate. Story by Leander Schaerlaeckens AT HOME

The Stolen Church of Glenford

A New York City family creates a community near Woodstock. Story by Mary Angeles Armstrong Photos by Deborah DeGraffenreid and Roy Gumpel / u p s t a t e r.c o m

HV PORTRAITS

THIS & THAT

WEEKENDER

12

MISSION STATEMENT

18

MARIANNE COURVILLE

13

CHECK OUT OUR TEAM

22

AMANDA KNOX

14

UPSTATE / DOWNSTATE

38

WILL LYTLE

17

WEEKEND GETAWAY CONTEST

54

JESSICA WICKHAM

20

OBJECTIFIED: WELLINGTON BOOTS

68

DENNIS CROWLEY

36

FLOW CHART: HOW TO DRINK GIN

40

MAP: HUDSON VALLEY ART

80

LAST LOOK: FINDING FUNGI

Front cover: Illustration by Jason Cring. This page: Photo of Bruised Apple Books and Music in Peekskill by Pamela Ashley Pasco.

Photo courtesy of Soul Fire Farm

TABLE of


DREAMING OF YOUR UPSTATE LIFE?

BE. HERE. NOW.

We’ve been guiding dreamers for over 40 years with knowledge, experience, community connections and exceptional client service.

Start searching today WestwoodRealty.com WOODSTOCK 845.679.0006

KINGSTON 845.340.1920

NEW PALTZ 845.255.9400

STONE RIDGE 845.687.0232

WEST HURLEY 845.679.7321

WestwoodRealty.com SPRING 2016

Serving the Hudson Valley Region

9


u SUBSCRIBE

FEED YOUR OBSESSION UPSTATER PRINT Don’t miss an issue.

???? Information is Power. 1 2

Here are two ways to secure your next issue: Sign up today to get the inside scoop and receive an email of locations where you can pick it up for free!

Reader Insurance.

Sign up to receive it via mail. $25 per year for 4-issue direct delivery.

S P R I N G 2016

Live like a local.

We’re all over this big city — you never know where we’ll turn up next.

SUBSCRIBE TODAY. VISIT US AT

As spring speeds up,

WE TAKE IT SLOW— THE

PROCESS OF LOOKING

MATTERS AS MUC H A S

WHAT WE FIND ALONG THE WAY.

upstater.com/ subscribe

THERE IS RAW POWER IN BEING

fully awake AND aware

OF THE UNFOLDING SEASON. SO WE

B R E AT H E

LONG AND

DEEP

I N TH E STI LL-S H IVE RY AI R,

AND GO FORTH

with wellies on.

In 1815, the Duke of Wellington invented the boot that bears his name. The era of smart casual was born.

E D I B L E I D E A L S 24

10 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

G I N U P 30

WAY D O W N I N T H E H O L E 56


.com upstater

E V E R Y D AY

TWO NUNS WALK INTO A WINE BAR

B Y M AT T P O N D

A mystery train wails to the west, while a buoy clangs eerily out east. It’s mid-winter in Kingston. I turn my collar up to the bitter wind, look over my left shoulder and wonder what my crew and I are doing on the wrong side of town. We’re down on the Rondout. The eponymous river at the bottom of the hill creates a modest harbor that empties into the Hudson. In the summertime, the area hums with meandering citizens, lazy explorers looking for a good deal or a mellow afternoon repast. But now it’s colder than a witch’s bosom. Tonight there are hints of snowpocalypse, heavy grooves of winter doldrums. Brunette Wine Bar, Kingston

upstater.com/two-nuns-walk-wine-bar/

NEWBURGH BREWING COMPANY GETS THE “MUNCHIES”

NEW KID ON THE BLOCK: RIVERFRONT ANTIQUES & DESIGN CENTER, HUDSON

By Kandy Harris

By Kandy Harris

VICE has a new show called “Munchies,” and if it wasn’t obvious from the name, it’s all about food and beverages. Turns out, Newburgh Brewing Company recently turned up on a recent episode called “Craftwerk,” which VICE filmed back in 2014.

We love taking a road trip to Newburgh to the Newburgh Vintage Emporium, but it’s a bit of a haul from our ’hood. Thankfully, there’s now a closer option in the city of Hudson in the form of the Riverfront Antiques and Design Center.

upstater.com/newburgh-brewing-company-gets-munchies/

upstater.com/new-kid-block-riverfront-antiques-design-center-hudson/

THE BENEFITS OF SHOPPING LOCAL

STEP INTO YOUR COMFORT ZONE: WM. FARMER & SONS BOARDING AND BARROOM

By Anthony Foppiano

By Peter Martin

I, like many minimalists, am a very outdoorsy kind of person. The minimalist lifestyle in general lends itself to being very outdoorsy, social, and community oriented. That is what happens when we live a life very focused on the core values of life. By that I mean health/wellness, relationships, and growth/ passion (for more info on this, you can get my book Living Better Small). upstater.com/benefits-shopping-local/

As Hudson continues its rapid transformation into a bona fide tourist destination, husband-and-wife restaurateurs Kirby Farmer and Kristan Keck have had front-row seats. As frequent weekenders prior to the purchase of their home in Germantown in 2008, they’ve watched as old, familiar buildings received sweeping renovations and were reborn as boutiques, galleries, and some of the best restaurants in the area. … When it came time for Kristan and Kirby to scout locations for their first restaurant, Hudson was at the top of the list. The deal was sealed when they found a beautiful 1830s brick building with plenty of charm and room for an inn upstairs. After a top-to-bottom renovation, Wm. Farmer & Sons boarding house and barroom opened last May. upstater.com/step-comfort-zone-wm-farmer-sons-boarding-barroom/ SPRING 2016

11


EDITORIAL

u

EDITOR

Susan Piperato susan@luminarymedia.com ART DIRECTOR

Jim Maximowicz jmaximowicz@luminarymedia.com CARTOON EDITOR

Carolita Johnson carolitajohnson@gmail.com PROOFREADER

Barbara Ross

As spring speeds up,

WE TAKE IT SLOW—

WANDERING THROUGH

WOODLANDS and PEOPLED PLACES SEARCHING FOR

SURPRISES INSIGHTS COMMUNITY AND OURSELVES

THE

PROCESS LOOKING OF

MATTERS AS MUC H A S

WHAT WE FIND ALONG THE WAY.

THERE IS RAW POWER IN BEING

fully awake AND aware

OF THE UNFOLDING SEASON. SO WE

B R E AT H E

LONG

AND

DEEP

I N TH E STI LL-S H IVE RY AI R,

AND GO FORTH. LIVE LIKE A LOCAL 12 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

CONTRIBUTORS

Mary Angeles Armstrong, Karen Angel, Debra Bresnan, Caylena Cahill, Linda Codega, Anne Pyburn Craig, Jason Cring, Brian PJ Cronin, Deborah DeGraffenreid, Liza Donnelly, Roy Gumpel, Shawn Hartley Hancock, Kandy Harris, Peter D. Martin, Pamela Ashley Pasco, Kirby Salvador, Leander Schaerlaeckens, Nina Shengold

PUBLISHING FOUNDERS & PUBLISHERS

Amara Projansky & Jason Stern CHIEF EXECUTIVE

Amara Projansky

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Brian K. Mahoney CHAIRMAN

David Dell Upstater is a project of Luminary Media.

ADVERTISING SALES (845) 334-8600 X106 DIRECTOR PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT & SALES

Julian Lesser jlesser@luminarymedia.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Paul Hope phope@luminarymedia.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Ralph Jenkins rjenkins@luminarymedia.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Anne Wygal awygal@luminarymedia.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Nicole Hitner nhitner@luminarymedia.com SALES & MARKETING COORDINATOR

Samantha Benedict sbenedict@luminarymedia.com

ADMINISTRATIVE DIRECTOR OF EVENTS & SPECIAL PROJECTS MANAGER

Samantha Liotta samantha@luminarymedia.com OFFICE MANAGER

Peter D. Martin peter@luminarymedia.com BOOKKEEPER

Molly Rausch accounting@luminarymedia.com

DIGITAL DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION & DIGITAL STRATEGY

Teal Hutton teal@luminarymedia.com

PRODUCTION PRODUCTION MANAGER

Sean Hansen sean@luminarymedia.com PRODUCTION DESIGNERS

Linda Codega Kerry Tinger

LUMINARY MEDIA 314 Wall Street, Kingston, NY 12401 (845) 334-8600 | fax (845) 334-8610 luminarymedia.com All contents © Luminary Media Inc. 2016 For extended coverage of the upstater lifestyle, join us at upstater.com. Upstater was founded in 2011 and acts as a guide for living, buying, renting, and vacationing in upstate New York. Our writers have hearts, mortgages, and legacies in the Hudson Valley.


CHE C K O U T O U R

TEAM LOOK FOR CONTENT BETWEEN ISSUES FROM YOUR FAVORITE CONTRIBUTORS AT upstater.com.

Kirby Salvador is a Chicago native living in New York City and working as an illustrator and project manager. In illustration, “the possibilities are endless,” she says. “I’m inspired by my friends, strangers, pop culture, and movies.” upstater.com/contributors/kirbysalvadore

VISIT US upstater.com

CONTACT US hello@upstater.com

Leander Schaerlaeckens is a freelance writer, based in Beacon, whose work has appeared in the New York Times, the Guardian, ESPN The Magazine, and elsewhere. His website is LeanderAlphabet.com, and his Twitter handle is @LeanderAlphabet. upstater.com/contributors/ leanderschaerlaeckens

FOLLOW US

facebook.com/upstater Liza Donnelly is an award-winning cartoonist and writer for the New York Times, The New Yorker, Forbes, Politico, and Medium. As a public speaker, she travels globally on behalf of freedom of speech and women’s rights, and is a cultural envoy for the U.S. State Department. Donnelly is also the author of 16 books for children and adults and the New York director of the international organization Cartooning for Peace. She divides her time between New York City and Rhinebeck.

instagram/upstater #upstater

upstater.com/contributors/lizadonnelly

When Jason Cring, a Rhinebeckbased illustrator and graphic artist (and Upstater’s founding art director), isn’t setting type, he’s probably doodling something incoherent in his sketchbook. In addition to his love of infographics, Cring has a fondness for the absurd and an uncanny knack for knowing all the best coffee shops within any given 10-mile radius. upstater.com/contributors/jasoncring

SPRING 2016

13


u

COMPARISON

14 upstater

I L L U S T R AT I O N S B Y L I Z A D O N N E L LY

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m


FRESH CONTENT EVERY DAY AT

upstater.com/cartoons

SPRING 2016

15


feed your obsession.

your real estate-obsessed best friend 16 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

upstater.com


Enter to Win Upstater’s

PEEKSKILL Weekend Getaway

enter

UPS

TA T

ER

/P .COM

EEK

SK

GET ILL-

A WA

Y

online

Dinner for 2 at 12 Grapes 12Grapes.com

Upstater Give-away 2 Tickets to a Paramount Hudson Valley Performance ParamountHudsonValley.com

Two night stay at the Inn on the Hudson InnontheHudson.com

Eat, drink, shop & stay in beautiful Peekskill...on us! ENTER FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN AT Upstater.com/peekskill-getaway Participating Businesses Include:

SPRING 2016

17


Photo by Roy Gumpel

MARIANNE COURVILLE OWNER, HUDSON WINE MERCHANTS AND THE HUDSON STANDARD HOMETOWN: Westerly, Rhode Island MOVED TO THE HUDSON VALLEY FROM: Brooklyn LIVES IN: Taghanik, by way of Chatham and Hudson FAVORITE THING ABOUT UPSTATE: “The clean air, the local farms, and Hudson, which uniquely combines an upstate and downstate sensibility.” LEAST FAVORITE THING ABOUT UPSTATE: “Driving! I’m not a big fan of driving and I do a lot of it.” When Marianne Courville and her husband, Michael Albin, became parents in Brooklyn in 2002, they found the clean, open spaces upstate beckoning irresistibly. “We had a kid and didn’t want to live in the city, not least because it’s too expensive,” she says. “We had already gotten a little house up in Chatham, and we found we just never wanted to go back [to New York]. We knew we were meant to be up here, even though we really had no idea what we’d do with ourselves for work. We just took the plunge and then figured out what to do after. It always felt right.” That’s not to say there was no adjustment involved. “At the same time, we’d find ourselves going to Hudson a lot, to get that city feel: ‘Let’s go to the Red Dot … it’s kinda like Brooklyn.’” Over the course of the next few years, Courville weaned herself away from her city gig as a curator for photographer, art collector, and philanthropist Henry Buhl. “When we first moved, I was commuting full-time with a kid. I loved my job—I mean, we created an exhibit at the Guggenheim,” she recalls. “I knew I wouldn’t find anything like that upstate, but the commute was brutal. I started gradually commuting less: four days a week, three, two.” (Buhl undoubtedly missed her. “[Marianne] knew much more than I did,” he told Sotheby’s magazine in 2012. “She was the one doing the legwork. ... She was very instrumental in honing my taste.”)

18 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

Determined to find a creative role upstate, Courville and Albin bought a Warren Street building. In 2004, they opened Hudson Wine Merchants on the first floor and the Marianne Courville Gallery on the third floor. “We just got this idea,” Courville says, “that we wanted to do a wine shop / gallery / tasting bar as a combination, but you can’t do all of those in the same space for legal reasons. So we opened the wine shop on the ground floor and the gallery and tasting bar on the third, and lived on the second floor.” (The gallery has since been renamed the Third Floor, and functions mostly as an events space.) After four years of city life in miniature, the family needed more room and moved 10 miles outside town. But when Courville found herself diving into yet a third business, the Warren Street building’s second floor became kitchen and office space for The Hudson Standard. Having become aware of the West Coast handmade bitters trend, Courville decided that bitters and shrubs—handcrafted cocktail ingredients—were a Hudson Valley natural. “I’ve witnessed the growth of the New York beverage boom firsthand through Hudson Wine Merchants,” she says, “and I got really excited to complement it with our mixers and bitters, which puts us in direct contact with local farms as sources for our ingredients.” Courville is no longer wondering what to do with herself upstate: seven-day workweeks are the rule. To recharge her batteries, though, she’s glad to have open spaces close at hand. “I love long hikes and walks with Percy, our rescue dog,” she says. “It definitely feels like we’re right where we’re supposed to be.”—Anne Pyburn Craig WE E K AT S UI N MNOVATION. M E R 2 0 1 5 N EW CONTE NT EVE RY18

upstater.com/innovators


ADAGE

LUXURY AMBIENT FRAGRANCES FOR A CURATED LIFESTYLE Visit the new flagship store at 314 Warren Street Hudson, NY

Online store: adage-nyc.com

HOUSE NORTH HUDSON COUNTRY VALLEY VINTAGE REALTY Vintage Rentals • Timeless Design A Hudson Valley vintage rental firm offering mismatched table settings, furnishings, and unique props. Our ever-evolving collection of hand-picked, one-of-a-kind pieces will add the charming touches to truly transform your wedding, party or photo shoot!

A boutique retailer offering a carefully curated selection of vintage, repurposed and eclectic finds, as well as gifts to compliment your special occasion.

347.615.5528 / 723 Columbia Street, Hudson, NY NorthCountryVintage.com SPRING 2016

19


u

OBJECTIFIED

S T O RY B Y P E T E R D . M A RT I N / P H O T O B Y R O Y G U M P E L / I L L U S T R AT I O N S B Y J A S O N C R I N G

Photo by Roy Gumpel

DEAR ARTHUR WELLESLEY, ST 1 DUKE OF WELLINGTON, Do you mind if we call you Artie?

We just want to say thanks for the boots. Sure, we get it, you did some other stuff too. You defeated Napoleon, lorded it over Britain’s Treasury before anyone else, and prime-ministered Great Britain, all while wearing wellies, and your statue’s looking great these days (thought you should know). But let’s put history aside: It’s spring in Upstate New York and the only things keeping us from getting trench foot happen to bear your moniker. In the wicked, rainy world beyond our foyers lie slush, mud, and puddles, all of which are waiting to ambush our etiolated extremities much like you ambushed the Persians at Thermopylae (did we get that right?).

20 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

As we well know, wet feet are about as enjoyable as a Mongol invasion (swell job with that, by the way). Your boots, like obdurate armaments, implacably impenetrable, and stave off the inevitable—dare we say it—like a naval blockade. Whether we’re crossing Seventh Avenue, the marsh on our country estates, the Catskills, or even the Alps (that was you too, right?), we know that Wellingtons, or even one of their hipster imitators (sorry, MukLuks), are the only boots for the job, and if they’re good enough for the likes of you, Artie, hey, they’re good enough for us. So thank you, many, many times, for the boots. Oh, and for all the other stuff too.


RUBBER BOOTS THROUGH TIME

RUBBER BOOTS THROUGH TIME

FAS H I O N

“Wellingtons” become all the rage amongst the foppish British elite, who wear them as “Wellingtons” a way to conveybecome their all the rage amongst theactually foppish patriotism without British elite, who wear them as engaging in the more savage a way to aspects of convey war. their patriotism without actually engaging in the more savage aspects of war.

The future Princess Diana is photographed sporting a pair of rubber Hunter boots at the TheBalmoral future Princess estate Diana duringisher photographed sporting a pair courtship with Prince Charles, of rubber Hunter boots at the moments before being Balmoral estate during her scolded by the Queen for a courtship with Prince Charles, flagrant display of nonchamoments before being lance.

scolded by the Queen for a At the height of mod culture, Mattelflagrant display of nonchaunveils “Twiggy Barbie.” Modeled lance.

the swinging fashion Atafter the height of mod ’60s culture, Mattelicon, the doll comesBarbie. complete with heavy unveils “Twiggy ” Modeled eye the makeup, a colorful minidress, after swinging ’60s fashion icon, yellow go-go complete boots, andwith impossibly the doll comes heavy attainable proportions. eye makeup,body a colorful minidress, yellow go-go boots, and impossibly attainable body proportions.

N -E ER ED

TI

T

B L Ü IT E NT H E T R

R T

E IS

O

F

Wellies give way to new brands such as Mukluks, UGG, and Nomad Puddles and are a Wellies give way to new brands accessory at such must-have as Mukluks,fashion UGG, and anyPuddles outdoorand event mud Nomad are where a must-have fashionconverge. accessory at and hipsters any outdoor event where mud and hipsters converge.

In Soviet Russia, rubber footwear is promoted as “socialism style”

DAN DI ES’ PEAK

In Soviet Russia, rubber footwear and much preferable to more lavish is promoted “socialism style” “capitalistasstyle” leather footwear. andGovernment much preferable to more attempts to lavish replace fur “capitalist style” leather footwear. Cossack hats with “Soviet power Government attempts to replace fur beanies” prove less successful. Cossack hats with “Soviet power beanies” prove less successful.T H E F U

1830

1815

boots is the equivalent of draping oneself head-to-toe in chinchilla D fur. LE

F O BE E Ü IS HE

R

DAN DI ES’ PEAK

1815

A worldwide rubber shortage puts such a premium on the material that wearing rubber A worldwide shortage of draping boots isrubber the equivalent puts such a premium on thein chinchilla oneself head-to-toe material fur.that wearing rubber

FAS H I O N

RUBBER BOOTS THROUGH TIME

1830

1853

1915

1853

1915

1945 1945

1961 1967 1961 1967

1981 1981

2015

T H E

2015

T U R E

2050

F U T U R E

2050

VA LLEY O F

OF PVALLEY R ACTI CALITY P R ACT I CALI T Y

The Duke of Wellington tasks Duke shoemaker of Wellingtontotasks his The personal his personal shoemaker improve upon the standardto improve uponHessian the standard military-issued boots, military-issued Hessian boots, resulting in the birth of the resulting in the birth of the Wellington boot, which ushers Wellington boot, which ushers in a new era of smart casual in a new era of smart casual military outfits. military outfits.

In the aftermath of World War

After learning about After learning about Goodyear’s Goodyear’s rubber rubber innovations, innovations, Hiram HiramHutchinson Hutchinson introduces introduces the to thefirst firstrubber rubber Wellingtons Wellingtons to farmers in France, enabling farmers in France, enabling them to work all day in the them to work all day in the muck fear muckand and mire mire without without fear ofofcontracting feet.”” contracting “bog “bog feet.

In the aftermath of World II, rubber boots prove War to be the II, rubber boots the footwear of prove choicetoinbesifting footwear of choice in sifting through the rubble of through the rubble of war-savaged Europe war-savaged Europe

Duringthe theWorld WorldWar War I, the During I, the productionofofWellingtons Wellingtons soars production soars as as theforward-thinking forward-thinking rubber the rubber technologyisisdeployed deployed meet technology to to meet thethe demandsofofthe thebackward-thinking backward-thinking demands militarytactic tacticofoftrench trench warfare. military warfare.

FUNC F U N TION C T I ON

ENTERTAINMENT ENTERTAINMENT ENTERTAINMENT

SPORT

LANGUAGE LANGUAGE

SPORT SPORT

LANGUAGE

TOP 10 MOST OBJEC TIVELY TOP 10 M OS T OB J E C T I V E LY ANNOYING HYPOCORISMS*

A N N OYI N G HYP OCOR I S M S *

G U M B O OT ZYD EC O

U M Bas O aOT ZYD ECO WhatGbegan form of communication by gumboot-wearing South African gold What began as a form of communication miners during Apartheid a by gumboot-wearing Southevolves Africaninto gold boot-slapping step-dance performance miners during Apartheid evolves into a set to traditional African rhythms. boot-slapping step-dance performance set to traditional African rhythms.

WE LLY WAN G I N G

E old LLYalike WA N GtoI N G Young W and flock annual competitions in Wellington hurling, Young and old alike flock to annual otherwise known as welly wanging. The competitions in Wellington hurling, sport, which elevates the athletic merit of otherwise known as welly wanging. The Cheese Rolling, originated in the British sport, which elevates the athletic merit of town of Upperthong. Cheese Rolling, originated in the British town of Upperthong.

1. telly – short for television 1. telly––short shortfor forsandwich television 2. sammie 2. sammie – short sandwich boots 3. wellies – short forfor Wellington 3. wellies short for Wellington boots 4. Gertie – short–for Gertrude 4. Gertie – short for Gertrude 5. bickie – short for biscuit 5. bickie – short for biscuit 6. brekky – short for breakfast 6. brekky – short for breakfast 7. Rodge – short for Roger 8. gummies shortfor forRoger gumboots 7. Rodge – short 9. chockie – short for chocolate 8. gummies – short for gumboots 10. zeke – short–for Elizabeth 9. chockie short for chocolate

10. zeke – short for Elizabeth *Affectionate nicknames *Affectionate nicknames

SPRING 2016

21


Photo by Roy Gumpel

ASHLEY KNOX COLLEGE ADMINISTRATOR/ACTIVIST HOMETOWN: Kingston LIVES IN: Port Ewen WORKS IN: Newburgh WORDS TO LIVE BY: “Stay hopeful. Stay positive. Stay optimistic.” Ashley Knox has an easy laugh, but she’s all business when it comes to her passion: helping young people get a strong start on life. Knox is the study-abroad coordinator at Mount Saint Mary College (MSMC) in Newburgh. As an attendee at the 2013 Women & Power Retreat at Omega Institute, she found herself deeply affected by the University of Houston sociology professor, author, and public speaker Brené Brown’s keynote speech. “It really touched my heart, and made me think about what I could be doing here,” she recalls. Following the retreat, Knox began offering free adult workshops in Ulster County on communication, dispute resolution, and parental support for families with youth who were getting off probation. “But I wanted to shift the same paradigm over to young people,” she says. Knox founded Go Beyond Greatness, Inc. (GBG) in November 2014. Through workshops and the organization’s website, Slammin.me, GBG offers training workshops for regional youth in leadership, communication, positive behavior, and personal discipline, all designed to prepare young people to thrive in real-life settings and achieve college and career readiness. As MSMC’s study-abroad coordinator, Knox travels a lot. Last year, she visited the Skema Business School, a top international business school located in Lille, France’s Silicon Valley, where she witnessed “absolutely amazing 21st-century learning”—and became even more determined to make a difference to Hudson Valley youth. This winter, Knox hosted 50 international students for a Hudson Valley sustainable business tour through a partnership between MSMC’s International School of Business; Re>Think Local, a nonprofit collaborative, to which GBG belongs, of businesses, artists, farmers, and nonprofits; and marketing communications firm Courtney Strong Inc. And last September, Knox won funding to bring 10 young women to Omega Institute’s Women & Power Retreat. “They listened to women

22 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

from around the globe who are redefining power talk about what it means to be a woman leader, and to come together with others for the progress and advancement of humanity,” says Knox. “They were inspired to feel ‘I can do this!’ and reminded to keep striving, no matter what.” GBG is already accumulating a string of success stories. One involves a shy young high school student from Guyana. Thanks to GBG, she became active in Middletown High School’s clubs and social life. Now a college student majoring in political science and history, she plans to become an international human rights attorney, and has lined up internships at a pre-law summer institute in Buffalo and elected officials’ offices in Newburgh and Albany. “GBG’s focus on tapping into your leadership, inner talents, and abilities helped her to believe in herself,” says Knox. “She learned to build up her perseverance and practice before real life. I’m very proud of her, because she took full advantage of what’s available.” Knox holds a master’s of professional studies in humanistic and multicultural education and an undergraduate degree in sociology, specializing in Spanish and Black studies, from SUNY New Paltz. While her own parents nurtured her resilient core of self-confidence, she acknowledges that not every young person is so fortunate. “They taught me to strive for excellence and to understand that failure is part of life. It gets you closer to your goals,” she says. “You have to focus on service to others, and tap into yourself as a meaningful contributor. All our life experiences shape us and bring us closer to our next accomplishment.” And for Knox, “next accomplishments” are always in the making. “I’m a woman and I’m a single mother, so when it comes to the art of multitasking, I do it naturally,” she explains. “I don’t even think about it: I make things happen. At the same time, I’m not a one-woman show, and I can’t take all the credit. I’m surrounded by, and supported by, a group of strong mentors with proven track records in business and education. I have a wonderful circle of support.” —Debra Bresnan INNOVATORS. NEW CONTENT EVERY WEEK 22 AT

upstater.com/innovators


Mount Saint Mary College

AN EXCEPTIONAL EDUCATION IN THE HEART OF THE HUDSON VALLEY

ExplorE thE mount!

Visit msmc.edu/VirtualTour

The Country’s Largest Display of Unique Slabs and Burls

Berkshire Products

Sheffield, MA 413-229-7919 BerkshireProducts.com

SPRING 2016

23


u

FOOD + DRINK

S T O RY B Y K A R E N A N G E L Photo by Jonah Vitale-Wolff

EDIBLE IDEALS Five food businesses put personal values into their products.

The Hudson Valley has long been a magnet for both the socially and the environmentally conscious. In recent years, the farm-to-table movement has focused consumers and producers alike on the environmental and health benefits of local fare. Now a growing number of businesspeople in the area—from farmers to cooks and bakers—are marrying their personal values with their professional lives and serving up social substance along with sustenance. Above: Harvesting garlic at Soul Fire Farms in Grafton. Opposite, from top: Making blondies at Greyston Bakery; Chocolatier Lagusta Yearwood; Vegan blood-orange and chocolate hearts from Lagusta’s Luscious.

24 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m


1

Photo courtesy of Greyston Bakery

1. GREYSTON BAKERY

Photo courtesy of Lagusta’s Luscious

Internationally famous Buddhist teacher Bernie Glassman—a Brooklyn native—founded Greyston Bakery in Yonkers in 1982 with a mission to fuel personal transformation among the disenfranchised and help bring about community economic renewal in struggling Yonkers. Today, the thriving bakery offers an array of community benefits along with its high-quality baked goods—$15 million worth of which were sold last year alone. “I think our product is absolutely amazing, but our major partnerships have come about through mission work,” says Ariel Hauptman, Greyston’s director of business development. Each year, under its open-hiring program, Greyston enrolls about 100 apprentices with criminal records and other barriers to employment and teaches them to make its signature cookies, brownies, and blondies. About a third of the apprentices graduate to full-time jobs at the bakery, whose main gig is supplying the brownies for several flavors of Ben & Jerry’s ice cream. Greyston also helps its staff find affordable housing, child care, and opportunities for advancement. One of its success stories is Dion Drew, an ex-convict who has risen from apprentice to assistant supervisor in his seven years at Greyston. “It’s just a blessing,” Drew says. “They gave me the opportunity to grow.”

104 Alexander Street, Yonkers / (914) 375-1510 / Greyston.com

2. LAGUSTA’S LUSCIOUS

2

Lagusta Yearwood’s artisanal chocolates are vegan, but if you didn’t know, you probably wouldn’t guess. “I wanted to do something in line with my values,” says Yearwood, an animal-rights activist. “But we have a lot of customers who aren’t vegan. We use coconut milk and coconut oil, which are nice and fatty and rich. It’s not like we’re using weird tofu.” She pairs unusual ingredients such as yuzu, shitake, fennel, and peppercorn with dark chocolate—all organic and ethically sourced— creating sweet, sour, earthy, and spicy flavor combinations. The intricately fashioned confectionary presented at Lagusta’s Luscious, Yearwood’s five-year-old shop in New Paltz, also has a distinctly feminist twist. Several offerings are named after groundbreaking female pioneers, including physicist Vandana Shiva. The Furious Vulva is a womanly shaped oval of dark chocolate, pink peppercorn, and pink sea salt. And Lagusta’s activist bonbons and truffles are making their way far beyond what she calls her “world headquarters” in New Paltz. Find them in the Hudson Valley at Outdated Café in Kingston, Echo Boutique in Beacon, Taste at Todd Hill in Poughkeepsie, Tuthilltown Spirits in Gardiner, and Verdigris in Hudson; in Manhattan at Handsome Dan’s and Local Roots NYC at Fulton Stalls Market; in Brooklyn at Riverdel Cheese and Sparrow; or in nine other states and Washington, D.C.

25 N. Front Street, New Paltz / (845) 633-8615 / LagustasLuscious.com SPRING 2016

25


3. SOUL FIRE FARM Soul Fire Farm is a sustainable, Certified Naturally Grown farm in Grafton that addresses disparities in land ownership and access to produce by offering a training program for aspiring black, indigenous, and Latino farmers, activist retreats, youth agriculture classes, and an inner-city CSA (communitysupported agriculture), which charges on a sliding scale and accepts SNAP benefits. In 2011, husband and wife and co-owners Jonah Vitale-Wolff and Leah Penniman launched Soul Fire on the 72-acre farm where they live with their two young children, growing vegetables, raising poultry, tending fruit orchards, teaching sustainable building methods, and focusing on ending racism and injustice in the food system through the many programs they offer. Penniman, who is African-American, and Vitale-Wolff, who is Italian and Jewish, met at Clark University, and bonded over their shared love of farming and desire to use it as a tool for social good. “Both of us feel our souls really come alive when we get to do this work,” Vitale-Wolff says.

1972 Highway 2, Grafton / (518) 229-1339) / SoulFireFarm.com Photo courtesy of Soul Fire Farm

4. CERTIFIED NATURALLY GROWN There are 740 American and Canadian farms (including Soul Fire Farm) whose produce is Certified Naturally Grown (CNG), a less expensive and less time-consuming alternative to the US Department of Agriculture’s organic certification. Several Hudson Valley farmers who were committed to organic practices but felt that the national program wasn’t a good fit founded CNG in 2002. They hired environmental activist Alice Varon to run the nonprofit organization after learning about her lobbying efforts to label genetically engineered seeds. CNG’s modest yearly dues range from $110 to $200, and its certification process includes an inspection by a local farmer, which makes it a true peer-to-peer system. “I wanted to invest my energy in an organization that would support the people working most closely with the land,” says Varon, who splits her time between Stone Ridge and Brooklyn, where CNG’s office is located.

3 Above: Leah Penniman and Jonah Vitale-Wolff, spouses and co-owners of Soul Fire Farm, and their children. Below: Alice Varon, founder of Certified Naturally Grown, at her office in Brooklyn.

540 President Street, 3rd Floor, Brooklyn / (845) 687-2058 / CNGFarming.org

4 Photo by Pamela Ashley Pasco

26 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m


COLD SPRING CHAMBER OF COMWALKWAY MERCE OVER THE HUDSON L Let’s meet in

COLD SPRING

Shop. Dine. Explore. explorecoldspringny.com

FULL & HALF MARATHON USATF Certified

5K & Think Differently Dash

The Borland House bed & breakfast / restaurant

L

SCENIC RAIL TRAILS & HUDSON RIVER VIEWS ALL AGES & ABILITIES WELCOME

L

gourmet farm I table brunch

SPONSOR

classic bed and breakfast style

L

845-457-1513

130 clinton st • montgomery ny www.theborlandhouse.com

DON’T MISS A THING.

VOLUNTEER

SPRING/SUMMER EDITION ON STANDS APRIL 1ST To advertise, email Nicole@explorethehudsonvalley.com SPRING 2016

27


5 Photos by Jennifer May

5. OUR LADY OF THE RESURRECTION MONASTERY VINEGAR For Brother Victor-Antoine d’Avila-Latourrette, crafting vinegar by hand is perfectly in tune with the monastic values of simplicity and hard work. The Benedictine monk, a 40-year resident of Our Lady of the Resurrection Monastery in Lagrangeville, grew up in the French Pyrenees, where he learned to make vinegar using the painstaking medieval method of the local monasteries. With herbs from the monastery’s garden and other local ingredients, he creates distinctive flavors like apricot, sherry, and honey cider that are tasty enough to sip straight from the bottles sold in the monastery’s small shop (prices range from $4 to $20 per bottle). The key, he says, is the fermentation process of up to 12 months for his standard vinegars and 20 months for the Special Reserve versions. “It’s like good wine—it gets better with time,” says d’Avila-Latourrette, who is also an accomplished chef and the author of a dozen cookbooks. You can taste for yourself at the monastery’s Vinegar Festival, held every July.

246 Barmore Road, Lagrangeville / (845) 677-9361 OurLadyoftheResurrectionMonastery.webs.com

From above: Vinegar varieties for purchase at the Our Lady of the Resurrection Monasgtery in Lagrangeville; Brother Victor-Antoine d’Avila-Latrourrette shows the fermented fruits of his labor.

28 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

HUNGRY FOR MORE? NEW CONTENT EVERY WEEK AT

upstater.com/food–drink


SPONSORED CONTENT

C A T E R I N G + E V E N T S

Lili Trenkova (left) and Raffaella Ciavatta exchange wedding vows at Catskill Animal Sanctuary in 2015.

Idyll with Ideals 175 MAIN ST. NEW PALTZ, NY · (845) 255-2600 · MAINCOURSECATERING.COM

upstater has a place for you. Reach thousands of NYC residents who care about the food they eat, travel and leisure, field-to-glass cocktails, shopping small, sustainability, and the natural beauty that surrounds us. UPSTATER.COM/ADVERTISE

(845)334-8600 x144

Since opening in 2001 to promote animal rights and vegan living, Catskill Animal Sanctuary in Saugerties has rescued more than 3,500 farm animals. Now, home to more than 300 animals, CAS welcomes guests for weekends, weddings, and other events at its bed-andbreakfast, the Homestead. An 1813 farmhouse, the Homestead was renovated using traditional carpentry methods and eco-friendly salvaged materials. Its original wide-plank floors, exposed brick walls, sumptuous fireplaces, and contemporary furnishings create an elegant, cozy wedding venue. The Homestead accommodates 30 people inside and 50 people outside on its gently rolling lawn. “I can’t think of a better place for a couple to exchange their vows promising love and understanding,” says CAS founder Kathy Stevens. “The Sanctuary has those very things at its heart.” Lili Trenkova and Raffaella Ciavatta were among the first couples to wed at CAS. “It was the first sanctuary the two of us visited, so we have a special connection with it and all of its residents, human and nonhuman,” says Trenkova. While staying at the Homestead, recalls Ciavatta, “We experienced one of the most peaceful nights of sleep of our lives, so it made perfect sense for us to hold our wedding ceremony at CAS.” The Homestead features a suite (queen bedroom, kitchen, private bath and living room) and three guestrooms, and offers extra cots and air mattresses for additional guests. (Well-behaved dogs are welcome.) Guests receive a complimentary vegan breakfast (with gift baskets available), a VIP pass to visit CAS’s animal residents, and a tour. Nearby, Saugerties offers an eclectic and charming array of dining, shopping, and hiking options. For more information, visit casanctuary.org/upwedding or call (845) 336-8447. —Susan Piperato

SPRING 2016

29


FOOD + DRINK

S T O RY B Y P E T E R D . M A RT I N Photo courtesy of Tuthilltown Spirits

u

Gin up

F

rom its heyday in the 1920s through its mid-century lull in popularity, gin has had a rocky course in American history. And the spirit itself, made by infusing a neutral base liquor with herbs and botanicals (namely juniper), has also seen its fair share of fluctuations. But today, things are looking up for gin. Because its broad flavor profiles make it uniquely suited to mixing, gin is getting a lot of attention in terms of the exploding cocktail culture and the craft-distilling trend. In fact, gin makes a compelling business case because it doesn’t need to be aged, meaning distillers can expect to see returns on their product much sooner than with other spirits, such as whiskey, that require years of barreling and storage. Propelled by some radical shifts in New York State’s distilling laws, Hudson Valley craft distillers are creating a gin renaissance, and there’s never been a better time—or place— to enjoy it. The 2007 Farm Distillery Act greatly reduced the legal hurdles for craft distillers to produce and market their products (as long as they use 75 percent of New York Stategrown ingredients), and the 2014 Craft New York Act allows distillers to serve “full pours” and cocktails from their tasting rooms, further establishing the region as a tourist destina-

tion. The state also offers grants for marketing and development, including $1 million recently awarded to Empire State Cooperage to satisfy the increasing demand for oak barrels. In the past five years alone, the number of distillers in New York State has skyrocketed over 500 percent, with many of them in the Hudson Valley. While offerings in the area run the gamut, there are some common themes emerging to give Hudson Valley gins a distinct character, and chief among them is balance. Many producers are opting to limit the variety of added botanicals, using fewer but adding more of each one for more expression in the finished spirit. Distillers are by and large embracing the New American style of gin, dialing back the juniper in favor of citrus and floral notes. Local producers offer plenty of variety to satisfy the seasoned gin drinker, but if you think maybe gin isn’t your thing, it may be time to give it another shot (but perhaps not literally). Almost all of the distillers featured here report visitors saying, “I don’t usually like gin, but I like yours.” Even if you haven’t drunk gin since college, these seven Hudson Valley distillers are making it like you’ve never had it before, and they definitely deserve a try.

A classic spirit gets back on the Hudson Valley map.

30 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m


Photo courtesy of Tuthilltown Spirits

TUTHILLTOWN SPIRITS DISTILLERY

Starting in 2003, Tuthilltown Spirits kicked off the craftdistilling movement in New York State after founders Ralph Erenzo and Brian Lee happened upon an obscure 2002 piece of state legislation allowing small distilleries to get a license for $1,450 instead of the $60,000 it cost back then. Since then, the two have been instrumental in legislation reducing red tape, lowering the cost of permits, and streamlining the application process, inspiring dozens of craft distillers to follow in their footsteps. It’s no surprise that Tuthilltown Spirits’ Half Moon Gin is equally inspiring. Erenzo and Lee use an 80 percent apple, 20-percent corn base infused with nine botanicals that’s perfect for cocktails. Erenzo says they deemphasized the juniper to keep the gin’s flavor from approaching medicinal. “Our goal was to keep it more cocktail friendly and approachable,” he explains, and “to make it fun to drink.” Don’t take his word for it though: At Tuthill House, the distillery’s adjoining restaurant, set in a historic 1788 gristmill, celebrates the current “ginsanity” trend with special drinks, cocktail classes, and even some gin-infused food on the menu (like seasoned Brussels sprouts with an added kick). The Gin and Jam, a mixture of gin, orange juice, and jam from local farmers, is served in a mason jar, ready for shaking.

14 Grist Mill Lane, Gardiner / (845) 255-1527 / Tuthilltown.com

Photo courtesy of Hudson Valley Distillers

HUDSON VALLEY DISTILLERS

The idea for Hudson Valley Distillers was born around a campfire when old friends and college frat brothers Tom Yozzo and Chris Moyer were hanging out drinking craft spirits. “We knew we could do this just as good,” recalls Moyer. Fast-forward to April 2014 when Hudson Valley Distillers opened a renovated barn’s doors at Spirits Grove Farm in Clermont, where Yozzo and Moyer have been making exceptional liquors ever since. Spirits Grove Gin stretches gin’s definition to the limit, making for an exceptional and unusual experience. “We did a couple of experiments on the still, and found what we liked,” Moyer says. Rather than start with a corn- or grain-based neutral spirit, Hudson Valley Distillers distills wine from neighboring HudsonChatham Winery. The gin is then flavored with a proprietary blend of botanicals, including juniper and staghorn sumac foraged on the property, which adds a soft but crisp touch of citrus. The results make for a very unusual gin. “It’s a lot like a Christmas tree punching you in the face,” says Moyer. The wine base is definitely expressed, creating a smooth-mouth feel, and its grape-brandy flavor might be familiar to fans of pisco—in fact, it makes a great pisco sour. But Moyer likes to keep it simple. To make a Hudson Valley Foghorn, he mixes the gin chilled with ginger beer and some lime at the Cocktail Grove, an indoor/outdoor tasting room, where visitors can bring their kids and dogs and hang out on the lawn, listening to music.

1727 Route 9, Germantown / (518) 537-6820 / HudsonValleyDistillers.com

GIN THROUGH

THE AGES

Early 1500s: The first recorded recipe for genever, gin’s precursor, is produced in Antwerp, the Netherlands. Produced with a fortified wine base and flavored with juniper, genever tastes like grappa or vermouth. Sold as medicine by distilleries, it’s drunk via the “kopstoot,” or head-butt method, by bending at the waist to “slurpen,” hands-free.

1609: Henry Hudson discovers the river that now bears his name, and invites some indigenous peoples aboard the Half Moon. Ship documents record how he “tooke them downe into the cabbin, and gave them so much wine and aqua vitae [likely genever], that they were all merrie.” The inevitable result: ”In the ende one of them was drunke…and that was strange to them, for they could not tell how to take it.”

1640s: During the Thirty Years War, England and Holland ally against Spain, with English soldiers drinking genever, nicknamed “Dutch Courage,” before battle. Genever production begins in London in “strong water shops.”

SPRING 2016

31


Photo courtesy of Denning’s Point Distillery

DENNING’S POINT DISTILLERY

Founded in 2014, Denning’s Point sits at the crossroads between old and new: Its spirits have a Colonial history, but founder Karl Johnson operates his equipment from his iPhone. Great 9 Gin is named for one of the original land patents given to Hudson Valley settlers, it’s decidedly modern. Instead of the typical double-barrel-juniper-blast, Great 9 Gin’s floral notes of citrus form early on the palette and finish gently into a clearly defined but mellower juniper flavor, making it great for mixing. Denning’s Point serves house cocktails to live music in its 2,800-square-foot tasting room, converted from an auto garage. Its Negroni Twist updates the classic combo of gin and sweet vermouth by substituting Aperol for Campari.

10 N. Chestnut Street, Beacon / (845) 230-7905 / DenningsPointDistillery.com

BERKSHIRE MOUNTAIN DISTILLERS

Photos courtesy of Berkshire Mountain Distillers

Chris Weld has been fascinated by distilling since eighth grade, when he tried to build a still for a science fair. Luckily, his mother stopped him from committing a federal offense, but more luckily, he later pursued his passion, opening the Berkshires’ first legal distillery since Prohibition. Berkshire Mountain Distillers, which has operated on an old apple orchard with its own spring in Sheffield, Massachusetts, since 2007, is a “distiller’s distillery.” Weld says running the spring water through his salvaged BrownForman still makes for an exceptional gin. “The core temperature is very gentle on the botanicals,” he says, allowing them to fully express their flavor. Berkshire’s flagship Greylock Gin is a juniper-forward Londondry style balanced with plenty of citrus and lots of florality, perfect for a dry martini. But gin aficionados should watch for Weld’s limited-edition Ethereal Gin. Each batch is different: One emphasizes rose hips (Batch 6), another exudes brown spice (Batch 8), and others barrel age for 18 months to make what’s arguably the king of Negronis. Recently, Batch 12 was in the works, but Weld kept the details top secret. Let’s see what he does next.

356 South Main Street, Sheffield, Massachusetts / (413) 229-0219 / BerkshireMountainDistillers.com

ORANGE COUNTY DISTILLERY

Orange County Distillery was born of a surplus of sugar beets that would’ve rotted in farmer John Glebocki’s barn in Goshen if he and his friend Bryan Ensall hadn’t decided to turn it into vodka instead. Two years later, the distillery makes sugar beet vodka, whiskey and, of course, gin. For Glebocki and Ensall’s gin, every ingredient is grown right on Glebocki’s farm, including the botanicals. “If we can’t grow it, we won’t use it,” says Ensall. The two substitute local lemon balm and citrus mint for orange peel, adding lavender for floral notes. The gin’s base is 100 percent corn, distilled until neutral and infused afterwards with botanicals. Its flavor is New American, with juniper giving way to citrus for a more balanced, drinkable spirit. Try it in Not by the Hair of My Ginny-Gin-Gin at the distillery’s tasting room. It’s a mix of blood orange juice, gin, and mint-maple syrup that showcases a slew of notes that otherwise may go unnoticed.

19B Maloney Lane, Goshen / (845) 651-2929 / OrangeCountyDistillery.com

1690: King William of Orange’s “Distiller’s Act,” deregulates distillation and enables home distillation. Gin becomes the drink of the masses. By 1721, over a quarter of London’s residents are employed in its production.

32 upstater

1720s: London’s gin craze is equivalent to America’s 1980s crack epidemic. Distilled crudely and flavored with just about anything, even turpentine, gin is dangerous. Late 1700s: The popularity of gin, a decidedly British spirit, declines in America thanks to the Revolution.

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m / fo o d – d r i n k

1862: The earliest recorded use of the word “cocktail” hails from the Columbian Repository newspaper in Hudson, which calls gin a “stimulating liquor…[that] renders the heart stout and bold, at the same time that it fuddles the head.” The first cocktail was like today’s Old-Fashioned, with gin instead of whiskey.

1888: Harry Johnson’s Bartender’s Manual includes the modern martini, made with gin. Early 1900s: The golden age of cocktails dawns, with New York City as its epicenter.

1919: Congress approves the National Prohibition Act over President Woodrow Wilson’s veto. But alcohol is as popular as ever. “Bathtub gin” is made with watered-down grain alcohol and juniper extract (sold in department stores) or kerosene for extra kick.


H U D S O N VA L L E Y W I N E S

Built on the foundation of a turn of the wines that represent the true flavor of the region, without the use of chemicals, pumps implementing concepts of sustainablity, biodiversity and energy efficiency.

The Gift Hut

naturally made

Open year-round: Friday - Sunday 11am-6pm

century winery, Stoutridge strives to make

or filters. The winery is state of the art,

|

10 Ann Kaley Lane, Marlboro, NY 845 236 7620 W W W . S TO U T R I D G E . CO M

The Corcoran Group Real Estate

Come visit us Fri, Sat, Sun 10am to 6pm

Samantha G. Reiss Licensed Associate Real Estate Broker m: (917) 575-5160, sgr@corcoran.com

Unique Gifts • Jewelry • Home Decor • Toys • Games & Puzzles A great selection of Eco-Friendly, locally made, and USA made products.

Planning a move to the country? We can assist you with all of your real estate needs, providing a seamless transition, whether you are looking to sell or to purchase a New York City apartment. If Samantha G. Reiss your objective is to move to the Hudson (left) and Catherine Menichino (right) Valley, we have agents who can assist in your search for a special place there as well. We are your primary resource when relocating to or from NYC!

86 Main St, Cold Spring, NY

TIME AND SPACE LIMITED Time & Space Limited in Hudson NY . . . the most adventurous globe-spanning indie movie programming in the region! www.timeandspace.org

Clothing and gifts for all seasons

A local destination in New Paltz for Handcrafts, Jewelry, and Clothing for over 40 years.

6 North Front Street, New Paltz, NY Open 7 Days 845.255.6277

Specializing in American Crafts

handmadeandmore SPRING 2016

33


GIN COCKTAILS

10 Union Street, Roscoe / (607) 685-8989 / ProhibitionDistillery.com

NEGRONI TWIST Dennings Point Distillery

1 oz. Great 9 Gin 1 oz. Aperol 1 oz. sweet vermouth Orange slice for garnish Combine and stir gin, Aperol, and sweet vermouth over ice. Strain and serve with an orange slice.

HUDSON VALLEY FOGHORN Hudson Valley Distillers

2 oz. Spirits Grove Gin 1 oz. lime juice 4 oz. ginger beer Combine gin, lime juice, and ginger beer over ice. Stir and serve.

NOT BY THE HAIR OF MY GINNY-GIN-GIN

Photo courtesy of Tuthilltown Spirits

Prohibition Distillery in Roscoe got its start in 2009, with founders John F. K. Walsh and Brian Facquet working alongside Ralph Erenzo and Brian Lee at Tuthilltown Spirits Distillery in Gardiner. In 2013, Walsh and Facquet opened up their own place in a converted 1929 firehouse, and have been watching the accolades pile up ever since. The secret to their gin is that they start with their award-winning Bootlegger Vodka (which, last year, picked up double gold at the Fifty Best Domestic Vodka competition, and a gold at the New York International Spirits Competition), made from 100 percent New York State corn, so it’s naturally gluten free. From there, Bootlegger Gin is kept simple, with only five botanicals added, so that each one is expressed in the final product. According to Facquet, one visitor to the tasting room compared Prohibition’s gin to jazz, saying, “You can taste each individual note, but they all go together so well.” Unlike other distillers, Prohibition set out to make a more juniper-forward, London dry-style gin, with the other botanicals helping to “smooth out the finish,” says Facquet, noting that its flavor was designed around a simple philosophy: “You shouldn’t have to explain spirits. Someone should be able to pick up a bottle without explanation and say this is a great gin.” Visitors to Prohibition Distillery can feel great about drinking it too. All proceeds from tours and tastings are donated to benefit veterans’ associations, says Facquet, a Navy veteran himself.

Photo courtesy of Denning’s Point Distillery

PROHIBITION DISTILLERY

Orange County Distillery

WARWICK WINERY & DISTILLERY

In the sleepy town of Warwick, Jason Grizzanti and Jeremy Kidde have been quietly building an empire. Since opening in 1994, Warwick Valley Winery & Distillery has slowly been expanding, creating new products like fruit brandies along with its now famous Doc’s Draft Hard Apple Cider. In 2012, they opened Black Dirt Distillery, which produces whiskeys, an applejack, and of course, Warwick Gin, which was designed from the outset for cocktails. “We experimented with over two dozen different botanicals and narrowed it down to eight or 10,” says Kidde. “We made the selection based on which paired best in a cocktail. I’ve never heard of anyone else doing it that way.” The approach definitely paid off: Warwick Gin is close to perfectly balanced. From the initial shock of juniper, it splinters into a half dozen components balanced so evenly that to emphasize one over the other takes little concentration. Floral prose aside, the masterful balance makes it a perfect gin for cocktails. Visit Warwick Valley Winery’s rustic tasting room to see for yourself.

114 Little York Road, Warwick / (845) 258-4858 / WVWinery.com

1933: The National Prohibition Act is repealed, and the Cullen-Harrison Act, legalizing manufacturing and selling low-alcohol-content beer and wine, is signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, who imbibed throughout the dry years.

1950s-1960s: Gin’s popularity is overtaken by vodka.

1990s: Thanks to luxury brands like Bombay and Sapphire, gin popularity begins rising again.

2 oz. Orange County Distillery Gin .5 oz. mint syrup 3 oz. sparkling blood orange juice Sprig of mint Shake and pour the gin and mint syrup into a Collins glass filled with ice. Top it off with the sparkling blood orange juice, and garnish with mint.

GIN AND JAM

Tuthilltown Spirits Distillery 3 oz. lemonade 1 oz. Half Moon Gin 1 tbsp. local jam Combine gin and lemonade in a sealable jar and serve with a spoonful of jam on the side, encouraging guests to stir it in and shake the cocktail themselves.

2003: Ralph Erenzo opens Tuthilltown Spirits and begins a campaign for distillery-friendly legislation.

2007: New York State passes the Farm Distillery Act, reducing permit costs and restrictions on distilleries that source 75 percent of ingredients from New York State.

2014: The Craft New York Act allows distilleries to serve full-portion cocktails in tasting rooms. The number of distilleries in the state grows from 10 in 2011 to over 60 today.

2016: Artisanal cocktails and craft beverages’ meteoric rise continues, with small distillers flocking to gin: Unlike whiskey, it’s sold non-aged, enabling producers to see a faster return on investment. u

34 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m


CELEBRATING HUDSON VALLEY FOOD, FARMS, & BEER

MILL WM. HOUSE FARMER BREWING & SONS COMPANY 845.485.BREW 289 MILL STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE

WWW.MillHouseBrewing.com

GUESTROOMS * BRUNCH * LUNCH * DINNER

MURRAY’S TIVOLI

OLE SAVANNAH TABLE & BAR

C A F É . C AT E R I N G . E V E N T S 7 3 B R O A D WAY , T I VO L I N Y - W W W. M U R R AY S T I VO L I . C O M

Authentic Barbecue & Comfort Food with a Modern Twist OleSavannah.com | 845-331-4283 Historic Rondout Waterfront Dining SPRING 2016

35


FLOW CHART

BY L I N DA C O D E GA

PICK YOUR POISON

*

WHAT’S YOUR GIN TOLERANCE LEVEL? OR

MORE, PLEASE

A MIXED DRINK

SAVORY

WHERE ARE YOU GOING TONIGHT?

OR

DO YOU HAVE ANY VODKA?

OR

TART

WHAT IF YOU CAN’T TASTE THE GIN?

SWEET STAYING IN

FINE

OR

BLOODY BULLDOG

TOM COLLINS

GIMLET

HEADING OUT

Gin, Bloody Mary base, black pepper, dash of hot sauce. Serve over rocks.

Gin, lemon juice, simple syrup, club soda. Lemon garnish Serve over rocks.

Gin, lime juice, simple syrup, lime wedge garnish. Serve straight up.

BLACK-TIE EVENT

OR

NEGRONI

BUTTERMILK MAPLE GIN FLIP

Gin, vermouth, campari, orange twist. Serve over rocks.

Gin, one egg, buttermilk, maple syrup, grated nutmeg garnish. Shake vigorously, serve straight up.

BUSINESS MEETING

OR SPEAKEASY

OR

SINGAPORE SLING

Gin, muddled raspberries, lime juice, simple syrup, seltzer. Serve over rocks.

Gin, cherry brandy, triple-sec, pineapple juice, lime juice. Serve over rocks.

WHOA, BACK UP

VESPER

CRAIG

ARE YOU INTO PAPER UMBRELLAS?

“Three measures of Gordon’s, one of vodka, half a measure of Kina Lillet. Shake it very well until it’s ice-cold, then add a large thin slice of lemon peel. Got it?” †

CAN I HAVE A CABANA WITH THAT?

MARTINI

NOT EVEN WITH ALCOHOL

Gin, vermouth, olive garnish. Shaken, not stirred.

DO YOU HAVE A WELL-STOCKED FRIDGE?

WOULD YOU LIKE AN EGG IN YOUR DRINK?

IT ISN’T EMPTY!

GIN & TONIC Gin, tonic, lime wedge garnish. Serve over rocks.

UH...

IF IT TASTES LIKE DESSERT

PLEASE, NO I’M GAME!

START WITH

ONLY WHEN I’M EXPECTING GUESTS

STRAIGHT Open bottle. Serve over rocks.

ARE THEY WITH YOU NOW?

YES!

HOW ABOUT BUTTERMILK?

YUM!

RASPBERRY RICKEY

WHO WAS THE BETTER BOND?

CONNERY

LITERALLY NO GIN

AN EGG WHITE THEN ADD

NOT TONIGHT

WHAT SORT OF MOOD ARE YOU SETTING?

GIN FIZZ

AN EGG YOLK

Gin, lemon juice, simple syrup, soda water. Serve over rocks.

THE WHOLE EGG

PINE TREES

OR

GIN BUCK

STRANGER IN THE ALPS

FINAL JUDGMENT

Gin, lemon or lime juice, ginger ale. Build over rocks.

Gin, sweet vermouth, Campari, amaro, dash of salt. Serve over rocks.

Gin, pear puree, lime juice, simple syrup, absinthe. Serve straight up.

PEAR TREES

†James Bond to the barman in Ian Fleming’s Casino Royale

*If you’re at a bar, this isn’t a bad place to start. For help finding a bar, brewery, distillery, or other purveyor of spirits, visit upstater.com

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m / fo o d – d r i n k

ROYAL FIZZ

HANKY-PANKY

OR

36 upstater

GOLDEN FIZZ

OR

Gin, sweet vermouth, amaro, orange twist. Serve straight up.

MODERN

RETRO

SILVER FIZZ

OR


Elephant, it’s not just for tapas anymore!

ELEelephant PHANT

We now have entrees and take reservations

FOOD & WINE

310 Wall Street, Kingston, NY (845) 339-9310 Tues - Sat 5-10pm like us on facebook @elephantfoodandwine

MARCH

G I N SA N I TY TUTHILL HOUSE is

Shake Up Your Night

month at

TUTHILLTOWN

Join us for the entire month of MARCH for HALF MOON GIN Events And Specials In Our Tasting Room And Resturant!

TUTHILLHOUSE.COM | TUTHILLTOWN.COM | 845.255.1527

DUTCHESS COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS

2016 Calendar of Events MAY 6-8 Rhinebeck Car Show & Swap Meet (rhinebeckcarshow.com) MAY 28 & 29 Barn Star Antiques at Rhinebeck (barnstar.com) JUNE 3 - 5 Country Living Fair (stellashows.com) JUNE 10- 12 Goodguys Rod & Custom Car Show (good-guys.com) JUNE 18 HV Craft Brew Festival BEER, BOURBON & BACON (beerbourbonbacon.com)

DUTCHESS COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS JUNE 25 & 26 Rhinebeck Arts Festival (artrider.com)

DENNING’S POINT DIS48 28 26 TILLERY, LLC 10N Chestnut Street, Beacon

TAS T I N G ROOM HOURS Fri

-

pm

'

Sat

-

pm

'

Sun

-

pm

www.DenningsPointDistillery.com

SAV-ON

Party Central Your One-Stop Party Shop!

The Premier Event Equipment Rental Company, Party Supply & Paper Goods Store in the Hudson Valley. (845) 336-5800 | SAVONPARTY.COM NEW LOCATION!

Kingston Plaza, 316 Plaza Road

JULY 1 & 2 AMCA Antique Motorcycle Show (rhinebecknationalmeet.com) JULY 30 Insane Inflatable 5K (insaneinflatable5K.com) AUGUST 23 - 28 171st Dutchess County Fair (dutchessfair.com)

SEPTEMBER 10 & 11 Hudson Valley Wine & Food Festival (hudsonvalleywinefest.com) Potter Bros Ski, Snowboard & Clothing Sale (potterbrothers.com) OCTOBER 8 & 9 Barn Star Antiques at Rhinebeck (barnstar.com) OCTOBER 15 & 16 NYS Sheep & Wool Family Festival (sheepandwool.com)

For more info: dutchessfair.com 845-876-4000 SPRING 2016

37


Photo by Roy Gumpel

WILL LYTLE COMIC ARTIST AND ILLUSTRATOR HOMETOWN: West Hurley LIVES AND WORKS IN: West Hurley HUDSON VALLEY RESIDENT SINCE: Birth (1986) Will Lytle hasn’t seen his chin for two years. He stopped shaving while traveling with friends in backcountry Alaska, and now sports a wizardly bush of chest-length red beard. His head is shaved clean. The visual contrast of smooth pate and intricate textures is striking. He looks like a Will Lytle drawing. Indeed, Lytle’s Thorneater Comics often feature a bearded voyagerwizard who lives in a tall narrow house in the woods. Approaching Lytle’s actual house for the first time, someone who reads Thorneater may feel a thrill of recognition, coupled with the sensation that she really should be arriving on owl’s back. Lytle was born here. His parents came to Woodstock for the concert (though his father arrived three days late), loved the local vibe, and stayed. In 1971, they bought a small plot of land to homestead, building a house from hand-milled wood and growing most of their food. The youngest of three siblings, Lytle reports, “By the time I was born, they were good at it.” They also encouraged young Will’s love of drawing. At Onteora High School, he joined the groundbreaking Indie film program, staying on after graduation to work with teen filmmakers. He attended New York’s School of Visual Arts for a year, but urban life and commercial art made him restless. He dropped out, alternating a day job at Woodstock’s Sunfrost farm stand with trips to New Zealand, Europe, and the American West, often hitchhiking or riding the rails. But the Hudson Valley always lured him back, and eventually he built his own

38 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

house on a wooded corner of his parents’ land so he could live rentfree; he heats with wood and has no phone. Inspired by Adrian Tomine’s guerrilla comics, Lytle started printing zine-style chapbooks in 2011, leaving free copies in locations ranging from local libraries to the beer fridge at Cumberland Farms (the franchise was not amused). For the past few years, he’s supported himself entirely with his art. Though he still prints hand-sewn chapbooks at “prices my peeps can afford,” he also drew a weekly Woodstock Times comic for two years, illustrated Clark Strand’s acclaimed book Waking Up to the Dark for Random House, and created logos and murals for Woodstock General Supply, Overlook Mountain Bikes, Phoenicia Flea, Ghent’s Ironwood Farm, Kingston’s Grounded Cafe and O+ Festival, and Paris’s Catskill-chic Colette boutique. “So much of his work reflects the magical essence of the Catskills, and it is that magic that’s finding its way onto the pages of newspapers, books, and even the streets of Paris,” says Jackie Kellachan, owner of Woodstock’s Golden Notebook bookstore, which hosts launch parties for Lytle’s DIY publications. The New York Times recently described his work as “fairytale-like comics that evoke the dark humor of Maurice Sendak and Edward Gorey,” influences he cites alongside Animalia’s Graeme Base, filmmakers Stan Brakhage and Andrei Tarkovsky, The Lord of the Rings author J. R. R. Tolkien, and tarot artist Pamela Colman Smith. But like the granola served as “breakfast in bed for 400,000” at That Concert, the mix is homemade and uniquely his own. Grab a sample at thorneater.tumblr.com. —Nina Shengold

CREATIVE CLASS. NEW CONTENT EVERY 38 WEEK AT

upstater.com/arts


Places to Stay: Resorts, Lodges and Campgrounds. Things to Do: Shopping, Golfing, Rock Climbing, Fishing, Wine Tasting, Dining and more.

ULSTER COUNTY TOURISM (BILL DIRECTLY)

To Book Your Stay in Ulster County, visit UlsterCountyAlive.com today.

... a world of adventure. Hudson Valley/Catskill Regions

CATSKILL UPSTATE FARMS HOUSE BUILDERS F om our backyard to your doorstep. Fr

Subscribe for home delivery today

UPSTATEHOUSE.COM/SUBSCRIBE

SPRING 2016

39


40 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m


u MAP I L L U S T R A T E D B Y K I R B Y S A L VA D O R

41

SPRING 2016


u

SPONSORED CONTENT

S T O RY B Y A N N E P Y B U R N C R A I G | P H O T O S B Y D E B O R A H D E G R A F F E N R E I D

A Style Star Rises

Welcome to Kasuri, the region’s first avant-garde fashion boutique.

Entering 1 Warren Street in Hudson, prepare to be stunned. Kasuri, a luxury boutique which sells curated cutting-edge runway fashion, is a gem that might be found in one of the planet’s fashion pulse points. But in this tiny city with just a mile of retail and a population of about 7,000, it’s utterly unexpected. “We opened the doors in spring 2014,” says Kasuri owner Layla Kalin. “What’s happened since has been breathtaking. These days I’m working with the crème de la crème, the designers who inspired me into fashion: Yohji Yamamoto, Rei Kawakubo, and Rick Owens.” Kalin knew it would take a little friendly persuasion to get Kasuri, which is named for a Japanese weaving method, off the ground. “We had to knock on a lot of doors,” she says. “Doing this level of fashion upstate didn’t make sense to a lot of brands at first. But I knew. Hudson had a ton of antiques, and antiquing is great, but for a woman with a little money to spend, there was nowhere to satisfy that certain itch. And with the second-homers and young creatives here, there are people who appreciate really high-quality fashion.” Kasuri also markets online, and is one of the top 20 U.S. retailers of fashion giant Farfetch.com. Kalin wasn’t raised in five-figure dresses. “I grew up very blue collar, wrong side of the tracks,” she says. “For back to school, it was Target or thrift shops. I wore jeans for 25 years straight.” After dropping out of a master’s program to attend Los Angeles Trade and Technical College and setting up dressmaker’s equipment in her garage, Kalin found her products popular with the likes of Scarlett Johansson and Trent Reznor. In 2007, she moved to Brooklyn. “I was working for a DIY sewing website that was connected to Etsy, and my boss had been roommates with [Etsy founder] Rob Kalin,” she says. “A month after we married, I was pregnant, and he wanted to move upstate.” The couple had already been spending time at Rob’s weekend place in Catskill, so it wasn’t a huge leap to life at a house in Milan, outside Rhinebeck. And so far, motherhood, especially with twins, is easier in the country. “The city is thrilling, but I like not being in the hive,”

42 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

Kalin says. “I have a fairly overwhelming energy level as it is, without that extra manic. I’m from Phoenix, Arizona, and I lived in Los Angeles, so I don’t mind car culture. And I do think family life with little kids is better up here. I like the cadence of it. I can build my own rhythm instead of having one forced on me.” After 18 months of stay-at-home motherhood, Kalin began birthing Kasuri. “We can work with designers you couldn’t connect to in New York or Los Angeles, where the market’s saturated,” she says. “But my name, personality, connections, and the look of the store came together. Rick Owens approached us—I didn’t think we were ready for them yet, but his commercial director approached my buyer when we were in Paris last June. The brand matrix wasn’t quite there yet, but they were excited to be part of the project.” And the response is growing. “We have impeccable, world-class customer service,” Kalin says. “We had a great Christmas. And people are welcome to come in and just browse and be inspired. If you can’t afford $2,000 pants, I get it. I haven’t always been able to either.”

Above: Kasuri’s storefront at 1 Warren Street. Opposite, Clockwise from Top: Kasuri’s current range of designer shoes; Layla Kaylin (holding her dog, Sir Emmett Rainbow Popcorn I) with Kasuri’s director, Jonathan Osofsky; a Bao Bao Issey Miyake handbag; Kasuri’s luxe designers include Ann Demeulemeester, who blends Gothic and Japanese influences.


SPRING 2016

43


u

WEEKENDER

exploring an ANOMALY

S T O R Y B Y B R I A N P J C R O N I N | P H O T O S B Y PA M E L A A S H L E Y PA S C O

PEEKSKILL

The highly browsable Bruised Apple Books and Music draws fans from throughout the Hudson Valley.

Artsy, edgy, urban Peekskill is still a place in the country.

44 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

T

echnically, Peekskill is part of Westchester County, but it’s never really quite fit in there. Since the late 1980s, when Peekskill began luring cash-strapped artists northward with economic incentives, this city of 24,000, tucked into a bend in the river, has been fresher and edgier than the rest of the county. In fact, its revival drew the blueprints for similar resurrections upriver in Beacon, Newburgh, Kingston, and Hudson. From New York City, there’s no quicker way to get a taste of what the Hudson Valley’s all about: Sixty-five minutes on a train from Grand Central and you’re there, where you’ll find an urban downtown beneath a wide sky, set within a landscape that’s dominated by Bear Mountain and the Hudson River.


PEEKSKILL GETAWAY ENTER TO WIN. Check page 17 for more details.

The cold confections at Hudson Creamery are locally made.

SPRING 2016

45


The quaint architecture and close density of the neighborhood makes Peekskill resemble a charming little French town.

Clockwise from top left: Peekskill’s recently restored Paramount Hudson Valley Theater dates back to the 1930s; A sampling from Peekskill Coffee House; The Flat Iron Gallery, a network of artists’ studios, is situated atop Peekskill Coffee House; Ice cream sandwiches at Hudson Creamery.

46 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m


downtown peekskill it’s happening here food | history | art entertainment downtownpeekskill.com

Refresh Your View Kayak, canoe, and paddleboard rentals, tours, and instruction for the novice to the experienced paddler.

PEEKSKILL

1 Annsville Circle | 845.737.1202 crew@hudsonriverexpeditions.com COLD SPRING

14 Market Street | 914.809.5935 paddle@hudsonriverexpeditions.com HudsonRiverExpeditions.com

SPRING 2016

47


Gleason’s offers innovative pizzas, garnering the restaurant a lot of local loyalists.

Metro-North stops at Peekskill’s waterfront, offering stunning views of the river and the mountains of Harriman-Bear Mountain State Park across the water as well as a sculpture garden, a playground, and even a small beach. The dining options near the waterfront are as satisfying as the views. Hudson Creamery offers flavorful scoops of Jane’s Ice Cream from Kingston and snacks from Peekskill’s own Homestyle Desserts, while Taco Dive Bar pairs wide-ranging craft beer and tequila selections with maple-glazed pork-belly tacos, chili-smothered nachos, and gluten-free pancakes with ancho-honey butter if you’re there for brunch. The payoff of Peekskill’s longstanding commitment to the arts can be seen in its downtown cultural district, which is an easy 10-minute walk from the river. The newly restored Paramount Hudson Valley Theater, a 1930s landmark, offers diverse programming that includes big-name comedians and musicians (Richard Lewis in April, Dr. John in June), children’s programming (Disney’s Choo Choo Soul tour), and even some dogs (America’s Got Talent winners, the Olate Dogs, a family dog-trick act, will perform in May). The Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art (HVCCA) features the best of Peekskill’s art scene, along with well-known artists from further afield. HVCCA is probably best known for The Peekskill Project, an internationally praised and irregularly occurring outdoor festival of public art that takes place throughout the city. Interested in seeing some art being made? Head up to the Flat Iron Gallery, where the studio doors are open and the painters are hard at work and friendly, to discuss aesthetics over a plastic tumbler of wine. Downstairs from the Flat Iron Gallery is the 13-year-old Peekskill

48 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

Coffee House, whose enormous windows make it an ideal spot to decompress and watch tourists and locals alike hum through the warren of narrow streets in this part of downtown. The quaint architecture and close density of the neighborhood make Peekskill resemble a charming little French town, but just a two-minute drive away finds you in the wilds of the Blue Mountain Reservation. The exquisitely maintained multiuse trails there may have intimidating names like “Ned’s Left Lung” and “Debacle,” but it doesn’t take more than a 45-minute walk to arrive at the 680-foot summit of the reservation’s namesake mountain, and behold a splendid view of the river. Peekskill’s dining scene has finally caught up with its art scene, and on Saturday nights the restaurants are packed. Gleason’s, which opened in 2012, has built up a devoted following thanks to its tangy sourdough crust pizzas with inventive topping combos, like octopus with pesto and arugula. But the pizzeria’s bent for innovation is hardly surprising, since it’s owned by the same people behind The Birdsall House, the gastropub that brought the cocktail revolution to Peekskill, as well as the Blind Tiger Ale House, New York City’s premier craft-beer bar. Since opening in 2008, the Peekskill Brewery has won several medals at the Great American Beer Festival, and its draft list is endlessly inventive, as is its pub menu, which features duck prosciutto and three kinds of poutine (Canadian-style French fries and cheese curds). Last December, the brewery offered a coffee IPA dubbed “Order 66” in honor of the new Star Wars movie. The combination was startling—coffee in an IPA instead of a stout, named after something from the prequels?—but, like Peekskill itself, the end result was surprising, refreshing, and funky. u


Watching the day go by from the perspective of Peekskill Coffee House.

PLAN YOUR WEEKEND ESCAPE. NEW CONTENT EVERY WEEK AT

upstater.com/weekending

SPRING 2016

49


THE HUDBIRDSALL SON HOUSE ROOM

chronogram.com A CREATIVE LOVE AFFAIR

in print and online

50 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m


SPONSORED CONTENT

WILLIAM WALLACE CONSTRUCTION, INC.

TAKING IT PERSONALLY

Hudson Valley mortgage banker Laura Moritz provides concierge service.

SUSTAINABLE PASSIVE HOUSE BUILDING NEW HOMES ADDITIONS 845 • 679 • 2130 WILLIAMWALLACECONSTRUCTION.COM

In today’s risk-averse banking climate, getting approved for a mortgage can be slow, scary, and confusing—making some would-be homebuyers give up. But not if their mortgage banker is Laura Moritz of Hudson Valley-based Classic Mortgage LLC. As a licensed mortgage loan originator with 32 years of experience, Moritz is “committed to exceeding expectations.” Effective communication with an experienced local lender makes all the difference, says Moritz. “Securing a mortgage should never be a ‘keystroke solution’—you need a real person who really cares about you to help navigate you through the process,” she explains. “My customers can count on me 24/7. While bureaucratic, big-box banks take months to fund loans, I can get clearance to close in four to five weeks.” Recently, one of Moritz’s customers was in a bidding war on a house, and time was of the essence to present a pre-approval letter to the sellers. “I got the letter presented in five minutes, and my client’s offer was accepted,” Moritz says. The other bidder waited more than a day for a letter from his lender, and lost out. Concierge service is “not a luxury but a necessity,” Moritz says. “I work with my clients, sometimes for more than a year, preparing them for successful outcome. When you’re buying a home, you should never be a pile of papers on someone’s desk in another time zone.” A lifelong Hudson Valley resident, Moritz has solid relationships with local title companies, attorneys, appraisers, and surveyors. Licensed in New York, New Jersey, and Florida, she can be reached at (845) 222-8270 or lmoritz@ classicllc.com; or find out more at wmbconstruction.com/ strategic-partners/classic-mortgage-llc.—Shawn Hartley Hancock SPRING 2016

51


u

WEEKENDER

S T O RY B Y K A N DY H A R R I S / P H O T O S B Y D E B O R A H D E G R A F F E N R E I D

Barbara Olsen Pascale (left) and Joanna Virello at home in their 1961 custom ranch in Hillsdale.

Farmlife among Friends BROOKLYNITES FIND COMMUNITY AT THE HEART OF HILLSDALE.

B

arbara Olsen Pascale is new in town. But that doesn’t mean she’s had any trouble getting up to speed on Hillsdale’s goings-on. In fact, since she and her partner, Joanna Virello, moved last year to the eastern Columbia County village, close to the Massachusetts border, they’ve made numerous friends, joined rock bands, and enjoyed more than their fair share of community dinner parties. “We have stuff to do all the time,” says Pascale, a woodworker and builder, and a former Brooklynite. “If we wanted to be busy every night of the week, we would be.” That’s surprising in an area mostly populated by working farms, but then again, Hillsdale isn’t a typical agrarian community. Hillsdale hamlet (part of the larger town of Hillsdale) sits at an important crossroads in Columbia County, where Route 22 meets Route 23. The hamlet is half an hour’s drive from both Hudson and Millerton, while Great Barrington, Massachusetts, is just 15 minutes away. It’s a 2.5-hour drive on the Taconic between Hillsdale and Midtown Manhattan, but the area’s reasonably priced real estate and beautiful views of both the Catskills and the Berkshires make it well worth the drive. “It’s so stunningly beautiful here,” says Pascale, who even finds the 45-minute morning commute to the Wassaic Metro-North station a sight to behold. “I never get tired of it,” she says. Pascale fell in love with Hillsdale in the same way many visitors do with Hudson Valley locations: She suddenly found the right house at the right price. For Pascale, the love object was a c. 1961 custom ranch

52 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

house, originally built for a beloved local schoolteacher and animal rescuer, located smack in the middle of farm country. “We looked at a few houses,” says Pascale, “and something about this place just called to us. It’s got a lot of mid century details. The architecture is very modern. It’s not a farmhouse. It’s a different thing.” Her initial plan was to gut the ranch house for a studs-out renovation, but her feelings for the house changed after purchasing the property. “It’s become more of a restoration project,” Pascale admits. “The windows—I won’t replace them because they’re so much a part of the house. The landscape comes in—you’re in the landscape. I’m standing in the middle of a field, almost.” Although the ranch rehab is a work-in-progress, it’s not hard to see what drew Pascale in: Mid century modern details include lush custom wood paneling in the living room and signature picture windows, which bathe the room in natural light. In keeping with the mid century theme, Pascale and Virello are fixing up a 1987 Airstream camper as a guest house. Ultimately, for Pascale, Hillsdale’s strongest draw is its vibrant, welcoming community. In the short time she and Virello, a media relations director in New York City, have lived in Hillsdale, they’ve already made many friends in town. And, despite the stereotypes ascribed to country folks, Pascale says, nobody bats an eye at her relationship with Virello. “I get a lot of tradesmen in here,” Pascale, says, referring to her mid renovation house, “and they’re cool with the fact that this lesbian couple has moved in. I just didn’t expect that.” The couple spends time with their new Hillsdale friends hiking, attending dinner parties, and hitting Chaseholm Farm in nearby Pine Plains for Burger Nights, even a barn dance. “I’d never been to a barn dance before, and it was awesome,” says Pascale. “Old hipsters and hippies and local farmers—a really interesting mix of people listening to this bluegrass band. People make more of an effort [here].” u


HILLSDALE SNAPSHOTS

REAL ESTATE

FIXING TO STICK AROUND HILLSDALE AND MILLERTON OFFER INSTANT COMMUNITY AND AFFORDABLE FIXER-UPPERS

Hillsdale Fine Wine and Spirits

C. Herrington Home + Design

Hillsdale General Store

HGS Home Chef

Passiflora

Hillsdale House

Mt. Washington House

Crossroads Food Shop

Mirror Mirror Clothing Shop

Little Apple Farm and Cidery

T

hings aren’t like they used to be along Route 22. Just ask Mimi Ramos Harney. For the past five years, as a local real estate agent and business owner, Harney has had a front-row-center seat to the changes around the town of Hillsdale and the nearby village of Millerton. “When I started real estate,” Harney explains, “I was mainly selling houses to second-home [buyers]. They were mostly 50 and over.” While she still sees second-home buyers, she finds that home seekers are starting to skew younger, and they’re looking to settle down. “They’re in their 30s and 40s,” she says, “and they’re looking at second homes, and constantly asking how we think they could make the transition to full-time up here.” There’s no doubt that real estate prices in Hillsdale and Millerton are more reasonable, to say the least, than prices for homes downstate. “You can get land here. And some people are up for a little bit of a project,” suggests Ramos Harney. “Let’s say their price range is below $350,000. They can probably find something great, and, with a little bit of elbow grease, they can make it what they want.” While turnkey properties “go really fast,” says Ramos Harney, “fixer-uppers are ubiquitous and a larger pool to draw from.” But what’s with the growing interest in eastern Columbia County? “The community,” Harney says, and “the idea of a country life versus their busy city life. I think people are getting a little more introspective and are sick of the race and want to make this time in their life count. They feel like they can do that more here. There’s more space to do those things.” Harney, who lives in Millerton, has certainly found that space for herself. In addition to working as a real estate agent, she owns a designer clothing pop-up store (housed in an Airstream) and plays in a local rock band. In fact, there’s long been a thriving community of musicians in the Millerton area, but until recently, there was no fixed music venue. In 2011, Harney and another Millerton resident, Kristen Panzer, co-created the Spring for Sound Music Festival, an annual event that brings together local acts on stages all over the village. So if you’re considering a move to the Route 22 area, don’t be afraid of a fixer-upper. And while you’re renovating your dream house, embrace the community spirit, and pick up a guitar occasionally. We hear they like that a lot around there.—Kandy Harris SPRING 2016

53


photo by Roy Gumpel

JESSICA WICKHAM WOODWORKER HOMETOWN: Manhattan HAS LIVED IN: Ann Arbor, Michigan; Rome, Italy; Jaipur and all over Rajasthan, India; Tokyo and Kamakura, Japan LIVES IN: “The middle of nowhere, outside Middletown” WORKS IN: Beacon Nearly 20 years into her career, Jessica Wickham is still surprised to have found her niche as a fine woodworker. Armed with an anthropology degree, she planned to become a documentary filmmaker, but wound up as a technical writer and got “vacuumed up” into Goldman Sachs. “Before I knew it, I was a VP in Tokyo,” she says. She calls her corporate decade “graduate school.” She explains: “It was an intense, fun work environment, with very smart people working in teams over distances.” As an architect’s daughter who grew up appreciating design, Wickham’s interest in woodworking was heightened in Tokyo when she bought a dining table “with a natural edge.” She explains: “Organic shapes in your home have a stunning impact on people. They create an emotional, elemental reaction. It’s truly humbling to work with natural materials.” Later, Wickham began studying traditional Japanese tools and woodworking as a counterbalance to the stresses of her job. When Goldman Sachs asked her to return to Manhattan after 9/11, she resigned and moved to a nearby Japanese seaside city, Kamakura. There, she lived in an artists’ enclave, studying traditional Japanese joinery methods. “I fell in love with Kamakura,” she says. “It’s an incredibly beautiful place, with two mountains surrounding a little valley that opens onto a waterfront. Everything is located around the axis of one street, with a giant temple at one end and hundreds of historic little wooden houses. It’s a magical, magnetic place.” After five years in Japan, Wickham returned to the US in 2002, rented a workspace in an old factory in Middletown, and began crafting tables. “I discovered woodworking as a way to get a grip on my life, and never imagined making objects for my work,” she admits, “but it’s extremely satisfying. With so many nuances and subtleties, creating a learning environment is part of the joy of it.”

54 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

In Middletown, Wickham created work for display in a Brooklyn gallery, built conference tables for the National Audubon Society, and grew her business, despite the recession. In 2009, she established Wickham Solid Wood Studio in Beacon. She now employs three fulltime skilled woodworkers and works intense 11-hour days, six days a week. “Wednesday is my sanity day,” she says. “I go into the city for a Pilates class, socialize with friends, eat good food, go to a museum.” Wickham sources wood by following leads about trees downed by storms and landscaping fells. She acquires about 20 logs a year this way, tracking them on a database, The Log Log. The recovered trees are seasoned for two years, then repurposed into signature pieces. Each log in Wickham’s inventory of 10,000 board feet of local hardwood slabs is sliced to preserve its natural edge, debarked by hand, and stacked and stored to mirror the tree’s original shape. She digs deep to understand her clients’ desires, involving them in wood selection. “I am always going for the wow factor. It’s a function of reality, time, and money,” she says. Wickham uses handmade edging tools from a seventh-generation Japanese blacksmith, with pieces taking up to three months to create and 150 hours to finish. “It takes a lifetime to learn to create with these traditional tools,” she says. “They come very rough. You adapt them to your body, your hands, your size— very different from clicking on Amazon to buy a tool and getting it in the mail. The tools become an extension of your body.” Wickham’s career recently came full circle when she built the tables and counters for Tempura Matsui, a tempura-tasting restaurant on East 39th Street. It’s a traditional space, “tiny, like being in Japan,” she says. “It was a fun, complex job,” she says. “I brought in a lot of people I know to work with me, and sourced all the wood, and I’m fiercely proud of it. When you’re developing skill, you’re forever getting closer. This job represents a culmination of a lot of things for me. It’s nice to create pieces people will know and love, pieces they’ll sit around and enjoy.” —Debra Bresnan

CREATIVE CLASS. NEW CONTENT EVERY WEEK 54 AT

upstater.com/arts


HAWTHORNE VALLEY ASSOCIATION Nurturing living connections... Early Childhood through Grade 12 Situated on a 500-acre Biodynamic farm in New York’s Hudson Valley, Hawthorne Valley’s integrative Waldorf curriculum is designed to meet the unique needs of developing children, helping them to grow academically, artistically, and socially into the creative individuals needed in today’s complex world.

ZIMMER BROTHERS

Day and Boarding Programs Accepting Applications

Waldorf School | www.hawthornevalleyschool.org

330 County Route 21C, Ghent, NY 12075 | 518.672.7092 x 111

SOCIAL VENTURE INSTITUTE HUDSON VALLEY

WEEKEND RETREAT

ANTIDOTE COLLECMAY 13-15 TIVE for world-changing social entrepreneurs

@ OMEGA INSTITUTE - Rhinebeck, NY

Join fellow world-changers for a weekend of profound problem solving, visioning and connecting — all in the inspired setting of one of the world’s premier educational retreat centers.

svihudsonvalley.com

Menla

MENLA MOUNTAIN RETREAT & CONFERENCE CENTER Escape the stresses of daily life for a Shangri-la experience in a magical 325-acre Catskills forest preserve. Mahasukha Spa specializes in healing herbal baths, Tibetan massage, Ayurvedic therapies, and traditional treatments. Rest & Rejuvenation Getaways March 10-13, May 6-8, Sept. 2-5, Oct. 20-23, Dec. 23-25 R&R Healing Getaways April 21-24, June 23-26, Sept. 22-25, Nov. 3-6 R&R Hiking Getaways May 27-30, July 8-10, August 18-21, Sept. 15-18, Oct. 6-10, Oct. 13-16 R&R Cleansing/Detox Getaways June 9-12,  July 28-31 Tibetan Rejuvenation Retreats: May 15-22, June 23-29, Oct. 23-30 Book your Getaway now at www.menla.org or 845.688.6897 ext.0

SPRING 2016

55


u

UPSTATE UPDATE

BY LEANDER SCHAERLAECKENS

WAY DOWN IN THE HOLE

56 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

As Shaft 6B in Wappinger is excavated, blasted rock is loaded into buckets and hauled to the top.


THE SHAFT IS SO DEEP THAT IT’S HARD TO MAKE OUT THE BOTTOM.

A few yellow hardhats bob amid the gray sheen of the shale that has yet to be coated in concrete. It took two years of methodical blasting to delve this far. The big, gaping hole in the ground, some 34 feet in diameter, is called Shaft 6. It’s 675 feet deep, 600 of those feet below sea level, just north of the Newburgh-Beacon Bridge, on the eastern bank of the Hudson River in the Town of Wappinger. This will be the end point of the new Rondout-West Branch Tunnel, where a bypass is being built to circumvent a section of the Delaware Aqueduct that has been leaking for over 25 years. This massive pipeline carries 1.1 billion gallons of water daily from the Cannonsville, Pepacton, Neversink, and Rondout Reservoirs to the Croton Watershed and into New York City. At 85 miles, it is the world’s longest tunnel, beating out recently constructed water pipelines in Finland and China. It supplies 8.4 million people in the five boroughs and another million north of the city, where dozens of towns tap into the line along the way. Since opening in 1948, the tunnel has done its job admirably— except for two sections. One is beneath Wawarsing in Ulster County, the other below the Town of Newburgh, where the tunnel slips under the river. The aqueduct mostly cuts through shale, except for two places where it passes through more porous and permeable limestone. In those two spots, cracks have emerged, leaking up to 4 percent of the total flow—–15 to 18 million gallons a day, or 360,000 filled bathtubs—or almost double that, depending on volume. “It’s not an insignificant loss,” says Adam Bosch of New York City’s Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), which manages the water supply. “You’re putting all that work into collecting the water and protecting the water, and you don’t want to be losing it through leaks.” Now a vast project more than 20 years in the making is being

The work platform at the bottom of the shaft, showing the excavator that is used to scoop up blasted rock.

undertaken. It’s a public works project of a rare scale, although almost nobody will notice or feel any effects: a DEP repair job that will take until 2023 to complete and cost $1.5 billion, paid for entirely by water bill revenues. It’s the largest, most complex fix made to New York City’s labyrinthine water system of aqueducts since its 1842 origin—a project that calls to mind the ancient Romans, who pioneered the gravitypowered methods the Delaware Aqueduct relies on. “It’s the largest water supply system in the country,” says deputy DEP commissioner Paul Rush. “This project impacts the place where the city gets half of its water. It’s a massive project that’s going on silently.” On the construction site, the scene looks even more archaic, positively Flintstonian. A giant bucket lifts the rubble from the pit through a pulley system, tipping it over the edge and into a horseshoeshaped receptacle. The construction is padded to lessen the noise for residents nearby. All that shale existed in the ground undisturbed for hundreds of millions of years until someone decided to name the buildings above it the Town of Wappinger and, shortly afterwards, blast the rock out. A round of explosions unloosed 10 feet of rock at a time, to be hauled up and donated to public works like Beacon’s Long Dock Park or sold commercially. Once 100 fresh feet were excavated, the walls were coated by a two-story tall, spider-like machine, which rotated and spewed concrete to form a neat cylinder. The shaft is so deep it’s several dozen degrees warmer down there than at its edge, thanks to the machinery, the lack of wind chill, and it’s being over 600 feet closer to the earth’s core. Around the gaping hole, the size and physics of the equipment beggar belief. Rods of rebar, the size of skateboard ramps, have been welded into pre-assembled sheets, bent to fit neatly along the new walls to fortify the concrete. The nuts and bolts being used are as big as dumbbells.

SPRING 2016

57


BY PA S S TU N N E L WE ST S HAFT 5B EXI STI NG S HAFT 5

EXI STI NG AQ U E D U CT

BY PA S S

Newburgh

BY PA S S TU N N E L WE ST S HAFT 6B

S U R FAC E EXPR E SS ION

LEAKS

EXI STI NG S HAFT 6

Hudson River

Across the river, along Route 9W in the Town of Newburgh, near Marlborough, the same thing has happened, except that shaft goes 850 feet down, because it’s being excavated from a bluff. It will have a large chamber at the bottom for a horizontal boring machine and sump pumps. Horizontal drilling will begin sometime in 2017, tunneling 600 feet below the river’s deepest point. The problem all this will address was first spotted in the early 1990s. A Central Hudson employee noticed bubbles along the Hudson’s western bank at low tide. Water was shooting into the river from somewhere below, but it could only be seen from nearby, from a narrow strip of land cut off by train tracks. The water there was found to contain copper sulfate. Only the DEP’s pipeline had used that chemical in that area to clear it of algae, but it hadn’t been used since, so it could only have come from the Delaware Aqueduct. However, in the 1990s, technology hadn’t yet advanced enough to pinpoint the leak’s source, let alone plug a crack while it gushed vital tap water, as deep below ground as skyscrapers are tall. It would take another 20 years to figure out how to get it done. In 2003, a robotic submarine developed by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution surveyed the length of the 45-mile tunnel between the Rondout Reservoir and the Croton Watershed, taking 160,000 pictures and gathering data to map the problem. The pictures will allow the DEP to plug the small holes leaking under Wawarsing with a dense grout. But the images also confirmed that the leak by the Hudson wasn’t directly below the spot where water was rushing into the river. The water was actually traveling sideways as well as upward, so the crack was further west and inland from the river.

58 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

TO

NY

C

Wappinger

The section under the river passing through limestone was lined with steel to retain the integrity of the rock, but that casing hadn’t been extended far enough into the river’s banks. Where it ended, cracks had formed, letting water escape. The only solution was to drill a second tunnel, adjacent to the old one, connect it to the waterline before it hit the unsalvageable problem spot, and cap the old waterway. But that would mean closing down the aqueduct for nearly a decade. How would New York City absorb the loss of 50 to 60 percent of its water supply in the meantime? “Making this happen was seen as a near impossibility,” says Bosch, “because where would you get this water from?” But recent improvements across the water system and a concerted DEP effort to reduce water consumption in the city have made a Delaware Aqueduct shutdown viable. Technological advances have helped cut New York City’s water usage by a third since the late 1970s—from about 1.6 billion gallons per day to 1.1 billion—thanks to more efficient toilets, taps, and showers, and an aggressive DEP campaign to replace old facilities. The DEP worked out that if it modernized and restored the other aqueducts to their historic capacity, and installed filtration systems in Croton and tapped groundwater in Queens, it could compensate for the loss of the Delaware Aqueduct for a short period—not years, but for a while. With a new tunnel dug beside the old one, which would keep running during construction, the flow of water would only need to be interrupted while the extremities were connected. That way, the interruption would only be six to eight months—sometime during 2022 and 2023—with enough water coming from elsewhere to bridge the gap in service.


Y O U R B R A N D , I L L U M I N AT E D . L U M I N A RY M E D I A . C O M DIGITAL STRATEGY. WEBSITE DEVELOPMENT. BRAND DEVELOPMENT. GRAPHIC AND WEB DESIGN. EVENT PRODUCTION. BUSINESS STRATEGY.

SPRING 2016

59


A drill rig sets holes in the bedrock inside Shaft 5B in Newburgh when it was at a depth of approximately 700 feet. The holes were then filled with explosive to blast up an additional 10 feet of bedrock from the shaft.

A HISTORY OF NEW YORK CITY’S WATER SYSTEM New York City’s water has come a long way. It flows 145 miles from its furthest reservoir—Cannonsville, near the Northeastern corner of Pennsylvania—to Staten Island. It’s also expanded from a few wells—at times carrying yellow fever, cholera, and typhoid—to one of the world’s vastest and cleanest water supply systems. The city’s water system was long racing to keep up with the demands of its mushrooming population. The first water shortage was reported in 1774, when the city had just 22,000 inhabitants. The first public well opened near Bowling Green in 1677, with more wells following on street corners. A reservoir was later made at Broadway and White Street and water pumped through hollow logs to distribute it, but with no sewer system, the water was notoriously fetid. A 1789 outbreak of yellow fever, one of several scourges attributed to the foul water supply, killed 2,000 New Yorkers, about six percent of the population. Five more major yellow fever epidemics and four cholera outbreaks followed. Ships traveling to New York carried enough water for the trip back as well, rather than fill up in the city. Regardless of the water’s quality, there wasn’t enough of it. By 1830, with reservoirs built out further and 40 miles of wooden pipes laid, the infrastructure still only served 60,000 of the then 200,000 Manhattanites. In 1842, a dam was built on the Croton River and an aqueduct laid into

60 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

Manhattan, now known as the Old Croton Aqueduct, marking the birth of New York City’s modern water system. Water quality improved, and service hasn’t been interrupted for anything other than maintenance since the Croton Aqueduct opened, but shortages continued until 1890, when a second aqueduct was built from the Croton watershed. Shortages abated but new sources needed to be tapped to stay ahead of population growth. The Catskill aqueduct was opened in 1915, followed by the Delaware aqueduct in 1944, which was eventually extended with the reservoirs that still feed into it today. The city’s expansion of its water system was often controversial. Following political maneuvering in the early 19th century, Columbia and Dutchess counties were bypassed, and the city’s water was sourced entirely from the Hudson River’s western bank. Planners tried to avoid building tunnels underneath the river, but eventually ran out of options and the Catskills had to be tapped. The Catskills line was built in 1915, crossing the river between Storm King and the West Point Military Academy, dipping 1,100 feet below sea level to pass underneath the base of Bear Mountain. The upstate communities whose natural resources would quench the city’s endless thirst never got much of a say in the matter. In Albany, New York City was seen as the engine of the state’s economic progress


“THERE’S A LOT OF MOVING PIECES. EVERYTHING HAS TO HAPPEN IN THE RIGHT ORDER.” But there were more complications. Towns above and along an aqueduct have a right to purchase water from it and tap in, so an alternative water source would also be needed, requiring new linkups between towns and aqueducts, new wells, and interconnections between towns and cities, like Newburgh, with their own reservoirs. “There’s a lot of moving pieces,” says Bosch. “Everything has to happen in the right order.” (At press time, Bosch said the project is months ahead of schedule.) Ironically, on the river’s eastern side there was no water supply to the building site. Houses in the Wappinger hamlet of Chelsea had their own wells. When the water lines were laid to the new shaft, Chelsea was plugged into the water grid—with pipes running up to every house’s front lawn for owners to tap into, should they choose. On the Newburgh side, there was insufficient water for firefighting, so hydrants were installed. Finally, with the many problems solved, the shafts could be dug to serve as the connection points between the new tunnel and the old aqueduct. The new bypass tunnel will be 2.5 miles long, but drop just five feet—to maintain the downward slope from the reservoirs all the way down to New York City, allowing gravity to power it. But that means fitting the new tunnel to the old one has to be exactly right, maintaining the correct slope. (New York has cheap water rates—half that of the most expensive cities, Seattle and Atlanta—because it only

and accommodated without question. The city freely gobbled up whatever water resources it demanded. Farms and other properties were seized and owners weren’t always compensated fairly. Critics say the city didn’t get serious about water conservation until the 1980s, instead, expanding its system rather than building efficiencies into it. Nor was the Hudson River ever seriously considered as an alternative. Rather than make an effort to clean it up and filter its water, the city simply argued that it was too dirty and that it needed the already clean water upstate. Today, the system has a reservoir capacity of 552.5 billion gallons of water, which is typically 85 percent filled. The largest of those reservoirs is the Pepacton, at 140.2 billion gallons. Along the way to the city, the water is disinfected with ultraviolet light, tested for purity at 1,000 different stations, and treated with chlorine; for every million parts of water, one part of fluoride is added. A security force of about 200 officers, once called the Aqueduct Police and now known as the DEP Police, protects the water supply.—Leander Schaerlaeckens

has to pump 5 percent of its water electrically. It also doesn’t have to filter it much. The gravity-powered pressure is so strong that unless a New York City building is over six stories, no water pump is needed to force the water to rise.) The tunnel will be 20 feet in diameter, including a six-foot steel lining—running deep enough into the riverbanks to avoid cracks in the limestone. The remaining 14 feet of water capacity are large enough to run a train through—in fact, a rail line will transport the rock out of the tunnel as it’s being excavated during construction. The tunnel will be so big that, if necessary, it could move all of New York City’s water at once, should other aqueducts need repairs. Amazingly, the rest of the aqueduct system needs nary a touchup. The shale it was tunneled through has proved enduringly reliable. The craftsmanship of this underground network of tunnels leaves today’s engineers stupefied. Except for the lamentable limestone cracks, the system, 175 years old in some parts, is in immaculate shape. A few years from now, the Delaware Aqueduct will be pumped dry for the first time since 1957, touched up, and rerouted. Then water will flow below us again, and the old water system will resume its diligent service to people in the city and upstate, the overwhelming majority of whom will never lay eyes on the technological marvel that puts water in their faucets and showers. u

Catskill Aqueduct was constructed from 1907 to 1916, and runs 92 miles from the Ashokan Reservoir in Ulster County to Hillview Reservoir in Yonkers. SPRING 2016

61


u

AT HOME

S T O RY B Y M A RY A N G E L E S A R M S T R O N G / P H O T O S B Y D E B O R A H D E G R A F F E N R E I D A N D R O Y G U M P E L

The Stolen Church of Glenford A New York City family creates a new community outside Woodstock.

E

Photo by Roy Gumpel

very New Year’s Day for the past 14 years, Mor Pipman and Eric Hurliman have invited friends over for soup. It’s a tradition that began their first year of marriage. “We’d met and married in a whirlwind and then the holidays came,” Pipman remembers. “There was our wedding party, then Thanksgiving and office parties. It was parties, parties, parties—by New Year’s Eve we refused to go out. So we decided to stay home and make a pot of seafood bisque.”

The soup was delicious. There was also plenty to share, so the next day, January 1st, they invited neighbors over for an impromptu lunch. This was in the East Village in 2002, before gentrification and high-priced lattes, when Pipman and Hurliman were an integral part of the inter-generational, intercultural neighborhood. Pipman, a stone carver and ceramic sculptor, was teaching as well as organizing the local “M’finda Kalunga” community garden. “It was activism along with gardening,” she recalls, “and was all about creating community. We held classes where the neighborhood elders taught the kids gardening. We screened political movies. We celebrated everyone’s festivals—the Chinese harvest festival, Juneteenth, and the Sukkot.”

62 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m


Photo by Deborah DeGraffenreid

This page: Pipman’s art studio inside the old church. Opposite: A volunteer serves up Pipman’s homecooking at a Hudson Valley Sudbury School Music Night.

SPRING 2016

63


The railroad president offered the church building to the congregation “if they could only cart it away.” Amazingly, they did.

Photo by Deborah DeGraffenreid

64 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

they made the former community hall their living quarters with a kitchen from Green Demolitions, a nonprofit that recycles luxury kitchens and bathrooms. The honey-colored solid wood countertops, ornate cabinetry, and shelves laden with canned veggies are reminiscent of the late 19th century. Four-paned windows and wood doors, bought secondhand from the Door Jamb in Shokan, complete the vintage look. A large, modern industrial stove is where Pipman, now a case worker for Hudson Valley Adoption Services, began her home-based business Much Mor Bread. Photo by Roy Gumpel

Their lives changed but the New Year’s soup tradition continued. Hurliman became an RN and they had two children, Ulysses and Zephyr. In 2007, their growing family and a rat infestation on their block sent them upstate looking for a new home, and they discovered an old church for sale outside Woodstock. Originally built in 1865, the former Methodist-Episcopalian church was one of 10 congregations displaced by the building of the Ashokan Reservoir. It came to be known as “the stolen church of Glenford” because, in 1911, parishioners moved the church from the proposed reservoir basin to its current home in Glenford. According to local historian Bob Steuding, the church grounds stood within the boundaries of the Ulster and Delaware Railroad, something disgruntled congregants noted when New York City took control. The railroad president offered the church building to the congregation “if they could only cart it away.” Amazingly, they did. It took five days using oxen to move the church to the .9-acre triangle of donated land at Ohayo Mountain’s base. The congregants then built a community hall (damaged and rebuilt after a 1935 fire) to include a kitchen, community meeting space, and Sunday school annex. Over time, the local Methodist community, spread over three campuses, wanted to consolidate and expand. The Glenford property’s limitations became apparent. That’s when the Hurliman-Pipman family stepped in. In the spring of 2008 they set up camp on the land and began remodeling. “Our priority was ecological,” Pipman says. “We weren’t concerned with aesthetics and we didn’t really have a plan.” First,

From top: The exterior of the “stolen church of Glenford,” where Pipman now has an art studio; a Hudson Valley Sudbury School Music Night, featuring the band Mamalama.


DELICIOUS A feast of creative spatial ideas! Texture, Shape, Light…. Perfect for minimalist design Tap into our design talent and see for yourself. CONCEPT to COMPLETION DESIGNtoCONSTRUCTION RESIDENTIALandCOMMERCIAL

Interior Design | Kitchens Baths | Additions & Decks Finished Basements Saunas, Steamrooms & Outside Showers Cabinetry | Countertops Sinks & Faucets Hardware & Lighting Flooring | Tile Carpets Fabrics & Wall Coverings • Kitchens • Baths • Closets • Tile • Flooring • Low VOC Paint

ESTABLISHED FAMILY BUSINESS

86-88 Mill Hill Road, Woodstock, NY

EvolvedInteriors.com

845.679.9979

GLENN’S SHEDS Quality firewood sheds, built to last.

Capitol Improvement

Free Installation

Each shed is built on-site to suit your landscape. Visit the web-site to see our full line of firewood sheds.

GLENNSSHEDS.COM

845.328.0447

SINCE

1987

AND STILL GROWING.

747 Route 28 Kingston New York 12401 845-331-2200 www.cabinetdesigners.com Located in the:

Sophisticated. Sustainable. Uniquely Artistic.

Distinctive Hudson Valley design. Residential and commercial.

DAVID BORENSTEIN ARCHITECTS AND BUILDERS

davidborensteininc@gmail.com ■ 845.758.6080 architectdavidborenstein.com

SPRING 2016

65


Photos by Deborah DeGraffenreid

Clockwise, from top: Pipman at the entrance of her home, a former church annex; Some of the house’s eclectic furnishings; The kitchen features reclaimed cabinetry and rows of Pipman’s homemade canned goods.

The hall’s drop-ceiling tiles, once removed, revealed an arched twostory ceiling, and new, higher windows infused the new family room with light. The former stage was transformed into an office and laundry room. Now, along the high walls, stained-glass art by Pipman’s sister and windows recycled from her parent’s house alternate with bookshelves; an oversize National Geographic world map hangs on the back wall, and a baby grand piano sits in the corner. The white-tiled bathroom includes an antique sink, clawfoot tub, and bidet, all salvaged from Zaborski’s architectural salvage in Kingston. The Sunday school annex was divided into two bedrooms and more office space, and a mudroom and deck were added. Pipman calls it her “loft in the sticks.” Today, solar panels supply most of the complex’s energy and charge the family’s plug-in hybrid car. Hurlimann has built a large garden over the former church parking lot and planted blueberry and raspberry bushes, grapes, and a fig tree, along with lots of vegetables. A recently built pond will eventually provide fish. A recycled stone walkway leads through newly planted fruit trees to the original church. Although modernized, the former church sanctuary remains true to the original 19th-century design. Low ceilings were removed, exposing the original beams and bell tower, and solar tubes provide natural light. Insulation was added to the walls but the original dark wood carved paneling was refurbished or painstakingly replaced, and Pipman added antique chandeliers and a small centerpiece to the alter. Stained-glass windows, remnants of the building’s rich history, bathe the square

66 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

chapel in blue and green light. Pipman’s small art studio sits above like a choir loft and the space regularly hosts public events—everything from book signings to art installations and musical performances. On the last Friday of every month, the Old Glenford church hosts an intimate house concert. Music Night showcases an eclectic variety of acts, and has become the go-to listening room for local musicians introducing new material and anyone else who wants an affordable, high-quality night out. Performers at previous music nights include Deni Bonet, The Trapps, the Duke McVinnie Band, Lara Hope and the Ark-Tones, Robert Burke Warren, and Mark Black. It was conceived by Pipman and local singer Carmen Senski as a benefit for the Hudson Valley Sudbury School—a community Pipman discovered serendipitously. Back in Manhattan, she had volunteered with the original Brooklyn Free School and was intrigued by the alternative-education movement. She knew she wanted to take a similar approach with her own children’s education. “I knew there was a little school up here, but I couldn’t remember the name,” she says. When she found it, only three miles from her house, she knew it was kismet. Her sons both attend the school today. u

NEW CONTENT EVERY WEEK S U M CREATIVE M E R 2 0 1CLASS. 5 66 AT

upstater.com/arts


6.19.16

Inc.

art of design + science of building We design and build Modern homes and guide you through the process of creating yours. Our Passive House and Net Zero designs end 80-90% of your home heating and electricity costs.

845/443-0657 BuildingLogicInc.com

fresh clean indoor air .

BuildingLogic

. healthy . durable . cozy . sustainable . beautiful .

GEORGE

COLE

Auc tioneers

ON AND 5K tains H T A R A M F L A A TRAIL H the Shawangunk Moun enic views of

Sc

Early bird deadline April 15, 2015

Register newpaltzchallenge.com

TO BUY...TO SELL...

or just for the fun of it.    .

R e s i d e n t i a l • A g r i c u lt u r a l Commercial • Industrial Small/Large Estates Liquidated A p p r a i s a l s • Fa s t R e s u lt s !

(845) 758-9114 G W. C  R B. M Auctioneers & Appraisers of George W. Cole Auctions Inc., Member of NYSAA & NAA•N. Broadway (Rte. 9, next to CVS Drug Store), Red Hook, NY • 845-758-9114 FIND UPCOMING EVENTS AT WWW . GEORGECOLEAUCTIONS . COM

Summer at High Meadow • June 27 - July 29, 2016 • Full day program • Daily drop-in available • Wayfinder in August

highmeadowschool.org High Meadow School 3643 Main Street Stone Ridge, NY 845.687.4855

DIRTY GIRLS DESIGN A GA R D E N & D ES I G N CO.

Discover the Fun of Summer on the Meadow! DGD

T H E C U R AT E D W I L D . WWW.DI RTYG I R LS DES IG N.COM

SPRING 2016

67


Photo by Roy Gumpel

DENNIS CROWLEY FOURSQUARE FOUNDER / SOCCER BARON LIVES IN: New York City and Kingston HUDSON VALLEY RESIDENT SINCE: 2013 WHY THE HUDSON VALLEY? “At a certain point, the city becomes too much.” Dennis Crowley is a master team builder. In 2009, he got some fellow techies together to unleash the GPS-enabled social app Foursquare. Suddenly, Millennials in downtowns all over the world were using the service to “check-in” at various hot spots in order to let their friends know where they were hanging out—and to win bragging rights as to who had been there the most. After 7 billion check-ins, seven years of ups and downs, and last year’s controversial decision to split Foursquare’s gamified elements into a separate app called Swarm, Foursquare is finally turning a healthy profit. Turns out that compiling records of where 55 million people like to go and spend money is of interest to a lot of other companies. “I still meet people on planes who, when I tell them I work at a company called Foursquare, say ‘Oh, yeah, I use that to check in places and I get a badge with a cupcake on it,’ says Crowley. “And I say, ‘Well, that’s one of a thousand things that we do.’ The most interesting thing being that I can predict the number of new iPhones that will be sold next week based on the amount of foot traffic that goes in and out of Apple stores globally. We had that early success with the game element of the app, but that tended to constantly overshadow all the other amazing things we’ve been working on.” Now Crowley is building another team, for a whole different ball game, right here in the Hudson Valley: The Kingston Stockade Football Club. The Stockade FC will take the field at Dietz Stadium in Kingston this May as one the newest members of the semi-professional National Premier Soccer League, which consists of over 70 teams from across the country. It’s a way for Crowley to combine two of his most recently acquired passions: the Hudson Valley and soccer.

68 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

He began spending time up in the valley when searching for wedding locations two years ago. “We were spending a lot of time in the area, and I thought, ‘I don’t know why we’re not spending ALL of our time up here,” he recalls. “So we bought a place right outside of Kingston. We’re up here weekends, holidays, all of our off time, and if we’re lucky, three days a week. Our ultimate goal is to just live here full time.” Crowley didn’t grow up playing soccer, but started playing it for fun in the city over the last few years. When he discovered the pick-up soccer scene in Kingston this past summer, he saw a wealth of untapped potential. “You’ve got kids who are in college and want to train in the off-season, people who didn’t go to college who are still super talented, and people who finished their college career but still want to play at a high level. There hasn’t been a platform around for all the really great players in the area who didn’t make it to the pro level, or for fans of the game who love to watch.” Crowley always tells high school students and tech conference attendees that if there’s something in the world that they think should exist that currently doesn’t, it’s up to them to go out and build it. “I’ve been saying that to people for years, but it’s been a long time since I went out and actually did that for myself,” he says. “And putting this together isn’t that dissimilar from the early days of Foursquare. It’s super daunting to put something like this together when you look at everything that has to be done, but if you just work on it for an hour every day, then after seven days or 10 days or three months, you’ve done a lot of it.” But will Crowley himself lace up a pair of cleats as a member of the Stockade? “Gosh, no, I’m awful!” he insists. “Even at our own tryouts, I would be laughed off of the field.”—Brian PJ Cronin

INNOVATORS. NEW CONTENT EVERY WEEK 68 AT

upstater.com/innovators


MAKING THE RIGHT MOVE HAPPEN FOR YOU IN THE HUDSON VALLEY

“ Hayes was my go-to guy throughout my Hudson Valley house hunt, intuiting very quickly my tastes and preferences, and finding my family a wonderful home that fulfills a long list of my dreams. I’ll be forever thankful to him. ”

WESTWOOD METES & BOUNDS REALTY, LTD. Specializing in Ulster & Dutchess counties: Woodstock, New Paltz, Kingston, Stone Ridge, Rhinebeck, Red Hook, Millbrook and beyond

HAYES CLEMENT Licensed Real Estate Salesperson

917-568-5226 M | Hayes@westwoodrealty.com HayesClement.com | Follow me on Facebook WESTWOOD METES & BOUNDS REALTY, LTD. 3927 Main Street, Stone Ridge, NY 12484

MARKJAMES & CO.

Kitchens Designed for Cooking

FALL SALE

ends 10/3 extended delivery available call or see website for details

www.markjamesandco.com

—A.R. LORENZO, NYC & ULSTER COUNTY

845.834.3047

QUATREFOIL Quatrefoil Inc. |

| www.quatrefoil.us

NEST RE- LAD INTEALTY CO. RIORS SPRING 2016

69


ON • THE• MARKET BROUGHT TO YOU

POSTS

BY UPSTATER.COM

Find new On the Market posts EVERY DAY at Upstater.com/on-the-market

A

t Upstater.com, we cross the line between “love” and “obsessed with” when it comes to real estate—so our On the Market posts go live every day. We scour the Internet and drive the streets to bring you the best-of-the-best houses on the market (although “best-of-the-best” is, of course, subjective). Our content runs the gamut, from “Five-Figure Fridays” (great homes under $99,000) to “More Than a Mill.” We also cover handyman specials, easy fixer-uppers, turnkey-move-in-ready homes, weekend escapes, country cottages, and grand estates.

Farmhouse Perfection

Fit for a Ship’s Captain

Tiny House, Huge Yard

2 Whitmore Road, Bethel Malek Properties

10 S. Front Street, Hudson Peggy Lampman Real Estate

2357 State Route 42, Forestburgh The Maxx Group

$249,900

$950,000

$83,900

BEDS: 5 / BATHS: 2 / SQUARE FEET: 2,200 LOT SIZE: .5 ACRES / TAXES: $4,609

BEDS: 5 / BATHS: 5 / SQUARE FEET: 3,340 LOT SIZE: 2,613 SQUARE FEET / TAXES: $8,820

BEDS: 2 / BATHS: 1 / SQUARE FEET: 852 LOT SIZE: 3.6 ACRES / TAXES: $3,000

If you’re currently paying $1,000 a month in rent, consider trading your lease for a mortgage on this well-priced, completely updated Victorian. (You could even be paying less than $1,000 a month, depending on the size of your down payment.) This roomy house sits on half an acre of land in the Sullivan County town of Bethel, otherwise known as the home of Woodstock ’69. More recently, Bethel has become renowned for the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, situated on the very same land that once hosted That Concert. The center features a Woodstock Festival museum, indoor and outdoor live musical performances, and plenty of seasonal festivals—just half a mile down the road. The house’s interior is not just big, it also flows beautifully, and includes five bedrooms (count ’em!), which offer a wide range of possibilities, plus a huge kitchen and a large walk-up attic (picture a studio/workspace). Looking for a bargain? Well, this is what one looks like!

It’s not that being a Hudson River ship’s captain in the 18th century was the fanciest of gigs. It’s just that this particular Hudson River ship captain’s home received a complete renovation in 2010, transforming this historic brick townhouse into an elegant home in the city of Hudson. Built in 1750, the house is currently the Hudson Merchant House, a boutique inn located just steps from the Amtrak train station on Hudson’s waterfront. Its location makes it ideal for commuting, but the interior is pure eye candy. It’s got polished wood floors; a brick fireplace in the living room; a fully modernized kitchen with blue jaguar granite countertops and a silver subway tile backsplash; and enough windows to bathe the entire inside with natural light. But the third floor is the cherry on top of the cake, in the form of a huge and completely private loft master bedroom suite. The second floor houses four bedrooms and three baths. Step out the back door and you’re in the midst of a landscaped courtyard featuring a patio that’s perfect for intimate outdoor dining.

Don’t dismiss this five-figure property based on eyeballing it alone. Yes, it’s a small house, with just two bedrooms and one bathroom, but the inside doesn’t feel cramped at all thanks to its high ceilings and large windows. What it does need is some polish and personality. The stone fireplace in the living room provides a solid jumping-off point for the look of the living room, as is the retro country kitchen, which features a basin sink, and those wood floors will gleam once they’re all shined up. Best of all, it sits on 3.6 acres of private land in quiet Sullivan County, within the Catskills region, just two hours drive from New York City. That’s a whole lotta yard to turn into your own mini-homestead—and it’s not far from the Forestburgh Playhouse, to boot!

70 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m /o n - t h e - m a rke t

R E A L E S TA T E S E C T I O N


DREAMY LOCATION

Custom Contemporary in the Midst of Mountains 24 Camp Ridge Road, Wallkill Colucci Shand Realty

$400,000 BEDS: 3 / BATHS: 2 / SQUARE FEET: 2,066 LOT SIZE: 2.8 ACRES / TAXES: $5,200

Oh, what a dreamy location. Situated at the end of a private road on the southern fringe of the 5,000-acre Awosting Reserve in Ulster County, this custom-built contemporary is literally steps away from Minnewaska State Park and Mohonk Preserve. Basically, if you live here, you’re right in the heart of the Shawangunk Mountains (aka the ’Gunks), with easy access to hiking, climbing, cross-country skiing—the works when it comes to outdoor sports. The scenery inside the house is pretty nice too. Renovated in 2009 by William Johnson Construction, a local firm that specializes in a style that melds natural and rustic with industrial contemporary, this house is an upscale retreat, showcasing the natural beauty that surrounds it. The soaring ceiling and over-sized windows in the great

room bring in the outdoors, along with plenty of light, and house’s open floor plan is perfect for both entertaining and energy efficiency, as it allows the wood-burning stove’s warmth to permeate throughout. This house has got great flow, with the kitchen opening directly into the dining area and main living area, and the attention to detail throughout is sublime. There’s an ample sleeping loft master bedroom plus two privately situated bedrooms at the rear of the house. Built-in bookcases flank the light-filled office/studio. The bathrooms, which have a spalike atmosphere, are a true delight, as is the kitchen, which features soapstone countertops and custom cabinets.

CHECK OUT MORE HOT SUM M EPOSTS R 2 0 1 AT 5

71

upstater.com/on-the-market R E A L E S TA T E S E C T I O N

SPRING 2016

71


A Unique Leasing Opportunity For Bold Creators and Innovators! Contemporary, build-to-suit loft offices from 1,000 to 7,000 sq. ft. are now available in Hudson, NY. 551 is located right on Warren Street next to a myriad of art galleries, antique shops, music venues, cool indie cafes and high class restaurants.

Hudson has become much more than a destination for weekend antiquers. It is “Upstate’s Downtown” where local businesses benefit from a closely woven fabric of like-minded, creative professionals. Join in this close-knit mini-metropolis just two hours north of New York City. 551 Warren Street is easily within walking distance from Hudson’s Amtrak station. Get in on the action! Lease space at 551 Warren. For further information or a private showing, please call 518-291-8057 or email info@551warren.com 72 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m /o n - t h e - m a rke t

R E A L E S TA T E S E C T I O N


Dismayed at the price of buying a NYC apartment? Follow the trend and buy your second home first. Room with a View $850,000

Milan Rural Residence $499,000

Harriet Shur ❚ 518.822.0800 x15

❚ Gary DiMauro 845.757.5000 x11

Minimalist Modern $835,000

Hamilton Clark House $489,000

Gary DiMauro ❚ 845.757.5000 x11

Rhinecliff Contemporary with Hudson River Views $795,000

Rachel Hyman-Rouse ❚ 917.686.4906

Germantown Weekender $599,000

David Ludwig ❚ 518.943.7533 x11

Farmhouse, Barn, Land $595,000

David King ❚ 518.822.0800 x12

Maple Lawn $525,000

Susan Barnett ❚ 518.943.7533 x13

Tivoli NY • Hudson NY • Catskill NY • Rhinebeck NY R E A L E S TA T E S E C T I O N

❚ David Ludwig

518.943.7533 x11

Water Street Farmhouse $370,000

❚ Susan Lyne 845.757.5000 x15

Rensselaerville Side Hall $319,000

❚ Pamela Belfor 917.734.7142

Pondside Farmhouse $319,000

❚ Rachel Hyman-Rouse 917.686.4906

Early Claverack House $239,000

❚ Kathy Duffy 518.822.0800 x11

garydimauro.com SPRING 2016

73


HOULIHAN LAWRENCE

ESTATE PROPERTY Meticulously maintained Contemporary home with breathtaking views of the Catskill Mountain Range and walls of glass to flood this open concept living masterpiece with light. WEB# PJ1173742 GERMANTOWN | $660,000

ENCHANTING GETAWAY Wide-board wood floors and stone fireplaces are some of the characteristics of this 1930s renovated home. Southwest-facing stone patio. Over 11 acres of complete privacy. WEB# PJ1288992 BEEKMAN | $575,000

Michael James Tellerday Real Estate Salesperson Mobile: 845.797.6891 MLS#344314

Jill L. Rose Real Estate Salesperson Mobile: 914.204.0124 MLS#347153

VINTAGE HOMESTEAD A beautiful vintage homestead on over 20 rolling acres. Wide-board pine floors, solid doors and original hardware. A rare 3 owners in 250+ years. Home professionally restored. WEB# PJ1288168 EAST FISHKILL | $519,900 Nicole Porter Associate Real Estate Broker Mobile: 845.797.5300 MLS#347023

CENTER HALL COLONIAL Central location. This charming Colonial offers the best in amenities and style. From custom lighting in every room, tray ceilings, triple French doors to manicured grounds. WEB# PJ1181269 POUGHKEEPSIE CITY | $343,600 Lynn M. Simmons Real Estate Salesperson Mobile: 845.797.5107 MLS#345709

LaGrangeville Brokerage | 1325 Route 55 | 845.473.9770 | HoulihanLawrence.com Local Market Leader. Area’s Largest Global Network. PROVEN AND PROVING IT.

Patricia A. Hinkein Realty

PATRICIA A. HINKEIN REALTY One of a Kind, Chalet style Hudson House, located on a beautifully landscaped double lot with decks & patios offering privacy in the heart of the city of Hudson. Three BR/1.5 baths, high ceilings, CA, wood floors, original windows & usable third floor are just some of the many features of this well cared for home. $495,000

Converted barn with Catskill Mountain views. House features 3 BR/1.5 baths, great room connected to light-filled sun room, family room & den with stove hook up, workshop, CA, deck. Beautifully landscaped grounds. Detached 2 car garage. Private lake privileges. $249,000

Country Cottage on 1.4 acres with Catskill Mountain views. This 2 bedroom home features a spacious LR, FR with fireplace & balcony, 2 car attached garage & updated mechanicals. Located on a scenic country road, only minutes to the hamlet of Germantown.

Eyebrow Colonial on 2.5 acres located in Livingston & in the Red Hook School District. House features an updated kitchen, DR, LR, den & 2 BR/Bath. New Furnace. Metal Roof. Detached garage with workshop area. $139,000

$229,000

19 Church Ave, Germantown, NY (518) 537-4888 www.hinkeinrealty.com • hinkein@gmail.com

74 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m /o n - t h e - m a rke t

R E A L E S TA T E S E C T I O N


CI RCA 19 00

hamlet 2 story. 3BRs, 2 baths, oak floors up & down, vaulted MBR, 2 porches, fenced yard, barn/ garage, park across the street. JUST LISTED. $185,000.

RHINEBECK VILLAGE

3 BR, 2 bath 1950s one story w/Craftsman details.

7.69 ACRES

w/dramatic Catskill views. Large pond. Architect designed

retreat w/ wonderful K, vaulted ceilings, walls of glass, stone FPL, many details $465,000.

COFFERED & VAULTED

ceilings, huge dream K, amazing first floor MBR suite, CA, FPL, 3 car garage, 11 acres. Stunning home built w/the best of everything. $599,000.

PAUL HALLEN BE CK R E A L E S TAT E , I N C . 6 3 7 0 M I LL S T R E E T • R H I N E B E C K , N EW YO R K • 1 2 5 7 2 P H O N E : 8 4 5 - 8 7 6 - 1 6 6 0 • FAX : 8 4 5 - 8 7 6 - 5 9 5 1

PAUL HALLENBECK REAL ESTATE

DR, FR, office, wood floors, 2 panel doors, 2 car garage, huge lot! Just Listed. $279,000.

P ERF E CT RE T REAT !

SEARS STYLE HOME

6.1 acres in a quiet area. Heated Inground pool. Open

Light filled. Incredible charm & detail. Wood floors,

Superb outdoor living. $249,000.

w/gardens & huge trees. $219,900.

floor plan w/lots of light. 2 MBR suites. Wood floors.

A N AM AZI N G VI C TO RIA N

in the center of RHBK village. 7 BRs, 5.5 baths, wonderful details w/board floors, 4 bay windows, & pocket doors. Modern K & baths. $769,000.

amazing stairway, DR, office, glassed porch, 1.58 acres

4 HUGE BEDROOMS

make this country home different. 2 full baths, DR, great K, 21 ft. LR. CA, oak floors, huge deck, glassed porch, barn/studio, & 2.7 private acres. $255,000.

20 X 40 HEATED INGROUND POOL!

3 private acres. 2500 SF, 4 BR. 3.5 bath Reproduction Saltbox. WB floors in every room, 2 FPLs, 2 MBR suites, 56 ft. deck. $389,500.

SITED HIGH

this 4.33 acre building site, is rolling & open, has dramatic views, is BOHA, & is just 1.2 miles from RHBK Village. The perfect spot for your dream home! $310,000.

w w w. h a l l e n b e c k r e a l e s t a t e . c o m • i n f o @ h a l l e n b e c k r e a l e s t a t e . c o m

WHERE EXPERIENCE AND HARD MAKE A BIG DIFFERENCE R E A L E S TA T E S E W C T I OO N R K

SPRING 2016

75


“It’s not just a property….it’s a lifestyle”

COUNTRY LIFE REAL ESTATE countryliferealestate.com 518-392-6600

Attention Artisians, Craftsmen & Creative Minded:

MONDELLO UPSTATE PROPERTIES, LLC 8DW Rare Opportunity to own this Unique Compound

Your Week. Curated.

30x60 Metal Shop w/Office, 22ft Ceilings, Overhead Door & High Efficiency Furnace. 1 Bedroom Soho Loft Style Apartment w/Open Living/ Dining Area, Transom Windows, Steel beams and Skylight.

Gallery/Studio with 14ft Ceiling, Controlled Lighting. Perfect for Exhibits & Displays.

2,500 sq.ft. Wood Shop w/3 Phase electric, 14ft Ceiling & Versatile Floor Plan. 2,600 Steel Building w/18ft Ceiling, Over Head Doors, Septic and Water.

1.3 Beautifully Landscaped Acres off High Visibility Road Between Red Hook and Rhinebeck. Easy Access to Hudson, Woodstock TSP & NYS Thruway. Maintained with Pride of Ownership!

Asking $749,000

Mondello Upstate Properties LLC

Simi Stone performing at the Chronogram Block Party, Kingston, NY.

HUDSON VALLEY EVENTS TO YOUR INBOX EACH THURSDAY

West Market Street, Red Hook, NY

Catherine, Terese and Margaret Mondello

(845) 758-5555 | mondellorealestate.com

76 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

EIGHT DAY WEEK

sign up now  www.chronogram.com/8dw


The Catskills Lifestyle

EXPLORE COMMUNITIES SEARCH PROPERTIES

villagegreenrealty.com/communities

*COLDWELL BANKER VILLAGE GREEN REALTY VillageGreenRealty.com Kingston

Saugerties

Woodstock

Windham

*according to Ulster County MLS and Columbia Greene Northern Dutchess MLS 2011-2014.

VILLAGE GREEN REALTY

20 years of finding our clients the perfect country properties has made us #1 in Ulster and Greene Counties*. Kingston 845-331-5357 | Goshen 845-294-8857 | New Paltz 845-255-0615 Stone Ridge 845-687-4355 | Windham 518-734-4200 | Woodstock 845-679-2255

Sophisticated Lady

COPAKE LAKE REALTY Specializing in Southern Columbia County, NY

This 4 BR, 4.5 BA, 3300 sf modern contemporary comes with 17 acres. Views of spring-fed and private Beezy Pond greet you upon entering and are offered throughout the home. The entry level hosts the kitchen with dining space, living room and den with a wood-burning fireplace. Sleeping quarters are located on the top floor. The master en-suite has a private balcony. The master bathroom has double sinks, bath and shower. There are three other bedrooms and two bathrooms on this level. The lower floor has a huge playroom, bonus room and garage access. Stroll down the path to your private dock. Outdoor amenities include patios, dock and outdoor shower. Asking $975,000.

Lindsay LeBrecht , Real Estate Broker

285 Lakeview Road, Craryville (Copake Lake), NY

SPRING 2016

77


GeorGe T. Whalen real esTaTe • ES TA B LI S H ED 1 9 2 5 •

CLASSIC DUTCHESS COUNTY FARMHOUSE—A charming and unique home featuring original details with recent renovations, tailored for modern living. Beautiful 6.5 acres in Millbrook Hunt Country, surrounded by large estate quality land. Living room w/stone fireplace, spacious dining room, galley kitchen and family room w/slider to deck overlooking rolling views. 2 car barn w/workshop. Splendid country retreat! OFFERED AT $550,000

GEORGE T. WHALEN FABULOUS VILLAGE COLONIAL—Absolutely beautiful colonial on a large Village of Millbrook lot. 4 BRs, including a master suite, 2.5 baths, incredible gourmet kitchen w/breakfast nook and access to covered porch, living room with fireplace, formal dining room, library and sunroom. Lovely stone patio that overlooks the big back yard. Within walking distance of Village shops, restaurants, schools and parks. OFFERED AT $585,000

FULLY FURNISHED MILLBROOK SUMMER RENTAL—Newly renovated home on 4.7 private acres of lawn and woods only minutes from the Village of Millbrook. The 1st floor  features a living room w/vaulted ceiling, dining room w/ fireplace, eat-in-kitchen, 2 BRs and a full bath   The 2nd floor has a sitting room and a master bedroom/bathroom suite.  Screened in porch, two car, detached garage and small storage building. Great location for enjoying all of Millbrook area summer activities and events! Available Memorial Day through Labor Day. OFFERED AT $5,000 PER MONTH

3269 Franklin Ave. Millbrook, NY 12545 845-677-5076 • GTWhalen.com 78 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m /o n - t h e - m a rke t

Cedar Heights Farm RHINEBECK

This idyllic property is the epitome of Hudson Valley charm. An A.J. Downing inspired Victorian farmhouse, 102 bucolic acres with dramatic Catskill Mountain views, 3.5-acre spring-fed lake, 6-stall barn, pastures with multiple run-in sheds, access to local horse trails and 175 apple trees which are part of Cedar Heights Orchard. Minutes to the Village of Rhinebeck, Kingston-Rhinecliff Bridge and Amtrak. Convenient to Tivoli and Bard’s Fisher Center. Offered at $2,495,000.

H.H. HILL REALTY SERVICES, INC. 845.876.8888 • hillrhinebeck.com

6408 MONTGOMERY ST., RHINEBECK, NY 12572

PEGGY LAMPMAN REAL ESTATE R E A L E S TA T E S E C T I O N


CONTACT our 551 Warren

ADVERTISERS George Cole Auctions & Realty

Murray’s Tivoli

Adage

George T. Whalen Real Estate

Nest Realty Co.

Atlantic Custom Homes

The Gift Hut

New Paltz Chamber of Commerce

Berkshire Products, Inc.

Glenn’s Sheds

North Country Vintage

Birdsall House

Handmade and More

Ole Savannah Southern Table & Bar

handmadeandmore.com / 845-255-6277

olesavannah.com / 845-331-4283

Hawthorne Valley Association

Omi International Arts Center

hawthornevalleyassociation.org / 518-672-7092

omiartscenter.org / 518-392-4747

HH Hill Realty Services

Patricia A. Hinkein Realty

High Meadow School

Paul Hallenbeck Real Estate

highmeadowschool.org / 845-687-4855

hallenbeckrealestate.com / 845-876-1660

Historic Huguenot Street

Peekskill Business Improvement District downtownpeekskill.com / 914-737-2780

Houlihan Lawrence Real Estate

Peggy Lampman Real Estate

551warren.com / 518-291-8057 adage-nyc.com / 518-697-5397 hudsonvalleycedarhomes.com / 845-265-2636 berkshireproducts.com / 413-229-7919 birdsallhouse.net / 914-930-1880

The Borland House

theborlandhouse.com / 845-457-1513

BuildingLogic Inc

buildinglogicinc.com / 845-443-0657

Buttermilk Falls Inn & Spa buttermilkfallsinn.com / 845-795-1310

Cabinet Designers, Inc

cabinetdesigners.com / 845-331-2200

Catskill Animal Sanctuary casanctuary.org / 845-336-8447

Catskill Farms Builders

thecatskillfarms.com / 845-557-3600

Charlotte Valley Farms

organiccatskillretreat.com / 607-434-5993

Chronogram

chronogram.com / 845-334-8600

Classic Mortgage

classicmortgagellc.com / 845-222-8270

Cold Spring Area Chamber of Commerce explorecoldspringny.com 845-265-3200

Coldwell Banker Village Green Realty villagegreenrealty.com

Copake Lake Realty

copakelakerealty.com / 518-325-9741

Corcoran Group 917-575-5160

Country Life Real Estate

countryliferealestate.com / 518-392-6600

georgecoleauctions.com / 845-758-9114 gtwhalen.com / 845-677-5076

thegifthut.com / 894-297-3786 glennssheds.com / 845-328-0447

hillrhinebeck.com / 845-876-8888

huguenotstreet.org / 845-255-1660

houlihanlawrence.com / 845-473-9770

HOUSE Hudson Valley Realty househudsonvalley.com / 518-828-5154

The Hudson Company hudson-co.com / 845-848-3040

Hudson River Expeditions

hudsonriverexpeditions.com / 845-737-1202 / 914-809-5935

The Hudson Room

tacodivebar.com / 914-788-TACO

Hudson Valley Home Source hvhomesource.com / 845-294-5663

Hudson Woods

hudsonwoods.com / 212-233-9187

LAD Interiors

ladinteriors.com / 518-392-0209

Luminary Media

luminarymedia.com / 845-334-8600

Luminary Weddings

David Borenstein Architects and Builders

luminaryweddings.com

Denning’s Point Distillery, LLC

maincoursecatering.com / 845-255-2600

Dirty Girls Design

markjamesandco.com / 845-834-3047

architectdavidborenstein.com / 845-758-6080 denningspointdistillery.com / 845-230-7905 dirtygirlsdesign.com / 845-626-1310

Main Course

MarkJames & Co.

murraystivoli.com / 845-757-6003 nestrealtyco.com / 845-417-7242 newpaltzchallenge.com / 845-255-0243

northcountryvintage.com / 347-615-5528

hinkeinrealty.com / 518-537-4888

peggylampman.com / 518-851-2277

Putnam County Tourism Office tourputnam.org

Quatrefoil

quatrefoil.us / 845-773-923

Sav-On Party Central

savonparty.com / 845-336-5800

Social Venture Institute Hudson Valley svihudsonvalley.com

Stewart Airport, Port Authority NY-NJ panynj.gov/airports/stewart.html / 845-838-8200

Stoutridge Vineyard

stoutridge.com / 845-236-7620

Time and Space Limited timeandspace.org / 518-822-8100

Tuthill House

tuthillhouse.com / 845-255-4151

Ulster County Tourism

ulstercountyalive.com / 1-800-342-5826

Ulster Savings Bank

ulstersavings.com / 845-338-6322

Walkway Marathon

walkwaymarathon.org / 845-454-9649

Westwood Metes & Bounds Realty westwoodrealty.com / 845-340-1920

Dutchess County Fairgrounds

Menla Mountain Retreat & Conference Center

Elephant

Mill House Brewing Company

William Wallace Construction

EvolveD Interiors & Design Showroom LLC

Mondello Upstate Properties, LLC

Wm. Farmer & Sons

Gary DiMauro Real Estate

Mount Saint Mary College

Zimmer Brothers

dutchessfair.com / 845-876-4000 845-339-9310

evolvedinteriors.com / 845-679-9979 garydimauro.com / 845-876-5100

menla.org / 845-688-6897

millhousebrewing.com / 845-485-2739

mondellorealestate.com / 845-758-5555 msmc.edu / 888-YES-MSMC

White Plains Hospital Center wphospital.org / 914-681-2929

williamwallaceconstruction.com / 845-679-2130 wmfarmerandsons.com / 518-828-1635 zimmerbrothers.com /845-876-6363

SPRING 2016

79


u

LAST LOOK

S T O RY B Y A N N E P Y B U R N C R A I G

FINDING FUNGI To a mycophile, there is no feeling quite like spotting a fresh fruiting. And it’s a highly practical obsession. “We’re talking about free, delicious food that would cost you $30 a pound at the store,” says Jill Weiss of Staatsburg, walks coordinator for the Mid-Hudson Mycological Association (MHMA). “And believe me, the oysters or Maitakes that are cultivated are nowhere near as tasty as the ones you find in the woods.” Mushrooms are revealing one wonder after another to the curious, admiring eyes of the mycologically inclined. Their nutritional and medicinal benefits are such that the Maitake [aka “hen-of-the-woods”], for example, rates an entire page on WebMD as a treatment for 10 different medical problems, ranging from weight loss to cancer. And that comprises just one of the rooms of riches in the castle of the Fifth Kingdom. “We know of 1.5 million species, and only 10 percent have scientific names,” says John Michelotti, founder of Catskill Fungi. “So there is a lot we don’t know. What we do know, besides medical properties ranging from antiviral to tumor reduction, gets more amazing all the time. Fungi can be used in place of Styrofoam. Mushroom mycelium cleans the soil and the environment.” Michelotti understates the case. Humble mushrooms, it turns out, exist in a symbiotic relationship with every other life form on the planet by means of their neural network, the mycelia, which crusading mycologist Paul Stamets calls a “biomolecular superhighway.” Possible future applications of this understanding include organic building materials and energy storage. Mushrooms have not only survived a series of mass extinctions, they’re very possibly the hope of the planet’s

80 upstater

/ u p s t a t e r.c o m

future: Several species of the life form have been identified that can cheerfully devour polyurethane, petroleum, toxic heavy metals, and radioactive waste. While scientists work out the possibilities of using mushrooms to reclaim the planet and terraform livable environments for outer space, you can dip a toe (or more) in the teeming waters of mycology simply by taking a walk in the woods with a group of well-met new friends. Both Catskill Fungi and the MHMA sponsor regular mushroom walks open to the public throughout the Hudson Valley and Catskills, on which you can learn the rules of engagement—the identification skills that will keep you from making a lethal error. (Catskill Fungi also offers private mushroom walks.) Guidance is crucial. “There are a lot of lookalikes,” says Weiss, “and some of the ugly ones are the most delicious; some of the beautiful ones the deadliest. And a lot of people new to foraging want a mushroom to be something good so much that they can fool themselves. Don’t rely on strangers or pictures. Go out on walks with experts.” Among the species to be found in our area in spring are the rock stars of the mushroom world, the prized truffle-like morels, as well as oyster mushrooms, edible puffballs, and hen-of-the-woods. As the season continues, there will be chanterelles, porcini, black trumpets, and Maitakes. So bring the camera. Whether you find edibles or not, you’ll find visually inspiring fun: An entire section of Catskill Fungi’s website is devoted to the growing field of mushroom art. “Some mushrooms,” says Weiss, “are stunning beauties. Others are just the funkiest things you’ve ever seen in your life.” u

INNOVATORS. NEW CONTENT EVERY WEEK 80 AT

upstater.com/innovators


Stewart International Airport

Neighborhood airport. World-class carriers. Conveniently located right in the Hudson Valley, Stewart’s comfortable size, modern amenities, friendly staff, and focus on customer care make getting to the airport, and flying out of it, hassle-free. In addition to its commercial services from Allegiant, American, Delta, and JetBlue, Stewart also features services for private or corporate air travelers from Independent Helicopters. All of these options make Stewart the most convenient and versatile airport in the region.

STEWART AIRPORT PORT AUTHORITY Stewart International Your neighborhood airport.


THE HUDSON COMPANY

CU STO M WO O D F LO O R I N G, PA N E L I N G & B E A M S S I N C E 1 9 95 MILL: PINE PLAINS

|

S H O W R O O M : B R O O K LY N

|

THEHUDSONCO.COM

Upstater Spring 2016  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you