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UNIVERSITY PRESS

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Some in FAU’s gay community feel the school hasn’t given them the advice and support they deserve—until now -10-

BU

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IED

January 25, 2011 Vol. 12 Issue 17

Owls basketball makes history -3First issue is free; each additional copy is 50 cents and available in the UP newsroom.


2 January 25, 2011

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opinion

www.upressonline.com January 25, 2011

Owls continue unprecedented run with weekend victory over UALR PHOTOS COURTESY OF JC RIDLEY

university press

Seventh Heaven

Editor-in-chief Gideon Grudo Managing Editor James Shackelford ART DIRECTOR Mariam Aldhahi WEB EDITOR Tyler Krome Copy DESK CHIEF Ricky Michalski SPORTS EDITOR Franco Panizo Features editor Alyssa Cutter Entertainment Editor Briana Bramm PHOTO EDITOR Christine Capozziello senior editor Karla Bowsher

Greg Gantt hovers in midair, moments away from shooting the ball.

LISTINGS EDITOR Kaceion Hudson Assistant art director Ariana Corrao Assistant Web Editor Paul Cohen SENIOR REPORTERS Brandon Ballenger Monica Ruiz Senior photograPher Liz Dzuro STAFF REPORTERS Ryan Cortes Sergio N. Candido Mark Gibson STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS Todd Roller Elizabeth Whitton STAFF ILLUSTRATOR Adam Sheetz COPY EDITOR Rachel Chapnick CONTRIBUTOR Philicia Douglas Megan Kiziah CIRCULATION MANAGER Chris Persaud

ADVISERS Marti Harvey Michael Koretzky

777 Glades Road Student Union, Room 214 Boca Raton, FL 33431 PHONE: (561) 297-2960 Want to join our team? E-mail: upress@fau.edu Staff Meetings: Every Friday at 2 p.m. in the Student Union, Room 214 WANT TO PLACE AN AD? Contact Marc Litt at (732) 991-6353 or marc@universityimpress.com PUBLISHER: FAU Student Government The opinions expressed by the UP are not necessarily those of the student body, Student Government or the university. Cover photo illustration by: Tyler Krome

3 January 25, 2011

Franco Panizo Sports Editor

Ray Taylor jumps toward the net as his team members and an Arkansas State player follow closely behind.

AU finished doing something over the weekend that it had never done before, and ESPN was there to cover it. The Owls (15-6) extended their unprecedented Division I winning streak to seven games by defeating Sun Belt Conference foe UALR 88-71 on Saturday, Jan. 22, at The Burrow. FAU’s win, which also raised the Owls to 7-0 in conference play, was made even more special as it was televised live nationwide on ESPN2. It’s likely the victory opened the eyes of many around the country, but Saturday’s win was just the latest example of how much this team has improved since the 14-16 record posted last season. “We’re practicing better and it’s all about practice,” said head coach Mike Jarvis after Saturday’s win. “No matter what Allen Iverson says, practice is incredibly important. Usually when people have asked me in the past why your team is so hot I say it’s because you practice hot.” Brett Royster and newcomer Kore White must be leading the way in practice, because those two have helped the Owls look much better defensively. The addition of White this season has been a major benefit, as he gives FAU another big man down low to defend and an extra offensive weapon with deceptive skills. “Kore White is a tremendous talent,” said Jarvis. “I mean, how many big guys can shoot a jump shot and make it consistently from midrange?” Offensively, guard Ray Taylor has also shone during this sevengame stretch. Averaging 11.6 points and 4.1 assists this season, Taylor has overcome an early-season suspension to look like a more mature player in his second year with the Owls. Those aren’t the only players who have done their part. From rookie Pablo Bertone to sophomore guard Greg Gantt, FAU has seen nearly all of its role players step up when needed.

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“We still feel like we have a lot to prove,” said junior guard Alex Tucker. No moment better highlights that than when Tucker scored a career-high 19 points to help give FAU a 50-42 victory over USF on Dec. 4. The win was the Owls’ second in a row over a “Big Six” BCS Conference team. That’s the difference between now and last season, and Jarvis deserves much of the credit for it. Jarvis has recruited a large portion of the current crop of players, and he’s done an excellent job molding them into a team with an aesthetically pleasing style of play. The man with possibly the thickest Boston accent in FAU history has made nearly flawless player personnel decisions. He also hasn’t been afraid to make tough decisions, not the least of which was suspending Taylor at the beginning of the season for conduct detrimental to the team. Jarvis has done such a strong job coaching that it could be argued he is the best coach FAU can boast from its cast of characters. Yes, even ahead of the highly touted Howard Schnellenberger. Superlatives like that will matter little to Jarvis, though, as all he’s likely focused on is getting this team to continue to reach its potential. This winning streak will almost surely come to a close eventually, perhaps against Middle Tennessee State in Thursday’s 7 p.m. home game. But the Owls, who are undefeated in Sun Belt play, are looking like as a good a team as any to win the conference championship in March. If that happens, FAU would be assured a place in the highly followed NCAA Basketball Championship, also known as March Madness. Get a winning streak in that tournament, and you could expect to see FAU on ESPN a lot more. upressonline.com


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FEATURE

A sizeable Shabbat FAU hosts Shabbat dinner for Jewish Heritage month Briana Bramm Training Editor FAU’s Jewish Student Union is holding its largest Shabbat dinner to date — and by largest, they mean planning on about 365 hungry attendees. For January’s Jewish Heritage Month, students are seeking to carry on this weekly weekend tradition by bringing it straight to campus. “It was the start of a new year and the end of Jewish Heritage Month, so we decided 365 days of the year [as a theme] was a cool thing,” said Jewish Student Union President Lauren Heyman. Heyman, a junior exercise science health promotion major, is working with Hillel, a worldwide Jewish student organization, to put on this first-of-its-kind dinner for FAU. “Hillel tries to help out with Jewish Life on Campus… we provide social programs, religious programs, education programs; all different types of programs around the Jewish religion and the Jewish culture.” Said Briana Schwartz, Hillel’s Director of Operations and Program Associate. “Last year we did a joint Shabbat dinner with the Black

Student Union … but it was a smaller scale,” said Heyman. The event went well, prompting the Jewish Student Union and Hillel to expand the event this year. And no, you don’t have to be Jewish to attend the Shabbat. The idea behind this dinner is to show both Jewish and nonJewish students what Shabbat and Jewish tradition are about. “We could bring the entire campus together to show people that have never had the Jewish experience what it is to be Jewish,” said Heyman. “Shabbat is the day of rest for Jews, so ordinarily it’s a time when families come together and have a dinner together.” Shabbat dinners have varied weekly menus, and this dinner will consist of baked ziti and salad. And it’s free to students. “Hillel has funding … they were planning on having an event like this,” said Heyman. For the event, Hillel is paying $3,000 and the multicultural programming office is sponsoring $2,000. And while groups are encouraged to sign up for a full table of eight, smaller parties and even singles are welcome. “If a group can only find two or three students or [students] are not affiliated with anyone, they can just RSVP,” said Heyman.

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Inked up

FEATURE

FAU does its homework on today’s tattoo culture

Kaceion Hudson Contributor

Graphic design junior Sole del Real took the tattoo culture survey and is proud to show off her inked body around campus. Her colorful arm sleeve and chest piece were done by Steve Lahman from Hellcat Tattoo in West Palm Beach.

PHOTO BY LIZ DZURO

M

ore than 40 million Americans, according to the Harris Poll, have at least one tattoo. It seems tattoos have gone mainstream, so what does the future hold for inked individuals? FAU is currently doing research through a study called “Stories on the Skin: Tattoo Culture at FAU.” This project attempts to shed some light on the growing emergence of, and changing attitude toward, permanent body art. “Anyone can get tattoos: prison inmates, athletes, students, even runway models,” said Karen Leader, a professor in the department of visual arts and art history and co-director of “Stories on the Skin.” Leader believes the meaning behind tattoos and the demographics of the people getting them has changed over the past 20 years. “If you had a tattoo [back then] you could be identified as something; that’s not true anymore.” Last fall, 1,147 FAU students took a survey during Phase 1 of the project. Fifty-eight percent of those taking the survey have tattoos. According to the survey results, the main reason a student gets a tattoo is to commemorate an event. Third-year marketing and management major Julian Hanlan shared his opinion on tattoos and his reason for getting them. “They all have meaning and they all relate to each other. One side of my body basically has a family and love theme, the other side has a strength and courage theme.” According to the project, there is a story behind every tattoo. Sometimes the story is found in the meaning of the tattoo, while other times it’s the experience of getting a tattoo. Arthur Jaffe, founder of the Jaffe Center for Book Arts and cocreator of the “Stories on the Skin” project, believes tattoos can be seen as another kind of book. “They are something that can be read, something that has a story.” Jaffe asked, “If a person dedicates their whole life to something, why shouldn’t they be able to tattoo it?” According to both Leader and Hanlan, one reason people do not tattoo their story is because of their current or future career. Hanlan confessed fears he had when getting body art. “I hesitate every time because of the thought of a career and just hearing what my mother feels about them.” He went on, “Instead of conforming … I’d rather get what makes me happy and stand by my belief that a person with tattoos can work just as well as someone whose body is spotless.” Leader believes, “Heavily tattooed individuals are still going to be largely judged in the business world, but otherwise attitudes are shifting. Cover up and discretion is where the split now lies.” One of the goals of the “Stories on the Skin” project is to help people understand that a tatoo’s permanance makes it more than a fashion statement. “I’m using tattoos to explore other things like aesthetics, beauty, identity and self-fashioning. We create who we present to the world and that creation is how society accepts or rejects us,” said Leader. Here on campus, students are in a constant state of learning and creation and many seem to be using tattoos as their outlet of expression.

“Stories on the Skin: Culture at FAU” The research done by Karen Leader and Arthur Jaffe is broken up into three phases. The project started in fall 2010 and should take a year to finish. Each phase takes place during a different semester. The official dates and place of participation will be available on myfau.fau.edu.

Phase 1: A student survey took place in fall 2010. Phase 2: Personal student stories will be gathered about art, songs or any other creative expressions relating to their tattoo. This will take place in spring 2011. Phase 3: A final film and book of the findings during the project will be produced with an expected release in either summer or fall of 2011.

The Jaffe Center for Book Arts JCBA houses a tattoo book collection and the office for “Stories on the Skin.” Founded by Arthur and Mata Jaffe, JCBA is located on the third floor of the Wimberly Library on the Boca Campus. The center also houses the Jaffe Collection, exhibition, gallery talks, films, performances and their popular Book Arts 101 presentations. The Book Arts studio offers workshops and classes for book binding. JCBA is also well known for its Letter Press studio. Coming soon in spring is their papermaking studio that will be located on the Boca campus. To find out more about JCBA, visit www. jaffecollection.org.

To get more info and to follow the timeline of the project, visit www.storiesontheskin.org.

9 January 25, 2011

upressonline.com


PHOTO BY CHRISTINE CAPPOZIELLO

LGBTQ students and faculty say there’s bullying at FAU

&

Gay mad Sergio N. Candido Staff Reporter

Ryan Ebanks lived in the University Village apartments during the fall of 2009, his roommate would never use the same silverware or plates he had used. It wasn’t because the utensils were dirty or because Ebanks was sick — it was because Ebanks was gay. “It becomes a part of your life,” said Ebanks, who has suffered bullying since an early age. “I get teased and mocked all the time: ‘Oh your voice is so high-pitched, oh you walk funny, oh we know you are gay.’” At FAU, police records show no hate crimes were committed in the last three years, but the gay community says heads turn, faces scowl, and profanity fills the air at the sight of a seemingly homosexual person. On top of that, until recently, the university hasn’t provided them with the resources gay students say they need on campus: advice for students who aren’t open about their sexuality, a safe place where they can feel comfortable, and more widespread education about gay issues to decrease discrimination, according to Jenna Beckwith, health promotion coordinator in the Today and Beyond Wellness Center. hen

W

Bullied everywhere

Peter Cava, an instructor in the Womenís study program, said he has been bullied multiple times at the Boca Raton campus.

10 January 25, 2011

Peter Cava does not look like your average professor: He wears a black dress accompanied by earrings, sky- blue eye shadow and a light-red shade of lipstick that stands out on his pale skin. At 6 feet 3-and-a-half inches, the lanky instructor towers over most of his students, but that doesn’t stop him from getting bullied. “We certainly do have [bullying] here, I’ve experienced it,” said Peter Cava in a soft-spoken voice. He teaches transgender studies, which examines the roles of transgender individuals from cross-cultural, historical, sociological and psychological perspectives. “I hear about it from my students and other instructors as well that there’s been some problems.” He said strangers shout curse words every time he walks on campus. And even though some students come up to him asking for advice on how to cope with harassment, others in his class decide to bash him mercilessly on the Internet, Cava said. “I’ve had situations with my own students posting comments online about my gender,” said the 28-yearold instructor from New York. “Or making sexually inappropriate remarks about me and my genitalia.” The comments were posted on ratemyprofessor.com, a website used by college students to rank faculty and classes. The comments were later removed by the website’s administrators, Cava said. Like Cava, students also suffer harassment on campus. upressonline.com

FAU student Amanda Dier, president of Lambda United, a student organization that provides social support and promotes events for LGBT students on campus, said somebody had posted a letter with the word “Gaylord” written in rainbow colors outside the dorm room of an openly gay student last semester. According to Dier, the girls who had written the derogatory message quickly apologized after they were told they could face hate crime charges for the incident. Despite these cases of harassment based on sexual orientation, the FAU Police Department Crime Statistics from 2007 to 2009 show a list of zeroes for every campus under “hate crimes,” according to its website, www.fau. edu/police/clery.php. Neither the FAU Counseling Center nor the office of Equal Opportunity Programs has encountered bullying victims in the last 10 years, officials from both offices said. “The thing with the Counseling Center is that a lot of people think that if you go there it means something is wrong with you,” Dier said. Ryan Ebanks said incidents happen so often that reporting them will not solve anything. He ended up moving off campus after one semester because he couldn’t stand his roommate’s attitude and now shares an apartment with a group of European women who he said are accepting of his sexuality. But for Ebanks, the bullying hasn’t stopped. He said he’s also bullied by a group of African-American males in the Breezeway, who mock him when he walks by. The harassment is generally mild, from imitating his gestures to making sounds as he walks by, but it still hurts, Ebanks said. “We have to deal with that all the time, so we have gotten so used to it,” Ebanks said. But Cava believes the reason incidents are kept unreported lies elsewhere. “A whole lot of people who are sexually variant have had bad experiences with the police,” Cava said. “Maybe what happens with the police could just be as traumatizing as what could have happened in the hate crime.” He said campus police are not trained to deal with these type of situations and when confronted with a case like this, officers can’t grasp the sensitivity of the incident, asking questions that can make the victim feel “embarrassed” for what happened to them. “You are like under a microscope, that’s why there are a lot of teens that try to commit suicide,” Ebanks said. “I’ve gotten depressed where I’ve thought about stuff because I was that depressed.” Professor Sameer Hinduja said he knows why people engage in bullying.

11 January 25, 2011

LGBTQ students and faculty say there’s bullying at FAU

“Reasons for bullying tend to range from insecurities — the need to push other people down in order to build oneself up — to the fact that some bullies are subject to power, control and abuse in their homes or other spheres of life and they are attempting to achieve some equilibrium by doing the same to others,” said Hinduja, who also included boredom, peer pressure and teens’ obsession with technology among the reasons.

Bully territories compared Although FAU is located in South Florida — which has one of the largest gay communities in the country according to The Advocate, a well-known LGBT-interest magazine — its resources are limited. Before January, the resources FAU offered best compared to the University of Southern Indiana, a historically conservative place, where the Klu Klux Klan achieved great political power in the early 20th century. “One of the things that caught my eye was that there’s very little when it comes to resources for LGBT on campus,” said Stephanie Young, adviser for Spectrum, the gay-straight alliance student organization at USI. Besides the student club and a safe zone program, where faculty and staff display a triangular rainbow-colored logo on their office door to indicate they are supportive of gay students, there is little USI offers to their gay community. “It’s still a work in progress. We want to create a better campus climate for LGBT students,” Young said. Until the FAU resource center opened on Jan. 10, the university had exactly the same resources as the University of Southern Indiana, according to FAU’s website. “There’s been nobody doing this job at FAU,” said Jenna Beckwith. At Florida International University, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students have more options. FIU has four student organizations, a resource center, LGBT seminars for students and professors, and the Stonewall Center, which provides students with a library of gay and lesbian literature and videos. “Our focus is in programming for the university,” said Bridgette Wynn, graduate assistant for LGBT Initiatives at the FIU resource center. Wynn said FIU wants to have more events for gay students on campus so that they can feel like part of the school. Another plan FIU has, according to Wynn, is to increase housing to accommodate LGBT students in an atmosphere where they feel more comfortable, especially transgender students, who are often housed in dorm rooms that don’t match their sexual identity.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 14--

The minds behind bullying In different parts of the country, some student victims of bullying who aren’t able to cope with the harassment think they know a way out: committing suicide. Last year, several high school and even college students killed themselves because they were bullied at school. In September, 18-year-old Tyler Clementi jumped off the George Washington Bridge in New York City after his roommate at Rutgers University broadcasted Clementi’s sexual encounter with another man on the Internet. Around the same time, Seth Walsh, a 13-year-old gay student at Jacobsen Middle School, hanged himself from a tree in his backyard in Tehachapi, Calif., after being bullied. FAU researchers, psychologists and counselors pointed out several reasons that may affect LGBT students’ decisions to commit suicide. “Bullying and cyberbullying do not directly lead to suicide,” said Sameer Hinduja, co-director of the Cyberbullying Research Center and professor of criminology at the Jupiter campus. “Bullying was just one additional stress that broke the camel’s proverbial back.” Rhonda Seiman, psychologist and counselor at the FAU Counseling Center, said that LGBT students tend to have less family support, which, combined with limited legal rights, makes them feel like they do not belong in society. “This population tends to feel unsupported, trapped, hopeless and maybe even purposeless,” Seiman said. “If people think, ‘Well I can’t get married, I’ll never have a family, I’ll never be able to adopt … I’ll never find a partner,’ all of those things are tremendous stressors.” Psychology professor David Perry, who is currently doing research on aggressive behavior in elementary and junior high school children, thinks LGBT students might sometimes blame themselves for the harassment they receive. “If they think there’s something wrong with them, or that they caused it, they are more likely to internalize the victimization experience as something that they deserve,” Perry said. “That creates depression.” Ryan Ebanks, who was born in Jamaica, “one of the most homophobic places in the world” according to a 2004 article in the British newspaper The Guardian, lived first-hand what it means for a gay youngster to be rejected by his own family. When he was 17, his stepfather read his private diary and kicked him out of the house. “Being gay, you are put into the spot where you are morally wrong,” said Ebanks, whose mother, according to him, is very religious. “You are fighting yourself, your own existence as a person being that you are like bad, you are an abomination to God.” At times, before going to therapy, he said he had considered ending his life. upressonline.com


PHOTO BY CHRISTINE CAPPOZIELLO

LGBTQ students and faculty say there’s bullying at FAU

&

Gay mad Sergio N. Candido Staff Reporter

Ryan Ebanks lived in the University Village apartments during the fall of 2009, his roommate would never use the same silverware or plates he had used. It wasn’t because the utensils were dirty or because Ebanks was sick — it was because Ebanks was gay. “It becomes a part of your life,” said Ebanks, who has suffered bullying since an early age. “I get teased and mocked all the time: ‘Oh your voice is so high-pitched, oh you walk funny, oh we know you are gay.’” At FAU, police records show no hate crimes were committed in the last three years, but the gay community says heads turn, faces scowl, and profanity fills the air at the sight of a seemingly homosexual person. On top of that, until recently, the university hasn’t provided them with the resources gay students say they need on campus: advice for students who aren’t open about their sexuality, a safe place where they can feel comfortable, and more widespread education about gay issues to decrease discrimination, according to Jenna Beckwith, health promotion coordinator in the Today and Beyond Wellness Center. hen

W

Bullied everywhere

Peter Cava, an instructor in the Womenís study program, said he has been bullied multiple times at the Boca Raton campus.

10 January 25, 2011

Peter Cava does not look like your average professor: He wears a black dress accompanied by earrings, sky- blue eye shadow and a light-red shade of lipstick that stands out on his pale skin. At 6 feet 3-and-a-half inches, the lanky instructor towers over most of his students, but that doesn’t stop him from getting bullied. “We certainly do have [bullying] here, I’ve experienced it,” said Peter Cava in a soft-spoken voice. He teaches transgender studies, which examines the roles of transgender individuals from cross-cultural, historical, sociological and psychological perspectives. “I hear about it from my students and other instructors as well that there’s been some problems.” He said strangers shout curse words every time he walks on campus. And even though some students come up to him asking for advice on how to cope with harassment, others in his class decide to bash him mercilessly on the Internet, Cava said. “I’ve had situations with my own students posting comments online about my gender,” said the 28-yearold instructor from New York. “Or making sexually inappropriate remarks about me and my genitalia.” The comments were posted on ratemyprofessor.com, a website used by college students to rank faculty and classes. The comments were later removed by the website’s administrators, Cava said. Like Cava, students also suffer harassment on campus. upressonline.com

FAU student Amanda Dier, president of Lambda United, a student organization that provides social support and promotes events for LGBT students on campus, said somebody had posted a letter with the word “Gaylord” written in rainbow colors outside the dorm room of an openly gay student last semester. According to Dier, the girls who had written the derogatory message quickly apologized after they were told they could face hate crime charges for the incident. Despite these cases of harassment based on sexual orientation, the FAU Police Department Crime Statistics from 2007 to 2009 show a list of zeroes for every campus under “hate crimes,” according to its website, www.fau. edu/police/clery.php. Neither the FAU Counseling Center nor the office of Equal Opportunity Programs has encountered bullying victims in the last 10 years, officials from both offices said. “The thing with the Counseling Center is that a lot of people think that if you go there it means something is wrong with you,” Dier said. Ryan Ebanks said incidents happen so often that reporting them will not solve anything. He ended up moving off campus after one semester because he couldn’t stand his roommate’s attitude and now shares an apartment with a group of European women who he said are accepting of his sexuality. But for Ebanks, the bullying hasn’t stopped. He said he’s also bullied by a group of African-American males in the Breezeway, who mock him when he walks by. The harassment is generally mild, from imitating his gestures to making sounds as he walks by, but it still hurts, Ebanks said. “We have to deal with that all the time, so we have gotten so used to it,” Ebanks said. But Cava believes the reason incidents are kept unreported lies elsewhere. “A whole lot of people who are sexually variant have had bad experiences with the police,” Cava said. “Maybe what happens with the police could just be as traumatizing as what could have happened in the hate crime.” He said campus police are not trained to deal with these type of situations and when confronted with a case like this, officers can’t grasp the sensitivity of the incident, asking questions that can make the victim feel “embarrassed” for what happened to them. “You are like under a microscope, that’s why there are a lot of teens that try to commit suicide,” Ebanks said. “I’ve gotten depressed where I’ve thought about stuff because I was that depressed.” Professor Sameer Hinduja said he knows why people engage in bullying.

11 January 25, 2011

LGBTQ students and faculty say there’s bullying at FAU

“Reasons for bullying tend to range from insecurities — the need to push other people down in order to build oneself up — to the fact that some bullies are subject to power, control and abuse in their homes or other spheres of life and they are attempting to achieve some equilibrium by doing the same to others,” said Hinduja, who also included boredom, peer pressure and teens’ obsession with technology among the reasons.

Bully territories compared Although FAU is located in South Florida — which has one of the largest gay communities in the country according to The Advocate, a well-known LGBT-interest magazine — its resources are limited. Before January, the resources FAU offered best compared to the University of Southern Indiana, a historically conservative place, where the Klu Klux Klan achieved great political power in the early 20th century. “One of the things that caught my eye was that there’s very little when it comes to resources for LGBT on campus,” said Stephanie Young, adviser for Spectrum, the gay-straight alliance student organization at USI. Besides the student club and a safe zone program, where faculty and staff display a triangular rainbow-colored logo on their office door to indicate they are supportive of gay students, there is little USI offers to their gay community. “It’s still a work in progress. We want to create a better campus climate for LGBT students,” Young said. Until the FAU resource center opened on Jan. 10, the university had exactly the same resources as the University of Southern Indiana, according to FAU’s website. “There’s been nobody doing this job at FAU,” said Jenna Beckwith. At Florida International University, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students have more options. FIU has four student organizations, a resource center, LGBT seminars for students and professors, and the Stonewall Center, which provides students with a library of gay and lesbian literature and videos. “Our focus is in programming for the university,” said Bridgette Wynn, graduate assistant for LGBT Initiatives at the FIU resource center. Wynn said FIU wants to have more events for gay students on campus so that they can feel like part of the school. Another plan FIU has, according to Wynn, is to increase housing to accommodate LGBT students in an atmosphere where they feel more comfortable, especially transgender students, who are often housed in dorm rooms that don’t match their sexual identity.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 14--

The minds behind bullying In different parts of the country, some student victims of bullying who aren’t able to cope with the harassment think they know a way out: committing suicide. Last year, several high school and even college students killed themselves because they were bullied at school. In September, 18-year-old Tyler Clementi jumped off the George Washington Bridge in New York City after his roommate at Rutgers University broadcasted Clementi’s sexual encounter with another man on the Internet. Around the same time, Seth Walsh, a 13-year-old gay student at Jacobsen Middle School, hanged himself from a tree in his backyard in Tehachapi, Calif., after being bullied. FAU researchers, psychologists and counselors pointed out several reasons that may affect LGBT students’ decisions to commit suicide. “Bullying and cyberbullying do not directly lead to suicide,” said Sameer Hinduja, co-director of the Cyberbullying Research Center and professor of criminology at the Jupiter campus. “Bullying was just one additional stress that broke the camel’s proverbial back.” Rhonda Seiman, psychologist and counselor at the FAU Counseling Center, said that LGBT students tend to have less family support, which, combined with limited legal rights, makes them feel like they do not belong in society. “This population tends to feel unsupported, trapped, hopeless and maybe even purposeless,” Seiman said. “If people think, ‘Well I can’t get married, I’ll never have a family, I’ll never be able to adopt … I’ll never find a partner,’ all of those things are tremendous stressors.” Psychology professor David Perry, who is currently doing research on aggressive behavior in elementary and junior high school children, thinks LGBT students might sometimes blame themselves for the harassment they receive. “If they think there’s something wrong with them, or that they caused it, they are more likely to internalize the victimization experience as something that they deserve,” Perry said. “That creates depression.” Ryan Ebanks, who was born in Jamaica, “one of the most homophobic places in the world” according to a 2004 article in the British newspaper The Guardian, lived first-hand what it means for a gay youngster to be rejected by his own family. When he was 17, his stepfather read his private diary and kicked him out of the house. “Being gay, you are put into the spot where you are morally wrong,” said Ebanks, whose mother, according to him, is very religious. “You are fighting yourself, your own existence as a person being that you are like bad, you are an abomination to God.” At times, before going to therapy, he said he had considered ending his life. upressonline.com


Feature

Winter wear

How to stay cozy and cute this winter without going broke

Megan Kiziah Contributor

Where to find it

Here’s where you can find the stores we checked out: =Forever 21 and Aeropostale can be found in the

Town Center at Boca Raton

6000 Glades Road Boca Raton, FL 33431

=Target 21637 State Road 7 Boca Raton, FL, 33428

PHOTOS BY CHRISTINE CAPOZZIELLO

It’s time for us to trade in the flip-flops for boots and the shorts for leggings. So where do you go to find a hot winter wardrobe when you just spent your last dime on those ratty textbooks? The only thing worse than starting the new year with last year’s fashion is starting it broke from breaking the bank on a new wardrobe. But let’s be honest — it can be really hard to find cute clothes when you don’t have much to spend. Freshman undecided major Alexis Wall put it perfectly: “I want to know where I can get quality for a good cost.” And the UP is here to help. After asking students around campus, the three winter must-haves became clear. Are you ready? Boots, coats, and scarves. So let’s start with boots. We all love the cozy and cute Ugg boots, but I’m sure you don’t feel like dropping a Benjamin on a pair of boots that you will probably only need three or four days out of the year. It’s okay. Target has the same look for less. Their Xhilaration Kendra Suede boots look almost the same as Uggs and come in identical colors. The difference? These cozy shoes are only $30.00 — which is a nice change from the expensive price tag usually attached to boots. Freshman communication major Samantha Lincoln said, “They’re [boots] comfy and cute, definitely my weakness.” Next on the list are coats. Everyone needs a coat for the winter, whether you’re a jeans-and-T-shirt gal or more of a fashionista. For the comfy sweater lover, Aeropostale has sporty hoodies for as low as $14.99. If you are feeling more New Yorker and want to go for the peacoat, head over to Forever 21. There you can find adorable short and long peacoats in a variety of colors for less than $50.00. Lastly, scarves come in every color and can be paired with most outfits to add a bit of spice. Elementary education major Gabriella Rivera, 19, said, “Scarves are very cute — they come in so many colors and you can put them with anything.” Forever 21 has plenty of scarves, which can be found for $10 or less. And H&M also has a variety of scarves for a few dollars more.

TOP: Forever 21 has peacoat jackets for a fraction of other department store costs. CENTER: Check out Aeropastale for sporty hoodies RIGHT: As an alternate to Uggs, Target has similar fuzzy boots

=H&M in the Gardens Mall 3101 PGA Boulevard Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410

12 January 25, 2011

upressonline.com


SPORTS

Blocking sensation Sun Belt Conference All-Time leading blocker Brett Royster playing huge role in FAU success PHOTO BY CHRISTINE CAPOZZIELLO Senior forward Brett Royster recently broke the all-time Sun Belt Conference blocking record, and heís been a major factor in FAUís success this season.

13 January 25, 2011

Philicia Douglas Contributor AU’s men’s basketball team drew lots of attention and excitement last season with just a 14-16 record, and midway through this season the team has already matched that win total. With a 14-6 record, and a first-ever six game winning streak, the Owls are on a roll. Part of the reason for that is because of the performances put forth by senior forward/center Brett Royster. Each year during his basketball career at FAU, Royster has shown improvement on the court. In his freshman year, he averaged 15 minutes per game, which he has now doubled to almost 30 minutes. In 2009, he was ranked 12th in the nation for defensive players in the NCAA, and in 2010 he was named the Sun Belt Conference defensive player of the year. This year has seen him break the Sun Belt Conference blocking record. Having recorded 73 blocks in his sophomore year and 90 blocks his junior year, Royster once again leads the Owls with 68 blocks this season, way ahead of second place Kore White who has 26. Royster has not only become one of the FAU captains, but a blocking sensation. On Jan. 11, FAU played in a home game against Manhattan College. With 8 rebounds and 4 blocks in that game, Royster’s overall amount of blocks hit 269, giving him the all-time Sun Belt Conference record. The previous record for blocks was 267, held by UAB’s Alan Ogg. The atmosphere at the Burrow was filled with excitement, as students clapped and hooted when the arena announcer declared Royster’s recordbreaking accomplishment. Yet this is not the only accomplishment Royster is working towards. “I want to win a championship,” said Royster. “That is the only way I see the team as truly being successful.” Head coach Mike Jarvis has watched Royster play for three seasons now, but he wishes he could have coached him during his freshman year as well. Although Jarvis has coached many great athletes, such as NBA Hall of Famer Patrick Ewing, he holds Royster as the most talented center he’s had. “I have watched him mature and grow to become a man on the court and he is certainly the most gifted center that I have coached,” said Jarvis. “At 6’8”, he is the purest shot blocker.” The Arlington, Texas native never thought about getting serious with basketball until high school. Growing up, he was more interested in technology and his friends considered him to be obsessed with watching movies. Yet his motivations changed during his junior year of high school when his mom saw his first big win. In that moment he realized that basketball could be his ticket to success. Coming out of high school, Royster got offers from universities all over the country, including Texas A&M, University of Arkansas, and the University of North Texas, but he saw FAU as the place where he could dedicate his talents to improve both the program and himself. “I saw coming to FAU as a situation where I could play and contribute right away,” said Royster, who is averaging 29.9 minutes per game and a .573 shooting percentage (both second bests on the team) this season. “Now that I am here my goal has changed a bit. It is not to just contribute, but to also become a leader.” Although this is Royster’s last season playing for FAU, he hopes to play professionally, whether it means playing in America or going overseas. But for now, Royster will continue to try and dominate the courts with his shot blocking ability in the hopes of getting the Owls to the Sun Belt Championship game.

F

upressonline.com


-- Continued from page 11 PHOTO BY CHRISTINE CAPPOZIELLO

Coming out soon

With the coming of FAU President Mary Jane The Student Code of Conduct, the rules which Saunders, the university created an LGBTQ task indicate what students can and can’t do on campus, force to specifically address the gay community on also protects LGBT students from unlawful campus. discrimination and harassment. After working for more than a year, the results Although she’s happy about the creation of the of the task force came in the form of a new LGBT new resource center, Dier believes that in order to resource center, which opened on Jan. 10, and is gain respect for gay students, FAU needs to provide housed in the office of Multicultural Affairs above more and better education about the topic to the the Breezeway. entire community. According to Lauren Walleser, the graduate “It would help if the school did like a generalized assistant hired to manage the center, renovations diversity training explaining that we have people are still going on. The plan is knock down a wall to from different cultures here,” said Dier, who has have more space to create a lounge where students seen people purposely knock down stuff from the can hang out, Walleser said. Lambda United table in the Breezeway. Volunteers, who can be graduate or undergraduate Cava supports Dier’s position to inform FAU’s students, are also being trained to help run the student body about the LGBT community. place. “I think that it would be really valuable if there Walleser said the center has LGBT magazines was more widespread education in terms of an Amanda Dier, president of Lambda United, the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender student organization on campus, has seen people and informational brochures, but she wants to stock awareness for all students about LGBT students, knock down stuff from the Lambda United table in the Breezeway. the center with gay and lesbian literature. Events how to be respectful with them,” Cava said. are also being planned for the semester. When all Despite their efforts, most gay students, faculty community shall be permitted to work or study in an the renovations are complete, the center will have and staff agree that it will take a long time before its grand opening “sometime in February,” Walleser said. environment free from any form of unlawful discrimination the LGBT community is fully integrated in society. The current hours of operation are Monday through Thursday or harassment that is based on a legally protected class, “Culturally we mutate into a better society because it including race, color, religion, age, disability, sex, national becomes less of an issue,” said Edward Rowe, associate from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Student Government House Speaker Boris Bastidas, who origin, marital status, veteran status or any other basis director of the office of equal opportunity programs, who also is part of the LGBT task force, is trying to bring change from protected by law.” serves as adviser for Lambda United. “It is a flaw in humans, “On my view, you can’t have a resource center if you don’t but it is in human nature to look for someone to be less than a legislative standpoint. In 2009, he co-wrote a resolution to include the phrases “sexual orientation” and “gender have a university policy that includes sexual orientation. I you so you can feel superior. identity” to FAU’s Anti-Discrimination and Anti-Harassment think it’s unacceptable,” Bastidas said. “It’s something that’s engrained in us and it’s unfortunate, Bastidas said that the Board of Trustees might pick up the but as long as we are aware of it we can always work to try Regulation 5.010 The policy currently mandates that the “University legislation to vote on it this semester. to combat it.

What do FAU administration, crime, adorable animals, club sports, local music, Student Government, and video games have in common?

You can read about all of them our new blogs. Check them out at www.upressonline.com 14 January 25, 2011

upressonline.com


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Student Elections

Student Government President/V.P and Gubenatorial Elections

Dates to remember DEADLINE FOR DECLARATION OF CANDIDACY Jan 28th (5 pm)

DEBATES Monday, 2/14-2/17 (Times and places tba) ELECTIONS Tuesday, 2/22 (12 am) til Wed. 2/23 (11:59)

17 January 25, 2011

Want more info? Heather Bishara

Director of Student Government hbishara@fau.edu

Thomas Levy Elections chair tlevy5@fau.edu

upressonline.com


listings & sudoku KACEION HUDSON LISTINGS EDITOR

LISTINGS

What: Tax Forum When: Monday, Jan. 24 Where: Majestic Palm- Boca Campus What time: 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. Cost: Free Details: Alpha Kappa Psi Business Fraternity, Inc. will do a presentation on how to file taxes and things to look for when others file your taxes. More info: Obed Louis, olouis1@fau.edu What: Cleaning up the BP Disaster When: Tuesday, Jan. 25 Where: Senate Chambers- Boca Campus What time: 4 to 8:30 p.m. Cost: Free Details: A presentation will be given on the economic lessons learned during and after the disaster in the gulf. More info: Eileen Schneider, schneide@fau.edu What: Lecture by John Scarpa and Shirley Pomponi When: Wednesday, Jan. 26 Where: Harbor Branch What time: 4 to 7 p.m. Cost: Free Details: A lecture on the Indian River Lagoon and the Red Sea will be held at Harbor Branch. More info: info@hboi.fau.edu

Where: Palmetto Palm- Boca Campus What time: 7 to 8 p.m. Cost: Free Details: Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority will give a presentation on the basics of being an entrepreneur. More info: Fedjgni Gaspard, fgaspar2@fau.edu What: Rape Aggression Defense Class When: Thursday, Jan. 27 Where: Majestic Palm- Boca Campus What time: 6 to 10 p.m. Cost: Free Details: FAU PD will do a presentation on how to defend yourself against harmful people. More info: Wayne Boxer, wboxer@fau.edu What: Career Fair When: Thursday, Jan. 27 Where: Live Oak A&B- Boca campus What time: 7 to 9 p.m. Cost: Free Details: Konbit Kreyol will host a career fair. More info: Michelle Pierre, mpierr64@fau.edu What: Movie Night When: Thursday, Jan. 27 Where: Carole and Barry Kaye Performance Arts Auditorium What time: 9 to 11 p.m. Cost: Free Details: Program Board will host a viewing of Social Network. More info: Miles Amos, mamos2@fau.edu

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February 10, 10 am - 3 pm Boca Raton Campus - FAU Arena Business Dress Required. Open to FAU Students & Alumni only. 19 January 25, 2011

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UP17  

University Press - Volume 12, Issue 17

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