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Upper School

FAMILY HANDBOOK 2014 – 2015


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Upper Canada College recognizes the importance of environmental sustainability and is committed to becoming a Green School for the 21st century—a model school that operates in harmony with the natural environment.

© 2014 Upper Canada College All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in any database and/or retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher.


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Mission Statement To ignite boys’ curiosity, imagination and passion. To support diligence, innovation and excellence in all they pursue. To encourage compassion and integrity throughout their lives. To challenge them to make a difference.

This is our mission.

We believe in boys.

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Section 1: Introduction A Message from the Head of the Prep and Upper Schools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

Section 2: Our Values Our Shared Ideals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Core Standards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 IB Learner Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Section 3: Curricular Program Academic Program Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Intermediate Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Senior Division. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 The International Baccalaureate . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 The Ontario Secondary School Diploma. . . . . . . . 15 Academic Policies and Procedures. . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Examinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Upper School Policy on Late Summative Assessment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Code of Academic Honesty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Textbook Purchasing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Evaluation and Reporting Student Achievement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Upper Canada College Assessment Policy . . . . . . 31 Evaluation Standards – Intermediate Division. . . . 36 Evaluation Standards – Senior Division . . . . . . . . 37 Learning Skills Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 IB Cumulative Evaluation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Awarding the IB Diploma. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 The Bilingual Diploma. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Promotion Policies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Academic Counselling and Support. . . . . . . . . . . 47 The Form and House Advising Systems . . . . . . . . 47

The Learning Commons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 University Counselling Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 The Office of the Academic Dean. . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Wernham West Centre for Learning. . . . . . . . . . . 49 Macintosh Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Academic Performance and Monitoring . . . . . . . . 51 Levels of Academic Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Teacher Grade Level Meetings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Academic Status. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Amendment to Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 UCC Career Studies Program (GLC20). . . . . . . . . 54 Use of Mobile Electronic Devices. . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Use of Computer Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Macintosh Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Norval Outdoor School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Wernham West Centre for Learning . . . . . . . . . . . 68

Section 4: Co-curricular Program The iDiv Community Service Program. . . . . . . . . . 77 The CAS Program: A New Direction . . . . . . . . . . . 77 The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Program . . . . . . . 82 International Student Exchanges. . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Honouring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 CAS Frequently Asked Questions. . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Creativity (Music, Publications, Theatre, Film, Clubs Program) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Green School Initiative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Horizons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Athletics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Athletics Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Sportsmanship in Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Hazing and Initiations Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96

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Section 5: Student Services/Advising The House System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Advising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 House Meetings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Mentoring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Prefects Cup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 House Advisers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Student Leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Health Centre. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 School Counsellor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Sports Injury Clinic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106

Section 6: Communication Year 1 Form Adviser. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 House Adviser. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Upper School Online Calendar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Intermediate and Senior Division Heads Up . . . 108 Email (Faculty/Staff). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Email (Parent). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Parent Information Events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Parents’ Organization Information Evenings . . . . 110 Parent-Teacher Interviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Student Publications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 UCC Communications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 UCC Website and Bluenet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Photography Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Privacy Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 School Directory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114

Section 7: School Routines Monday to Friday, in Term . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Weekends and School Holidays, in Term. . . . . . . 117 Long Holidays. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Daily Schedules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Weekly Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119

Access to Upper School Facilities . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Safe Arrival. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Attendance Policy and Procedures . . . . . . . . . . 120 Absences From School. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 Extended Absences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 Concussion Protocol. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Emergency Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 Field Trips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 Food Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 Identicard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 Locker Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 Lost and Found . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 Telephone Messages to Students . . . . . . . . . . . 134 The Upper School Blues Shop . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 Re-registration and Financial Assistance . . . . . . 135 Health Insurance Coverage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 Student Parking as a Green School. . . . . . . . . . 136 Car Pooling and Alternative Modes of Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 Vehicle Access to UCC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 Special Parking Consideration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 Dress Code. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 New and Used Uniform Sale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 Team Uniform Rental Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142

Section 8: Student Expectations Alcohol and Controlled Drugs and Substances. . 143 Alcohol and Drug Policy Statement. . . . . . . . . . 143 Policy Regarding Students Having Prescription Medication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 College Neighbourhood Rule. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 Determining Disciplinary Responses . . . . . . . . . 150 A Gradation of Disciplinary Responses. . . . . . . . 151 Dignity, Well-Being and Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156 Personal Appearance and Hygiene. . . . . . . . . . . 160 Theft. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 (continued)

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Section 9: School Organization Board of Governors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 Principal’s Office. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 Director of Community Relations. . . . . . . . . . . . 161 Upper School Administration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 Head of the Preparatory and Upper Schools. . . 162 UCC Program Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 Upper School Administration Committee. . . . . . 163 The Academic Policy Advisory Committee. . . . . 163 The Academic Administration Committee . . . . . 164 Preparatory School, Prep Office. . . . . . . . . . . . 164 Facilities and the Centre for Environment and Sustainability. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 Finance Office. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 Human Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165 Office of Admission. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165 Advancement at UCC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165 UCC Association . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 Common Ties Mentorship Program. . . . . . . . . . 168 The Foundations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168 UCC Association Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 Upper Canada College Archives . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 UCC Parents’ Organization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 The Used Blues Shop (TUBS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 UCC Arts Booster Club (ABC). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 UCC Blues Booster Club (BBC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178

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Section 10: Residential Life Residence Personnel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 Boarding Contact Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 The Five Essential Agreements . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 Expectations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 Support Services for Boarding Students . . . . . . 185 Common Facilities in the Boarding Houses . . . . 192 Dress for School and Boarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192 Room Decoration, Furnishings and Appliances. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 Security, Health and Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 Care and Maintenance of Rooms and Common Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198 Access to Main Building after Regular School Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 Daily Schedule and Student Responsibility . . . . 200 Leave Policy for Boarding Students . . . . . . . . . . 204 Disciplinary Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206 Additional Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209 Campus Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inside Back Cover

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Section 1: Introduction section 1

Introduction

A MESSAGE FROM THE HEAD OF THE PREP AND UPPER SCHOOLs Dear Parents: It is my honour to welcome new and returning families to the Upper School at UCC for the 2014–2015 academic year. Students undergo profound changes as they are challenged by new learning experiences, find their passions in some aspect of the Upper School program and deepen their connections to their friends. This handbook is meant to be a useful resource to students’ families as they guide their sons through this time of rapid change and growth. The Upper School is an exciting place to be, but life there can be demanding at times. Our expectations and supports are in place for two reasons. First, almost without exception, UCC graduates report that they are well prepared for their lives beyond UCC. Their ability to dig for information, interpret it and communicate their understanding in a well-organized and meaningful way has been well honed at UCC. Secondly, collaborative efforts among peers and between teacher and student in challenging circumstances develop a determination and a shared bond that can last a lifetime. Learning can be a source of tremendous satisfaction and pride. But it’s not always easy and mistakes and failure are part of the learning experience. They build resilience and confidence that will enable them to make a difference and will empower them going forward. What can parents do to support their sons and build a healthy link with the school? Be Knowledgeable A positive partnership is built when you and your son understand the Upper School program and when we understand your son. New research, constructive input from the whole community and our shared experiences continue to push us to review our practices on an ongoing basis. To understand these changes and how they will impact you and your son, I invite you to become as knowledgeable as possible about the Upper School. I know that, as supportive parents, you will share the responsibility of guiding him forward to be his best self.

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Help Your Son Meet The Challenges As students mature throughout their Upper School years, we expect them to take a lead role in self-advocacy. Now it is their turn to question misunderstanding or a lack of clarity, as they will soon assume this responsibility on a more exclusive basis. Listen to your son with care and without judgment, but let him wrestle with adversity. Step in only to guide him in his next steps. In this way he will develop strategies to be resourceful and resilient. James Joyce wrote, “Mistakes are the portals of discovery.” As long as we focus on the lesson learned and know where to find support when we need it, we can keep these portals open. Help Your Son Own His Learning If your son truly needs your advocacy, please work through your form/house adviser, subject teacher, director or coach; he or she is ideally situated to answer your questions. If the answer is not immediately available, she or he will guide you to the person who can best respond. In this manner, we can understand your questions, clarify matters accurately and take constructive, respectful next steps. Sometimes we will make errors and, if we do, we will correct our mistake and apologize. While we may agree to disagree at times, I assure you that it is our intent to work with you in the best interests of your son.

THE UCC MISSION To provide a focus for continued positive change, we will address our Mission Statement: To ignite boys’ curiosity, imagination and passion. To support diligence, innovation and excellence in all they pursue. To encourage compassion and integrity throughout their lives. To challenge them to make a difference This is our mission. We believe in boys.

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Introduction

To address this mission, there are four key priorities in our Strategic Plan: building a small school feel; taking advantage of the expertise in a big school to create exciting learning opportunities; continuing to increase accessibility in order to expand the cultural and socioeconomic diversity of our community; and helping teachers to continuously develop their teaching skills. Specifically, we will: • Work to foster the most positive and engaging learning environment for boys. • Review and articulate student, parent and school responsibilities that best serve the interests of the boys. • Continue to update our curriculum documentation to align with the developmental profiles of boys, best practices in assessment and learning skills. • Continue to promote faculty professional development to support both academic and social and emotional expertise. • Continue to fine-tune communication channels between school and home. If you have any questions or concerns about your son or Upper School programs, please call your form/house adviser or the teacher in question. Should you require further assistance, your adviser will be pleased to refer you to Mr. Derek Poon (Intermediate Division) or Mr. Scott Cowie (Senior Division) to address your question. The Upper School Family Handbook provides a guidebook for the year ahead, especially for those new to Upper Canada College. This handbook is a compendium of very useful information, and I encourage you to read it carefully and keep it close by for handy reference throughout the year. I look forward to welcoming you to our Curriculum Night and to the Parent Grade Level Information Evenings at the Upper School as follows: Curriculum Night for all parents Location: Various Tuesday, September 9, 2014 Curriculum Night will run from 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. on the Tuesday of the second

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week of school in September. Further details will be provided in Heads Up as the date approaches. Parent information evenings In collaboration with the Upper School Parents’ Organization, we invite parents to learn about the routines and life of the Upper School. IB2 Parent Information Evening

IB1 Parent Information Evening

Location: Student Centre

Location: Student Centre

Tuesday, September 16 at 7:00 p.m.

Tuesday, September 30 at 7:00 p.m.

Y1/Y2 Parent Information Evening

FY Parent Information Evening

Location: Student Centre

Location: Student Centre

Tuesday, September 23 at 7:00 p.m.

Tuesday, October 7 at 7:00 p.m.

Throughout the year, parent meetings with teachers are scheduled in October and February. These are important opportunities for your son’s teachers to report on his academic progress, and for you to ask questions in return. In addition, course selection information meetings for parents are scheduled in January. Your role as an informed guide through the process of course selection is critical; it is in your son’s best interest that both he and you understand the breadth and depth of opportunities available to students. There is much to be done and your commitment to your son’s success and growth is essential. Please be sure to read Heads Up, a publication delivered weekly to your preferred email. Heads Up is your lifeline to the College. Best wishes for a productive and positive year. Donald Kawasoe Head of the Prep and Upper Schools

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Section 2: Our Values section 2

Our Values

This handbook contains useful information and guidance for the students and parents of the Upper School. If all members of the UCC community, including students and parents, familiarize themselves with the information in this handbook, we will have taken a big step toward living by Our Shared Ideals.

OUR SHARED IDEALS Although we are all unique in interests and talents and bring to our education our own needs and goals, together we form a community of learners. We rely on one another: first, for the security of our person and belongings; second, for our personal and social growth; and third, for our intellectual development. Moreover, we share ideals about how we should behave toward one another. We like others to be honest with us; we like others to respect our person, feelings and ideas; we like others to care for us. When we choose to recognize these common ideals and act on them, we create the habit of trust that is central to a healthy community. We improve the lives of all and make possible the fulfillment of our individual goals when we strive to uphold our shared ideals of honesty, respect and caring.

TRUST AND HONESTY We begin in trust. When we cannot expect or ensure trust, we compromise our relationship with all members of the community. We strengthen and maintain our trust through honesty and through basic respect for the dignity of others. We strive to be honest and forthright at all times and in all places.

RESPECT FOR OTHERS We hold the utmost respect for all members of our community. We strive to be respectful of each other’s strengths and weaknesses and of everyone’s contributions. We maintain the right of each member to express ideas and beliefs constructively. We actively embrace sensitivity to difference. We also respect all those who serve the welfare of the community, including staff, Old Boys and friends.

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RESPECT FOR PROPERTY We respect each other’s property as we respect one another. We also respect our shared property: just as the people around us support our growth and learning, so do classrooms, facilities and the grounds.

SELF-RESPECT We respect our minds and bodies. Above all, we take responsibility for all of our actions.

CARING Mutual respect provides the basic civility that allows the community to exist. When we reach beyond respect to care for each other, we provide the strength and support necessary for all of us to achieve our full potential. We therefore strive to look out for each other’s well-being. We also support each other’s efforts and achievements in all spheres of endeavour on behalf of the community.

CORE STANDARDS As a community of students and teachers, Upper Canada College strives to foster an environment in which Our Shared Ideals will flourish. We take an educational approach to accomplishing this, helping our students to appreciate and uphold these high standards of personal accountability and citizenship within the school community, thereby nurturing in them the values and habits of responsible adulthood. The progress made by each student in meeting these expectations is maximized through the partnership of the student and his parents with his teachers, coaches, directors and form or house adviser. To help promote this personal growth:

The College commits to setting and communicating clear expectations, standards and rules for personal responsibility and for citizenship in the school community, and to applying a gradation of disciplinary responses, as appropriate.

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The student commits to knowing and acting upon all expectations, standards and rules for his personal responsibility and for his citizenship in the school community.

Our Values

Parents commit to knowing and reinforcing these expectations, standards and rules. Students are responsible for their citizenship in the school community, and we ask parents to support the College in the application of managed consequences when standards are not met. Parents also commit to contacting the College if they have a concern, and to trusting that the College is acting in good faith. It is expected that individual classroom issues that cannot be addressed directly between student and subject teacher will first be addressed through a conversation between parent and subject teacher that may involve the form or house adviser and/or Department Chair.

This section provides a statement of 10 core standards based on Our Shared Ideals. As members of a community that prizes the values of Our Shared Ideals, students are expected to uphold the following core standards: 1. Honesty and Integrity: Honesty and integrity underlie all relationships in our community, including all academic endeavours. Deceit and untruthfulness undermine this core standard and are unacceptable in our community. 2. Respect for Others: Students are expected to respect the dignity, safety and well-being of others in all realms of College life. Harassment in any form is a serious breach of this community standard. Initiations and hazing of any sort are prohibited. 3. Courtesy: Courtesy and politeness are measures of the quality of community life. Students are expected to show courtesy toward one another, College staff and visitors. 4. Responsibility and Accountability: Students are expected to honour all school appointments and obligations, to do their best at all times, and to act upon the highest personal standards of commitment to the classroom and to all their co-curricular activities.

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5. Respect for Private Property and School Property: This is fundamental to community trust. Theft of, or intentional damage to, another’s property or school property is a serious violation of community trust and will always be treated as such. 6. Alcohol and Drugs: For reasons of health, self-respect and out of respect for the law, the use, possession, sale or being under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs, including marijuana, at the College or at any school-sponsored events is strictly prohibited. The College’s Alcohol and Drug Policy is presented in Section 8. 7. Safety: All students are required to protect and promote the safety of the school community. In particular, malicious tampering with the fire alarm or security system is a very serious and criminal offence. 8. Use of Facilities: Students are expected to respect and adhere to all rules governing the use and enjoyment of school facilities, such as the library, computer labs, dining halls, athletic facilities, locker rooms and all common areas of the College. 9. Respect for the Environment: Through its Green School initiative, UCC is committed to environmental stewardship and responsibility. In our daily actions, respect for the environment means, for example: keeping locker rooms, the Student Centre and dining halls clean; recycling waste; and reducing paper usage and energy consumption whenever possible. 10. Respect for College Neighbours: The College has a responsibility to ensure that its members respect the rights of its neighbours. The College Neighbourhood Rule requires students to conduct themselves in a considerate and cooperative manner in travelling to and from the school grounds. In particular, loitering near people’s homes, trespassing on private property, smoking or littering on private or public property in the College neighbourhood, or congregating in any manner that may cause offence to our neighbours are strictly prohibited.

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IB LEARNER PROFILE

Our Values

The IB Learner Profile is a clear set of learning outcomes. The attributes of the profile express the values of the IB continuum of international education beginning in SK and continuing through Leaving Class. It is the embodiment of what the IB means by “international mindedness.”

“The aim ... is to develop internationally minded people who, recognizing their humanity and shared guardianship of the planet, help to create a better and more peaceful world.”

At the heart of IB programs, this statement underscores and resonates with the Character Education strand of UCC’s strategic plan and UCC’s mission “ ... To challenge them to make a difference ... ”

IB learners strive to be: Inquirers

They develop their natural curiosity. They acquire the skills necessary to conduct inquiry and research and show independence in learning. They actively enjoy learning, and this love of learning will be sustained throughout their lives.

Knowledgeable

They explore concepts, ideas and issues that have local and global significance. In so doing, they acquire in-depth knowledge and develop understanding across a broad and balanced range of disciplines.

Thinkers

They exercise initiative in applying thinking skills critically and creatively to recognize and approach complex problems, and make reasoned, ethical decisions.

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Communicators

They understand and express ideas and information confidently and creatively in more than one language and in a variety of modes of communication. They work effectively and willingly in collaboration with others.

Principled

They act with integrity and honesty, and with a strong sense of fairness, justice and respect for the dignity of the individual, groups and communities. They take responsibility for their own actions and the consequences that accompany them.

Open-minded

They understand and appreciate their own cultures and personal histories, and are open to the perspectives, values and traditions of other individuals and communities. They are accustomed to seeking and evaluating a range of points of view, and are willing to grow from the experience.

Caring

They show empathy, compassion and respect toward the needs and feelings of others. They have a personal commitment to service, and act to make a positive difference to the lives of others and to the environment.

Risk-takers

They approach unfamiliar situations and uncertainty with courage and forethought, and have the independence of spirit to explore new roles, ideas and strategies. They are brave and articulate in defending their beliefs.

Balanced

They understand the importance of intellectual, physical and emotional balance to achieve personal well-being for themselves and others.

Reflective

They give thoughtful consideration to their own learning and experience. They are able to assess and understand their strengths and limitations in order to support their learning and personal development.

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Section 3: Curricular Program section 3

ACADEMIC PROGRAM OVERVIEW

INTERMEDIATE DIVISION The Intermediate Division includes students in Year 1 and Year 2. The Head of the Intermediate Division, the Year 1 form advisers and the senior house advisers work with faculty, staff and school resource personnel to enhance the skills introduced in the Middle Division and to prepare students for the transition into the Senior Division. In Year 1, students complete a program of 10 courses: English, French, Math, Science, Geography, Physical Education, Art, Music, Film and Civics (the latter four are half courses). In Year 2, students complete a program of eight courses: English, Science, Contemporary Canada, Math, Physical Education, a second language (a choice of French, Latin, Spanish or Mandarin), an arts subject (a choice of Visual Arts, Music or Dramatic Arts) and one elective (a choice of Computer Science or Geography, or students may choose to take an additional second language or arts subject). Students complete the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test in the Spring of Year 2. During these critical years, boys are prepared for the rigours of high school and, in particular, prepared for success in the International Baccalaureate Programme. Emphasis is placed on research and study skills, time management and exam-writing techniques. The Intermediate Division offers a rich co-curricular program, including athletic teams, musical groups, theatrical productions, digital film, school publications and a number of school clubs. Students in the Intermediate Division are expected to participate fully in this program (in at least one co-curricular program in at least two different terms) to grow as individuals and to contribute to life at the College. Maintenance of a well-rounded program

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Curricular Program

In their first three years at the Upper School (Year 1, Year 2 and Foundation Year), students are enrolled in courses based on the curriculum expectations of the Ontario Ministry of Education. In their last two years at UCC, all students are enrolled in the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme, while concurrently finishing the requirements for their Ontario Secondary School Diploma. Upon successful completion of the Upper School academic program, a student is awarded both the IB Diploma and the OSSD.

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also prepares students for the Creativity, Action and Service (CAS) requirements of the IB years in the Senior Division.

SENIOR DIVISION The Senior Division includes students from three grades: Foundation Year, IB1 and IB2. The Foundation Year academic program comprises a combination of IB prerequisites, electives and a compulsory course in Physical Education, making up a total course load of eight subjects. Students become familiar with the skills and content that will best prepare them for the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme, taught during their final two years at the College. In the winter of Foundation Year, students finalize their selection of an IB program. It is recommended but not required for students to fulfill the 40-hour community involvement expectation of the Ontario Secondary School Diploma program. In the IB Diploma Programme, all students study six courses over two years: three Higher Level subjects and three Standard Level Subjects chosen from the six IB subject groups. All students also complete Theory of Knowledge, the Extended Essay and the Creativity, Action and Service (CAS) Program. In IB1, students begin their course work, which includes their six subjects and Theory of Knowledge. They also work on their Extended Essay, which is completed by May of the IB1 year. Documentation of CAS activities begins this year. In IB2, students complete course work and the CAS requirement and write externally evaluated cumulative exams in May of the IB2 year. Students are expected to maintain a balanced program of academic work and co-curricular activities throughout their years in the Senior Division. The Senior Division offers a rich co-curricular program, including a wide variety of athletic teams, musical groups, theatrical productions, digital film, school publications and a vast number of school clubs. In IB1 and IB2, the general goal is to complete a total of at least 50 hours in each of the areas of Creativity, Action and Service as part of their diploma requirements. While the hours are important, there is a growing emphasis on student learning and reflection. The service component of the IB Diploma Programme also fulfills the community involvement requirements of the Ontario Secondary School Diploma. The Head of the Senior Division, Dean of Students, house advisers and senior house advisers work together with faculty, staff and school resource personnel to help students

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balance the demands of their curricular and co-curricular commitments and prepare them for their post-secondary experience.

THE INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE Curricular Program

The International Baccalaureate (IB) is the principal diploma program at UCC and is undertaken by all students in their final two years at the Upper School. The IB Diploma Programme is structured in such a way as to allow students to complete the requirements for the OSSD; both diplomas are awarded upon graduation. The IB is the most widely respected and rigorous secondary curriculum in the world, offering a balanced liberal arts education with extremely high performance standards that are set and assessed by an international body. Not only does the IB Diploma Programme provide thorough preparation for university, it also allows students to develop a 21st century outlook and outstanding creative and critical thinking skills that encourage lifelong learning. For the IB Diploma, students are required to select one subject from each of the six subject groups listed below. Three of the six subjects are taken at the Higher Level (HL) and three at the Standard Level (SL).

THE IB SUBJECT GROUPS Group 1: Language A HL/SL English (Literature/Language and Literature), HL/SL French, SL Mandarin (French and Mandarin are offered in Language A when these are a boy’s first language.)

Group 2: Language B HL/SL French B, SL Spanish B, HL/SL Mandarin B, SL Spanish ab initio, SL Latin

Group 3: Individuals and Societies HL/SL Geography, HL History, HL/SL Economics, HL Philosophy (IB Subject Groups continued)

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Group 4: Experimental Sciences HL/SL Biology, HL/SL Chemistry, HL/SL Physics, SL Environmental Systems, SL Sports, Exercise and Health Science

Group 5: Mathematics HL Mathematics, SL Mathematics, SL Mathematical Studies

Group 6: The Arts and Electives HL/SL Music, HL Dramatic Arts, HL/SL Visual Arts, HL/SL Film, or an additional subject from Group 1, 2, 3 or 4

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS In addition to completing six subjects, all IB students must also complete the following:

THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE (TOK) ToK is an interdisciplinary course at the core of the IB Diploma Programme. It is designed to stimulate a critical awareness of the bases of knowledge, experience and judgment in human thought and creativity.

EXTENDED ESSAY (EE) Students research, write and submit for external evaluation a 4,000-word essay on a topic of interest from within the IB curriculum, usually taken from one of their Higher Level subjects. Students at UCC complete the EE during their IB1 year.

CREATIVITY, ACTION, SERVICE (CAS) Over the two years of the IB Diploma Programme, students must complete a minimum of 150 hours of extra-curricular involvement evenly balanced between creative, athletic and community service activities. • Creativity programs and activities provide opportunities for personal growth through cultural appreciation and achievement in performance, music, art, current affairs and clubs.

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• Action activities offer a blend of team and individual sports and also recreation activities that promote sportsmanship and cooperation as well as physical fitness. • The Service program provides students with a large number of opportunities to participate in individual and team-based service locally, nationally and internationally.

Curricular Program

Each of the six IB subjects is graded on a scale of seven (excellent) to one (very poor). The IB Diploma is awarded to students whose total score, including up to three points for combined performance in both the Extended Essay and Theory of Knowledge, reaches or exceeds 24 points and does not contain any failing conditions as defined by the International Baccalaureate Organization (for further information, see the Awarding the IB Diploma section in this handbook).

THE ONTARIO SECONDARY SCHOOL DIPLOMA The Ontario Secondary School Diploma is awarded by the Minister of Education, on the recommendation of the Principal, to a student who has earned a minimum total of 30 credits as outlined below.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ONTARIO SECONDARY SCHOOL DIPLOMA In order to earn the Ontario Secondary School Diploma, a student must successfully complete: • 18 compulsory credits • 12 optional credits • 40 hours of community involvement activities • The Ontario Secondary School Literary Test (OSSLT)

CREDIT DEFINITION A credit is granted to a student in recognition of the successful completion of a course for which a minimum of 110 hours has been scheduled.

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THE ONTARIO SECONDARY SCHOOL LITERACY TEST All students are required to meet the secondary school literacy graduation requirement in order to earn an Ontario Secondary School Diploma. The Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT) is the usual method for assessing the literacy skills of students in Ontario for the purpose of determining whether they meet the provincial secondary school literacy requirement for graduation. The test is based on the Ontario Curriculum expectations for language and communication — particularly reading and writing — up to, and including, Year 1 (Grade 9). The test identifies students who have demonstrated the required skills in literacy, as well as those students who have not (in the latter case the test will identify the specific areas in which students need remediation). The test is scheduled once each year, usually in the spring. UCC students write the test in Year 2. Students who are English language learners may be entitled to special provisions. Students with special education needs as documented in the student’s One Page Report (OPR) will be provided with accommodations. A deferral may be granted by the principal. Deferrals are intended for students who are working towards an OSSD and have not yet acquired a level of proficiency in English that would allow them to successfully complete the test. Exemptions may be provided on an individual basis, with parental consent and the approval of the principal, in accordance with the procedures outlined in Ontario Schools, Appendix 3. Once students have successfully completed the literacy test, they may not retake it. Schools are required to provide remedial assistance for students who do not complete the test successfully. This assistance should be designed to help improve their skills so that they are better prepared to retake the literacy test. If a student has had two opportunities to take the OSSLT and has failed it, the student is eligible to enrol in the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC). The principal has the discretion to allow a student to enrol in the OSSLC before he has had a second opportunity to take the OSSLT, if the principal determines that it is in the best educational interest of the student. Students who pass the course are considered to have met the literacy graduation requirement.

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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES STUDENT RECORDS THE OSR

Curricular Program

An Ontario Student Record (OSR) is maintained for every student in the Academic Dean’s Office. The OSR is the record of a student’s progress through the Ontario educational system. It contains biographical data and a record of student academic achievement, including copies of all report cards and an up-to-date Ontario Student Transcript (OST). Every student has the right of access to his/her OSR. The parents/guardians of a student have the right of access to the student’s OSR until the student turns 18, at which time the student must grant permission for a parent to view the records. The Principal and teachers of the school have access to the OSR for the purpose of improving the instruction of the student. The file is available for inspection by the student (or, if the student is under 18 years of age, their parents or guardians) by request at the Academic Dean’s Office.

THE OST The Ontario Student Transcript (OST) is the formal record of a student’s secondary school course work and diploma requirements. In accordance with Ontario Ministry of Education policy, the OST will include: • All Grade 9 and 10 courses successfully completed by the student, with percentage grades obtained and credits earned. • All Grade 11 and 12 courses completed or attempted by the student, with percentage grades obtained and credits earned. • All equivalent credits granted through the Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) equivalency process under OSS or through the equivalency process under OSIS. • All Grade 10 courses for which the student successfully challenged for credit through the PLAR challenge process, with percentage grades obtained and credits earned. • All Grade 11 and 12 courses for which the student successfully or unsuccessfully challenged for credit through the PLAR challenge process, with percentage grades obtained and credits earned.

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• Identification of compulsory credits, including credits that are substitutions for compulsory credits identified by the ministry as diploma requirements. • Confirmation that the student has completed the 40 hours of community involvement. • Confirmation that the student has successfully completed the provincial secondary school literacy requirement. An up-to-date OST is kept in the student’s OSR. Students needing a copy of their Ontario Student Transcript must submit a request to the Academic Dean’s Office.

FULL DISCLOSURE Since 1999–2000, the Ontario Ministry of Education requires that schools provide a complete record of students’ performance in Grade 11 and 12 courses. Under this requirement, both successful and unsuccessful attempts at completing Grade 11 and 12 courses must be recorded on the OST. All courses coded with a 3, 4, U, M or O designation are subject to this policy of full disclosure. All such courses in which a student is registered will be recorded on a student’s transcript five days after the issue of the First Full Report Card (January), whether the course has been successfully completed or not. This information is to be made available to community colleges and universities for them to consider when making admission or scholarship decisions. This information has been communicated to all students. • Withdrawals occurring within five days of the issuing of the First Full Report Card in the course/grade will not be recorded. • A withdrawal from a Grade 11 or 12 course after five days of the issuing of the First Full Report Card will result in a “W” being entered in the “Credit” column of the OST, along with the mark at the time of the withdrawal. • Withdrawals from Grade 9 or 10 courses are not recorded on the OST. • Failures in Grade 9 or 10 courses are not recorded on the OST. • Any repeated Grade 11 and 12 courses will be recorded on a student’s transcript. Each attempt and the grade earned will be recorded on the OST. Students may earn only one credit per course (i.e. only one credit is earned if a course is repeated). For repeated courses, an “R” will appear in the credit column beside the attempt with the lower mark.

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COURSE SELECTION AND LIMITATIONS

COURSE CHANGES Provided that class size, balance among sections and timetabling make a change possible, a student may transfer from one course to another prior to the beginning of the school year. Students wishing to change courses must have written permission from a parent or guardian. Once school has begun, students who still wish to change a course are permitted to do so; however, they may only do so during the first two cycles of classes (up until the Thanksgiving long weekend for those students in IB1). Students are advised to consider their course choices very carefully during the course selection process and are strongly advised against making changes after the start of the school year unless absolutely necessary; such changes will potentially be disruptive to the student’s existing schedule and will necessitate getting caught up on a significant amount of missed work in the course into which they are transferring. In order to request a course change, the student must complete a Course Change Application Form and have it approved by his house adviser and his parent or guardian. Completed forms should be submitted to the Academic Dean’s Office for review and, if approved, final processing.

Curricular Program

The course selection process for the next academic year occurs in January–February. Every effort will be made to provide students with their chosen academic program; however, certain combinations of courses may not be possible because of timetabling constraints. Sometimes the College may be unable to offer courses because of insufficient student enrolment or staffing considerations. In such unusual circumstances, students will be advised and every effort will be made to accommodate them with suitable alternatives. Course descriptions are available in the Academic Program Guide which can be accessed online www.ucc.on.ca.

It is the policy of the College that students are not permitted to change courses or sections because of teacher preference.

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HOMEWORK, TESTING AND ASSIGNMENTS The scope and intensity of homework and studying varies over the five years at the Upper School and expectations will also differ depending on the subject area. Intermediate Division students are expected to complete about 10 to 15 hours per week. Senior Division students should expect about 20 hours per week. During examination periods or when assignments are due, this workload may become heavier. Testing is limited to periods 1 and 2. For the purposes of this policy, a test is considered to be an assessment that requires study time, is written under test conditions, and is scheduled in advance. With respect to lab reports and oral/written assignments, faculty will reinforce organizational skills so that students do not feel overwhelmed by the workload. It is the custom at UCC to protect long weekends, to ensure that both teachers and students get a well-deserved rest. No tests or major assignments should be scheduled on the day of return from long weekends or breaks. The College respects students’ other obligations during periods of religious observance.

EXAMINATIONS Formal examinations are held for Foundation Year and IB1 students in December and for Year 1 to IB1 students in June. Examinations for IB2 students are held in December and May. All aspects of final IB2 exams in May are strictly governed by IB regulations. Final IB2 exams in May must be written at the College. They may not be moved or delayed for any reason. The rules regarding absence from or lateness to these exams are governed by IB regulations only. These regulations will be distributed to students and parents before the May exam period. The College expects all students to write examinations on campus at the scheduled time. Requests for exceptions must be submitted in writing to the appropriate Division Head. Each case will be considered individually. Alternative exam arrangements may be subject to a fee. If, for some reason, a student is unable to write a final exam at the designated time due to illness or other extenuating circumstances, he will be expected to write his exams during a designated make-up week (the first week of school in January for missed December exams and the week prior to the start classes in the next school year for missed June exams) according to a schedule determined by the

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College. In the case of illness, a doctor’s note will be required to allow the examination to be written. In the event of a medically documented illness that impedes a student from writing his exams within the designated exam period, a student will receive an “N” on his report in the disciplines for which no exam was written; the “N” designates that there is work yet to be completed in the course. After make-up exams have been graded, the student’s academic record will be updated and an amended report provided at that time. Curricular Program

DRESS: Students must observe the regular dress code during the December examination period. Warm weather dress applies for the May–June examinations. LATENESS: If a student is late for an examination, he should proceed as quickly as possible to the examination room (in proper school dress) and begin writing immediately. No extra time will be allotted for lateness. A student more than 15 minutes late for an examination must report to the Main Office. ABSENCE: If a student is absent for an examination, one of his parents must notify the Main Office at 416-488-1125, ext. 2219 on the morning of the exam. Notification must be made for each exam missed. Medical documentation acceptable to the College must be provided in such cases. Medical notes must clearly outline the reasons for the absence and the expected duration of the absence. In the case of boarders, the senior house adviser and/or the College Nurse will provide appropriate documentation. All cases of absence, whether for compassionate, medical or exceptional reasons, will be reviewed by the Academic Dean and the Upper School Administration Committee, who will determine the details of any required makeup exams.

UPPER SCHOOL POLICY ON LATE SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT GUIDING PRINCIPLES • Since timely feedback is important for student learning, teachers require that work be submitted in a timely fashion. • Responsibility, organization and time management are critical learning skills and work habits that provide the foundation for student success at the College, in post-secondary

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study and beyond. Students’ ability to meet deadlines is an important indicator of the development of such work habits and particular strengths and challenges. • It is essential for students to learn the importance of submitting assignments by the deadlines set by teachers and that there are consequences for late work. Students must also learn the value of open, honest communication when they find themselves at risk of missing a deadline and to seek support when they are struggling to balance competing commitments. • Consistent with Ontario Ministry of Education guidelines, the College employs a variety of strategies to encourage students to meet deadlines and to assist them when they fall behind in their work. The supports provided include, but may not be limited to: • Announcing assignments and due dates in class at the beginning of term and posting deadlines on Haiku, as well as providing ongoing reminders about due dates; • Explaining assignment requirements/expectations in class and providing opportunity for students to ask clarifying questions; • Where possible, “chunking” major assignments into stages; • Where applicable, arranging library instruction to support completion of the work; • Providing dedicated time in the library and/or in class for students to complete the work; • Providing one-on-one extra help sessions if needed; • Initiating communication with the student, house adviser and parents if problems arise.

THE LATE POLICY • If an assignment is not submitted at the date/time it is due, an immediate penalty of 10 per cent will be applied. An additional 10 per cent deduction will apply for each 24-hour period after the due date/time (excluding weekends, which count as one 24-hour period) up to a maximum of 50 per cent. The work is still required, but, when graded, will have the penalty deducted. After the fifth day, the assignment will be given a mark of “zero.” • A student who anticipates a problem with an assignment or project is encouraged to discuss the matter with his teacher in advance of the due date. Late submissions due to illness or other extenuating circumstances will be negotiated on an individual basis and

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a doctor’s note may be required. If a student is absent from school for a field trip or other school-related event, he is expected to submit the assignment to the teacher before his departure. • All applications of late penalties and exceptions to published deadlines are documented by the teacher with a Red Rocket. House advisers note such patterns and contact parents if necessary. Curricular Program

There are limited exceptions to the process outlined above. The IB Mathematics Exploration components have firm timing restrictions. The Science Department has a separate policy regarding IB Lab Portfolios. Also, externally assessed IB work must be completed by published due dates in order for the school to collect, organize and send the work forward in compliance with IB-established deadlines. In some cases, failure to submit work for external assessment and/or moderation means that a student will not receive his IB Diploma; therefore, work must come in no later than the final published due date.

CODE OF ACADEMIC HONESTY Honesty is fundamental to all aspects of academic work, and students at Upper Canada College are held to the highest standards of conduct in this regard. In addition, the International Baccalaureate Organization demands of Diploma candidates the very highest standard of academic integrity in all aspects of internally and externally assessed work. The College also recognizes its responsibility to prepare students for university and to develop in them the habits and personal standards of academic honesty. The commission of an offence against academic honesty at university will always compromise the student’s grades and good standing. At Upper Canada College, cheating, plagiarism and all other forms of academic dishonesty are serious violations that undermine and compromise both the student’s education and the integrity of this learning community. An offence against academic honesty is judged to have been committed knowingly if the student ought reasonably to have known that the conduct was an offence.

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CHEATING Any deceit in academic work is cheating. At Upper Canada College, for example, it is an offence for a student to knowingly: • Use unauthorized notes or other aids in a test, or copy from or be influenced by someone else’s work during a quiz, test or examination. • Use any form of electronic device except approved calculators (this includes cell phones, iPods and all similar devices). • Give unauthorized aid to someone else. • Allow someone else to copy or use one’s quiz, test, examination, assignment, essay or homework. • Gain any prior or unauthorized access to tests or examination materials. • Use help on homework or take-home tests beyond the limits specified by the teacher. • Submit the same work for credit to more than one teacher without prior permission. • Use translations of texts studied in class without the permission of the teacher.

PLAGIARISM Plagiarism, a specific form of cheating, is the theft of someone else’s work. The unacknowledged use of another’s words, ideas, arguments or research is plagiarism. At Upper Canada College, for example, it is an offence for a student to knowingly: • Submit work as his own, any part of which was written or created by someone else. • Submit work as his own, any part of which was copied directly from a source without proper quotation marks and without acknowledgment, or was paraphrased from a source without proper acknowledgment. • Submit work as his own, any part of which was based on an idea or research unique to a particular source without due acknowledgment.

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY It is the student’s responsibility to be honest in all aspects of academic work, to be familiar with the UCC Code of Academic Honesty and to conform to all practices and guidelines

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for academic honesty given by teachers and in the UCC Style Guide or other recommended guide books. For example:

Curricular Program

Quizzes, Tests and Examinations: A student must write a quiz, test or examination from his own knowledge and ability. The possession and/or use of unauthorized aids, texts or notes of any kind during the writing of a quiz, test or examination is cheating. A student who knowingly gives unauthorized aid to another student in a quiz, test or examination will be considered a party to the offence against academic honesty. Homework: Homework is to be completed by the student himself — never completed or copied in whole or in part from another person, student or source. While it may be permissible to discuss homework assignments with other students, such discussion is a preliminary stage only, to be followed carefully at all times by individual effort, research and answering. In presenting homework, the student is in effect declaring, “This is my own work.” Assignments: Assignments prepared outside of class, including lab reports, written responses, creative work, homework and take-home tests or components of tests must be completed by the student and be the student’s own work — never in part or in whole copied from another person, student or source, and never presenting the words, research or ideas of another person, student or source without proper acknowledgment. The student is expected to follow the instructions for preparing and submitting the assignment and adhere to the practices for academic honesty outlined in the UCC Style Guide or other recommended guide books. When submitting an assignment, the student is in effect declaring, “This is my own work.” Essays: Essays must be completed by the student and be the student’s own work — never in part or in whole copied from another person or source and never presenting the words, research or ideas of another person or source without proper acknowledgment. The student is expected to carefully follow instructions for preparing and submitting the essay and to adhere to the practices of academic honesty outlined in the UCC Style Guide or other recommended guide books. When submitting an essay, the student is in effect declaring, “This is my own work.”

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Class Presentations and Seminars: Work prepared for presentation in class is presumed to be entirely a student’s own, unless proper acknowledgment of help from another person or source has been made. In making a class presentation, the student is in effect declaring, “This is my own work.” Use of the Internet: Students often find useful information, data, articles or other sources on the Internet. They are reminded, however, that information and ideas from these sources are to be treated no differently from information and ideas from traditional sources. Proper acknowledgment of Internet sources must always be made in academic work. Instructions for properly acknowledging Internet sources are found in the UCC Style Guide or other recommended guide books. Collaboration: Unless specifically directed or permitted by the teacher, collaboration with another student in any academic work, including assignments, lab reports, essays, takehome tests or components of tests, is to be avoided at all times. The College encourages students to discuss and debate their ideas because discussion and debate are basic to the educational experience. But in an academic assignment of any sort, discussion is only a preliminary and limited strategy, a means of stimulating one’s own approach and thinking, and must be followed by individual and unaided research, thinking and writing. Pooling ideas, sharing or assigning sections of writing, and incorporating another student’s ideas and writing into one’s own are examples of unacceptable collaboration. Unacknowledged collaboration or collaboration that has not been permitted by the teacher is cheating, and a student whose academic work shows collaboration will be considered to have committed an offence against academic honesty. When such collaboration happens, the student cannot truthfully declare, “This is my own work.” Sharing Academic Work: Students should decline to share homework, assignments, essays and any notes or research with other students. In responding to a classmate’s enquiries for help, the student should simply clarify the assignment, not provide answers, ideas or materials. The classmate is expected to ensure that his work is “his own work” in all respects. When cheating or plagiarism occurs, a student who has allowed a classmate to borrow his work or who has given an inappropriate degree of assistance will be considered a party to the offence against academic honesty.

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Receiving Tutoring: A student who, for understandable reasons, engages a tutor for support in his academic work is especially reminded that a tutor is not a substitute for the student’s own research, thinking and writing. A responsible tutor guides the student by questioning and by instruction in skills; the tutor does not do the work for the student. A student who receives excessive assistance from a tutor cannot declare, “This is my own work.” Curricular Program

Academic Work for a Course: Academic work submitted for a course must always be submitted for that course only. Unless the student has requested and received explicit permission in advance from both teachers, the same piece of work, in whole or in part, must never be submitted in two separate courses. Seeking Guidance in Matters of Academic Honesty: A student who is in doubt about any aspect of the principles and practices of academic honesty should consult his teacher, house adviser or the Librarian.

DISCIPLINARY ACTION The disciplinary response to offences against academic honesty is designed to protect academic integrity in the interest of learning and to promote the development of the habits and skills of academic responsibility. Cheating of any sort is a violation of community standards and of the principles upon which an academic institution is built and will not be tolerated in any form. In addition, an offence against academic honesty in academic work submitted by a UCC student in fulfillment of IB examinations and evaluation, which includes all externally and internally assessed components, the Extended Essay and Theory of Knowledge, is subject to penalties detailed in the IB Malpractice Policy. The following discussion of disciplinary responses serves as a guideline only and does not limit the ability of the College to apply whatever disciplinary sanctions it determines to be appropriate in individual cases.

FIRST LEVEL Taking into consideration the nature and severity of the offence and the grade level of the student, a first offence may result in, but is not limited to, the following:

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1. The student can expect to receive “zero” on the evaluated work and may be required to undertake additional academic work. 2. The student will be placed on Conduct Concern or Conduct Probation, and his compliance with the principles and practices of academic honesty will be carefully monitored. 3. The student’s parents or guardian will be notified in writing of his breach of academic honesty, of the disciplinary action taken and of the consequences of a subsequent breach of academic honesty or other College standards. 4. The student may be advised or required to undertake an appropriate counselling or academic support plan to promote responsible academic conduct.

SECOND LEVEL Taking into consideration the nature and severity of the offence and the grade level of the student, a serious first offence or any second offence may result in, but is not limited to, the following: 1. The student can expect to receive “zero” on the evaluated work and may be required to undertake additional academic work. 2. The student is liable to be suspended for a time determined by the College. 3. A student who has been suspended will return on Conduct Probation, with stipulated conditions for continued enrolment at the College; his compliance with these probationary conditions and with the principles and practices of academic honesty will be carefully monitored. 4. The student’s parents or guardian will be notified in writing of his breach of academic honesty, of the disciplinary action taken and of the consequences of a subsequent breach of academic honesty or other College standards. 5. The student may be advised or required to undertake an appropriate counselling or academic support plan to promote responsible academic conduct.

THIRD LEVEL Taking into consideration the nature and severity of the offence, and the grade level of the student, a serious offence, which includes a third offence, may result in the following:

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1. The student can expect to receive “zero” on the evaluated work. 2. The student is liable to be expelled or denied re-enrolment at the College.

ACADEMIC HONESTY AND THE INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE DIPLOMA

Curricular Program

An offence against academic honesty in any area of formal IB evaluation, including all internally and externally assessed components, the Extended Essay and Theory of Knowledge, will compromise the awarding of subject grades and the diploma itself. According to the Vade Mecum 2006, “Candidates are required to act in a responsible and ethical manner throughout their participation in the Diploma program and examinations. In particular, candidates must avoid any form of malpractice.” Malpractice includes the following: plagiarism, collusion, duplication of work or “any other behaviour that results in, or may result in, the candidate or any other candidate gaining an unfair advantage in one or more assessment components.” Students who comply with the UCC Code of Academic Honesty in all respects in their IB work can be confident that they meet IB expectations for academic honesty. The school has a responsibility to follow IB guidelines when reporting and investigating concerns about academic honesty.

TEXTBOOK PURCHASING All new and used textbook purchases are made directly through the Canadian School Book Exchange (CSBE) rather than at the College. Textbooks are ordered using CSBE’s online ordering system, which is accessed directly through the UCC website. Go to ucc.on.ca>Academics>Upper School, and then choose the Online Bookstore link from the menu of options on the left, where you can follow the instructions for placing and paying for orders. The online ordering system is active from the middle of June through to the end of the school year. Completed orders must be shipped to an address where a signature can be obtained upon delivery. Boarding students may request that their orders be shipped directly to the College for pick up in the Upper School Blues Shop upon arrival in September. New boarding parents should refer to the package of information sent upon admission for more information about textbook ordering.

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EVALUATION AND REPORTING STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT UPPER SCHOOL EVALUATION AND REPORTING: AN OVERVIEW UCC’s assessment of student performance is consistent with both IB and provincial diploma requirements. Percentage grades form the basis for our grading in Year 1 and Year 2. Starting in Foundation Year, the seven-point IB scale replaces percentages for reporting purposes. Assessment of student performance is a continuous process in all courses taught at UCC. Achievement in a course is based on an allotment of marks that is divided between term work (regular assignments, tests, essays and term projects) and examinations. Seventy per cent of the grade will be based on evaluation conducted throughout the course. Thirty per cent of the grade will be based on a final evaluation in the form of an examination, performance, essay and/or other method of evaluation suitable to the course content and administered towards the end of the course. At the Upper School, a variety of regular formal reporting procedures keep parents informed of their son’s progress and share ways in which students, parents and teachers can work together to promote the overall engagement and success of each boy. September Curriculum Night: Parents have an opportunity to meet each of their son’s subject teachers to gain an overall understanding of the subject matter and expectations for each course. Parents of boys with new advisers also can meet their son’s adviser. First Interim Report (October): In this early report, subject teachers indicate the degree to which students are demonstrating key learning skills. Combined with attendance data, such feedback will allow parents to understand their son’s progress in optimizing his learning. The adviser will also comment on the student’s initial adjustment and his early contributions to school life. At this date, students will not generally have completed any major assessments. October Parent Teacher/Interviews: Parents book interviews with subject teachers, who will share more specific information on student progress. First Full Report (January): The January Report presents a full academic summary of a student’s performance since September, including subject marks and comments. Senior

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Division (FY, IB1, IB2) reports include exam marks, the overall IB grade (scale 1–7) and the equivalent Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) percentage grade. Intermediate Division (Y1 and Y2) reports communicate an overall percentage grade. Cumulative attendance data is also reported. February Parent/Teacher Interviews: Teachers will communicate a student’s overall standing to date, including assessments completed since the beginning of January. Curricular Program

Second Interim Report, Y1–IB1 (April): This report provides a learning skills’ assessment for each subject, cumulative attendance statistics and the adviser’s comment. In addition, subject teachers indicate whether a student is “at,” “above” or “below” his January level of achievement. Second Full Report, IB2 only (April): This is the final report issued to IB2 students by UCC. Marks are calculated based upon the cumulative marking scheme (results from IB1 and work completed to date). This report will include the final adviser comment. Second Full Report, Y1–IB1 (June): This is the final report issued to students in Y1 to IB1 and includes subject grades, June exam marks, teacher comments and final attendance data. There is no final adviser comment. In addition to the formal reporting practices listed above, subject teachers will communicate serious academic concerns as they arise. Parents should note that they are welcome to contact teachers or their son’s adviser directly at any time if they have a specific concern.

UPPER CANADA COLLEGE ASSESSMENT POLICY INTRODUCTION The purpose of student assessment, evaluation and reporting is to: • Improve learning for all students • Provide feedback to students, parents and teachers about the learning process

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• Provide information for planning, implementing and improving instruction, based on the strengths and needs of students

GUIDING PRINCIPLES Principle 1: Assessment, evaluation and reporting practices are based on the Ontario Ministry of Education and the International Baccalaureate curriculum guidelines. We link assessment, evaluation and reporting practices to expectations with respect to knowledge, concepts and skills in accordance with the UCC curriculum.

Principle 2: Assessment, evaluation and reporting practices are fair for all students. We use a variety of assessment strategies to accommodate students’ learning styles. We ensure that assessment is ongoing and provides multiple opportunities to include a range of evidence to support judgments about students’ levels of achievement. We provide opportunities for practice and feedback through formative assessment. We make clear what the summative assessment will look like, early in each unit of instruction. We ensure that the students understand the methods and criteria by which they will be assessed and evaluated. We provide students with exemplars showing a range of quality when possible. We ensure that assessment is based on what has been taught. We help students develop the ability to reflect on their learning styles, strengths and areas for growth and use this information to set learning goals for improvement. We develop students’ skills in self and peer assessment. We ensure that the students are made aware of the UCC Academic Honesty Guidelines. We support the needs of students, consistent with the strategies outlined by the Wernham West Centre for Learning, including the One Page Reports.

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Principle 3: Assessment, evaluation and reporting practices are clear, accurate and timely. We give students constructive feedback with clear guidance for improvement in a timely manner. We provide regular information to parents and students about students’ progress over the duration of the year. Curricular Program

We ensure that through report card comments, parent-teacher interviews and parentteacher-student conferences, we clearly communicate what is done well, what needs improvement, what steps can be taken to support improvement and how these next steps will be monitored. We ensure that personal assessment and evaluation records are kept confidential.

Principle 4: Assessment, evaluation and reporting practices require the partnership of students, parents, teachers, advisers and administration We ensure that when a student is at risk of not achieving the expectations, the student and his parents are made aware of the situation well in advance of the formal reporting process. We promote assessment literacy for all partners by involving students and parents (e.g. sharing information at curriculum nights, parent information meetings, student-led conferences, actively involving students in self-assessment, having students reflect on their progress and setting goals with parents and teachers and advisers).

RESPONSIBILITIES Teachers • Become aware of the individual needs of their students, including recommendations from the Centre for Learning. • Teach students to use their agenda effectively. • Work collaboratively to set assessment criteria and tasks based on clear learning expectations. • Assess students’ prior knowledge whenever possible at the beginning of units.

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• Show assessment criteria and exemplars early in the unit. • Use a variety of assessment strategies and tools. • Assess learning skills, subject-specific skills, knowledge and understanding of concepts. • Return student work in a timely manner. • Provide feedback early in the unit and often. This feedback specifies strengths and areas for improvement and gives the learner opportunities to meet the expectations. • Encourage self-assessment, reflection and goal-setting. • Reflect on their practice and modify their units as needed. • Keep an accurate and detailed record of the students’ achievement. • Communicate student progress and achievement through report cards, and parentteacher and parent-student-teacher conferences. • Communicate concerns early to form teachers, advisers and the Centre for Learning Faculty. • Communicate with parents and advisers early when a student does not meet the expectations. • Share marks and results only with the student, his parents and colleagues.

Wernham West Centre for Learning • Assist students in making effective use of their agendas. • Assist students in developing learning and study skills. • Determine required testing accommodations as outlined in psycho-educational evaluations. • Give feedback to Faculty on students’ learning issues. • Assist Faculty in developing appropriate assessment strategies.

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Administration • Ensure that the Assessment Policy standards are met consistently. • Provide appropriate professional development to Faculty. • Provide support to teachers when they communicate with parents. • Ensure that Faculty review the Assessment Policy on a regular basis. Curricular Program

Students • Become actively involved in their learning. • Become diligent, and produce good quality work and submit their work on time. • Use their agendas effectively. • Use appropriate strategies to prepare for assessments tasks. • Seek extra help when needed. • Reflect on assessed work: strengths, areas for improvement and next steps. • Adhere to the Academic Honesty Policy guidelines.

Parents • Celebrate their sons’ accomplishments. • Encourage their sons to reflect on their learning. • Support their sons’ learning by helping them organize their work at home. • Support their sons’ learning by helping them to implement their teachers’ recommendations for improvement. • Support their sons’ learning by communicating relevant information, issues and concerns to their sons’ teachers, form teachers, form advisers and house advisers in a timely manner.

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EVALUATION STANDARDS – INTERMEDIATE DIVISION

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GRADE

DESCRIPTOR

95 to 100%

Outstanding

90 to 94%

Excellent

85 to 89%

Superior

80 to 84%

Very Good

75 to 79%

Above Average

70 to 74%

Good

65 to 69%

Satisfactory

60 to 64%

Below Average

55 to 59%

Mediocre

50 to 54%

Remediation Required

50%

Minimum Mark for Credit

49% and Below

A Failing Mark

N

Major Assignment(s) not submitted and/ or Final Examination not written

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EVALUATION STANDARDS – SENIOR DIVISION REPORTING STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT IN THE SENIOR DIVISION (FY, IB1, IB2) This table (on pages 38 and 39) illustrates how a student’s achievement in a course (internal UCC grade) is translated into the International Baccalaureate (IB) and Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) grades that appear on the school’s full report cards (January and June) and on the transcripts sent to post-secondary institutions. Curricular Program

• A student’s achievement in each course reflects his performance measured against established criteria. A student’s internal UCC grade (Column A) is calculated using the assessment methods and component weightings described in each course outline. • The descriptors in Column B provide a broad indication of student achievement in relation to performance standards. • A student’s reported IB grade (Column C) is based on the internal UCC grade he earns. For example, a student who earns an internal UCC grade of “77” and another who earns “79” both receive a reported IB grade of “5+.” • A student’s OSSD percentage grade (Column D) is based on the internal UCC grade he earns. For example, a student who earns an internal UCC grade of “77” receives a reported OSSD grade of “90” and another who earns an internal UCC grade of “79” receives a reported OSSD grade of “92.” The OSSD translations in this table are consistent with the ranges mandated by the Table of Equivalence developed by the International Baccalaureate Schools of Ontario (IBSO) and in use at all Ontario IB schools. • The school reports both IB grades and OSSD grades to post-secondary institutions. Please note: in the case of Foundation Year, only final OSSD percentage grades from Column D are reported to universities.

A grade of “N” is entered on a student’s school report card when he has not completed one or more major assessments by the end of a marking period. If left unresolved, a grade of “N” will result in no OSSD credit being awarded in that subject.

(senior evaluation continued)

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A INTERNAL (UCC) GRADES

B UCC DESCRIPTORS

C REPORTED IB GRADES

D REPORTED OSSD GRADES

100 99 98

100 outstanding

100

7+

100

97

100

96

99

95 94

excellent

99

7

98

93

98

92 91

97 within the critical range

7-

97

90

97

89 88

96 superior

6+

96

87

96

86

95

85 84

very good

95

6

94

83

94

82 81

93 within the critical range

6-

93

80

93

79 78

92 above average

5+

91

77

90

76

89

75 74

good

88

5

88

73

87 (senior evaluation continued)

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A INTERNAL (UCC) GRADES

B UCC DESCRIPTORS

C REPORTED IB GRADES

within the critical range

5-

72 71

86

70

85 84

69

83 satisfactory

4+

81

67

80

66

78

65 64

below average

4

63

58

4-

mediocre

3+

53 52

71 70 69

remediation recommended

3

55 54

73 72

57 56

76 74

within the critical range

60 59

77 75

62 61

Curricular Program

68

D REPORTED OSSD GRADES

67 65 63

within the critical range

3-

remediation required

2+

60 56

61

51

remediation required

2

50

within the critical range

2-

53

47–49

may achieve a passing grade

1+

47–49

40–46

a failing grade

1

40–46

39 & below

a failing grade

1-

39 & below

N

No Mark

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LEARNING SKILLS GLOSSARY INTERMEDIATE DIVISION YEAR 1 AND YEAR 2

SENIOR DIVISION FOUNDATION YEAR, IB1 AND IB2

COMES TO CLASS PREPARED TO LEARN

DEMONSTRATES EFFECTIVE ORGANIZATIONAL SKILLS

• Arrives on time, ready to work with required materials • Organizes notes effectively • Uses agenda effectively • If absent, gets the missed material to complete work

• Attends class regularly and is punctual • Brings required textbooks, notes and other materials • Develops, applies effective planning and organization • Takes responsibility for all assigned work

USES CLASS TIME EFFICIENTLY

COMES TO CLASS PREPARED TO LEARN

• Maintains focus, perseveres with complex tasks • Makes good use of suggestions and feedback • Shows creativity in posing questions and solving problems

• Completes required tasks in advance of class • Is reflective about and responsive to prepared material • Identifies questions and explores connections

CONTRIBUTES POSITIVELY TO CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT

DISPLAYS POSITIVE ENGAGEMENT IN THE CLASSROOM

• Listens actively to others • Takes on various roles • Contributes ideas and solutions; asks relevant questions • Shares with and supports others

• Listens actively; readily contributes to discussion and poses relevant questions • Strives to think critically and creatively • Keeps detailed and effective notes • Is supportive in attitudes; shares and collaborates with classmates (glossary continued)

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SENIOR DIVISION FOUNDATION YEAR, IB1 AND IB2

DEMONSTRATES EFFECTIVE STUDY HABITS

EXHIBITS DILIGENCE IN HIS WORK

• Follows directions and instructions • Submits assignments on time • Shows accuracy, neatness and care in his work, and revises it as needed • Prepares carefully for evaluation • Seeks out extra help when necessary

• Identifies course requirements; plans accordingly • Seeks help when necessary; responds well to feedback • Shows accuracy, rigour and care; revises his work as needed • Prepares thoroughly for evaluation • Meets deadlines and satisfied criteria

Curricular Program

INTERMEDIATE DIVISION YEAR 1 AND YEAR 2

The skills will be rated using the following scale: Always, Usually, Sometimes, Rarely, Never.

IB CUMULATIVE EVALUATION It is important to note that, in order to reflect the two-year structure of the IB Diploma Programme, student evaluation is cumulative over IB1 and IB2. Details about how this grading continuum is handled in individual disciplines are provided to students and parents at the start of IB1.

AWARDING THE IB DIPLOMA Performance in the International Baccalaureate Programme is assessed by means of criteria that vary for each subject. These performance criteria consist in every case of some or all of the following: internal evaluation of written work, external evaluation of written work, oral components and external examinations. The assessment of IB examination performance has seven grade levels:

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Grade 7: Excellent Grade 6: Very good Grade 5: Good Grade 4: Satisfactory Grade 3: Mediocre Grade 2: Poor Grade 1: Very poor

The Diploma will be awarded to students whose total score (including up to three Diploma Points for Theory of Knowledge and the Extended Essay) reaches or exceeds 24 points and does not include any of the failing conditions outlined below.

For all candidates: • A grade of “N” (indicating incomplete work) for one or more subjects, Theory of Knowledge or the Extended Essay • A grade of “E” for both Theory of Knowledge and the Extended Essay • A grade of “1” in any subject at either Higher or Standard Level • Incomplete CAS requirements • A determination that the candidate is guilty of malpractice • A grade of “3” awarded more than three times

For candidates with 24 to 27 points inclusive: • A grade of “2” in a Higher Level subject • More than one grade of “2” awarded in Standard Level subjects • Three Higher Level grades that total fewer than 12 points • Three Standard Level grades that total fewer than 9 points • A grade of “E” in either the Extended Essay or Theory of Knowledge

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For candidates with 28 points or more: • Grade 2 awarded for a Higher Level subject two or more times • Grade 2 awarded for a Standard Level subject three times • Candidate has received fewer than 11 points on three Higher Level subjects • Candidate has received fewer than 8 points on Standard Level subjects Curricular Program

Candidates who do not fulfill all of the IB Diploma requirements will receive a certificate of results listing the subjects in which they have satisfactorily completed a Standard Level or Higher Level course, as well as Theory of Knowledge and the Extended Essay. The grade achieved in each subject will appear on the certificate.

THE BILINGUAL DIPLOMA From 2013 onwards, a bilingual diploma will be awarded to a successful candidate who fulfils one or both of the following criteria: • Completion of two languages selected from group 1 with the award of a grade of “3” or higher in both • Completion of one of the subjects from group 3 or 4 in a language that is not the same as the candidate’s nominated group 1 language. The candidate must attain a grade 3 or higher in both the group 1 language and the subject from group 3 or 4.

PROMOTION POLICIES YEAR 1 and YEAR 2 For students in Year 1 and Year 2, the following regulations will normally be enforced for promotion to the next grade level: • A student who attains 50 per cent or higher in all subjects on his June report will be promoted to the next grade. • A student who has one subject below 50 per cent but a 60 per cent average for the remaining subjects will be conditionally promoted. The conditions, which may include

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attendance at a recognized summer school program, will be established through consultation between the College and the student’s family. • A student with one subject below 50 per cent and an average of less than 60 per cent for the remaining subjects will be required to leave. • A student who has two or more subjects below 50 per cent will be required to leave.

FOUNDATION YEAR For students in Foundation Year, the following regulations will be enforced in normal circumstances for promotion to IB1: • A student who attains a grade of “3+” or higher in all of his subjects on the June report will be promoted to IB1. • A student with a grade of “3” or higher in every subject will be conditionally promoted, assuming that the College is able to provide him with a viable Diploma program and that he is prepared to undertake a recommended program of academic reinforcement before commencing IB1. • A student who has one grade of “2+” or lower and an average grade of “3+” in his remaining subjects will be conditionally promoted, assuming that the College is able to provide him with a viable Diploma program and that he completes a program of academic reinforcement before commencing IB1. • A student who has two or more grades below “2+” will be required to leave the College unless there are extenuating circumstances to indicate that his current level of academic achievement is not an accurate reflection of his potential to achieve success in the IB. If the College is also able to provide him with a viable Diploma program, he will be required to complete a program of academic reinforcement before commencing IB1. • A grade of “N” on the June report indicates non-submission of a major assignment by the end of classes for that year. Any such grade will be considered a failing condition. Missing assignments must be submitted by an agreed upon deadline — and meet the required standard — before promotion will be granted.

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IB1 CRITERIA FOR PROMOTION TO IB2 Student’s June IB1 report indicates that he:

Action Required

Outcome

1

• W  ill achieve the IB Diploma • Is meeting expectations for academic responsibility 1

None

Student continues to IB2. Will apply to university on the basis of the IB Diploma

2

• M  ay achieve the IB Diploma despite currently having one failing condition 2 • Will achieve the OSSD with a qualifying average based on six Level 4 credits • Is meeting expectations for academic responsibility 1

Student continues to demonstrate academic responsibility by creating an approved plan to address failing condition(s). Appropriate strategies include:

Student continues to IB2 in full Diploma program following completion of approved plan. Depending on progress during the Autumn Term, he may apply to university on the basis of either the IB Diploma or the OSSD.

• Is unlikely to achieve the IB Diploma because of two or more failing conditions 2 • May achieve the OSSD with a qualifying average based on six Level 4 credits • Is not meeting expectations for academic responsibility 1

Student begins to demonstrate academic responsibility by creating an approved plan to address failing condition(s). Appropriate strategies include: • Prompt completion and submission of overdue IB assignments • Attendance at summer school • Completion of independent and/or assisted study leading to additional UCC evaluation • Modification(s) to IB program for the second year

3

• A ttendance at summer school • Completion of independent and/or assisted study leading to additional UCC evaluation • Modification(s) to IB program for the second year

Curricular Program

Status

Student continues to IB2 in full Diploma program following completion of approved plan. Depending on progress during the Autumn Term, he may apply to university on the basis of either the IB Diploma or the OSSD.

(criteria continued)

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CRITERIA FOR PROMOTION TO IB2 Status

Student’s June IB1 report indicates that he:

Action Required

Outcome

4

• W  ill not achieve the IB Diploma because of three or more failing conditions 2 • Is unlikely to achieve the OSSD with a qualifying average based on six Level 4 credits earned at UCC • Is not meeting expectations for academic responsibility 1

Student is awarded OSSD credits for course work successfully completed during IB1.

Student does not continue to IB2. He will apply to university on the basis of the OSSD with six Level 4 credits earned elsewhere.

1

Academic Responsibility is defined as follows:

The student has demonstrated that he meets academic obligations conscientiously. The student has demonstrated that he meets College expectations for conduct and attendance. In cases where a learning disability affecting academic performance is indicated, the student is actively involved in an educational plan based on an assessment report.

2

Failing conditions consist of one or more of the following:

IB1 subject total of 23 points or fewer Higher Level grades which total 11 points or fewer Higher Level or Standard Level grades of 1 or 2 Four grades of 3 A grade of N in one or more subjects because of missing major IB assignments No Extended Essay has been submitted

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ACADEMIC COUNSELLING AND SUPPORT Academic advising is a key component of the educational program at UCC. Students are encouraged to draw on a variety of resources for personal as well as academic reasons. The following outline provides an overview of the components of the counselling services, resources and support available to assist students in their academic activities.

Curricular Program

THE FORM AND HOUSE ADVISING SYSTEMS Central to the academic and personal program for each student in the Upper School are the Form and House Advising Systems. Each adviser is responsible for overseeing the academic as well as the co-curricular and social development of each student assigned to him or her. A student is encouraged to discuss any problems, academic or otherwise, first with his form or house adviser; the adviser is also a good point of contact for the family of an advisee. As necessary, the adviser may draw the student’s teachers and other staff — with specialized knowledge and skills — into the conversation.

THE LEARNING COMMONS The Learning Commons is a welcoming virtual and physical environment in which engagement in collaborative teaching and learning, grounded in best practice, is supported and optimized. Creativity is fostered and academics are celebrated.

UNIVERSITY COUNSELLING OFFICE The University Counselling Office at Upper Canada College is committed to supporting our students as they identify and develop their individual passions and strengths and explore how these will shape their post-secondary studies and future careers. We strive to work in close partnership with boys and their parents, recognizing, as psychologist Michael Thompson has pointed out, that this process is about much more than the mechanics of selecting a place of higher education: it is “the most important and difficult transition” in a young person’s life. As such, the primary goal is to encourage our young men to develop a useful template for making wise adult decisions, one which recognizes the value of thorough research, honest reflection, and a willingness to follow one’s own path.

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Located beside the Student Centre, the University Counselling Office works most closely with students enrolled in the Senior Division, delivering the Career Studies credit for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma and offering individual support for students in their post-secondary planning. However, boys at all grade levels and their parents are welcome to obtain information about university and career preparation and to receive advice about the application/admission process. The office also provides course selection counselling for those entering Foundation Year and IB1, since subject choices at these grade levels often influence opportunities for study at the post-secondary level. Boys are assigned to their university counsellor by house. Katherine Ridout (Director of University Counselling) advises boys in Martland’s and McHugh’s. Jane Audet (Associate Director) works with students in Mowbray’s, Orr’s and Scadding’s. Michelle Carvalho (Associate Director) counsels boys in Bremner’s, Howard’s and Jackson’s. Boarding students in Seaton’s and Wedd’s are advised by Andrew Turner (Director of Residential Life). To arrange an appointment with your son’s university counsellor, please contact Leigh Berndsen, Office Coordinator, at 416-488-1125, ext. 2262 or lberndsen@ucc.on.ca.

THE OFFICE OF THE ACADEMIC DEAN The Academic Dean’s office is located just off the Student Centre and offers a range of services and supports, including: • Communicating information to students and parents and responding to queries regarding all aspects of the academic program of the Upper School • Counselling for boys (and their families) to ensure their academic program, at all grade levels, is a match for their abilities and interests; supervision of all aspects of course selection and course changes • Organizing and monitoring the delivery of the IB Diploma Programme (excluding Creativity, Action, Service) • Serving as liaison between UCC and the International Baccalaureate Organization • Handling of appeals of final IB results • Overseeing all examinations at the Upper School • Academic record-keeping, including maintenance of Ontario Student Records for all Upper School students and the production of transcripts for current students and Old Boys

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Appointments with Dr. Julia Kinnear, Academic Dean, are made by contacting Amy Hewson, Administrative Assistant, at 416-488-1125, ext. 2222 or ahewson@ucc.on.ca. Any IB-related queries may be directed to Ms. Hewson. Other academic queries, including those related to transcripts, course selection, and course changes, may be directed to Sandra Fulford, Administrative Assistant, at 416-488-1125, ext. 2213 or sfulford@ucc.on.ca. Curricular Program

WERNHAM WEST CENTRE FOR LEARNING The Richard Wernham and Julia West Centre for Learning is a school-wide program that helps all boys understand the process of learning and approaches to learning that work for them and helps them develop a “tool kit” of academic and study strategies. The Centre for Learning connects with all boys by: • Conducting activities and discussions in academic reflection, goal-setting and planning (for boys in the Intermediate Division, these reflections are gathered in a digital portfolio as a part of their Career Studies credit and shared with their adviser and parents once a year); • Providing various group sessions in the Centre for Learning on exam preparation, testtaking, time-management and study skills at scheduled times throughout the year; • Encouraging any student to visit the Centre for Learning; • Planning programs and support for parents to help them understand the many issues around learning styles and differences, with a focus on boys and learning. The Centre for Learning provides individualized or small group support by: • Scheduling times for boys in the Intermediate and Senior Divisions to receive small group or individual support (Year 1 Boys may attend a Study Skills Session at 7:30 a.m. on Monday mornings. Year 2 Boys may attend a Study Skills Session at 7:30 a.m. on Friday mornings. Meetings with boys in FY, IB1 and IB2 are arranged before and after school or during spares); • Encouraging the Peer Tutoring Program for additional support in content areas; • Communicating information from a confidential educational evaluation that has been administered by an educational psychologist or other qualified professional. The Centre for Learning encourages parents to share educational evaluations with the school so

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that information on their son’s learning strengths and learning needs can be shared in a confidential manner with his teachers. Accommodations, such as use of a lap top and extended time, will be arranged in cases where the results of the testing meet the guidelines as set by the College Board and the International Baccalaureate Programme. Parents or students with any questions about this process should contact Mary Gauthier in the Centre for Learning office.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Mary Gauthier, Executive Director of the Wernham West Centre for Learning and Intermediate Division Coordinator, 416-488-1125, ext. 2211, email: magauthier@ucc.on.ca. Jody McLean, Senior Coordinator of the Wernham West Centre for Learning, 416-488-1125, ext. 2243, email: jmclean@ucc.on.ca.

MACINTOSH LIBRARY The Macintosh Library is at the heart of the Upper School’s academic program. The Library’s Information Literacy focus is built around three main principles: • Teaching and instruction, in collaboration with faculty; • Development of the collections to support the curriculum; • Service to all segments of the UCC community.

Emphasis is also placed on: • Literacy development; • Celebration of reading; • Life-long learning. The Library maintains an extensive collection of materials, print and electronic, and provides guidance to members of the community in connecting with other library networks such as Toronto Public Library and the University of Toronto Libraries as appropriate. Instruction on effective use of the Internet is also provided, as is guidance on the use of information management tools. The library program is present in many subject

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contexts in all grades and is extensively involved in the Extended Essay process in IB1, providing subject-specific workshops and individualized support.

ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE AND MONITORING Curricular Program

Student academic performance is reviewed and communicated formally at scheduled reporting points in January, April and June of each year. At other times, teachers will report serious concerns about a student’s performance or conduct to his house adviser, who will discuss the matter with the student and, as appropriate, inform the parents. Parents should communicate their concerns about their son’s academic progress to his house adviser, who will draw the student’s teachers and staff into the discussion as required. In addition to the aid given through the house adviser, the College also provides a number of other strategies to try to help students throughout the course of their academic program in the Upper School. The various levels of support identified below are offered to students at all grade levels. While not an exhaustive list, these levels do provide a sense of the support process that is usually applied to students who may be experiencing specific struggles within their program of study at the school. The progression of the steps involved in the support process is not necessarily linear, and some students may be identified as requiring available supports at different levels at different times, depending on their specific academic needs.

LEVELS OF ACADEMIC SUPPORT STAGE 1: IDENTIFICATION OF CONCERNS • Review of information on student performance (email, Red Rockets, one page report, Green Sheets, Teacher Grade Level Meetings) • Adviser/advisee discussions • Student support plans

STAGE 2: DEPARTMENTAL SUPPORT • Designated extra-help sessions (Math clinic, French/Spanish extra help, etc.)

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• Specially arranged student/teacher extra-help sessions (before tests, with assignments, etc.)

STAGE 3: SUPPLEMENTARY SUPPORT SERVICES • Peer tutoring • After-school support in the Centre for Learning • Centre for Learning check-in • Professional tutoring for knowledge gaps (additional fees may be required) • ESL support • Educational evaluations (paid for by student’s family) • Health Centre • Counselling • Medical treatment • Support groups

STAGE 4: UPPER SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION COMMITTEE (USAC) SUPPORTS • Discussions/recommendations • Red Rockets • Centre for Learning information • Teacher Grade Level Meetings • Academic status recommendations • Student support plans • Advising: Upper School Administration Committee (USAC) member as a supporting adviser

STAGE 5: SPECIALIZED SUPPORT FOR BOYS OF CONCERN • Centre for Learning/parent meetings and Health Centre/parent meetings • Established plan for detailed working relationship with the Centre for Learning, which may include scheduled/structured spares in the Centre for Learning

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• USAC discussions/recommendations • Established plan for internal/external counselling • Adjustment of academic program

TEACHER GRADE LEVEL MEETINGS Curricular Program

Teacher Grade Level Meetings represent our grade-wide approach of ongoing monitoring of student performance and success. Teacher Grade Level Meetings are scheduled regularly throughout the year for teachers, advisers and our Centre for Learning professionals. Each meeting is specific to a particular grade level and allows for the sharing of information and focused conversations about individual students. Also discussed are observations regarding trends and concerns at that particular grade level. The purpose of these meetings is to have action-based outcomes. As concerns are raised, strategies to address them are provided and individuals are assigned the responsibility of following up. The support strategies are monitored and amended as necessary by teachers, advisers and members of the Upper School Administration Committee to the benefit of the student, teachers and the overall school community.

ACADEMIC STATUS ACADEMIC CONCERN A student may be placed on Academic Concern when, in the judgment of the College, additional support, monitoring and guidelines are warranted to promote academic responsibility and achievement. Academic Concern status emphasizes the need to address areas of academic weakness and to develop an appropriate plan of action. Parents will be formally notified. A student’s academic performance will be monitored by his house adviser and the Upper School Administration Committee and reviewed at faculty meetings each term. If significant improvement is attained, Academic Concern status will be removed. If improvement is not observed, however, the student will remain on Academic Concern or, in serious cases, be placed on Academic Probation.

ACADEMIC PROBATION For failure to respond positively to Academic Concern status, in response to serious academic difficulty, or to signify that his current record of achievement does not meet

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College standards for promotion to the next grade, a student will be placed on Academic Probation, with clearly stated expectations and requirements for his continued enrolment at the school. Parents will be formally notified. On the recommendation of the Upper School Administration Committee, a student placed on Academic Probation may be removed from co-curricular activities, or in some instances classes, until such time as all academic requirements have been met. A student on Academic Probation is expected to show improvement in all areas of concern, to abide by any specific terms and conditions of his probationary status, and to meet all academic expectations. His performance will be monitored by his house adviser and the Upper School Administration Committee and will be reviewed at faculty meetings each term. If significant improvement and consistent commitment are observed, and if the student demonstrates that he is meeting College standards for promotion, Academic Probation will be removed; however, Academic Concern will remain in force. If these standards are not attained, the student may be asked to leave the College.

AMENDMENT TO PROGRAM In exceptional circumstances, such as the documented identification of a learning disability or a temporary or chronic medical condition, the College may modify a student’s academic program. Not all such needs can be accommodated. In all cases in which amendment of the program is requested, the student and his parents must present full professional documentation of the circumstances and demonstrate that a treatment and support program is both in place and effective. Requests for amendment are handled by the Upper School Administration Committee. In its deliberations, this Committee will identify the specific amendment granted, the responsibilities of the student and his parents, and the role of the College.

UCC CAREER STUDIES PROGRAM (GLC2O) At Upper Canada College, the compulsory half-credit in career studies for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma is completed over the five years at the Upper School. The program is designed to fit the developmental needs of the students as they mature. It encourages them to engage in thorough, thoughtful research and reflection in order to ensure wiser post-secondary and career choices.

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Curricular Program

In Year 1 and Year 2, the program will be delivered primarily through the Centre for Learning and the Form Advising and House Advising systems. In Foundation Year, the primary responsibility for the program will rest with the University Counselling Office (with support from the CFL and the House Advising system). The Intermediate Division program will focus on self-knowledge and personal management. The Senior Division years will concentrate on exploration of opportunities and preparation for transitions. Assessment for the career studies credit will be based on the student’s individual portfolio. The grade will be recorded on the IB2 report cards of students who qualify for the half-credit.

USE OF MOBILE ELECTRONIC DEVICES Mobile electronic devices such as laptops, cell phones, music playing devices, video games and the like have become an almost ubiquitous appendage of modern life. However, students and parents should understand that in a classroom environment, unauthorized use of these devices demonstrates disrespect and lack of courtesy and civility, and is distracting. Specific to cell phones, if a student must bring one to school, it should be turned off during class time, and ideally stored in his locker. If a call must be made or a text message sent or read, it should be done at recess, lunch or after school. Mobile electronic devices used in violation of this rule of courtesy and respect will be confiscated for return after a discussion with the classroom teacher or the Dean of Students.

USE OF COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY USE OF COLLEGE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY— COMPUTER RESOURCES FOR UCC STUDENTS Students will have the use of a laptop bundled with school-licensed software and a technical support model. This will ensure that technology is always available for use in the classroom. The laptop is considered one of many teaching tools available to teachers when considering curriculum implementation. The $500 technology fee is mandatory for all students in Grade 4 and up. The technology fee allows for exclusive access to a laptop (the current Prep School model is 13-inch MacBook Air, 1.3GHz, Intel Core i5, 4GB Ram, 120GB SS hard drive imaged with

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OS 10.8.x; the Upper School model is 13-inch MacBook Pro, 2.5GHz Intel Core i5, 8GB Ram, 500GB hard drive imaged with OS 10.8.x); the associated software needed for the curriculum, and tech support that will allow teachers to prepare knowing that their students will always have a functioning computer ready for the class work. Students will be administrators of the computer and will be able to keep them during holidays. Information and Communication Technology Integrators support faculty with their technology integration and skill development at both the Prep and Upper Schools. The Integrators, who are part of the faculty, lead student groups that help with technical direction, as well as student and faculty skill development. A Help Desk is available to students for their laptop support needs. The IT support staff is always available at the Help Desk between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. on regular cycle school days. Loaner laptops are available to students when their computers are not functioning properly and need to be repaired. It is expected that students will store their school files in Google Drive. This will make sure their files are always safe and accessible. Loss of files because of damaged hardware is never an excuse to miss an academic deadline.

COMPUTER ACCOUNT All Upper School students are assigned network login IDs when they start at the College. Usernames will stay the same for the duration of a student’s enrolment at the College. The login ID will be for network resources, including email, printing, network storage and Haiku. Haiku is an online learning system that teachers may use to post course outlines, assignments, readings and other material. It is very important that students maintain the security of their login ID. They should choose a password that is easy to remember, but hard for anyone else to guess, and not tell anyone their password. Passwords must contain a minimum of six characters and also include two of the following: a number, an uppercase character and a symbol.

STUDENT LAPTOP AND NETWORK AGREEMENTS Student use of technology at UCC is intended for teaching and learning purposes. It is a privilege to use these services and this privilege can be retained through responsible use. Technology will be used in the classroom at the discretion of the teachers. Teachers will use

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technology in their classroom in accordance with when they feel it best fits the curriculum.

AS STUDENTS AT UPPER CANADA COLLEGE, YOU AGREE TO:

Curricular Program

Act responsibly with the equipment supplied to you. This is true whether you are using the equipment on campus or not. Keep it under your care and control and ensure that you do your best to keep the equipment in good working order. You are responsible for the equipment at all times. The equipment must always be kept in the plastic case in which the laptop has been given to you. Failure to keep the laptop in this case will result in you being removed from the Damage Protection Program. If the case becomes loose or broken, you must bring it to the IT Help Desk immediately. No insurance is available on the computer. To start, all students will be part of a Damage Protection Program.

Liquid damage is not covered.

Theft is only covered if it is not careless loss. Leaving it in a restaurant, an airport, or a library is not covered. If the laptop is stolen, then we will need a police report that includes details about how the laptop was secured and how it was stolen. Replacing the unit is at the discretion of UCC. Theft is covered at 50 per cent of the cost of the computer. Careless loss is not covered and the family will need to pay the full replacement fee of the computer.

UCC will pay 50 per cent of the first fix.

These are non-accumulative. We will do 50 per cent of the fixes of one piece of damage at the discretion of UCC.

Replacement fee for a lost computer will be a minimum $500 up to the replacement fee of the computer.

The duration of the program and the availability of the 50 per cent coverage is from June 2013 to June 2016. Always carry your laptop from home to College, or from class to class, in a padded, protective laptop bag. Laptops found unattended or out of a bag will be brought to IT for pickup. Careless handling of the laptop like this will remove you from the Damage Protection Program and remove your admin privileges on the computer for three months.

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Follow your teacher’s direction in class. Misuse of technology in the class will be addressed the same as other conduct infractions in the College. If you have an issue with the laptop then you will bring it to the Help Desk for service and support. The Help Desk is available Monday to Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Students are never to try to repair laptops on their own as this will void warranties. Students who try to fix their own computer will be exempt from Applecare and the Damage Protection Program. If the laptop needs to be fixed, bring it to the IT Help Desk as we will give you a loaner. The laptop will be assessed and quoted by a third party. If your parents choose to have the machine fixed with us then we will send a form to ensure the quote is accepted and only then will we fix. Take a loaner computer in the event there is not a quick fix to the machine assigned to you. This computer will be returned promptly when the original machine is ready for pick-up. You will only get a loaner laptop if you have submitted a laptop to be fixed. Loaners are not given for laptops that are forgotten at home. All other laptops are given at the discretion of UCC. VPN software and torrent software are never allowed on these computers. Your files should be on Google Drive. This way, any issue with the computer will not impact your ability to continue your school work. Computer failure is never an excuse for missing an academic deadline. It is your responsibility to ensure your work is backed up in the event of hardware failure. Keep the integrity of the administrator account. Students are not to remove the Administrators account or change/disable settings that are necessary for the laptop to function properly on the network. Students are not to create “ad-hoc” student networks. Maintain your own records for personal software. The College will only support software that is supplied on the image. If your machine is re-imaged then you must re-install your software and re-enter your customizations. Do not access social networks, games, chat sites or anything that will distract from classroom learning. These features will be filtered from the College’s network during the College day. Ensure that your battery is charged at the beginning of the school day. Although there will be many opportunities to charge your battery throughout the College, you may still have one or two classes in the morning where this will not be an option. You are

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expected to follow the best practices for maximizing your battery life, including having your display go to sleep after five minutes and your computer go to sleep after 10 minutes while using battery. You should also keep your screen brightness to the minimal (F1 and F2), disconnect peripherals and close services (like Bluetooth) when not in use.

AS BOARDERS AT UPPER CANADA COLLEGE YOU AGREE TO: Attend the orientation session during the first week of school if you are new. This will include care and control of the laptop, acceptable use, and accessing network resources. You will be informed when these workshops are available to you.

Curricular Program

Keep the laptop within your care during the school year. Returning students are allowed to keep their laptop over the summer, at the discretion of the College. If you are not returning to UCC, then you agree to bring the laptop back to the IT department within 24 hours after your last exam.

Be responsible administrators on the laptop supplied by UCC. You will not need another computer. Keep all personal computers at home. The school-supplied laptops will be the only laptops that can access the network during normal school hours. Access the internet through the content filter. There will be different content filtered during the day than what the Boarders experience in the evening and on weekends. The senior house advisers will decide the details of this.

IB1 and IB2 boys will not have internet shut off at any time.

Y1, Y2, and FY boys will have internet access on off times as decided by the Senior Boarding Heads. Transport your computer to and from the boarding house in a protective bag or knapsack. You are responsible for keeping the computer safe and in good working order.

AS PARENTS OF UPPER CANADA COLLEGE YOU AGREE TO: Support the Student Agreement between the College and your son, and support the Acceptable Use Policy. Ensure your boy is taking care of the equipment supplied to him.

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The yearly technology fee of $500, which comprises the use of the computer, software licensing and technical support. Ensure the laptop comes back when your son graduates or leaves the College in the same working state that the laptop was given to your son.

ACCEPTABLE USE OF TECHNOLOGY STUDENT AGREEMENT Upper Canada College is committed to providing a high level of information technology resources and facilities in order to provide a secure and effective learning environment. Information technology services are intended for teaching and learning purposes. Access to these services is a privilege granted upon application and retained through responsible use. Acceptable use of technology includes ethical and legal use of technology, is governed by College values and standards as outlined in the Family Handbook, and by all relevant statutes, laws and regulations. Each student is responsible for all of the content on his laptop, and all of the content on email and network storage associated with his username, at all times. The expectations listed below must be followed and students must sign this form, indicating their commitment to acceptable use.

Respect Respect the rights and dignity of others at all times, based on Our Shared Ideals. Students are reminded that information technology is subject to the same standards of respect as any other written or personal communication and relationship with others. Sending or displaying any information, pictures or messages that are disrespectful of others or that are unlawful, harassing, threatening, obscene or otherwise objectionable by email, intranet or Internet are not allowed.

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Privacy 4 I will not take digital photographs, videos or audio recordings of people without their

consent. 4 I will not publish text documents, digital images, video or audio recordings of, or

belonging to, other people on any social network or website without their permission. 4 Email, online chatting and postings on social networks are not guaranteed to be private. Curricular Program

I understand that messages relating to, or in the support of, illegal or inappropriate activities will be reported to UCC Administration. I understand that actions that occur outside of the UCC Network can still have consequences as outlined in the Acceptable Use Policy for Students, the UCC Code of Conduct and Harassment Policy. 4 I understand that all communications and information accessed through UCC’s network

is not private. Email and other modes of communication can be accessed at a time.

Illegal Activities 4 I will not knowingly introduce a computer virus into the UCC network. 4 I will not tamper with or try to “hack” into any UCC computer resources. 4 I will not violate any patent, trademark, trade name or copyright laws. 4 In adherence to UCC’s Academic Honesty Policy, I will not plagiarize any work done

by other people. 4 I will not put software or files on my laptop that have not been properly purchased and

documented. Cracked software and illegally downloaded music are not acceptable to have on a College laptop. 4 I will not purposely damage any part of the College’s technology equipment or

computer network. 4 I will not use the UCC computer network for commercial or ongoing personal business

purposes. This includes, but is not limited to, using the computer resources for commercial purposes and product advertising. 4 I am responsible for any repercussions, which may include civil actions or criminal

charges that may result from my online activities.

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Inappropriate Use 4 The primary use of this equipment is to support learning. I will ensure that my machine

is in good working order and ensure that I have not done anything to the operating system configuration to prevent the machine from working on the College’s network. 4 I will not submit, publish, transmit or receive any defamatory, inaccurate, harassing,

abusive, obscene, profane, sexually explicit, threatening, offensive or illegal material. 4 I understand that incidents involving inappropriate use, as outlined in above point #2,

that occur off-campus can still have consequences as outlined in the Acceptable Use Policy, the UCC Code of Conduct and the Family Handbook. 4 I will report any security problem I have identified immediately to a UCC staff member,

and I will not demonstrate the problem to others. 4 I will not take photographs or video, by any method including a cell phone, of a person

without his or her expressed consent. 4 I understand that plagiarism is wrong and I will not use the Internet, or other

resources, incorrectly. 4 I understand that logging in as someone else, or using a computer that has been logged

in as someone else without his or her knowledge, is a violation of privacy. This includes remote access to another’s computer. 4 I will not game or access social network, chatting or associated applications that will

take my attention away from class work or in a way that is disruptive to academic space such as the Macintosh Library, irrespective of the time of day.

Personal Safety 4 I will not give my email or computer network access passwords to anyone else, or use

another’s password even if only for the purposes of browsing. 4 I understand that personal information is not to be posted in public forums. I will not

give out personal information, such as my name, address, telephone number or information about family or friends in a public online forum. 4 I will not agree to meet in person with anyone I “meet” online.

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4 I will not respond to any messages that are objectionable or make me feel

uncomfortable. I will inform a teacher right away if I come across any information that is objectionable or that makes me feel uncomfortable. 4 I will be responsible for any repercussions, which may include civil actions or criminal

charges that may result from my online activities.

SANCTIONS AND DISCIPLINARY ACTIONS Curricular Program

The College Administration will determine sanctions for violations of the UCC Acceptable Use Policy for Technology. Sanctions will be pursued vigorously and may include a verbal warning and/or notification of parents, the removal of admin rights from their computers, and a ban from computer and technology access. Severe or repeated violations may result in suspension from the College or expulsion. All violations will be brought to the attention of the appropriate Division Head; serious violations will be brought to the attention of the Principal. Conditions for reinstatement of privileges will be determined and reviewed by the Administration. NOTE: All information and communication technologies accessible on UCC’s network should NOT be regarded as private. The student consents and agrees to allow UCC personnel to review any and all files, data and messages, without notice, to ensure that students are using the system responsibly at all times.

UCC makes no warranties of any kind, whether expressed or implied, for the supervision and service it is providing. Use of any information obtained via the Internet is at the student’s own risk. UCC is not responsible for the accuracy or quality of information obtained through its services. All students receive an introductory session when accepting the school’s laptop for their use. The introductory session and the sign-out form reference this document. By accepting the laptop and signing for it, the student agrees to this document. If you are not sure whether something you are doing is inappropriate or wise, use this rule of thumb: would you want your parent or teacher to see what’s on your computer screen right now? When students are found to be in violation of the AUP, then they are dealt with through the Division Head in the academic office. Consequences include the

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removal of administrative rights on the laptop for a length of time determined by the Division Head.

MACINTOSH LIBRARY The Macintosh Library is at the heart of the Upper School’s academic program. The library maintains an extensive collection of materials geared to the curriculum of the school. The library’s purpose is to meet the academic needs of students and faculty. In order to achieve this, its information literacy program is built around three main principles: teaching and instruction in collaboration with faculty; development of the collection to support the curriculum; and service to all segments of the UCC community. For students, it is a space for study, learning, research, reading and reflection. Students use the resources not only of the Macintosh Library but also of other libraries in the Toronto area to supplement their research, including, in their IB years, the university library systems. Print resources are complemented by a wide variety of electronic encyclopedias and full-text databases accessible via the Online Library on the school network. The Macintosh Library also enhances literacy-skill development by encouraging a love of reading. Comfortable reading spaces are available for students, and new books are highlighted regularly. Classroom teachers can schedule Book Talks in the library, which give the teacher-librarian an opportunity to highlight some of the best and latest books, both fiction and non-fiction, that appeal to a variety of interests and reading levels. Author visits are arranged on several occasions during the school year to promote books of interest to the student body and to introduce boys and the UCC community to notable writers and their work. Hours: Normal hours of operation during the term are:

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Monday–Thursday 8:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. when residential assistant is present

Friday

8:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Saturday/Sunday

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Curricular Program

Exceptions to these hours occur occasionally during the year. Students should watch the library door for postings regarding changes. Most library materials may be borrowed for a two-week period, and renewals may be requested. Materials must be returned or renewed by the due date. Students with overdue materials are notified via email and are expected to take responsibility for returning or renewing the materials. Although there are no fines for overdue materials, a charge of $30.00 per item will be charged to the student’s account at the end of the year for lost or unreturned materials. List price will be charged for reference materials. Once the replacement bill has been issued by the Finance Office, the charges will not be waived. School policies, the Macintosh Library Code of Conduct and the dress code apply in the library.

NORVAL OUTDOOR SCHOOL The Norval Outdoor School, UCC’s “other campus” and Outdoor Education department, is situated on more than 400 acres in the Credit River valley near the village of Norval, Ontario. In 1910, a proposal to sell the present UCC lands and move to a less expensive location was considered. As a result, the College purchased a tract of farmland from the Noble family in 1913. However, the onset of World War I, the escalating costs of re-establishing the school at Norval and its remote location prevented the development of the Norval property. The use of the property for educational and recreational purposes was initiated in the mid-1930s by Alan Stephen, who would later become a Prep Headmaster. Students and faculty have since planted over 650,000 trees, contributing to the stability of the Credit watershed and providing a diverse natural habitat for a number of wildlife species and migratory birds. This example of private stewardship is unique to southern Ontario. A more formalized outdoor environmental education program was initiated in the mid-1960s by Bruce Litteljohn. At the same time, a dramatic outdoor education facility was constructed, named Stephen House after Prep Headmaster Alan Stephen, and became the base for all Prep classes. There is accommodation for 24 students plus staff, dining and lounge areas, and a classroom and storage facility. During the fall and spring terms, students camp out on the property in tents or cabins. Operation of the facility is sensitive to the environment and consistent with the educational goals of the program. All students

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at the College from Senior Kindergarten through Foundation Year attend outdoor and environmental education programming at Norval.

UPPER SCHOOL NORVAL PROGRAMS Year 1 The program takes place over five days in the spring term. The program is strongly focused on environmental education. Students are introduced to a wide variety of activities and perspectives centred around the question, “How can I connect with the environment in meaningful and sustainable ways?” 2015 Dates for the Year 1 Norval Program: Monday, April 20 to Friday, April 24 Year 1 students attend a five-day expedition-based program in and around the Norval area. Like the Prep Norval program, the goal of the Year 1 Norval program is to introduce students to a variety of activities and perspectives to help them further their connection to the natural world. Program components include overnight camping, expedition cooking, moving-water canoeing on the Credit River, rappelling, ropes course activities, landscape art, a field science crayfish study and a service project. There will be a parent presentation about the trip during the Y2 Course Selection evening in early January. Permission forms, including details about program activities, will be sent home in early 2015.

Year 2 2014–2015 Dates for the Year 2 Norval Program: Each phys-ed class will go to Norval during one school day in late April to do teambuilding activities on the high ropes courses.

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Foundation Year Students will go to Norval for one night and one day as part of our Form 7–Mentor Leadership program. This program is designed to help Prep Form 7 students prepare for the move to the Upper School. 2015 Dates for the Foundation Year/Form 7 Norval Program: Curricular Program

Monday, April 13 to Tuesday, April 14 or Wednesday, April 15 to Thursday, April 16 The students would be grouped by House during this time.

Details of your son’s trip to Norval will be given to him and you closer to the date of his visit.

FAMILY OPEN HOUSE DAYS AT NORVAL The Norval Outdoor School provides many programs for students throughout the school year. Because of these activities and the relatively small staff at Norval, drop-in visits from the UCC community cannot be accommodated. However, the school provides several opportunities throughout the year for current UCC families and alumni to explore Norval. Please refer to the UCC calendar for specific times of these events. • New Family Open House: Sunday, September 7, 2014 • Fall Open House: Sunday, October 19, 2014 • Winter Open House: Sunday, January 18, 2015 • Maple Madness Open House: Sunday, March 22, 2015 • Spring Open House: Sunday, May 3, 2015

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WERNHAM WEST CENTRE FOR LEARNING The services of the Richard Wernham and Julia West Centre for Learning support learning and teaching at the Preparatory School and the Upper School. The Wernham West Centre for Learning staff members at the Upper School are as follows:

Mary Gauthier, Executive Director SK–IB2 and Intermediate Division Coordinator (Y1–Y2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. 2211

Jody McLean, Senior Division Coordinator FY–IB2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. 2243

Julia Rosefield, Administrative Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. 2242

Reflecting the goals and objectives of the College, the Wernham West Centre for Learning at the Upper School has the following four mandates:

1. The Centre enhances the learning environment by facilitating a greater understanding of the different learning styles and needs of all students, and by assisting them in developing strategies appropriate to their learning profiles. The Centre meets this mandate by: • Encouraging boys to visit and use the Centre for Learning’s online course that contains information on study skills, organizational tips, strategies to manage workload, communication and note-taking strategies, etc. • Working with boys to develop organizational and time management skills. Any student can contact the Centre for Learning and learn how to use their online calendar to prioritize, plan and create a task list • Helping the boys develop self-advocacy and an understanding of their learning through their portfolios in the iDiv through their Year 1 form adviser or house adviser (Year 2) in preparation for their student-led conferences • Planning activities and discussions on academic reflection and goal-setting through the Form Advisory (Year 1) and House Advisory system (Year 2 to IB2)

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• Providing group sessions open to all boys in the Centre on exam preparation, testtaking, time management and study skills at scheduled times during the year • Encouraging any student to visit the Centre (email or drop by to schedule an appointment) • Coordinating writing support and research skills with the Macintosh Library, including Academic Honesty Workshops and support for the Extended Essay Curricular Program

• Planning programs and support for parents to help them understand the many issues of learning styles and differences, with a focus on boys and learning • Coordinating support with the Academic Programs Office, University Placement and Library for Intermediate and Senior Division boys

2. The Centre provides direct program support to students with exceptional learning styles or needs. The Centre meets this mandate by: • Scheduling times for students to receive individualized support group study-skill sessions are offered at 7:30 a.m. on scheduled weekdays (Mondays for Year 1 and Fridays for Year 2). A weekly group is available for FY boys and students in IB1 and IB2 may use their spares for individual appointments. No fee is charged for appointments with Centre for Learning staff. • Encouraging students to use the Peer Tutoring Program (see section below for information on Peer Tutoring) • Organizing ongoing or additional tutoring for English Language Learners (ELL), in some subject areas, and academic coaching if it is determined that this is in the best interests of the student. There is a fee of $70.00 per person for each session for this additional tutoring. (See the section below for Tutoring Policy and Guidelines for our process and standards.) • Working with groups of boys and their coaches, directors of school plays and music conductors to help boys balance extra-curricular responsibilities with their academic workload

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• Coordinating and supporting plans for students with extended absences (concussions, illness, athletic commitments, etc.) to manage academic work and/or tests • Partnering with teachers to develop skills with ELL students and modify course content to assist with the transition into the program • Meeting with students, parents, teachers and house advisers about any boy and his learning needs • For boys with Educational Evaluations, please see Educational Evaluations below and also the Process and Procedure chart for Educational Evaluation, the One Page Report Process and, if needed, information on testing accommodations.

3. The Centre provides professional development and support for UCC faculty. The Centre meets this mandate by: • Working closely with other departments and services in the Upper School • Assisting in the development of student programs (i.e. the House Advisory system) • Planning and providing professional development opportunities for faculty in the areas of learning styles and differences, instructional strategies and relational teaching, best practices, differentiation, and brain research

4. The Centre permits Upper Canada College to be a site for educational research that will be shared with the broader educational community. The Centre meets this mandate by: • Actively bringing new information on research in the areas of learning and brain development to the UCC community • Providing opportunities for faculty to be actively involved in research • Monitoring its own progress to ensure that appropriate support is provided for every student

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EDUCATIONAL EVALUATIONS

Curricular Program

An educational evaluation is a testing process administered by a psychologist that helps the boy, his parents and the school understand the boy’s learning profile, strengths and possible gaps in areas of skill or processing development and strategies to help the boy meet his potential and gain academic confidence. The Centre for Learning encourages parents to share educational evaluations with the school so that information on their son’s learning strengths and needs can be shared in a confidential manner with his teachers. Program accommodations, such as the use of a laptop or extended time, will be arranged in cases where the educational evaluation meets guidelines set by the College Board and the International Baccalaureate Program. Parents and students with questions about this process should contact Mary Gauthier in the Centre for Learning office. We request that parents send the psychologist a list of the tests and measures required by the International Baccalaureate and the College Board. This avoids the school requesting re-testing and clearly sets the dates for re-evaluation as determined by the International Baccalaureate and the College Board. Please contact the Executive Director to request this document. Details outlining what an educational evaluation involves, what the school does with the information, testing accommodations by grade level and applications for accommodations to the IB and the College Board are included in the chart for Educational Evaluations on pages 72 and 73.

PEER TUTORING Peer tutoring is an organized program at UCC supervised by the Centre for Learning. Students from any grade in need of academic support in any subject area are welcome to seek assistance through the program. Trained IB1 and IB2 tutors, most of whom are Prefect Candidates, as well as some Foundation Year tutors, work alongside staff from the Centre for Learning in providing this peer academic support. Tutoring sessions occur on weekday mornings from 7:30 a.m. to 8:15 a.m., during lunches or after school. Students from any grade are able to book appointments with tutors at mutually convenient times. For more information, contact Jody McLean in the Centre for Learning at ext. 2243 or email jmclean@ucc.on.ca.

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THE WERNHAM WEST CENTRE FOR LEARNING section 3

Procedures for Receiving, Processing and Documenting a Student’s Professional Educational Evaluation Director: Mary Gauthier, Division Coordinators: Primary – Tina Jagdeo, Middle – Kathryn Barnes, IDiv – Mary Gauthier, Senior – Jody McLean

Educational Evaluation Recommendations The Centre for Learning (CFL) coordinates all aspects of the educational evaluation process.

Parent gives the Educational Evaluation to a teacher, counsellor or other school employee.

Educational Evaluation is sent to the Main Office or the Centre for Learning.

Educational Evaluation is mailed or emailed to the School.

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PERMISSION Director of the CFL is informed that an Educational Evaluation has been submitted. Parents are asked to sign a release to have a One Page Report written (Prep) or send permission via email to do so (Upper).

THE ONE PAGE REPORT (OPR) The OPR is written. Parents are invited to meet with The CFL and the boy’s form teacher or adviser, and if necessary the boy’s teachers. Parents or the school may wish to have the evaluator present. The OPR will be reviewed and other input and suggestions for the report will be welcomed. The OPR will: 1. Clearly state if there are required accommodations. 2. Outline the student’s learning strengths, areas of need and suggestions for teachers and the student. 3. Includes student’s academic goals. 4. Includes subject-specific strategies from teachers and an adviser comment. 5. The OPR will be reviewed with Intermediate and Senior Division students, and when appropriate with Primary and Middle Division students.

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COUNSELLORS, HOUSE ADVISERS AND FORM TEACHERS/ADVISERS, TEACHERS, STUDENTS AND PARENTS 1. Counsellors, house advisers and form teachers/advisers, teachers and Parents (and when appropriate the student) will be responsible for reading the OPR. Digital copies of the OPR are in Student Tracking and a hard copy in the Centres for Learning. 2. Required accommodations must be met and the CFL staff will help arrange if necessary. 3. Teachers are encouraged to work with the CFL as effective and appropriate classroom strategies are developed. 4. Students will be encouraged to follow the list of recommendations to the best of their ability and with CFL support. 5. Parents are encouraged to work with the school and support the recommendations outlined in the OPR.

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Curricular Program

THE WERNHAM WEST CENTRE FOR LEARNING 1. The Coordinators for each division submit new/revised OPR’s to be reviewed by the Director. 2. The CFL Coordinators will work closely with the Student, Counsellor, house adviser, form teachers/ adviser, teachers and Parents­and in keeping with the academic standards of UCC and the IB Program. 3. The OPR will be updated annually. 4. A list of students with a OPR is online for teachers in addition to a digital copy of the OPR in Student Tracking. 5. Copies of the OPR are filed in the CFL. 6. Parents will be notified by letter when a new or updated educational evaluation is needed; once three to four years have passed or for external accommodations such as the College Board and the IB.

TESTING AND EXAM ACCOMMODATIONS 1. The CFL will provide testing accommodations for all tests and exams. Laptops provided in the CFL do not have internet/network access. 2. The CFL requires two weeks to review and process new educational evaluations. This includes the two weeks prior to exams. 3. Although teachers may have accommodation ET/LT in the classroom, any student with testing accommodations may request to write in the CFL. 4. Students needing highly individualized accommodations (i.e. scribe or oral testing) will have this clearly indicated on their OPR and should come to the CFL for test. The CFL will meet the needs of highly individualized accommodations to the best of its ability. It is likely there will be an additional cost for supervision of exams or some tests, where the CFL is unable to accommodate. Parents will be notified of additional fees. 5. For students with ET/LT accommodations, the extra time is 50 per cent until March of their IB year, at which time it decreases to 25 per cent in preparation and in keeping with the IB standards. If 50 per cent extra time is still needed after March, an additional application must be made to the IB for approval. 6. Extended time and use of a paper dictionary for ELL students is determined by entry year and will be documented and clearly communicated to each student. 7. Any accommodations approved at UCC are usually, but not necessarily, approved by the College Board or the IB.

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PROFESSIONAL TUTORING PROGRAM AND PROCEDURES The Centre for Learning staff plans and provides programs and support for achieving and maintaining academic success. This is done through a variety of programs for all boys, professional development for faculty, and programs for parents. We will also meet with any member of the UCC community to discuss and help individual boys develop study strategies. There are no fees for any of these supports. In addition, and for an hourly fee that is communicated through the Centre for Learning, tutoring can be arranged. Individualized content or academic coaching, ELL (English Language Learners/Upper School) and specialized reading tutoring (Preparatory School) must be arranged through the Centre for Learning at both the Preparatory and Upper Schools if it is determined that arranging a tutor is in the student’s best interest. ALL tutoring on the Upper Canada College campus must be arranged through the Centre for Learning. All tutors who tutor at UCC must agree to only tutor on the Upper Canada College campus during the hours of: 7:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Fridays and 12:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. on Sundays (for Boarders only)

1. Hiring Tutors: All tutors must submit a résumé, a recent police background check and be interviewed by the Director of the Centre. Prior to tutoring students, the Director of the Centre for Learning will review all standards and procedures in the areas of communication and working with students. Tutors may be UCC faculty, although they may not tutor any student whom they are presently teaching and the times they tutor may not conflict with times they must be available to meet with the students they teach. UCC faculty may not provide admissions tutoring for students applying to UCC.

2. Arranging a Tutor: Requests for a tutor should be directed to Julia Rosefield at extension 2242. Requests for

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a tutor may be made by a parent, student, subject teacher or the student’s Form Master/ house adviser. The following questions will be asked: • Are the Form Master/house adviser and subject teacher aware of the request? • Is the student fulfilling his responsibility, i.e. completing homework and assignments?

Curricular Program

• Is the student aware of and investigating other supports available within the school, i.e. attending help sessions, meeting with a member of the Centre for Learning staff, or arranging a peer tutor? In the case of ELL and specialized reading support, all students will meet with a member of Centre for Learning staff to determine the type and extent of support needed. • Is the parent aware that a tutoring fee will be billed to their UCC account?

3. Tutor Responsibilities: • Arrange times to meet the student on the UCC campus and notify the Centre for Learning about arrangements. • Follow all “Professional Boundaries Guidelines” as determined by Upper Canada College. • Tutoring is to take place in an available classroom (with the door open or a room that has an uncovered window in the door) in the Intermediate Division, the iDiv lounge or Senior Division CFL until 5:00 p.m. or in the Student Centre during any of the above noted times. • Submit a monthly summary of the student’s progress to the Centre for Learning, which can be made available to the Form Master/house adviser, subject teacher and the parent. • Ensure that tutoring is focused on content understanding and skill building but does not involve correcting or doing work for the student. This is especially true for assignments. For example, student writing may be edited but the tutor may not write corrections or new phrasing for the student.

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• Support and reflect the classroom teacher’s goals and objectives through direct communication with the subject teacher prior to the initial tutoring session and on an ongoing basis. • Reflect an understanding of the individual learning needs of the student during tutoring sessions. • Follow all contractual agreements

4. Student Responsibilities: • Continue to meet classroom expectations. • Be prompt. • Notify the tutor if unable to attend a session. Students will be billed for sessions they have failed to cancel within 24 hours of a scheduled session.

5. Centre for Learning Responsibilities: • Assist the tutor in individualizing instruction for the student. • Arrange for each tutor to have a professional development session where expectations and procedures for tutoring is reviewed. • Have textbooks and course syllabi available.

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Section 4: Co-curricular Program section 4

Upper Canada College offers a wide range of co-curricular activities and programs to help students develop new skills, undertake new challenges and cultivate character. Whether it is through competitive sports, performing arts or community service, UCC’s co-curricular program aims to ignite curiosity and prepare students for life outside the classroom.

THE IDIV COMMUNITY SERVICE PROGRAM Co-curricular Program

The iDiv Community Service Program at UCC aims to engage students in community service projects throughout the school year and to help them become more aware of short- and long-term volunteer opportunities in their community. The purpose of this program is to promote student learning about social responsibility and the obligation to pay into their community through service. In Ontario, all secondary students are obligated to complete 40 hours of community involvement. The guiding framework for the iDiv Community Service Program is based on this Ontario Ministry of Education requirement. Although the 40 hours of community involvement may be completed at any time during a student’s secondary schooling, students at UCC are encouraged to fulfill this requirement before the end of their Foundation Year.

THE CAS PROGRAM: A NEW DIRECTION One of the most important characteristics of the UCC community is active citizenship. UCC encourages students, and all community members, to be creative, active and serviceoriented. We believe it builds a responsible, resilient community and a healthy learning environment. The CAS Program at UCC is designed to promote active citizenship and to help IB1 and IB2 students draw wisdom from their own experience. According to the IB CAS Guide for 2010 and onwards, the three strands of CAS should be interpreted broadly:

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Creativity includes a wide range of arts activities as well as the creativity students demonstrate in designing and implementing service projects. Action includes not only participation in individual and team sports, but also taking part in expeditions and in local or international projects. Service encompasses a host of community and social service activities. Some examples include helping children with special needs, visiting hospitals and working with refugees or homeless people.

Although the IB CAS requirement is assessed internally through reflection and reporting, students must show evidence that they have fulfilled eight CAS learning outcomes to complete the CAS Program.

LEARNING OUTCOMES OF THE CAS PROGRAM The CAS Program aims to develop students who are reflective thinkers, who understand their own strengths and limitations, who are willing to initiate and accept new challenges and who are aware of their responsibilities to serve others. In order to achieve these goals, students must undertake a purposeful approach to CAS and show evidence that they have met the eight learning outcomes prescribed by IB. This is consistent with our support of Carol Dweck’s growth mindset concept — an open-mindedness to improvement through dedicated effort. The eight learning outcomes of CAS are as follows:

1. Increased your awareness of your own strengths and areas for growth They are able to see themselves as individuals with various skills and abilities, some more developed than others, and understand that they can make choices about how they wish to move forward. 2. Undertaken new challenges A new challenge may be an unfamiliar activity, or an extension to an existing one.

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3. Planned and initiated activities Planning and initiation will often be in collaboration with others. It can be shown in activities that are part of larger projects, including ongoing school activities in the local community and small student-led activities. 4. Worked collaboratively with others Collaboration can be shown in many different activities, such as team sports, playing music in a band, or helping in a kindergarten. At least one project, involving collaboration and the integration of at least two of creativity, action and service, is required.

Co-curricular Program

5. Shown perseverance and commitment in your activities At a minimum, this implies attending regularly and accepting a share of the responsibility for dealing with problems that arise in the course of activities. 6. Engaged with issues of global importance Students may be involved in international projects, but there are many global issues that can be acted upon locally or nationally (for example: environmental concerns, caring for the elderly). 7. Considered the ethical implications of your actions Ethical decisions arise in almost any CAS activity (for example: on the sports field, in musical composition, in relationships with others involved in service activities). Evidence of thinking about ethical issues can be shown in various ways, including journal entries and conversations with CAS advisers. 8. Developed new skills As with new challenges, new skills may be shown in activities that the student has not previously undertaken, or in increased expertise in an established area. In order to help students meet these eight learning outcomes, UCC requires students to be engaged in a variety of co-curricular activities. At a minimum, all IB students must participate in at least three Individual CAS Activities that are challenging to them personally, help develop new skills and include a variety of creativity, action and service.

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By the end of the IB program, each student must be able to demonstrate that they have been challenged and developed a new skill in at least one Creativity, one Action and one Service Activity. Eligible Individual CAS Activities are relative to each individual’s strengths and weaknesses, but may include: • Increasing flexibility, strength and stamina • Bollywood dancing • Musical performance • Public speaking • Rock climbing In addition to Individual CAS Activities, IB students are required to show evidence of planning, initiation and collaboration. As a result, IB students must participate in at least one Collaborative CAS Activity per year (IB1 and IB2) that demonstrates a student’s ability to plan and initiate in collaboration with others. Eligible Collaborative CAS Activities might include: • Getting people together from Wedd’s and BSS and running a car wash • Bowling as a class with autistic children from the TDSB • Getting the Art and Architecture Club together and painting with seniors • Getting the hockey team together and teaching disadvantaged youths how to skate • Singing with The Blue Notes at a local seniors’ home In addition to Individual and Collaborative CAS Activities, each member of the UCC IB community must participate in at least one Extended CAS Project lasting, at a minimum, three months in duration. The Extended CAS Project must be focused on community service and show evidence that the individual has displayed perseverance, commitment, engagement with an issue of global importance and considered the ethical implications of their actions. Suggested Extended CAS Project themes might include: • Local investments in education • Advancing democratic governance • Ensuring environmental sustainability • Improvements to human health and dignity • Engagement in and promoting the arts

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• Alleviation of poverty and hunger • Opening doors of opportunity to disadvantaged youths and persons The guideline for the minimum amount of CAS activity is approximately the equivalent of half a day per school week (three to four hours per week), or approximately 150 hours in total, with a reasonable balance between creativity, action and service. “Hour counting,” however, is not encouraged.

INTERNATIONAL CAS TRIPS

Co-curricular Program

International CAS Trips are extensions, or unique enhancements, to any student’s Extended CAS Project. Students interested in participating in an International CAS Trip must show evidence of self-efficacy and motivation and be involved in the planning and initiation of the trip. Accordingly, any students interested in participating on an International CAS Trip are encouraged to meet with UCC’s Director of CAS to discuss their Extended CAS Project and their International CAS Trip proposal.

REFLECTIONS AND REPORTING The most important component of the CAS Program is the requirement to develop reflections and report CAS experiences to the Director of CAS. Students are required to keep records of their activities and show evidence of achievement through reflection and completion signatures by CAS advisers. The fundamentals of reflection consist of an evaluation of how the “planned” activity was “experienced” and what, if any, “learning” was gleaned from the activity. There is no prescribed method of reflection and a variety of methods are encouraged, such as facilitated discussions, scrapbooks, photo essays, blogs, websites, videos and journals. The method should complement the nature of the activity being carried out. For example, an appropriate style of reflection for a mountain bike activity might be recording a ride or challenging move with a goPro camera and then narrating a personal reflection on top of the footage. As part of the reflection process, there should be evidence that students see themselves as individuals with various skills and abilities, some more developed than others, and understand that they can make choices about how they wish to move forward.

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THE DUKE OF EDINBURGH’S AWARD PROGRAM Students aged 14 and older are eligible to participate in the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Program, which is composed of community service, skill development, physical recreation and adventurous journey requirements. Participation in this youth award program is well-recognized internationally and students are recognized for their achievements with bronze, silver and gold awards. It should be noted that the “Duke of Ed” is an international youth award program promoted within UCC, but facilitated and assessed by external representatives. Although UCC encourages students to register in the Duke of Ed program, it is not mandatory and UCC does not organize any specific “Duke of Ed” program. While a number of the co-curricular activities offered at UCC can be used to fulfill the “Duke of Ed” requirements, students who enroll in the program are encouraged to be self-motivated and display a strong sense of self-efficacy in fulfilling the requirements of the award.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT EXCHANGES It is part of the intention of the IB program to have students who have a more “worldly” view of things and to develop fully rounded people. One method for obtaining this “worldly” view is to participate on an international student exchange. In the past, UCC has offered the following exchange opportunities: • Y2–FY students: Australia, in exchange with Trinity Grammar School • FY and IB1 students: South Africa and Costa Rica In all exchanges above, the visiting school will be here during October–December or January–February of the school year, and we will go there in the following July–August.

HONOURING The College recognizes and honours students who have had a deep, broad and meaningful Community Service and CAS Program. A listing of these awards can be found in the CAS Office. In addition to UCC co-curricular awards, students are also eligible to be nominated for The Lieutenant Governor’s Community Volunteer Award and the Duke of Edinburgh’s

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Bronze, Silver and Gold Awards. The Lieutenant Governor’s Community Volunteer Award pays tribute to students who not only complete the required number of volunteer hours to graduate, but who go above and beyond. Each year, an award is given to one graduating student at each of Ontario’s secondary schools. In addition, UCC students are eligible for Bronze, Silver and Gold awards in the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Program. Students completing the requirements for these levels will be recognized in Assembly and in the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award ceremonies at Queen’s Park. Those who have achieved the Gold award receive it from Prince Philip or another member of the Royal family in ceremonies in various locations in Ontario.

CAS FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS Co-curricular Program

1. What does CAS stand for? C = Creativity A = Action S = Service

2. Do I have to fully complete CAS in order to receive my IB Diploma? YES. The CAS Program is a mandatory requirement for the IB Diploma and has a similar position in the Diploma program as ToK and the Extended Essay. 3. Do I have to meet all of the outcomes? YES. You must meet all of the eight outcomes in order to complete CAS. 4. Do I have to have 50 hours in each category? Achieving the “outcomes” and being able to reflect on them meaningfully has greater emphasis than hours. The expectation is that IB students stay involved in the CAS Program for 18 months, or approximately a minimum of 150 total CAS hours, that are evenly balanced between C, A and S.

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5. I participated in C, A and S activities during the summer before IB1. Can I use these for CAS? For FY students entering IB1 in September 2012 and beyond, the IB now insists that CAS must be from “Day 1 of the Diploma program.” That means we can only start the CAS Program from September of IB1. 6. Do I have to complete a reflection for each activity? NO. You must complete a reflection for each learning outcome. If you carry out a number of skill development activities, one reflection that covers all aspects of those skills can be done rather than one reflection per skill development activity. 7. Are we only allowed to submit written reflections for CAS activities? NO. Students can choose to reflect through pictures, videos, blogs, etc. Again, you must complete a reflection that addresses each of the outcomes selected. 8. Students are expected to be involved in the CAS Program consistently over the two years of IB1 and IB2. The IB calls this “concurrency of learning.” What does consistent mean? The IB recommends that students be involved in CAS activities for approximately three to four hours per week over the two years. One-day events are acceptable but they should not make up all of the hours. Students should be spending time with people, building relationships, working towards a goal, etc. 9. Do taking different kinds of classes at a fitness place count for Action? If you have someone that can sign off that you consistently attended these classes, then yes, it can count. However, committing to a program is preferred. 10. What does coaching count for? It depends on what you did. If you were a volunteer, you were active with the athletes, and you planned the practices and activities (using your creativity), it can count as all three — another example of an excellent CAS project! It does not count if you are paid. 11. Can my parents be “supervisors” of an activity? The IB does not allow parents or relatives to act as supervisors of CAS activities.

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12. Do religious activities count towards CAS? The IB is very clear about this. If the activity has to do with religious devotion, education or proselytizing, then it cannot count towards CAS. If however you are performing secular activities through your church, synagogue, mosque, etc. (e.g. out of the cold programs, fundraising for homeless, etc.) then it does count.

CREATIVITY (MUSIC, PUBLICATIONS, THEATRE, FILM, CLUBS PROGRAM) The Creativity section includes music, arts, theatre, student publications, films and the majority of the UCC Clubs. Co-curricular Program

MUSIC Music courses, private lessons and regular individual practice combine to help students grow toward mastery of their instruments. The use of these skills culminates in the ensemble program. The discipline of ensemble playing (“working together” to make music) is a valuable life skill. The large ensembles rehearse throughout the school year, appear at festivals and competitions, and perform frequently for the school and community. Students who perform in the Jazz Ensemble or Stage Band must also play in either the Symphonic Band or Wind Ensemble. All groups demand serious commitment and full attendance so that high standards of performance are maintained.

UCC Blue Notes – Conductor Peter Merrick The UCC Blue Notes are open to all students in the Upper School, by audition. They perform a widely varied repertoire, both as a male-voice chorus, in various mixed-voice settings with choirs from girls’ schools, and in an annual appearance at the Independent Schools Music Festival at Roy Thomson Hall. The singers rehearse during the lunch hour on Tuesdays and Thursdays. String Ensemble – Conductor Kathryn Brookes/Tony Gomes The String Ensemble is open to all students who play violin, viola, cello or double bass.

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The String Ensemble performs frequently throughout the year. Rehearsals are on Wednesdays and Fridays during the lunch hour.

Wind Ensemble – Conductor Tony Gomes The Wind Ensemble is the senior instrumental ensemble at Upper Canada College comprised of students from FY to IB2. It uses a smaller instrumentation that places greater demands on individual performers. New students who wish to audition for this ensemble may do so in the first week of the fall term. The Wind Ensemble performs at school functions, Music Night and at Music Fest Canada. The full ensemble rehearses twice a week on Mondays from 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. and on Thursdays from 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Symphonic Band – Conductor Peter Smith The Symphonic Band is open to students sufficiently advanced to play with confidence in a large group setting. While this band is largely composed of students in Year 2 and Foundation Year, students in IB1 and IB2 are also welcome. Students perform at school functions and Music Night, along with Music Fest and Kiwanis. The band rehearses on Tuesday and Thursday mornings at 7:30 a.m. Concert Band – Conductor Ashley Scott The Concert Band is open and designed to develop performance skills at the Year 1 level. Students perform a variety of works that range from marches to popular arrangements. Students perform at school functions and Music Night, along with Music Fest and Kiwanis. The ensemble rehearses on Tuesday and Thursday mornings from 7:30 a.m. to 8:25 a.m. Jazz Ensemble – Peter Smith The Jazz Ensemble is the senior jazz group at the College. Open auditions are held early in September. Members must also perform in one of the larger ensembles or the UCC Blue Notes. Students perform a variety of works that range from ballads to swing and rock charts. Students perform at school functions, along with Music Fest at the Oshawa Motor City Jazz Festival. Their final performance at Jazz Night in April is a fundraising concert

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that features a number of ensemble soloists and community guests. The Jazz Ensemble rehearses on Tuesday evenings from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Intermediate Stage Band – Tony Gomes The Stage Band is open and designed to develop performance skills that include jazz improvisation at the Year 2 and FY levels. Students are asked to audition for all positions. Students perform a variety of works that range from ballads to swing and rock charts. Students perform at school functions, along with Music Fest at the Oshawa Motor City Jazz Festival. The Intermediate Stage Band rehearses on Wednesday mornings from 8:00 a.m. to 9:20 a.m.

Co-curricular Program

Junior Stage Band – Ashley Scott The Junior Stage Band is open and designed to develop performance skills that include jazz improvisation at the Year 1 level. Students perform a variety of works that range from ballads to swing and rock charts. Students perform at school functions, along with Music Fest at the Oshawa Motor City Jazz Festival. The Junior Stage Band rehearses on Wednesday mornings from 8:00 a.m. to 9:20 a.m.

PUBLICATIONS Blazer This humour magazine addresses school issues and current events in an often silly, irreverent, unsentimental and, before anything else, funny manner. The club meets by arrangement. Publishes in Convergence. Student staff meets regularly with the editor, who reports to a faculty adviser. Blue Page The Blue Page prints students’ points of view (POV) on a variety of school topics. The POVs are often outspoken but always sincere in their convictions. The short entries stimulate discussion about school issues. Editors (usually IB1 or IB2 students with junior editors from FY or IB1) and contributors meet under the supervision of a faculty adviser. Student contributions should be sent directly to the student editors.

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College Times The College’s yearbook is an undertaking in student journalism of great magnitude involving student editors, photographers and a faculty adviser. The yearbook is a 200-pluspage production in full colour. As Canada’s oldest student publication, past editors have included prominent Canadians such as Robertson Davies and Michael Ignatieff. We welcome a group of students to work on the book who are interested in developing their interests and skills in the following areas: team management, editorial and copy work, graphic design and photography. Convergence Convergence is the student-run monthly newspaper/magazine of the Upper School. As the “journal of record” for UCC, Convergence covers the life of the school and offers student reporters opportunities to investigate local, national and international news stories, as well as to report on events within the school. Convergence welcomes contributors who like to write reviews, comments and editorials as well as designers and photographers. Convergence usually publishes on Monday. General staff meetings are held during Monday lunch in Room 235. All students are welcome to attend our Monday meetings or to write to Convergence at convergence@ucc.on.ca.

THEATRE The co-curricular Theatre program is co-educational, run in conjunction with the nearby Bishop Strachan School. The program offers a range of opportunities to boys from Year 1 through IB2: as actors; set, stage, costume, lighting and sound designers; graphic designers; stage managers; directors; business managers; and in other roles. The 2014-15 year will include theatre from different periods and genres, including classical and contemporary plays. Student-directed plays are also a feature of the program, which includes the Graduate Internship, in which an old boy is invited to direct a show in the program. Students also have opportunities to work with theatre professionals. Faculty from UCC and BSS are involved in the shows, but the program seeks to offer students as many responsibilities and opportunities to learn as possible. The program is headed by a Director and Technical Director who oversee all dimensions of it. Contact Dr. Churchward at dchurchward@ucc.on.ca if you have any questions.

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FILM

Co-curricular Program

College Film College Film is both a UCC club and a professionally equipped multimedia facility. The club is based on a mentorship model and relies on experienced students and Old Boys working with new members. It has a dual mandate: to provide all students with access to training and equipment; and to act as a launching pad for those specifically interested in attending film school and pursuing a career in the industry. College Film serves as an extension of the curricular film program and as an independent co-curricular program in its own right. Last year saw the production of spoofs, theatrical trailers, assembly videos and sports reels. “Graduates” of College Film have been accepted by film schools at USC, NYU, Ryerson, Queen’s and Concordia.

CLUBS PROGRAM The following listing of clubs is organized into the three categories of CAS (Creativity, Action and Service):

Creativity Clubs Application Development Club Art and Architecture Club Blue and White Club Blue Army Drumline Blues TV Booth AV Crew Chess CHOQ FM 105.1 Classics Club Classic Film Cooking Club Computer Club Creative Writing

Debating Society and Public Speaking DECA (Business Competitions) Duke of Edinburgh Club eSports Club Engineering Club

Improv Club International Club International Languages Committee Investment Club Junior Programming Club

Flickophiles Club

Knitting Club

Gay/Straight Alliance (GSA) Green School Club

Library Club

Healthy Living Club Healthy Relationships Committee History Club

Mahjong Mathematics Society Media Association Club Model United Nations

(clubs program continued)

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Creativity Clubs Ontario Model Parliament (OMP)

Quiddity

Peer Tutoring Photography Poetry Prep Peer Mentoring

Random Acts of Kindness Club Robotics Club Role Playing & Strategy Games Club

Society of American Baseball Research (SABR) Science Club Scrabble Club World Affairs Conference (WAC) World Wildlife Fund (WWF)

Action Clubs Outdoors Club

Fencing

Strength and Fitness Club

Breakdance Club

Judo Club

Table Tennis Club

Club Meditation

Mountain Biking

Service Clubs Best Buddies

Free the Children Club

Community Service Council

Junior Achievement Club

Entrepreneurial Service Club

Key Club

North Korean Human Rights Club (NKHRC) Soccer Buddies UNICEF

GREEN SCHOOL INITIATIVE At Upper Canada College, we strive to inspire students to demonstrate exemplary character, including how they interact with their environment. This is why, in 2002, we formed UCC Green School — our commitment to transforming UCC into a “Green School for the 21st Century.” By inspiring students through our example and a “learning it by living it” approach to sustainable development, our boys will better learn how to live and work in a more sustainable way.

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Changes implemented under the Green School Initiative include an idling ban for cars in the College driveways, the composting of food waste, and motion-sensitive lighting, which turns on only when someone enters a room. Our new arena is a model of sustainable LEED building practices and includes amenities such as waterless urinals, geothermal heating and solar panels. The buildings and operations of The Norval Outdoor School have long reflected many of these same approaches. Our goal is to maximize sustainable practices so that we can better meet the needs of current generations without compromising the ability of future generations to meet theirs. In the process of doing this, we integrate environmental, social equity and economic considerations in our decisions and actions.

THE GREEN SCHOOL PRINCIPLES Co-curricular Program

“Learning it by living it” is the essence of experiential education. As such, these principles will encourage environmental awareness and responsibility at UCC.

1. Harmoniously integrate the UCC community with its natural environment • Use the campus as a learning grounds, including learning in outdoors spaces • Ensure new and existing buildings “work” in sustainable ways • Rely more on renewable energy, promote energy conservation, reduce our dependence on fossil fuels, eliminate waste and “renaturalize” air and water

2. Reflect on how we conduct ourselves as an organization • Students’ and employees’ environmental awareness will be enhanced when they see and understand UCC’s day-to-day green practices such as reducing our use of water, paper and energy. Facilities function in a sustainable manner throughout both the Deer Park and Norval campuses.

3. Consider all aspects of value and cost, in both the long term and the short term: environmental, social, fiscal and material 4. Strive for continual improvement in our demonstrations of environmental responsibility • Think differently and boldly

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• Strive to accomplish what has not yet been achieved within the curriculum, daily practices and the nature of the physical plant • Recognize that this will be a continuous process, involving the whole UCC community

5. Private school, public purpose • Demonstrate leadership by being a model for others. Our knowledge and actions must be shared with those beyond our immediate community.

HORIZONS Horizons is a learning partnership program that permits the College to share its resources, strengths and capabilities with the larger community. Horizons is a truly reciprocal program. While providing academic tutoring, sports, music and an innovative summer school for students from Toronto inner-city schools, Horizons provides UCC boys with additional opportunities for personal growth. Upper School boys have the opportunity to tutor and coach younger students and along the way develop leadership skills. Boys commonly report that their involvement in Horizons as tutors, coaches, tutor leaders and program initiators is a highlight of their week. They find the experience engaging, challenging and meaningful.

ACADEMIC TUTORING The year-round tutoring program sees Upper School boys assisting students from innercity schools with academic skills. Every September, boys sign up to become part of a tutor team. This team partners with a classroom of students and their teacher. Each team has a tutor leader and faculty/staff supervisor. Each class of students is supervised by their classroom teacher. This provides a unique opportunity for on-site training in teaching and learning. Tutors receive training, focusing on strategies that help students “learn to read” and “read to learn,” build self-confidence and improve skills in mathematics and essay writing. Classroom teachers and site supervisors collaborate in preparing the work for students. Tutoring takes place both before and after school at UCC or partner schools.

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LEADERSHIP THROUGH SPORTS UCC student coaches work with their partner schools and local community centres to help young athletes develop skills in ice hockey, lacrosse and soccer. This provides an invaluable mentoring and leadership experience.

MUSIC/ARTS/MEDIA UCC students share their love of music with budding musicians. Tutors also offer their expertise in digital media and the arts.

HORIZONS DEBATING Co-curricular Program

A new initiative is the introduction of the Horizons Debating program. UCC tutors have developed workshops to guide and instruct students from our partner schools in public speaking and debating skills.

HORIZONS SUMMER SCHOOL The Horizons Summer School program supports academically talented, highly motivated inner-city students over a three-year period, from Grades 7 to 9. Approximately 150 students attend each summer and are supported by tutor leaders, classroom teachers and programming consultants. Students also participate in arts, sports, creative writing and drama options. Integral to the program is a focus on student leadership to help students with their transition into secondary school.

GRADUATES PROGRAM Summer School graduates receive ongoing support to prepare for post-secondary education. Graduates meet regularly for discussions and workshops on topics including time management, essay writing, public speaking and job interview skills.

HORIZONS PARENT VOLUNTEER PROGRAM UCC parent volunteers play an integral role in the program’s success. They volunteer at many of our public school partners during the school year. They also arrange winter clothing and sports equipment drives.

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ATHLETICS The College is committed to providing a competitive and healthy athletic experience for all boys. With one of the largest high school athletic programs in Canada, UCC offers numerous individual and team interscholastic competitive opportunities. The College’s athletes are expected to compete with honesty, integrity and respect for their opponents and game officials. This comes with the expectation that boys and their families alike are to make a full commitment to their particular athletic endeavours while competing for UCC on representative school teams. Full attendance at all practices and games is expected of all student athletes. UCC competes in the Conference of Independent Schools Athletic Association (CISAA). With some 40 member schools, the CISAA is one of the most competitive high school organizations in Ontario. Success in the CISAA can lead to individuals and teams competing in the Ontario Federation of Secondary Schools Athletic Associations (OFSAA), the body that governs all Ontario provincial championships. As boys develop athletically in their high school years, our program strives to foster their skill development, a healthy competitive spirit and, most importantly, their character. Representing UCC against other CISAA and OFSAA schools is a privilege and should be viewed as such by both the boys and their parents.

ATHLETICS PROGRAM 2014–2015 Fall 2014 Cross-Country

JV Soccer

Varsity Volleyball

Varsity Football

U16A Soccer

U16 Volleyball

JV Football

U16B Soccer

U14 Volleyball

Varsity Soccer

U14 Soccer

Year 1 & 2 Intramurals Senior House Soccer

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Winter 2015 Varsity Hockey

U16A Basketball

U14 Squash

JV Hockey

U16B Basketball

Varsity Swimming

U16A Hockey

U14 Basketball

U16 Swimming

U16B Hockey

Rowing Dryland Training

U14 Swimming

U14 Hockey

Varsity Squash

House Hockey

Varsity Basketball

U16 Squash

Junior House Soccer

Varsity Cricket

Golf

U14 Tennis

Varsity Rugby

Varsity Lacrosse

Varsity Badminton

JV Rugby

U14 Lacrosse

U16 Badminton

U14 Rugby

Rowing

U14 Badminton

Varsity Baseball

Varsity Tennis

Track & Field

U14 Softball

U16 Tennis

House Softball

Co-curricular Program

Spring 2015

SPORTSMANSHIP IN ATHLETICS Upper Canada College and all member schools of the Conference of Independent Schools Athletic Association uphold the values of the Positive Coaching Alliance and strive to “Honour the Game.” To do so we go to the “ROOTS” of the game. The following is excerpted from the Positive Coaching Alliance resources. Each letter in ROOTS stands for an important part of the game that we must respect. The R stands for Rules. The first O is for Opponents. The next O is for Officials. T is for Teammates, and the S is for Self.

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ROOTS R is for Rules

The rules of soccer ensure the game is fair. Respect for the rules is important, even when it’s possible to break them without getting caught. Breaking the rules dishonours the game, even if it means that we win.

O is for Opponents

Without opponents, we could have no game and a good opponent makes us do our best. Respect your opponents, and remember they are out there to have fun just like us.

O is for Officials

It is very important to respect officials. Officials are not perfect (just like coaches, athletes and parents!) and sometimes make mistakes. However, there is no excuse for treating officials with disrespect when they make errors. We show respect for officials, even when you disagree with the call.

T is for Teammates

A big part of the game is the team. Being with your teammates should be fun and it is important to learn to work together. We encourage and support each other on and off the playing field.

S is for Self

We honour the game no matter what the other team or its fans do because we set our own internal standards. And we live up to them.

HAZING AND INITIATIONS POLICY PURPOSE Upper Canada College is committed to providing a safe and orderly environment for all students that promotes respect, civility and dignity based on Our Shared Ideals. The

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purpose of the UCC Hazing and Initiations Policy is to create and preserve an educational environment free from any type of hazing or initiation activities that involve hazing. Hazing and initiation activities that involve hazing are abusive and, in some cases, illegal behaviours that harm victims and have a negative impact on the school environment by creating an atmosphere of fear, distrust and mean-spiritedness.

POLICY

Co-curricular Program

Upper Canada College strictly prohibits students from engaging individually or collectively in any form of hazing or related initiation activity on school property and in conjunction with any school activity, regardless of location. Any student who organizes, leads or participates in hazing or related initiation activities, or conspires to engage in hazing, will face serious disciplinary action, and the school organization, club or team may be subject to disciplinary sanction as described below.

DEFINITION Hazing or related initiation activity means the performance of rituals or ritualistic acts in order to earn one’s status in a group. The performance of these acts may or may not necessarily produce mental or physical harm or discomfort, embarrassment, harassment, ridicule, personal degradation or loss of dignity to any student. Consent is no defense of hazing — the implied or expressed consent of a person or persons to hazing shall not be a defense to discipline under this policy.

DUTY TO REPORT, INVESTIGATE AND RESPOND All members of the UCC community — staff, faculty, parents and students — have a duty to support the College in its goal of creating a safe and orderly environment that promotes respect, civility and dignity. Furthermore, they have a duty to report suspected or alleged incidents of hazing or initiation-related activities as prohibited by this policy. To protect and promote the dignity, safety and well-being of its students, and as directed by this policy, the College has a responsibility to investigate and, as appropriate, apply disciplinary action. The police may be involved. In some instances, the College has a duty to report incidents of abuse to provincial authorities under the Family Services Act.

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DISCIPLINARY ACTION The following discussion of disciplinary responses serves as a guideline only and does not limit the ability of the College to apply what disciplinary sanctions it determines to be appropriate in individual cases. At the discretion of the College, a student involved in organizing, leading or participating in hazing or initiation activities is liable to serious disciplinary action, including suspension or expulsion and to loss of school, leadership and membership privileges. Further, as appropriate, teams or organizations may be suspended from operation for a duration determined by the College. The police may be involved.

COMMUNICATION AND AFFIRMATION 1. The UCC Hazing and Initiations Policy will be printed in the Upper School Family Handbook and reviewed with students at the beginning of each academic year and at other times during the school year. 2. The policy will be reviewed with all faculty and staff involved in teams, student organizations, clubs and Houses at the beginning of each year. 3. As a condition of membership in a team or other activity, students will agree to and sign a commitment form affirming their understanding and acceptance of the UCC Hazing and Initiations Policy and other relevant school policies and expectations that may be determined.

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Section 5: Student Services/Advising section 5

THE HOUSE SYSTEM Central to the personal, community and academic programs of the Upper School is the House system. Every new student is assigned to one of 10 “Houses,” 10 groups containing students from all five grade levels. Two of these Houses are residential, and the remaining eight are for students who live at home. Each House is led by a student-elected IB2 student Head of House, a faculty senior house adviser, up to four IB2 student Prefects, and a team of six faculty and staff house advisers.

ADVISING

Student Services/Advising

Every UCC student is assigned to an adviser who provides individual academic, social and emotional support for each of his or her advisees. The adviser is also the liaison between the school and the home and is the main contact person for parents. The advising curriculum is comprised of formal and informal meetings and conversations that cover a wide variety of pertinent issues and timely topics of school life. In group Advising, the boys chat about issues (academic and otherwise) with their adviser and among themselves. On some days, there are assigned topics that may be the focus of group discussion and debate. This is often the case after a special speaker in Assembly, or a school event that has piqued particular interest. Advising group discussions are facilitated by the adviser and/or by students within the group. Over the course of a five-year career at the Upper School, a student will have at least three different advisers.

Year 1 Form Adviser In Year 1, the boys are divided into six Forms. Each of these Forms is managed by a Year 1 form adviser who is also one of the subject teachers for that Form. The Y1 boys see their adviser every school day.

Dave Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. Terry Denstedt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. Jeff Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. Gillian Levene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. Mike Mirkovich . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. Andrew McCubbin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext.

3328 3309 3320 3361 3372 3102

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THE SENIOR HOUSE ADVISER Year 2 students come under the care, guidance and support of the senior house adviser. Each week, the senior house adviser and the Year 2 boys in his or her House meet as a group on Tuesday and Thursday mornings.

THE HOUSE ADVISER When a student enters the Senior Division, the same kind of care and support is provided by the house adviser who will usually remain with him until he graduates. Each Senior Division student has two kinds of advising commitments: individual appointments with his adviser on a rotating basis throughout the year on Tuesday mornings, and group meetings with his adviser and the other students in his Advising Group on Thursday mornings, right after House meeting.

HOUSE MEETINGS In addition to the small-group Advisory meetings, all the boys in each Day House gather once a week, on Thursday morning, to review school and House matters. Different Houses have different traditions, but most House Meetings include some kind of celebration of student academic and co-curricular achievements, complemented by comic relief from short skits, games and presentations. Promotion of and planning for House social events and inter-House competitions also take place in these weekly House Meetings. Residential House Meetings run every night after dinner, Sunday through Thursday, inclusive.

MENTORING Every Y1 Day Boy is paired with an IB1 student from his House. The pairings are made by the senior house adviser after the Form 7/FY Norval Retreat the previous spring, with input from both sets of students. Aside from incidental daily contact, each Y1 boy meets formally with his IB1 mentor every Tuesday in the Fall Term as part of an Advising group under the supervision of the Y1 form adviser. Each brand new boy above Y1 is assigned two mentors (one boy from the same grade and one of the Prefects from his House) to help him adjust to College life.

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PREFECTS CUP One of the strongest binding forces within the school is inter-House competition. Various contests, academic and sporting events are run in every term in both Intermediate (Y1 and Y2) and Senior (FY, IB1 and IB2) Divisions. Points are awarded for participation and achievement in each of these competitions, and the top House at the end of the year is declared the Prefects Cup Champion.

HOUSE ADVISERS

Student Services/Advising

While speaking to a particular teacher is the best approach for subject-specific queries, the house adviser is the person to contact to discuss broader academic and/or co-curricular concerns about your son, or matters of a social or emotional nature. In addition to her/his work with the Y2 boys in her/his House, the senior house adviser is responsible for mentoring members of the advising team within the House, lending support in certain situations with specific students, parents and faculty, and for generally providing professional development and support. The Senior House Advisers Committee meets on a regular basis throughout the year to monitor the House System; review and improve school policies; plan programs and events; and discuss student support, student conduct and other concerns. The senior house adviser has primary responsibility for encouraging, nurturing and developing the community of the House through a range of House-based student programs and activities and for supporting student leadership in the House. All house advisers have responsibilities with respect to four groups within the College community. Students: The house adviser is responsible for getting to know each boy in his or her group as an individual; assisting in setting academic, co-curricular and personal goals and reviewing progress; advising about balancing academic and co-curricular commitments; responding to concerns and questions from or about the boy; and referring him, if necessary, to the appropriate College support service. Parents: The house adviser is responsible for responding to parent questions about their son’s progress, conduct and well-being; responding to questions about the College, its programs and support services; guiding parents, as required, to the appropriate College

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personnel; communicating concerns that the College may have about their son; and communicating formally through written House Advising comments. Faculty and Administration: The house adviser is responsible for responding to teachers’ concerns about the academic progress of his/her advisees, their social well-being, trends in negative behaviour and the like; initiating support plans for particular students in collaboration with other support services; and supporting and reinforcing College values, standards and expectations. House: The house adviser is responsible for assisting with the general management of the House; attending House Advisory, House Meetings and Assembly; attending house adviser team meetings; House on Duty commitments; and supporting and supervising House activities and social events.

BOARDING HOUSES

Seaton’s Senior House Adviser . . . . Gareth Evans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Amit Morris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. Wedd’s Senior House Adviser . . . . . Carl Beaudoin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mark Baxter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext.

4151 3174 4054 4094

DAY HOUSES

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Bremner’s Senior House Adviser . . . Charlotte Aust . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ext. Howard’s Senior House Adviser . . . . Bina Evans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. Jackson’s Senior House Adviser . . . Matt Griem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. Martland’s Senior House Adviser . . . Anne Kaye . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. McHugh’s Senior House Adviser . . . Reem Aweida-Parsons . . . . . . . . . ext. Mowbray’s Senior House Adviser . . . Mario Sturino . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. Orr’s Senior House Adviser . . . . . . . Deirdre Timusk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. Scadding’s Senior House Adviser . . . Reed Jeffrey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext.

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STUDENT LEADERSHIP There is a wide range of leadership opportunities in the academic, arts, athletic, cultural, current affairs, publications and clubs programs at the College. Boys are encouraged to explore as many of these as they like, with the sincere belief that they will find at least one that they love.

PREFECTS Prefects embody UCC’s core values and beliefs. The title of Prefect is a distinguished recognition that the College bestows for character and leadership at the House level. Prefects are fully engaged and vital members of the community who have maintained exemplary records of citizenship and have served as effective mentors and leaders throughout their years at UCC. Students apply for consideration to their senior house adviser during the winter term of IB1. Each House may appoint up to four Prefects each year. Each Prefect is bound by a signed statement of affirmation, roles and responsibilities until the end of his term of office, at graduation. For more information, contact the Dean of Students.

The Board of Stewards is the Student Governing Body at the College. It is chaired by the Head Steward and includes the Heads of Houses, as well as six Portfolio Stewards, who are responsible for the various areas of student life. The Board of Stewards is elected annually near the end of the winter term by the students and faculty, and each member of the board is bound by a signed statement of affirmation until the end of their term of office at graduation. The Stewards’ election process is governed by the Student Constitution of Upper Canada College, ratified by the Board and Administration in 2005.

Student Services/Advising

BOARD OF STEWARDS

BOARD OF STEWARDS 2014–2015

Head Steward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ben Mahon Academic Steward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tyler van der Velden Athletics Steward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tyler Burns Community Service Steward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alnur Kassim-Lakha Creativity Steward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David Cash

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Social Steward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seth Zucker Sustainability Steward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Sheehy Secretary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . James Lutz Treasurer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Emir Belkacem

HEADS OF HOUSES 2014–2015

Bremner’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David Chiodo Howard’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jeff Misner Jackson’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lucas Manucha Martland’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jameson Lobb McHugh’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Themi Babatsikos Mowbray’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ciaran Wilkie Orr’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jack Nolan Scadding’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew Sterling Seaton’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ali Haydaroglu Wedd’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Xu Zhang

HEALTH CENTRE

Nurses: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Avia Peacock, RN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. 2270 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cindy Lima Rivera, RN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. 2270

Founded in 1952, the “infirmary” at the Upper School, once a mini-hospital for convalescing boys, has evolved into a multi-faceted Health Centre addressing the individual needs of all of our students. Taking a holistic approach to the physical and emotional well-being of the boys, we have nurses, a School Counsellor, an Athletic Therapist and a doctor available and eager to address the challenges presented by some of our boys as they journey through the Upper School.

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OUR GOALS • To provide services that address the physical, emotional and mental health and safety of our students • To provide our boarding community with professional health care services • To create an atmosphere of acceptance and harm reduction; our doors are open to any student, with any problem, and all services are confidential • To work collaboratively as a team of health professionals and, as appropriate, with teachers, parents, students and administration to serve our students

THE RIGHTS OF OUR STUDENTS • The right to confidentiality • The right to make their own decisions • The right to accurate medical information • The right to ignore or reject our services altogether Student Services/Advising

Through in-class teaching, individual sessions, confidential support groups and the services of registered nurses, a School Counsellor, an Athletic Therapist and a doctor, we at the Health Centre do our very best to provide every boy who comes through our doors with the care he seeks and needs.

CONCUSSION PROTOCOL Please see Section 7.

SCHOOL COUNSELLOR The School Counsellor, Susan Boeckh, is available during school hours, Monday to Friday, in the Health Centre for confidential counselling. No appointment is necessary. The School Counsellor also assists house advisers, staff and parents in promoting the well-being of the students and advises as necessary on external referral and assessment. Telephone: 416-488-1125, ext. 2263.

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SUPPORT GROUPS Since 1993, teachers and Health Centre staff have led support groups for students. The groups are voluntary and confidential in nature, and are intended to provide a safe and caring environment in which students can support each other regarding issues in their lives. To date, groups have focused on the themes of substance abuse, changing families, grieving and motivation. A student’s participation in a support group is considered confidential and, while we encourage students to discuss their participation with their parents, in accordance with Ontario’s Child and Family Services Act, R.S.O. 1990, we neither seek nor require parental consent. Questions or concerns about the support group program should be directed to the Health Centre.

CONFIDENTIALITY We want to ensure we uphold the standards and guidelines of our profession in respecting confidentiality of our students. Beyond situations where we suspect harm to self or others, abuse (sexual or otherwise), or abuse of professional boundaries by other members of the faculty or staff towards a student, all visits to the Health Centre are held in the strictest confidence. This is communicated clearly to all students visiting the Health Centre.

WERNHAM WEST CENTRE FOR LEARNING Please see Section 3 for student learning support.

SPORTS INJURY CLINIC The College’s Sports Injury Clinic is located in the basement of the Upper School, Room 077. The clinic is open Monday to Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., and on Saturdays for UCC sports fixtures only. The clinic has full athletic rehabilitative facilities for the school’s athletes. Assessments and rehabilitation are undertaken by appointment only. The clinic is staffed by Head Athletic Therapist Sonya Pridmore, CAT(c), with assistance from two yearly athletic therapy co-op student therapists. The clinic’s extension is 2278.

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Section 6: Communication section 6

Communication

Consistent with our goal to develop responsible students, who are advocates for themselves, small, subject-specific concerns should be addressed directly by the student and his teacher. If the concern cannot be resolved at that level, a parent is invited to contact the teacher to discuss the matter further. The same is true for difficulties that may arise in the co-curricular programs of the College. In our experience, the vast majority of issues are successfully resolved in this direct manner, and set a great example for the boys of healthy working relationships. Academic and/or co-curricular problems that are more extensive — involving more than one subject, for example, or ones that are frequently recurring — should be taken to a student’s Form (Year 1 students) or house adviser, who will draw, as necessary, the student’s teachers and other staff with specialized knowledge and skills into the discussion. Students will inevitably face social or personal problems as well, and should feel just as comfortable confiding in their house advisers about these matters. If, however, they do not feel so inclined, then they should feel free to approach any other adult in the school with whom they do feel comfortable.

YEAR 1 FORM ADVISER Students in Year 1 are grouped in classes called Forms. A “homeroom” teacher or Y1 form adviser is the primary point of contact for information about your son’s academic and social growth at school. We encourage parents to initiate communication with Y1 form advisers whenever questions or concerns emerge. Y1 form advisers are responsible for keeping a general eye on students to ensure that they are comfortable and engaged in all aspects of school life. Y1 form advisers also liaise with parents, subject teachers, the Health Centre Staff, the School Counsellor, the Wernham West Centre for Learning and administrators, as needed. The Y1 form adviser meets briefly with his or her Form at the

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beginning (8:15 a.m.) and end (3:30 p.m.) of each day, providing regular opportunities for conversations with and organizational support for his or her advisees.

HOUSE ADVISER In Year 2, students in a particular House come under the oversight of the senior house adviser. The senior house adviser takes on the same role as the Y1 form adviser described earlier. The senior house adviser meets the advising group on Tuesday and Thursday mornings. Students in the Senior Division (FY, IB1 and IB2) are assigned to a specific house adviser for the balance of their time at the College (subject to staffing changes). While speaking to a particular teacher is the best approach for subject-specific queries, the house adviser is the person to contact to discuss broader academic and/or co-curricular concerns, or matters of a social or emotional nature. Senior Division students meet with their adviser on Tuesday and Thursday mornings.

UPPER SCHOOL ONLINE CALENDAR During the academic year, the Upper School calendar will be accessible online at www.ucc.on.ca. Please log in to Bluenet (top right-hand corner), the password-protected community portal, and click on Events or on the calendar icon on the scrolling navigation to the right for the most up-to-date version of the calendar. Please know that the calendar is continually updated, and we therefore recommend that students and parents consult it regularly. It will outline all programs or events that take place beyond the regular timetable. The weekly schedule, available to parents and students via email, describes the type of schedule each day and outlines the highlights of the week. Parents should remember that this is not a complete list of all Upper School events.

INTERMEDIATE AND SENIOR DIVISION HEADS UP Heads Up is the weekly parent electronic newsletter that arrives via email each Thursday from the last week in August until the end of school. Important and timely information

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about upcoming school events is communicated through this weekly broadcast, and it is our expectation that at least one adult in each family read this weekly. The Intermediate Heads Up includes upcoming dates, a message from Mr. Derek Poon, Head, Intermediate Division, and information about important events. The Senior Division Heads Up focuses on matters relating to Foundation Year–IB2, with a message from Mr. Scott Cowie, Head, Senior Division. The Future Ties section is prepared by Ms. Katherine Ridout and contains important information about all matters relating to University Counselling. The Boarding Life section, authored by Mr. Andrew Turner, keeps parents up to date on Boarding House events.

Email (FACULTY/STAFF) To email a staff or faculty member, please use the person’s first initial and last name @ucc. on.ca. For example, to email John Sample, enter jsample@ucc.on.ca.

Email (PARENT) The parent email directory is used to send out a variety of broadcast emails to all parents or parents of select groups. Please ensure your email address is current. You can edit your profile and directory listing in Bluenet or contact the Main Office for assistance.

PARENT INFORMATION EVENTS At the beginning of the school year, Curriculum Night offers parents opportunities to meet their son’s teachers and learn about curriculum and expectations for each course. Curriculum Night will run from 6:30 to 9:00 p.m. on the Tuesday of the second week of school in September. Further details will be provided in Heads Up as the date approaches. In September and October, the Parents’ Organization at the Upper School hosts Parent Information Evenings. Each one targets specific grade levels and offers parents an opportunity to hear about general program outlines, learn more about student expectations and the daily routines and procedures at the Upper School. It’s also an opportunity to hear responses to any questions parents may have. In January, faculty and representatives from the University Counselling Office conduct

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three Course Selection Information Evenings for parents and students in Year 1, Year 2 and Foundation Year. These evening sessions are valuable for understanding student options as they begin to pursue more specific areas of interest within the breadth of the IB Diploma Programme. The schedule for all of these evenings is published in the annual summer letter to all families and, are in the online school calendar. Timely reminders are given in Heads Up.

PARENTS’ ORGANIZATION INFORMATION EVENINGS The Parents’ Organization (PO), in partnership with the Prep Parents’ Organization (PPO), organizes information evenings on topics of interest to parents. Topics in the past have included: What do caring adults do in response to bullying?; How do we talk to our boys about sexuality?; How does the developmental profile of boys impact how we teach and work with boys?; How do we address issues of substance abuse?; Facebook 101: a parent’s guide to social networking; and Raising money-smart kids. A series of parent education sessions is planned for 2014–2015. Please see Heads Up for upcoming dates.

PARENT-TEACHER INTERVIEWS Parent meetings with teachers are scheduled in October and February. Instructions on how to book interviews through our online system will be communicated to you in a timely manner through Heads Up. These are important opportunities for you to discuss your son’s academic progress with his teachers. For Y1 and Y2 students, the boys are expected to join their parents at the meetings, following a three-way conference structure. In addition to these formal interviews, course selection information meetings for parents are scheduled in January and it is in your son’s best interest that both he and you are wellinformed about the breadth and depth of opportunities available to students.

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS College Times, the Upper School yearbook, is Canada’s oldest student publication, in which photographs, articles and creative work tell the story of each school year. The book documents our accomplishments in the academic, House, co-curricular and athletic realms

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and serves as a valuable keepsake of the students’ experience at the College. The Blue and White is a student-edited collection of literary and artistic works showcasing student creativity and expressive talent. It is published annually in the spring term. Convergence is the student newspaper and editorial forum for Upper School students. The Blue Page is an opinion forum for students to express their views on a range of current school events. Both of these publications are now available online.

UCC COMMUNICATIONS Part of the Office of Advancement, UCC Communications and Marketing is responsible for upholding and enhancing the reputation of the College among major stakeholders, including current UCC families, alumni, faculty, staff and friends of the College. Communications is responsible for promoting and building awareness of UCC’s vision and messaging in both online and print media. Communications also creates all UCC branding and upholds its graphic standards. Communications is the first point of contact for all media inquiries and oversees all media relations. (All media inquiries directed to staff or parents should be redirected to Communications.) Communications is responsible for dispersing news and promoting events on behalf of UCC constituents, including students, faculty, parent volunteer organizations and event coordinators, Advancement, the UCC Association and the Board of Governors, among others. Communications keeps the UCC community informed of events, major developments and other news through a variety of communications vehicles, including the following: • Heads Up, a weekly e-newsletter to UCC families providing key school information • Connection, an e-newsletter for current and past UCC families and students, offering news stories of school-wide interest • Old Ties, an e-newsletter for alumni, created with UCC Association staff • Old Times, UCC’s semi-annual alumni magazine mailed out to 11,000 Old Boys, and current and past parents • The UCC public website, www.ucc.on.ca, with access to: the parent public site (parents. ucc.on.ca); the Old Boy public site (oldboys.ucc.on.ca); Bluenet, the College’s password-

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protected site; and the UCC Community Directory, which helps keep members of the UCC community connected • Social media, including the UCC YouTube channel, Facebook and Twitter pages. For an up-to-date index of all online initiatives, go to www.ucc.on.ca/connect. For more information, contact Cristina Coraggio, Director of Marketing and Communications, at 416-488-1125, ext. 3341, or ccoraggio@ucc.on.ca.

UCC WEBSITE AND BLUENET Parents are able to access important information about UCC, event calendars, ways of getting involved and even archived issues of publications, such as Heads Up, on the public parent website at: parents.ucc.on.ca. From there, parents can also log in to UCC’s intranet “Bluenet.” Through your password-protected login, parents and students gain exclusive access to event registration, photos, video, community directories, school forms and the ability to maintain your profile information. Parents will also be able to re-register their son, access online report cards, your son’s schedule, and current attendance information.

Having trouble logging in? Once distributed, if you lose your username and password or delete the email, you can always recover your credentials using the “Forgot Password” link on the Bluenet Login page (https://bluenet.ucc.on.ca). You may also contact our Help Desk at 416-488-1125, ext. 3323.

PHOTOGRAPHY POLICY Upper Canada College strives to ensure that the learning environment for students is safe and secure, and that it respects their dignity and well-being. During the school year, photographs of UCC students are taken at a variety of school events. These images can enhance publications such as the annual report, e-newsletters such as Connection, and the College’s website — which keeps the UCC community

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informed of all the great activities going on at UCC. Students may also appear in videos, including those used by teachers to demonstrate their teaching methods. At some point during the school year, we may want to use a photograph of your son for any or all of the examples above. If you DO NOT want photographs or videos of your son to be used for these specific purposes, please email Andrea Aster, Associate Director of Marketing and Communications, at aaster@ucc.on.ca. Please include your son’s name and grade/form. Your son will then be identified at school functions as being unable to participate in any group photo sessions. If you do not make this request, we will assume that you have granted permission to use your son’s image.

PRIVACY POLICY At UCC, we are committed to protecting your personal information. This is our privacy commitment to you as a parent, student or other member of the UCC community. The College respects the right to privacy, as directed by applicable federal or provincial law. UCC also voluntarily supports the Canadian Standards Association Model Code for privacy protection. We collect your information only to provide services for which you have registered, to understand your needs and to assist us in creating new services that will serve you better. We do not disclose your personal information to any other organization or individual unless it is necessary to provide you with services from UCC, UCC communications or when required by law. Your personal information is processed and stored in secure and confidential databases with strict access controls. If you have questions or concerns about how your information is gathered, used or retained, or wish to opt out of receiving specific UCC communications, please inform our Chief Privacy Officer at privacy@ucc.on.ca.

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SCHOOL DIRECTORY All extension numbers are available by dialing the College Receptionist during or after school hours by following the recorded voice instructions. Directory

UCC Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. 8609 Director of Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gareth Sayce . . . . . . . . ext. 2224 After hours, please contact UCC Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cell: 416-786-3531 or . . . ext. 8609

College Receptionist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 416-488-1125

Principal’s Office Principal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . James Power . . . . . . . . . . ext. 2200 Executive Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lorraine Fernandez . . . . . ext. 2201 Head of the Preparatory and Upper Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Donald Kawasoe . . . . . . . ext. 4000 Executive Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Barbara Beecroft . . . . . . ext. 2274 Head of the Upper School, Senior Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head of the Upper School, Intermediate Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dean of Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Academic Dean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director of University Counselling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associate Director of University Counselling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associate Director of University Counselling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director of CAS (Creativity, Action and Service) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director of Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director of Residential Life and University Counsellor – Boarding . . . Executive Director, Facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director of Community Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Scott Cowie . . . . . . . . . . ext. 3368 Derek Poon . . . . . . . . . . . ext. 3400 Evan Williams . . . . . . . . . ext. 3416 Julia Kinnear . . . . . . . . . . ext. 3365 Katherine Ridout . . . . . . . ext. 2264 Jane Audet . . . . . . . . . . . ext. 2260 Michelle Carvalho . . . . . . ext. 3210 Craig Parkinson . . . . . . . . ext. 3378 Brent MacKay . . . . . 416-484-8645 Andrew Turner . . . . . . . . . ext. 2500 Steve Thuringer . . . . . . . . ext. 2309 Ruth Ann Penny . . . . . . . ext. 3808

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Directory

Wernham West Centre for Learning Executive Director & Intermediate Division Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . Mary Gauthier . . . . . . . . ext. 2211 Senior Division Coordinator FY–IB2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jody McLean . . . . . . . . . . ext. 2243

Office of Admission Vice-Principal Enrolment Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Executive Director of Admission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associate Director of Admission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associate Director of Admission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

David McBride . . . . . . . . ext. 2220 Chantal Kenny . . . . . . . . ext. 4062 Sandra Hives . . . . . . . . . ext. 4041 Tricia Rankin . . . . . . . . . . ext. 2221

Boarding Contact Numbers Director of Residential Life and University Counsellor – Boarding . . . Andrew Turner . . . . . . . . . ext. 2500 SENIOR RESIDENTIAL HOUSE ADVISERS Seaton’s House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wedd’s House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seaton’s and Wedd’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Gareth Evans . . . . . . . . . ext. 4151 Amit Morris . . . . . . . . . . ext. 3174 Weekday Cell . . . . . 647-294-5305 Carl Beaudoin . . . . . . . . ext. 4054 Mark Baxter . . . . . . . . . . ext. 4094 Weekday Cell . . . . . 647-294-5306 Weekend Cell . . . . . 647-294-5306

Finance Office Chief Administrative Officer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Patti MacNicol . . . . . . . . ext. 2259 Student Billing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Colleen Papulkas . . . . . . ext. 2250

Health Centre Nurses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Avia Peacock . . . . . . . . . . ext. 2270 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cindy Lima Rivera . . . . . . ext. 2270 School Counsellor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Susan Boeckh . . . . . . . . . ext. 2263

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Human Resources Executive Director, People and Organizational Development . . . . . . . Lara Koretsky . . . . . . . . . ext. 2293

Information Technology Director, IT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jim LaPlante . . . . . . . . . . ext. 3326 Help Desk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. 3323

Advancement Vice-Principal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bill O’Hearn . . . . . . . . . . ext. 2236 Campaign Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director of Marketing and Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director of Advancement Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director of the UCC Association and Annual Giving . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director of Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Manager, Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Linda Barnett . . . . . . . . ext. 3308 Cristina Coraggio . . . . . . ext. 3341 Uma Guddanti . . . . . . . . ext. 3348 Jody Jacobson . . . . . . . . ext. 2235 Sarah Robertson . . . . . . . ext. 2238 Maria Karakoulas . . . . . . ext. 2231

Association and Foundation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Direct Line . . . . . . . 416-484-8629 Archives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jill Spellman . . . . . . . . . . ext. 2372 Macintosh Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mari Roughneen . . . . . . . ext. 2281 The Upper School Blues Shop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Patti Cawker-Chiang . . . . ext. 4500 TUBS (The Used Blues Shop) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. 2380 UCC Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. 2350

Summer Academy/Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 416-484-8627

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MONDAY TO FRIDAY, IN TERM

School Routines

During all regular school days, the Main Clocktower door is open from 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. for all visitors. For student use, the Basement Clocktower door is open from 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Using their Identicards, students may also enter other designated perimeter doors, including the Hewitt south, north Student Centre and certain Massey Quadrangle doors, from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. After 7:00 p.m. and up to 10:30 p.m., student access is by Identicard at the Basement Clocktower door only. All students are to leave the building by 11:00 p.m.

WEEKENDS AND SCHOOL HOLIDAYS, IN TERM The main building is normally locked on Saturday and Sunday during the regular school term. It is also locked on Thanksgiving weekend, the November and February weekends, the Easter weekend and the Victoria Day weekend. However, students may gain access by using their Identicards between 7:30 a.m. and 8:30 p.m. at the Basement Clocktower door. Students are not allowed to remain in the main building after 9:00 p.m. Access arrangements for special events or purposes will be communicated in advance.

LONG HOLIDAYS During scheduled working hours during the December and March breaks, when a receptionist is on duty, the Main Clocktower doors only are open from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Outside of these working hours, no visitor or student access is provided. Access arrangements for special events or purposes will be communicated in advance.

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DAILY SCHEDULES Regular Schedule ASSEMBLY Period 1 RECESS Period 2 LUNCH Period 3 Period 4

8:30 a.m. – 8:55 a.m. 9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. 10:30 a.m. – 10:50 a.m. 10:50 a.m. – 12:20 p.m. 12:20 p.m. – 1:10 p.m. 1:10 p.m. – 1:55 p.m. 2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Modified Schedule HOUSE MEETING ADVISORY TIME Period 1 RECESS Period 2 LUNCH Period 3 Period 4

8:30 a.m. – 8:55 a.m. 9:00 a.m. – 9:25 a.m. 9:30 a.m. – 10:50 a.m. 10:50 a.m. – 11:10 a.m. 11:10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. 12:30 p.m. – 1:20 p.m. 1:20 p.m. – 2:05 p.m. 2:10 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Afternoon Focus ASSEMBLY Period 1 Period 2 RECESS Period 3 Period 4 LUNCH

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8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m. 8:50 a.m. – 9:55 a.m. 10:00 a.m. – 11:05 a.m. 11:05 a.m. – 11:25 a.m. 11:25 a.m. – 12:05 p.m. 12:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m. 1:15 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

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WEEKLY SCHEDULE YEAR 1 STUDENTS School Routines

In addition to the description below for Year 2–IB2 students, Year 1 students will begin each day except Wednesdays at 8:15 a.m. in their Y1 form adviser’s room. Additionally, each school day will end with a bookending session, also in the Y1 form adviser’s room, from 3:35 p.m. to 3:45 p.m. On Afternoon Focus days, this will occur from 1:20 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.

YEAR 2–IB2 STUDENTS With the exception of some Wednesdays throughout the year, every day begins at 8:30 a.m. with 25 minutes or more of meeting time that has different functions depending on the day of the week.

8:30 a.m. – 8:55 a.m. Monday: Principal’s Assembly Tuesday:

Advising

Wednesday: Various student meetings as designated in the UCC Calendar Period 1 begins at 9:30 a.m. Thursday:

House Meeting: 8:30 a.m. – 8:55 a.m. Advising: 9:00 a.m. – 9:25 a.m. Period 1 begins at 9:30 a.m.

Friday:

Assembly

Please consult the weekly calendar on the College website for specific details of the schedule week to week.

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ACCESS TO UPPER SCHOOL FACILITIES For safety and security reasons, the College strictly controls access by students to Upper School facilities as outlined below. Students are allowed access to the building outside school hours only for school-related purposes. Most perimeter doors are accessible with the student’s Identicard. At all times, boys are expected to cooperate respectfully with Security staff and to follow their direction.

SPECIAL PURPOSE ROOMS Access to special purpose rooms, publication rooms, club rooms and art or music rooms is given only with prior written authorization of a faculty supervisor. Any extensions beyond the criteria for students being in the Main Building described above must be requested in advance with the approval of a Head of School. To gain access to these special purpose rooms, students must present a UCC Facilities Pass to Security staff. When it is not possible to arrange for permission in advance, or it is for a simple matter (such as a student forgetting his books or a blazer, etc., and needs to retrieve the item), the student should seek authorization from the Main Office.

SAFE ARRIVAL For Year 1 and Year 2 students in the Intermediate Division, the College strives to ensure their safe arrival to school each morning. To this end, the office assistants in charge of attendance will contact parents of boys who are absent from Assembly/Advisory and period 1 without school or parental authorization. If you are aware of your son’s absence from school for a personal matter, please notify us by calling 416-488-1125, ext. 2219, or email the Upper School Attendance Line at usattendance@ucc.on.ca at any time, day or night. School-related absences are typically noted internally by the faculty in charge.

ATTENDANCE POLICY AND PROCEDURES Attendance on time at all classes, Assemblies, House Meetings, House Advising appointments and other school activities is required of all students. These are mandatory school appointments. Absence from these school appointments is not permitted, unless

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for reasons accepted by the College (such as illness) or for scheduled school co-curricular commitments, field trips or other authorized school appointments or meetings. Every absence must be reported by a parent or legal guardian on the day it occurs. Students may not excuse their own absences. Absences must be reported either to the Attendance voice line or to the Attendance email address: either 416-488-1125, ext. 2219 (a 24-hour voice mailbox) or usattendance@ucc.on.ca The UCC Attendance Policy and the procedures that support it are based on three educational principles, which we seek to instill in our students and which we require parents to support at all times:

1. Commitment to Personal Learning and Achievement Students are expected to meet their academic obligations and requirements, including attendance at all classes and at community functions such as Assembly, House Meeting, House Advising appointments and other school appointments. 2. Commitment to the Learning Community Students are expected to understand that members of an academic community have a responsibility to contribute to the progress of teaching and learning in a classroom. Absenteeism undermines the integrity of shared learning, impedes teaching and lessens opportunities for the discovery and advancement of knowledge, both for the student and his peers. 3. Accountability As members of an academic community and as young adults, students are expected to be accountable by presenting acceptable reasons for absences, according to the procedures discussed below, and by dealing promptly and responsibly with all unexplained absences as reported by the school. Absence Due to Illness: A parent or legal guardian must telephone the Attendance Line (416-488-1125, ext. 2219) or email usattendance@ucc.on.ca BEFORE 8:30 a.m. EVERY

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MORNING a student is kept home due to illness. Absences must not be reported to teachers or house advisers. Students who become ill, or who are injured during the school day, must report to the Health Centre and then sign out at the Main Office before going home. Religious Holidays: Upper Canada College celebrates the diversity of its student body and recognizes religious holidays of all faiths. If a student will be absent due to a religious holiday, we kindly ask that parents or guardians call the Attendance Line to notify us of the reason for their son’s absence from school. Appointments: Appointments should be arranged outside of class time. Students who miss class for an appointment must present a parent’s note to the Main Office or have a parent telephone on the day of the appointment. Students arriving from an appointment must sign in at the Main Office. Students leaving during the school day must sign out at the Main Office and sign in when they return. Unacceptable Personal Absences: The College does not consider late-night athletic or other obligations an acceptable reason to miss Assembly, House Meeting, House Advising or class. Students are not allowed to miss any academic or school appointment, Assembly, House Meeting, class, House Advising appointment or College ceremony in order to complete assignments or study for a test. Parental permission in such instances sends a negative message to the student about his school attendance obligations and is not considered an acceptable reason for absence. However, the College respects parental discretion regarding their son’s health and welfare. It should be noted that a teacher is not required to prepare a makeup test for students who are absent. Parents will be notified about patterns of test absences. Holiday Schedule, Family Trips: Family holidays or trips when classes and examinations are in session are not considered an acceptable reason for absence. Vacation time during the academic year is generous, and parents should make arrangements for family or student vacations or other activities outside of the academic calendar. A student absent for such a reason will not be allowed to make up missed tests or quizzes and will be assigned a penalty for late submission of assignments. Similarly, the College does not reschedule examinations to accommodate family or personal discretionary travel or vacation arrangements. If your son is expected to be away from school for an extended period of

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time, you must complete an Extended Absence Request Form, available from the Main Office.

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Parents’ Absence from Home: While such practice is strongly discouraged, parents who plan to be absent for a period of time should inform the Main Office, by letter or phone call, of the duration of the absence and of arrangements for alternative adult supervision of their son. The name and contact information of the responsible adult should be provided in the event of emergency or another need to communicate. Under no circumstances is a student allowed to write or present his own reason for lateness or absence during his parents’ absence. Start of School Day: The daily schedule and school calendar can be viewed on the College website. All students must be present at 8:30 a.m. every day for Assembly, House Meeting or group House Advisory. Late Arrival for Assembly or House Meeting: Students who arrive after Assembly has begun must report immediately to Room 131. They must sign in upon their arrival. In the event of significant lateness, or a missed assembly or House meeting, students will be given a detention unless a note or a phone call is received from a parent or legal guardian to explain his absence. Students may not explain their own lateness. Students who exhibit a pattern of lateness will be subject to the College’s progressive disciplinary system. Late Arrival for Period 1: Students who arrive after classes have begun must sign in at the Main Office.

Penalty for Class Absence Absence from class without a reason acceptable to the College is a serious disciplinary matter. A student recorded as absent from a class or classes without a reported legitimate reason will be notified and required to present an acceptable reason in the time specified. Unless the matter is resolved in accordance with school policy, and within the time specified, he will be subject to the following gradation of disciplinary response. FIRST UNEXPLAINED ABSENCE: The form/house adviser may meet with the boy, counsel him

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on the importance of being in Assembly, advising and academic class, ensure the boy has a plan and the intent to meet his commitment and outline the escalating response. SECOND UNEXPLAINED ABSENCE: The student will be notified by the Division Head/Dean of Students in charge of his House (see above) to serve a detention on the following Tuesday or Thursday from 3:45 p.m. to 4:45 p.m. in Room 131. Students may be asked to write a reflection outlining his plan to be in school, his intent to follow through on his plan and his understanding of the escalating consequences to his unexplained absences. THIRD UNEXPLAINED ABSENCE: Division Head/Dean of Students in charge of his House will call a meeting with the student, his parents and adviser to review the reasons for his unexplained absences and to amend or recommit to his plan to attend school. FOURTH UNEXPLAINED ABSENCE: A Conduct Advisory letter from the Division Head/Dean of Students in charge of his House will be sent to parents emphasizing the student’s lack of progress in meeting his commitment. The student will again confirm his commitment to be in school and his understanding of the escalating consequences, and have it co-signed by his parent. FIFTH UNEXPLAINED ABSENCE: The student will meet with the Division Head/Dean of Students in charge of his House and will serve a one-day in-school detention. He will be required to articulate his commitment to the expectations of UCC in a written letter. He will not be allowed to attend any co-curricular commitments on that day. ADDITIONAL UNEXPLAINED ABSENCE: There will be a continued escalation of Conduct status to Conduct Concern, Conduct Probation and suspension (which is reportable to certain post-secondary schools). At this point, the question of commitment and fit at UCC will be raised and denial of re-registration may be invoked. In addition, a student who is absent from class without a reason acceptable to the College will receive “zero” on any missed tests or quizzes. In cases of flagrant absence, or failure to respond to direction, a student may be suspended. LATENESS FOR CLASS: Students are expected to arrive on time for class. A student who

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arrives significantly late will be sent to the Main Office for a late slip. Students who show a pattern of lateness without an acceptable reason will be subject to the College’s gradation of disciplinary responses. School Routines

REMOVAL FROM CLASS: A student who is sent out of class for disciplinary reasons must report to the Main Office immediately. The student will not be permitted to rejoin his class without written permission from the Main Office. Further disciplinary action may be taken.

ABSENCES FROM SCHOOL Under the Ontario Education Act, every child who attains the age of six years after the first school day in September shall attend school each day that school is in session every year from September to June until the child attains the age of 16. Typically, a child is excused from attendance if he is unable to attend by reason of sickness or other unavoidable cause, for religious holidays or designated holy days. For reasons of extended illness of more than five consecutive days, a doctor’s note is required. In most cases, under the direction of the adviser, the school may send work home if the absence extends beyond three days. Under the Ontario Education Act, as we are required to do for any student absent for 15 consecutive days, we shall inform the Provincial Education Officer who will then determine the appropriate course of action. At Upper Canada College, a boy who is required by law to attend school and who refuses to attend or is habitually absent from school will be put on Conduct Probation and his continued enrolment will be considered to be in jeopardy. It is important to note that academic, social and co-curricular success requires hard work and a regular time commitment. Many students are involved in organized activities outside of the school and it may be difficult for students and families to keep up with conflicting schedules. The school policy states that in order to effectively achieve our program goals, the school must come first. This expectation also applies to Norval Outdoor School educational experiences. We discourage planned absences, but if your son must be away, please advise your son’s adviser, the attendance line, and the Head of the School at

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least three days in advance. Work missed will be the responsibility of the student to obtain. In planning family trips, parents should consider the school’s academic calendar carefully and make every effort to plan accordingly. The academic calendar is full with much to do and our holiday schedule is quite generous. As a result, absence due to extended holidays is discouraged. Again, we believe that school comes first, but if your son must be away, please send a letter to the Head of the Division well in advance. The attendance line, and your son’s adviser and subject teachers should be advised as to the duration of the absence. Work missed under special circumstances will be arranged between home and school. Work missed will be the responsibility of the student to obtain after the class has occurred. We appreciate your support and co-operation.

EXTENDED ABSENCES Academic, social and co-curricular success at Upper Canada College requires hard work and a commitment to regular attendance. The overall benefit of the UCC experience cannot be realized by doing academic work only, and important classroom activities, including class discussions, rehearsal of second language, collaborative work, student presentations and experiential learning (science labs, field trips, etc.) cannot be easily replicated for absent students. Further, a student’s absence has implications to the daily academic routine. Teachers may have to create additional tests or delay returning assessments to ensure that all students are fairly treated. Thus, it is our belief that in order for a student to effectively achieve our program goals and to realize his full potential, regular attendance must remain a top priority. Having said this, the College also acknowledges that some of our students are involved in valuable organized activities outside of the school or may experience extenuating circumstances which may impact their ability to attend all classes throughout the year. It is imperative for students and parents to partner with the College to ensure the best possible success for students with commitments that require irregular attendance patterns or who may be away for an extended period of time. Students who will be absent for extended periods of time (specifically three or more consecutive school days or multiple days over an extended period of time) are required to

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complete an Extended Absence Request Form, available from the Main Office. This form must be signed by a student’s parents or guardians, his adviser, CFL division coordinator, and the Division head, and returned to the Main Office well in advance of the first day of the absence. This is the crucial first step in a process which engages a network of supports organized by the Centre for Learning and a student’s adviser.

CONCUSSION PROTOCOL BACKGROUND Upper Canada College is committed to the health and safety of all students, and in that vein adheres to a strict procedure and protocol when presented with a student who has suffered and been diagnosed with a concussion. Upper Canada College has many athletes striving for excellence and we have a long tradition of success in our athletics program. We must however ensure that all concussed students are treated promptly and professionally to minimize risk of long term physical, emotional and psychological damage associated with concussions.

STEPS TO RETURN TO PLAY (OR ACTIVITY) GUIDELINES A concussion is a serious event, but one can recover fully from such an injury if the brain is given enough time to rest and recuperate. Returning to normal activities, including sport participation and academics, is a step-wise process that requires patience, attention and caution. Sometimes symptoms of a concussion can be present at any of the steps below. This means that the brain has not yet healed and needs more rest. If any signs or symptoms return during the Return To Play process, the player must be re-evaluated before trying any activity again. Symptoms may return later that day or the next, not necessarily during the activity. At UCC we use ImPACT (Concussion Management Program) testing. This is a test that athletes on certain contact teams take which produces a base line score for that individual. In the event of a concussion at school, during a game or practice, based on the Index of Suspicion (signs and symptoms of a concussion), the AT, nurse or coach will remove the student from play. The student can then retest before seeing our Sports Medicine Doctors (Dr. Michael Clarfield and his SMS team) to assess the severity of the

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concussion and recommend steps for returning to play. Once the UCC nurse or athletic therapist has assessed the student, and a concussion is suspected, the student shall:

Step 1:

No activity, only complete rest. This means no work, no school (cognitive rest) and no physical activity. An SMS doctor, booked through the UCC Athletic Therapist, is consulted and the student can be cleared and proceed to the next step. Once the SMS doctor has cleared him, the athletic therapist will monitor him throughout the return to play process.

Step 2:

Light aerobic exercise, such as walking or stationary cycling. Someone who can help monitor for symptoms and signs should supervise the player. No resistance training or weight lifting. The duration and intensity of the aerobic exercise can be gradually increased over time if no symptoms or signs return during the exercise or the next day. The athletic therapist will monitor this step. Symptoms? Go back to Step 1. No symptoms? Proceed to Step 3 the next day.

Step 3:

Sport-specific activities, such as skating, running or throwing, can begin at Step 3. There should be no body contact or other jarring motions such as high-speed stops or hitting a baseball with a bat. Symptoms? Go back to Step 2. No symptoms? Proceed to Step 4 the next day.

Step 4:

Drills without body contact. Symptoms? Go back to Step 3. No symptoms? Read below: The time needed to progress from non-contact exercise will vary with the severity of the concussion and with the player. Proceed to Step 5.

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Begin drills with body contact.

Step 6:

Game play.

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Step 5:

Please remember that these steps do not correspond to days. It may take many days to progress through one step, especially if the concussion is severe. As soon as symptoms appear, the player should return to the previous step and wait at least one more day before another attempt. The only way to heal a brain is to rest it. Never return to play if symptoms persist. A player who returns to active play before full recovery from the first concussion is at high risk of sustaining another concussion, with symptoms that may be increased and prolonged. If a student shows symptoms of a concussion, and has not had the ImPACT baseline test done (if he does not play on a contact sports team), he must see a doctor for confirmation of a concussion. For a boarder, he will see Dr. Baker, our staff physician. If it is a day boy, he will see his family doctor. Once the concussion has been diagnosed, we ask that the boy see Sonya Pridmore or one of our nurses to set up an appointment with Dr. Clarfield or one of his associates for follow-up. This ensures continuity of care and consistency with our concussion policy. NB: If the student is diagnosed by his family physician, the concussion must be verified with a doctor’s note detailing instructions with regard to return to play. Without a doctor’s note, the student will be unable to return to school. This note must be given to the RN or the athletic therapist. If a student sustains a concussion outside of school, it is the responsibility of the family and student to inform us and we will follow the above procedure so that Dr. Clarfield and his associates can oversee his care.

THE CENTRE FOR LEARNING AND RETURN TO ACADEMICS GUIDELINES When a concussion has been diagnosed and verified, the Wernham West Centre for Learning (CFL) team will be contacted by the RN and the athletic therapist. The CFL will

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message teachers and parents about the student and his return to learn and academics. The student will be contacted by the CFL once he has returned to school to ensure that he is supported while he gradually catches up on his schoolwork. The CFL provides resources and support for the boy, his parents and his teachers. The Health Centre and Centre For Learning professionals meet weekly to review the students who are being monitored on the Concussion Protocol.

Sports Medicine Physician . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dr. Michael Clarfield Staff Physician . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dr. Jason Baker Athletic Director, Upper School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Brent MacKay Athletic Director, Prep School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nigel White Head of the Health Department . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Evan Williams Athletic Therapist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sonya Pridmore, CAT(c) Nurses: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Avia Peacock, RN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cindy Lima Rivera, RN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gina Suva, RN Wernham West Centre for Learning: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tina Jagdeo, Primary Division CFL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kathryn Barnes, Middle Division CFL . . . .Mary Gauthier, Executive Director & Intermediate Division CFL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jody McLean, Senior Division CFL

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact any of the following members of the UCC Concussion team: • Athletic Therapist Sonya Pridmore, CAT(c): spridmore@ucc.on.ca • Avia Peacock, RN: apeacock@ucc.on.ca • Cindy Lima Rivera, RN: climarivera@ucc.on.ca • Gina Suva, RN: gsuva@ucc.on.ca • Divisional members of the CFL team: Tina Jagdeo (tjagdeo@ucc.on.ca), Kathryn Barnes (kbarnes@ucc.on.ca), Mary Gauthier (mgauthier@ucc.on.ca), Jody McLean (jmclean@ucc.on.ca)

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EMERGENCY PROCEDURES The College has four different emergency protocols in place that are practised every academic year. They are: School Routines

• Emergency Evacuation (e.g. fire alarm) • Shelter in Place (external environment threat) • Hold and Secure (danger near the school) • Lockdown (danger inside the school) In the case of an emergency, all building occupants (students, employees and visitors) are expected to follow procedures under the direction of school officials.

RATIONALE FOR FIRE DRILL AND LOCKDOWN Ontario regulations require us to hold six fire drills per calendar year, and the Toronto Police Services recommend that we hold drills to practice our lockdown and evacuation procedures. These practice measures prepare our boys and employees for real emergencies should they occur.

FIELD TRIPS Travel to and from other schools, day excursions and longer field trips are a common and enjoyable part of the educational experience at UCC. Students must behave responsibly during such trips and are subject to all school regulations, including conduct expectations, dress code and the Alcohol and Drug Policy. They will cooperate fully with faculty supervisors or face the necessary disciplinary consequences. Even when away from the College, students are ambassadors of the College, and they are expected to conduct themselves appropriately. Team trips are covered by the Athletic Consent Form, which parents complete. All other trips require that parents and students complete a consent form, which includes a section on student conduct and student responsibility, to acknowledge that the behavioural expectations and the risks entailed in the trip are understood. All students should have their own passport when travel to other countries takes place.

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FOOD SERVICES Aramark Campus Services provides excellent food services to the College’s day and boarding students. For day students, snacks are available before school and at morning recess in the Lower Dining Hall. At lunch, healthy choices of hot and cold menu items are available in the Upper Dining Hall and quicker alternatives, also including healthy food options, are available in the Lower Dining Hall and Student Centre. In the Upper Dining Hall, purchases are made by presenting the Student Identicard, linking purchases with the student billing system. Identicards are distributed to students at the beginning of term. Identicards or cash may be used in the Student Centre and the Lower Dining Hall. Food service for boarding students is described in Section 10: Residential Life.

IDENTICARD Each student must have a UCC Student Identicard showing the student’s photograph and UCC identifying number. This card is to be carried by all students and must never be shared with or given to another student. Students obtain an Identicard at the beginning of the school year. The Identicard is required for all purchases in the Upper School Blues Shop, and for meal purchases in the Upper and Lower Dining Halls and snack bars. It is also required for authorized entry to certain school facilities during the day and after regular hours. The loss or a malfunction of an Identicard should be reported immediately to the Security office. A replacement card can be obtained from the Security office during school hours; a $25.00 fee will be charged for the replacement of a lost card. Misuse of the Identicard may result in cancellation or restriction of privileges and other disciplinary action.

LOCKER ASSIGNMENTS At the beginning of the school year, each day student is assigned a locker in his House Locker Room. (In addition, each Year 1 student has a second locker assigned to him — a “book locker” — in the second floor main hallway.) Each student must supply his own combination lock. Locks may be purchased from the Upper School Blues Shop. Before the assignment is complete, each student signs a Locker Use Contract, recording his lock’s

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combination, acknowledging that the locker is College property and promising to maintain his locker in good condition. These lockers are for storage of texts, notebooks, clothing and personal belongings, including wallets and other valuables. Cages above the lockers are provided for the storage of bulky sports equipment, hockey and lacrosse sticks, and the like. Boys most often lose their belongings when they leave their knapsacks on the benches or floors of the locker rooms, or neglect to lock their locker doors. Problems commonly arise during Phys-Ed classes or after-school team practices when some boys leave their clothes and other belongings out in the open instead of securing them in their lockers. In their use of the personal locker and in the House Locker Rooms, students will respect their own personal property and the property of others and of the College at all times. Students are to keep their lockers in good repair. The cost of repairing abnormal wear or damage will be assessed to the student’s account. Every student is required to completely empty his locker by the last day of school before both the December and the March breaks, with the locker door left open and his lock secured to the open latch. Any lockers not left open will be cut open and the items removed. By the last day of school in June, every boy must remove his lock and completely empty his locker. Boys failing to do so will have their locks cut and their locker belongings removed and donated to The Used Blues Shop (TUBS). While respecting the privacy of students, the College reserves the right to open and inspect a locker when there are reasonable grounds to believe that a serious disciplinary infraction or the existence of a physical, health or other risk to the student or others will be discovered.

LOST AND FOUND The College strongly recommends that all articles of clothing, sports equipment, books and binders be clearly marked with the student’s name and House. Found items are stored in The Used Blues Shop (TUBS), located in the basement across from UCC Press. If a lost item is labelled, TUBS volunteers will attempt to contact boys directly via school email. Lost items are stored in TUBS for the remainder of the term in which they are found; however, 30 days after the end of each term, all unclaimed items become the property of TUBS. These items are then sold by TUBS, with the proceeds going to support the school wish list, or are donated to charity.

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TUBS Hours: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday: 8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Monday to Friday: 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Monday to Thursday: 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Personal belongings should be kept locked in lockers when not being used. Large sums of money are not needed and should not be brought to school. Valuable watches, jewelry and iPods should be left at home. The insurance policy of the College does not cover students’ belongings that are lost, stolen or damaged. Any valuables (such as wallets, watches, keys, glasses, calculators, cell phones and music players) found should be turned in to the Main Office for safekeeping and to help the rightful owners find them. Laptops and chargers, specifically, should be turned in to the IT HelpDesk.

TELEPHONE MESSAGES TO STUDENTS We respectfully ask parents not to call the Main Office with messages for their son unless in the case of a real emergency. Reminders and/or last-minute changes of appointments are not considered emergencies, and delivery of such notices cannot be guaranteed. You should also know that there are restrictions to student cell phone use in class. Please arrange any important communication with your son in a way that doesn’t compromise his attention to his work in class. Students who use their phones during test times will be sanctioned.

THE UPPER SCHOOL BLUES SHOP The Upper School Blues Shop is located on the lower level of the Upper School. The shop provides one-stop shopping for all your school needs. The shop carries school and athletic uniforms, school supplies, backpacks, sporting goods and gifts. Students must present their UCC Identicards for purchases and the Finance Office issues monthly itemized statements for payment. The Upper and Prep Blues shop hours are as follows:

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Monday/Wednesday/Friday: Prep Shop 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Upper Shop 12:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. School Routines

Tuesday/Thursday: Upper Shop 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Prep Shop 12:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

RE-REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE All families are required to re-register annually to confirm their son’s enrolment for the following academic year. The process is completed entirely online and all information about fees, policies and tuition refund insurance is accessed at the time of registration. Notification of the start of the re-registration process will be communicated to all parents through email and weekly reminders which will appear in Heads Up. The deadline for re-registration is February 13, 2015. Each parent has been given a unique username and password and these are also used when accessing the online re-registration forms. It should also be noted that the first instalment of fees is due at the same time as the forms are completed online and payment is a condition of enrolment. Re-registration will be withheld for students whose accounts with the College are not current. Information about the annual online application process for financial assistance will also be communicated by email and in Heads Up. Returning families should note that the financial assistance application deadline is November 21, 2014. This has been done to facilitate the generation of timely offers of assistance in advance of the February 13 re-registration deadline. For further details regarding the re-registration process and the College’s financial assistance program, please contact Colleen Papulkas in the Finance Office at ext. 2250.

HEALTH INSURANCE COVERAGE All students are required to have an Ontario Health Card. Parents should be aware that

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only students who reside in Ontario are eligible for coverage under the Ontario Health Insurance Plan. Benefits paid by the plan for hospital and medical services outside of Canada may be insufficient to meet the charges assessed in those areas. Students and staff planning school trips outside Canada will arrange additional medical coverage with the Finance Office, as necessary. An out-of-country policy is in place, with short-term coverage available for students travelling with teams or on class trips. Out-of-province residents are covered by their provincial policies, but these may have different coverage from the Ontario plan. Parents are encouraged to confirm their son’s coverage before the start of the academic year. Boarding students who reside overseas and do not have a valid Ontario Health Card must present proof of valid private health insurance or subscribe to the private health insurance plan arranged by the College. The cost of this policy will be billed directly to the student account. In the absence of proof of adequate health insurance coverage, the College will automatically enrol boarding students in the College’s private plan.

STUDENT PARKING AS A GREEN SCHOOL We hope that our Upper School students will walk, bike or take public transportation to school. This reduces both congestion and greenhouse gas emissions. If they must arrive by car, it is best that they be driven to and from the College by parents, preferably as part of a carpool, using designated drop-off and pick-up areas on the grounds. While the property at UCC may seem extensive, parking is extremely limited and barely meets the needs of the College teachers, staff, residents, volunteers and visitors. In addition, parking is prohibited on designated fire routes and in areas designated for buses and commercial delivery.

At all times, parking is by authorized permit in assigned areas only. Vehicles parked on the College grounds without the permission of the College may be ticketed and towed at the owner’s expense.

Permit parking for student use is limited and may only occur in the lot at the Kilbarry

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Road entrance to UCC (the “North entrance”) or in the arena lot (at the south end of campus). Because space is limited, priority will be given to IB2 students who do not have reasonable access to public transportation, who have extremely heavy and ongoing co-curricular obligations and who carpool with other students. With very few exceptions, parking is available only to IB2 students. To apply for this limited parking privilege, a Student Parking Application must be requested by email from marilyn.mcmonagle@ucc.on.ca or by phone at 416-488-1125, ext. 2299, or obtained from the Main Office. This form must be completed, signed and returned to the Main Office. Students granted a parking permit will be notified at the beginning of the term and will be required to sign, with their parents, a Parking Agreement. Students given this permission must park only in the designated area, drive with care and caution on College grounds, and cooperate fully with College Security staff at all times. Failure to abide by the terms of this agreement will result in immediate loss of parking privileges. In special circumstances, a student may request short-term permission from the Main Office to park a vehicle on the grounds during the school day. This request may be granted only if space permits and the student is involved in a specific school event or program that requires him to drive. The student must provide a detailed written request accompanied by a letter of support from the faculty supervisor of the specific event or program in question. A student granted a temporary pass may park only in areas designated by the College. Any student in flagrant or repeated violation of parking policy (such as parking without a permit or parking in an unauthorized location) will be subject to the full range of disciplinary responses outlined in the Upper School Family Handbook. Because student parking is strictly limited and the number of applications is extremely high, some families may be disappointed that the College is not able to accommodate their request. Students who have not been granted permission to park at UCC may wish to use public parking lots in the Yonge and St. Clair area or negotiate parking arrangements at the homes of other students, family friends or relatives near UCC. Curb parking on neighbouring streets is severely limited by by-law restrictions and is undertaken at your own risk.

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CAR POOLING AND ALTERNATIVE MODES OF TRANSPORTATION As another way to reduce congestion and to reduce emissions from vehicles on College grounds, parents are encouraged to carpool when driving students to school. In addition, students are encouraged to take alternative modes of transportation such as public transit, walking and bicycling.

VEHICLE ACCESS TO UCC To protect the safety of everyone, to ease traffic congestion on the campus and in the UCC neighbourhood, and to facilitate the morning student drop-off, we ask that you follow the following instructions for entering and leaving the College by car. From Kilbarry Road: Cars may enter from Kilbarry Road and drop students in the traffic circle north of the Boarding Houses. Cars may not be parked in this area at any time or anywhere else along the north entrance road as this is a designated fire route. All parking in the area is reserved for faculty and staff. From Forest Hill Road: Entry from Forest Hill Road will be one-way until 6:00 p.m. Parents are requested to use the designated drop-off zones near the Hewitt Centre or the Main Upper School entrance. Please do not park or idle vehicles in these areas. After drop-off, proceed cautiously south on the main driveway and follow the traffic signs. Please beware of Prep students at play or crossing the driveway. From the South: Cars may enter the College from the south only by turning right from Lonsdale Road. Cars entering from the south may not proceed further than the William P. Wilder Arena Parking Lot.

SPECIAL PARKING CONSIDERATION In the past, UCC has obtained special parking consideration for vehicles parked on neighbourhood streets beyond the three-hour limit for special events. Changes to local bylaws no longer allow this consideration from 6:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. and from 3:00 p.m.

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to 7:00 p.m. We would ask parents to pay close attention to information that can be found in event announcements.

School Routines

DRESS CODE The dress code is a daily expression of our respect for ourselves and our community and of our pride as members of the College. These regulations are intended to meet standards of appearance for the formal part of the school day and also to eliminate unnecessary expenditure and competition. Because many students travel great distances, arrive early for practices and rehearsals, and stay late after school, the Upper School does not require our students to arrive or leave in school dress. The full cooperation of students and parents in all matters related to dress and personal appearance is expected. Parents are requested to ensure that their son’s school dress is complete, clean and in good repair at all times. Parents must also ensure that students have sufficient shirts, socks and trousers to allow for cleaning/laundry.

REGULAR DRESS Regular dress is worn from the Tuesday following the November long weekend to March break. Students may opt to wear regular dress throughout the year if they wish. At all times during the school day from 8:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. during classes, Assembly, House Meetings, Advisory meetings and appointments, examinations and while in the corridors and other public areas of the College, students are required to wear the following: • A dress shirt in a conservative colour or stripe with a UCC tie (school, House or team). Denim, flannel or plaid shirts are not acceptable. Shirts are to be tucked in at all times. If required, only a white, short-sleeved T-shirt may be worn under the dress shirt. • Students may wear a sports jacket, blue crested blazer, blue crested College sweater or UCC blue fleece top, which are available for purchase in the Upper School Blues Shop. Other sweaters or sweatshirts, including hoodies, are not allowed. • Grey dress pants (not cotton). Trousers are to be well-fitting, conservative in cut and worn with a dark-coloured belt.

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• Dark socks (blue, grey, black) • Polished leather shoes in keeping with school dress. Running shoes, including black running shoes, topsiders, boots, sandals or any other form of casual shoes are not permitted. • Head coverings (except where religious custom dictates), baseball or sports caps, headbands and earrings may not be worn during regular school hours or at school functions. Sunglasses may not be worn in school during the school day.

FIRST DRESS First Dress is the formal dress code worn on the day of the Principal’s Assembly, except during the period of Warm Weather Dress. It is also worn for important events such as Prize Day, Remembrance Day in November and Founder’s Day in February, and for other special assemblies or ceremonies called during the year. First Dress is also required when students are serving as ambassadors of the College and for specified off-site events. First Dress consists of: • Blue blazer with the UCC crest • Conservative white or solid light blue dress shirt • Grey flannels • College or House tie • Dark socks and polished leather shoes Parents must ensure that their son is equipped with First Dress, and that it is wellfitting and kept in good repair. Prize Day is the first occasion for which First Dress must be worn. The next occasion is for the College’s Remembrance Day observance, which is the Thursday leading into the November long weekend. After that, First Dress must be worn on the first school day of every week until the March break. Students who fail to appear in First Dress when required to do so must obtain a Dress Code Infraction slip from the main office. Failure to observe the DCI will result in a detention. Repeat offenders will be subject to further consequences. Regular Dress and First Dress are available at the annual uniform sale (with the exception of footwear) held in the

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David Chu Theatre on the Tuesday and Wednesday after Labour Day. Please refer to the “Uniform Sale” section of this handbook for further details.

WARM WEATHER DRESS School Routines

Warm weather dress can be worn from the beginning of school in September to the Thursday prior to the November long weekend and from March break to the end of the academic year. Other than for Prize Day and Remembrance Day, as outlined above, Warm Weather Dress may be worn from the start of the school year until the November long weekend, and resumes again after the March break. Warm Weather Dress is designed to provide students with comfort during the fall and spring, while maintaining clear standards for dress and appearance. There are two options for Warm Weather Dress. Students may continue to wear regular school dress, as defined above, or they may choose from the following options: Trousers: Beige or tan cotton pants, or khakis may be worn. A belt must be worn. No cargo pants or any other casual or leisure pants may be worn. Pants must be clean and in good repair. Shoes: Polished topsiders may be worn in place of dress shoes. Running shoes, sandals and all other forms of footwear are not permitted. Regular dark socks must be worn. Shirt: A blue crested UCC golf shirt may be worn in place of the dress shirt and tie. The UCC golf shirt is available for purchase in the Upper School Blues Shop.

Note:

1. Other UCC team golf shirts, or any other golf shirt, may not be worn. 2. If required, only a plain white short-sleeved undershirt may be worn with the UCC golf shirt. 3. The golf shirt must be tucked in at all times. 4. A UCC blue crested sweater or UCC blue crested fleece top may be worn, but no other sweaters or sweatshirts.

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CASUAL DRESS Casual dress days are announced regularly throughout the year for a variety of reasons. Clean, casual clothes may be worn. As with First Dress and Warm Weather Dress, the expectation is that the student maintain a neat and tidy appearance. On some casual dress days, there will be a specific “Blue and White” or “House Colour” theme requested for events such as the Friday before A-Day or House Track meet day.

NEW AND USED UNIFORM SALE Every year in the Fall, the Parents’ Organization holds a sale where students and parents can buy new and used uniform items required for the school year (blazers, dress shirts, grey flannel pants, khaki pants, socks and belts). Crested navy golf shirts are sold through the Upper School Blues Shop. Please refer to Section 9 for full details and dates for the New and Used Uniform Sale.

TEAM UNIFORM RENTAL PROGRAM To reduce incidental costs to parents, the College operates a Team Uniform Rental Program. Players on school teams in volleyball, basketball, rugby, tennis, baseball and lacrosse will rent team jerseys and shorts; football players will rent full equipment in addition to team jerseys; soccer and hockey players only rent team jerseys. Other items of equipment, including team shorts for soccer and hockey socks, are the personal expense of the student and will be available in the Upper School Blues Shop. The Rental Room is located in the Wilder Arena Complex and is under the supervision of the Director of Athletics. Each player is expected to take care of his rented uniform and to keep it clean and in good condition. If the equipment is lost or not returned in good repair or by the specified deadline at the end of each season, the full replacement cost of the item plus rental will be charged to the student’s account.

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ALCOHOL AND CONTROLLED DRUGS AND SUBSTANCES

Student Expectations

Upper Canada College’s policy on alcohol and drugs is consistent with its Mission Statement. The College firmly believes in the development of responsible citizenship, physical and mental health, and moral integrity among its students. Upper Canada College believes that student alcohol and drug use, either on school property or at school events, interferes with personal health as well as the legitimate academic and co-curricular interests of that student and other students, and with the well-being of the school community as a whole.

ALCOHOL AND DRUG POLICY STATEMENT The use, possession or sharing of smoking or chewing tobacco by any student while on school property, or at any event sanctioned by UCC or hosted by any other school, is strictly prohibited. This includes all time spent on field trips, athletic trips, dances and school-sponsored co-curricular activities. The use, possession, being under the influence or sharing of alcohol by any student while on school property, or at any event sanctioned by UCC or hosted by any other school, is strictly prohibited. This includes all time spent on field trips, athletic trips, dances and schoolsponsored co-curricular activities. The use, possession, being under the influence or sharing of illegal drugs by any student is prohibited while on school property or at any event sanctioned by UCC or hosted by any other school. This includes all time spent on field trips, athletic trips, dances and school-sponsored co-curricular activities.

DISCIPLINARY RESPONSE The following discussion of disciplinary responses to substance use, possession or sharing serves as a guideline only and in no way limits the ability of the College to apply what disciplinary sanctions it determines to be appropriate in individual cases.

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Tobacco With reference to tobacco products, the school encourages its students to be non-users. It should be noted that federal law prohibits anyone under 16 years of age from using tobacco in a public place, or purchasing any tobacco product, such as cigarettes or chewing tobacco. Ontario law prohibits the sale of tobacco to anyone under 19 years of age. In accordance with the Smoke-Free Ontario Act (2006), smoking is prohibited in any school buildings and on school property. Infractions of the school’s no-smoking policy will be dealt with on an individual basis, with the emphasis on helping the student refrain from tobacco use. However, repeated violations of the school’s tobacco ban will be dealt with by increasingly strict responses.

Alcohol Alcohol is one of the most widely used drugs in our society. It is acknowledged that many students will begin to use alcohol during the time they are enrolled in the school. The following information has been considered in establishing a policy for UCC: In Ontario, it is illegal for anyone under 19 years of age to purchase, possess or use alcohol, except in a residence or private place, and only if the alcohol has been provided by that youth’s parent. This permits parents to serve alcohol only to their own children. The abuse of alcohol, whether on one occasion or consistently, constitutes a threat to the user, as well as to those around him. The costs and dangers of alcoholism are obvious. Being Under the Influence of Alcohol: For a student with an otherwise clean conduct history, he may expect to be placed on Conduct Concern, though Conduct Probation and/or a Suspension of one to three days is still a possibility. If, however, this is not the student’s first offence, then Conduct Probation with Suspension will be the likely minimum consequence as well as a recommendation for the student to undergo counselling for a possible substance use issue. Possession of Alcohol: At the minimum, a student can expect to be placed on Conduct Probation with a Suspension of one to three days.

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Sharing or selling of Alcohol: This is the most egregious alcohol offence and a student should expect a minimum of Conduct Probation with a Suspension and understand that, depending on the circumstances, denial of re-registration or even immediate expulsion from school will be seriously considered.

Drugs

Student Expectations

Because Canadian Law makes a distinction between alcohol and drugs (please see the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA), http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/C38.8/), and because their dangers are different, the College also makes a distinction between alcohol and drugs in its disciplinary policies. The possession or use of drugs by any student is a serious offence, and any student who provides drugs — whether for money, for goods or services, for free, or in any other way — to anyone else is guilty of trafficking in narcotics, and is liable to the most severe disciplinary consequences. Being Under the Influence or in Possession of Drugs: For a student with an otherwise clean conduct history, he should expect to be placed on Conduct Probation with Suspension and recommended to undergo counselling for a possible substance use issue. If this is not the student’s first offence, then the student will likely be denied re-registration or immediately expelled from the College. Sharing or selling of Drugs: This is the most egregious drug offence and a student should expect denial of re-registration or immediate expulsion from the College. In addition to any school consequences, the police may also be involved.

Prescription Drugs Prescription medications are for the sole use of the person for whom they are prescribed and the use of a medication by anyone other than the person for whom it is prescribed is illegal and may cause dangerous health issues, including death. For this reason, no student should ever ingest the medication of any other student. Furthermore, any student who is required to take prescription medication while at school is allowed to have that medication at school, but he is responsible for the security of that medication at all times, for keeping it out of reach of any other students. If he would like, any student with medication prescribed to him may ask for his prescription medication to be stored in our Health

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Centre. (Please see below the “Policy regarding Students having Prescription Medication” for further details.) If any student’s prescription medication is one that is listed in any of Schedules 1 through 8, inclusive of the aforementioned CDSA, then both the sharing and selling of that medication is illegal. If any student provides any of his prescription medication to anyone else — whether for money, for goods or services, for free, or in any other way — it is trafficking. In addition to any disciplinary response by the College for such a student, that student may also be arrested and charged with trafficking in a controlled substance. Being Under the Influence or in Possession of someone else’s Prescription Medication: For a student with an otherwise clean conduct history, he should expect to be placed on Conduct Probation with Suspension and recommended to undergo counselling for a possible substance use issue. If this is not the student’s first offence, then the student will likely be denied re-registration or immediately expelled from the College. Sharing or selling of Prescription Medication: A student should expect a minimum of Conduct Probation with a Suspension and understand that, depending on the circumstances, denial of re-registration or even immediate expulsion are distinct possibilities. Regardless of the school’s disciplinary response, the police may choose to pursue criminal charges against the student or students involved.

POLICY REGARDING STUDENTS HAVING PRESCRIPTION MEDICATION Preamble The ability of an individual to control his/her own personal health information is key to his/her privacy rights. In Ontario, the 2004 Personal Health Information Protection Act, gives patients control over their own personal health information, including any information about any medication a person may be taking, including any prescription medication. This means that any Day or Boarding student at UCC may have medication that is prescribed to him and he has no obligation whatsoever to disclose that information to the College, any employee of the College, or anyone else.

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Considerations

Student Expectations

In Ontario, there is no minimum legal age for consent. Any individual deemed competent may visit a doctor independently and, in turn, be prescribed medications, even without parental knowledge or consent. This can be as young as 13 years old, for example, for birth control pills or anti-depressant or ADHD medication. Boys in Y1 at UCC are 13 years old and may, therefore, have prescription medications of which the College is unaware. This right to privacy extends, of course, to both Boarding and Day students. The College’s Health Centre may become aware of a student’s prescription medication in the following instances: • It is communicated to the College by a student and his parents • It is communicated to the College by a student • It is communicated by the school doctor or student’s physician with the consent of the student

Policy Statement regarding Students having Prescription Medication Prescription medications are for the sole use of the person for whom they are prescribed and the use of a medication by anyone other than the person for whom it is prescribed is illegal and may cause dangerous health issues. Any student who is required to take prescription medication while at school is allowed to have that medication at school, but he is solely responsible for the security of that medication at all times. For a Boarder, this means any prescription medications must be locked in the closet of his room at all times; for a Day Boy, this means any prescription medications must be locked in his locker at all times. All prescription medication must be kept in its original pharmacy container with complete medical labels, including the student’s (i.e. patient’s) name. In addition, it is expected that no more medication than is necessary for a reasonable amount of time (e.g. a week for a Day Boy, a month for a Boarder) needs to be with the student–patient at any given time. If any student provides any of his prescription medication to anyone else — whether for money, for goods or services, for free, or in any other way — it is trafficking. In addition to any disciplinary response by the College for such a student, that student may also be arrested and charged with trafficking in a controlled substance. If such a student is

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allowed to remain in the College, the College reserves the right to store his prescription medication in the school’s Health Centre, as described below.

The Request For Storage of Prescription Medication at School Any student, whether Boarding or Day, with medication prescribed to him is required to manage his own medication. If he would like, a student may ask for his prescription medication to be stored in the Upper School Health Centre. In this case, the Health Centre staff will provide the student access to his prescription medication based on a mutually agreeable schedule, on school days, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Neither the College nor any of its employees, however, assume any responsibility nor liability for the use or misuse of any medications prescribed to any of its students, nor be held responsible for the loss of this property. Any student who wishes to ask the Upper School Health Centre to store his prescription medication while at the College, with or without the knowledge or consent of his parents, must provide disclosure of the prescription medication and its therapeutic purpose to the Upper School Health Centre of the College, accompanied by a written request for storage to the Health Centre (please see attached request form.) Access to these medications is limited to school days only, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.

The Request For Storage of Prescription Medication on a School Trip As is the case at school, any student with medication prescribed to him is required to manage his own medication on a school trip, whether a day trip or a multiple days/nights trip, and maintain the security of his prescription medication. If he wishes to, a student may choose to ask the supervising teacher to hold his prescription medications for safekeeping and arrange a mutually agreeable schedule to obtain the container of medication from the supervising teacher. Again, the container must be the original pharmacy container and have the complete medical label on it, including the student’s name. Any such request for safekeeping must also be accompanied by a written request for storage from the student (please see request form below).

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Upper Canada College Request For Storage of Prescription Medication Form

Grade:

House:

Adviser:

Student Expectations

Name of Student:

Options for storage of this student’s prescription medication. Please check the option that pertains to you: Disclosure of the prescription medication and its therapeutic purpose to the Upper School Health Centre of the College. Access to these medications will be based on a mutually agreeable schedule, on school days, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Disclosure of the prescription medication and its therapeutic purpose to the Supervising Teacher. Access based on a mutually agreeable schedule to obtain the container of medication from the Supervising Teacher during the trip. Please state the name and purpose of each prescription medication that you would like to have stored on your behalf:

Student’s Signature:

Date:

Parent’s Name (if applicable): Signature: UCC Employee’s Name: Signature:

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COLLEGE NEIGHBOURHOOD RULE The College exercises its responsibility to ensure that its members respect the rights of its neighbours in the area surrounding the school. The College Neighbourhood Rule requires students to conduct themselves in a considerate and cooperative manner in travelling to and from the grounds. In particular, trespassing on private property, littering on private or public property, and loitering or congregating in a manner that might reasonably cause offence to neighbours, are prohibited. Senior Division students smoking on Frybrook Avenue is a particularly disappointing example of this disrespect for our neighbours (not to mention the self-destruction). Serious or repeated misconduct will lead to parental notification and to a gradation of disciplinary response.

DETERMINING DISCIPLINARY RESPONSES In general, students at Upper Canada College are responsible and meet or surpass basic standards of community life. Minor infractions are normally addressed through supportive counselling by faculty and staff. In more serious breaches of these standards, to provide guidance to the student and to respect others and the well-being of the community, more serious interventions may be necessary. In most of these situations, the College’s Student Discipline Council (please see below) will review the relevant information of a given case within the context of the appropriate application of school policy. The Council then makes a disciplinary recommendation to the Senior House Advisers Committee which, in turn, independently reviews the case and the recommendation from the Council. The Senior House Advisers Committee supports or modifies the Council’s recommendation, and forwards this information on to the Upper School Administration Committee for its consideration. The Administration Committee correspondingly deliberates and then submits a final recommendation of the College’s disciplinary response to the Dean of Students, the Division Head for the student in question, or the Head of the Upper School, depending on the severity of the disciplinary response.

STUDENT DISCIPLINE COUNCIL The Terms of Reference for the Student Discipline Council were established by a student committee chaired by the Head Steward, 2006–2007. These terms were approved, with some modifications, by the Upper School Administration Committee at the end of that

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Student Expectations

year. The Council consists of three IB1 and three IB2 students. A non-voting member of the Upper School Administration Committee also sits on the Council. At least one and no more than two of the student members must be boarders. A shortlist of candidates is generated by faculty vote, and Council members are then selected by interview with members of the Board of Stewards. Once selected, each member of the Council signs a confidentiality agreement. Without mentioning any student names, a written account of the facts and circumstances of a given discipline case are presented to the Council. The Council nominates one member to chair and another member to take minutes at each meeting. The Council deliberates and reaches consensus, which is submitted to the Dean of Students as a recommendation.

A GRADATION OF DISCIPLINARY RESPONSES The following eight stages of disciplinary response serve as a guideline only, and do not limit the ability of the College to apply whatever disciplinary sanctions it deems appropriate in any individual case.

Depending on the severity of a student infraction, any step or steps may be skipped in order to reach the appropriate level of disciplinary response. In addition, any “Conduct Status” may or may not be combined with a Detention or Suspension.

1. AFTER-SCHOOL DETENTION A student will be given a detention for reasons of misconduct and for absence from Assembly or House Meetings. Detentions take precedence over all other activities and will be served on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:45 p.m. to 4:45 p.m. in Room 131. School dress must be worn. The student is to sit quietly and work on homework or school assignments. The student is expected to attend the first detention date after the infraction, and may receive a reminder notification. A student who misses his detention must bring a note from his parent/guardian to the Main Office to explain his absence. Failure to do so may result in an escalated response.

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2. HALF-DAY AND FULL-DAY DETENTIONS A half- or full-day detention is a serious disciplinary consequence that is usually applied if a student is not positively responding to other consequences. A student can receive a full-day detention in school for a number of reasons including, but not limited to, the following: unserved detentions, neglecting to submit IB Diploma requirement work, or for various violations of school policy or citizenship expectations. Half- or full-day detentions will be dispensed by the Head of Division or Dean of Students. Students who have received one must report to school at 8:30 a.m., prepared to do school work under the supervision of one of the members of the Upper School Administration Committee. In addition, a reflection and writing component may be attached to this detention, requiring students to reflect on the actions that caused the detention and, to recommit to the standards and core values of the College. A student who has received a full-day detention will not be permitted to participate in classes or any co-curricular activities on the day it is served. 3. CONDUCT ADVISORY (FIVE WEEKS ON STATUS) Conduct Advisory serves the purpose of informing parents of student conduct which, in some way, has violated school policy or breached our community expectations. Through the process of Conduct Advisory, students and parents are cautioned about the potential escalation of disciplinary response if inappropriate behavioural incidents persist. This status will lapse after five weeks if the student maintains a clean record of citizenship during that period. 4. CONDUCT CONCERN (10 WEEKS ON STATUS) A student may be placed on Conduct Concern status for a variety of infractions against UCC’s stated policies, standards and expectations for behaviour and responsibility: repeated absence from class and/or other College appointments and first offences against published College standards and policies. Once placed on Conduct Concern status, it is the responsibility of the student to demonstrate through his choices and actions his re-commitment to the College’s values and standards. He must demonstrate his re-commitment not merely through the absence of negative behaviours and the fulfillment of academic responsibilities, but also through the presence of positive contributions. At the end of 10 weeks on Conduct Concern status,

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the student may apply in writing to have his status reviewed. The student’s letter must present specific evidence of the student’s re-commitment to UCC’s stated policies, standards, expectations and values, and of his ability to make them active in his daily life at the College. The letter should include: • A specific account of contributions to the community since the infraction through participation in the academic and co-curricular program, and;

The Dean of Students (or the Academic Dean, for conduct status arising from an academic infraction) will examine the appeal and determine whether or not to lift Conduct Concern status. At the end of 10 weeks on Conduct Concern status, if the student has not requested review or his request has been denied, he will remain on Conduct Concern status. If, after five more weeks, he still has not taken the necessary action to request review or the appeal has again been denied, he may be suspended and placed on Conduct Probation upon his return. If, while on Conduct Concern, a student commits further infractions, he may be suspended and placed on Conduct Probation.

Student Expectations

• Reference to school documents where possible, such as the latest report card. In addition, each student must provide a letter of support from each of two adults within the school (e.g. house adviser, teacher, coach or co-curricular supervisor).

5. CONDUCT PROBATION (15 WEEKS ON STATUS) Any student who has committed an offence against the community of sufficient seriousness will be placed on Conduct Probation for a period of 15 weeks. While on probation, he must demonstrate his re-commitment through his attitude, choices and actions. The onus is on the student to earn his way off probation. He must demonstrate his re-commitment not merely through the absence of negative behaviours but also through the presence of positive contributions. At the conclusion of his 15 weeks on Conduct Probation, the student must make an appeal in writing to have his status lifted. The appeal must include evidence of re-commitment in the form of examples of constructive participation in the various aspects of community life. The student is supported in his efforts toward constructive, responsible citizenship by his house adviser, who meets regularly with him. The letter should include the following:

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• A clear expression of understanding by the student as to why he was placed on Conduct Probation; • A specific account of contributions to the community since the infraction through participation in the academic and co-curricular program, and; • Reference to school documents where possible, such as the latest report card. In addition, each student must provide letters of support from two adults within the school (e.g. house adviser, teacher, coach or co-curricular supervisor). Following submission of the relevant documentation, the Division Head for the student will determine whether or not Conduct Probation will be lifted. In the process of arriving at his decision, he may consult with faculty with whom the student has worked. The decision will be communicated in writing to the family. The student’s disciplinary history will always be considered should further disciplinary action be taken. In particular, a student who has been removed from Conduct Probation but who subsequently commits a serious offence or whose actions indicate that he is still not meeting expectations for responsibility and citizenship when he writes his appeal may be expelled or denied re-registration.

6. SUSPENSION Suspension means that a student has been required to take a “time out” to think seriously about whether he wishes to still be a part of the UCC community and, consequently, about whether he can commit to the community’s values and standards. The duration of a suspension from College activities will vary depending on the circumstances. While serving a suspension, a student is barred from all school privileges, including classes, co-curricular activities and College-sponsored events. During his suspension, a student is expected to reflect formally in writing on his behaviour and to set personal goals for improvement. Before his return, the student and his parents may be required to attend a re-entry interview in which the student, with the support of his family, must demonstrate that he has thought seriously about his attitude, choices and actions and has made a deliberate re-commitment to the College’s values and standards. 7. DENIAL OF RE-REGISTRATION At the discretion of the College, a student may be allowed to complete his academic

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year at the College but denied re-registration for the subsequent school year for reasons including, but not limited to, a single extremely serious offence or violation of school standards, or for repeated serious offences or violations of school standards (particularly if two or more infractions are of a sufficiently similar nature), or for failure to meet the requirements of Conduct Probation status, or for bringing dishonour to the College.

Student Expectations

8. EXPULSION FROM SCHOOL If the infractions committed by the student as outlined in the above “Denial of Re-registration” section are, in the opinion of the College, sufficiently egregious, then consideration will be given instead to the immediate expulsion of the student, regardless of the timing within the school year.

REPORTING SERIOUS DISCIPLINARY ACTION Students who apply to universities in the United States are required to answer the following question on the application form: “Have you ever been found responsible for a disciplinary violation at any educational institution you have attended from 9th grade (or the international equivalent) forward, whether related to academic misconduct or behavioural misconduct, that resulted in your probation, suspension, removal, dismissal, or expulsion from the institution? If you answered yes, please attach a separate sheet of paper that gives the approximate date of each incident, explains the circumstances, and reflects on what you learned from the experience.” UCC is required to answer a similar question on the Secondary School Report to U.S. colleges. In such cases, admission committees will decide what effect, if any, the reported circumstances should have on the candidate’s eligibility. Any student who has such information on his record and decides to apply to universities that require disclosure should speak to his university placement adviser about the appropriate manner in which to proceed. Students and parents should be aware that the College’s obligation to report serious infractions and disciplinary consequences continues until submission of the Final School

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Report in mid-July. In particular, IB2 students who are active in the co-curricular programs after the Leaving Ceremony in May are reminded that they remain under the College’s expectations and policies for the duration of their commitment.

APPEALING A DISCIPLINARY DECISION If a family does not agree with the disciplinary response being applied to their son, a written appeal may be made to the following person, according to the degree of the disciplinary decision (and sometimes the Grade Level of the student): • In the case of Conduct Advisory or Conduct Concern for a boy in Y1 or Y2, the appeal should be addressed to the Head of the Intermediate Division, Mr. Derek Poon • In the case of Conduct Advisory or Conduct Concern for a boy in FY, IB1 or IB2, the appeal should be addressed to the Head of the Senior Division, Mr. Scott Cowie • In the case of Conduct Probation and/or Suspension for a boy at any Grade Level, the appeal should be addressed to the Head of Schools, Mr. Don Kawasoe • In the case of Expulsion for a boy at any Grade Level, the appeal should be addressed to the Principal, Dr. Jim Power

DIGNITY, WELL-BEING AND SAFETY The College strives to provide a positive, humane and safe environment for students, faculty and staff — a community that supports the dignity, well-being and safety of all its members.

HARASSMENT AND BULLYING The full text of the UCC Policy and Procedures for Preventing, Identifying and Investigating Harassment, Abuse and Violence and its companion statement, Standards and Boundaries for Working with Children, are available upon request through the Main Office. Upper Canada College is fully committed to respecting and protecting the dignity and human rights of its students, faculty and staff. Harassment, abuse or intimidation in any form are against everything for which the College stands as an educational institution. Students, faculty and staff have a right to work in an environment that is free of any of

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form of harassment, bullying, intimidation, violence and abuse, and all members of the community share a responsibility for ensuring that such an environment exists at all times. The UCC Policy and Procedures for Preventing, Identifying and Investigating Harassment, Abuse and Violence states that such conduct will not be tolerated, and that all reported incidents will be thoroughly investigated and appropriate action taken.

Student Expectations

Harassment: It is defined in the Ontario Human Rights Code to mean “a course of vexatious comment or conduct that is known or ought reasonably to be known to be unwelcome.” The Code prohibits such harassment when it relates to prohibited grounds: race, ancestry, sex, sexual orientation, age, record of offences, marital status, same-sex partnership status, family status or disability. For the purpose of the College’s protocols, any form of harassment is prohibited, regardless of whether or not it relates to these enumerated grounds. Harassment may be physical, such as pushing or unwelcome contact. It may be verbal, including insults and threats. It may be written or visual, such as graffiti or the display of offensive and hurtful materials designed to exclude or marginalize its targets, sometimes through the use of the Internet. To be clear, such material need not target a named student or individual to constitute harassment. Under the Ontario Human Rights Code, sexual harassment is a course of vexatious comment or conduct of a sexual nature that is known or ought reasonably to be known to be unwelcome. Sexual harassment may refer to instances where the behaviour is not overtly sexual in nature, but is related to the person’s gender and demeans or causes personal humiliation or embarrassment to the recipient. Bullying: A certain amount of conflict and disagreement is common among children and teens as they explore and develop their relationships with others and learn to manage these relationships responsibly and with respect and empathy for others. Conflicts and disagreements may be hurtful, but do not necessarily result in long-term harm. Timely and collaborative intervention by parents and school normally address such incidents and concerns. In addition to counselling and monitoring, school disciplinary procedures may well be involved. Bullying refers to the conduct of one or more students who repeatedly intimidate another student or students through: actual violence; threatened violence; verbal taunts and name-calling; extortion or theft of money, lunches or possessions; or enforced

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exclusion from peer groups. Bullies rely on a perceived power imbalance between themselves and their targets. This power imbalance may be based on perceived strength, age or accomplishments. Racially or ethnically based verbal abuse and gender-related harassment are also frequently related with bullying. Any student who is the victim of harassment or bullying should know that he is supported by the College, and that his dignity, well-being and safety are of the highest importance. A student who is the victim of harassment or bullying is encouraged to seek the assistance of his form or house adviser, one of his teachers, a member of staff, School Counsellor, College Nurse or administrator. Reported incidents of harassment or bullying will be fully investigated, with the goal of stopping the misconduct, supporting and empowering the victim, and intervening to correct the perpetrator through a gradation of disciplinary response. Alternative methods, such as mediation, may also be considered. However, serious or repeated incidents of harassment or bullying will also result in serious disciplinary response, which may include suspension or withdrawal. The police may also be contacted.

CYBER-HARASSMENT AND CYBER-BULLYING New technologies such as email, cell phones, text and picture messaging, chat lines, websites, blogs, wikis, social networking sites such as Facebook, and online voting booths have unfortunately become outlets for harassment and bullying, which can often be especially damaging and corrosive. Young people need to know that the same basic rules of respect and courtesy apply to the use of these new technologies as to any other form of human communication. Harassment or bullying by means of the school computer network is a serious violation of school’s Appropriate Use of Technology Policy. The school cannot presume to police the use of private Internet services at home, and parents have an important role to play in monitoring their son’s conduct there. Nonetheless, “off-site” cyber-harassment and cyber-bullying very often spill directly into school relationships, targeting individuals or groups of students, and undermine their dignity and well-being as members of the UCC school community. Such incidents will warrant intervention and appropriate disciplinary action by the College.

CHILD ABUSE The duty to report the sexual or physical abuse of a child to the Children’s Aid Society is

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VIOLENCE

Student Expectations

required of faculty, staff and volunteers at the College. The protection of children is paramount. Any student who is the victim of physical or sexual abuse, or who is concerned about the safety of another, should know that he is fully supported by the College, that appropriate action will be taken, and that his dignity, well-being and safety are of the highest importance and urgency. A student who is the victim of abuse, or who is concerned about the safety of another, is encouraged to seek the assistance of a teacher, house adviser or administrator. Harassment officers, the School Counsellor and the College Nurses are always available for confidential support and guidance. The obligation to and procedures for reporting suspected child abuse are outlined in the UCC Policy and Procedures for Preventing, Identifying and Investigating Harassment, Abuse and Violence, and in Standards and Boundaries for Working with Children.

Violence, bullying and physical intimidation have no place in the life of Upper Canada College and are treated as very serious disciplinary matters. Any student who is the victim of violence, bullying or physical intimidation should know that he is supported by the College, that appropriate action will be taken, and that his dignity, well-being and safety are of the highest importance. A student who is the victim of violence, bullying or physical intimidation, or who is concerned about the safety of another, is encouraged to seek the assistance of his form or house adviser, one of his teachers, a staff member or administrator. The School Counsellor and the College Nurses are always available for confidential support and guidance. Standards and procedures for investigating and responding to incidents of violence are outlined in the UCC Policy and Procedures for Preventing, Identifying and Investigating Harassment, Abuse and Violence. The Ontario Safe Schools Act provides an important context. Acts of violence are a serious disciplinary matter and are subject to a gradation of disciplinary responses.

THE ROLE OF BYSTANDERS Most incidents of harassment or bullying are witnessed by other students. Their presence brings with it the obligation to intervene as quickly and as frequently as possible, to support and comfort the victim and, if necessary, to seek the help of a trusted adult in the school community. Bystanders who look the other way or who remain silent further victimize the target of harassment or bullying, and give power to the perpetrator to

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victimize the school community as a whole by weakening the foundation of respect. In addition, by not nipping the problem in the bud, the bystander has just increased the odds that he, himself, will become a future victim of bullying.

PERSONAL APPEARANCE AND HYGIENE Students are to be clean-shaven at all times. Hair must be neat, well-groomed and off the face. Students are to have regular haircuts and are to be clean in person and apparel. Sideburns may not extend below the bottom of the ear.

THEFT Theft strikes at the heart of trust in relationships in a school as in any other community. Students are reminded that they should take care of their possessions by keeping them in locked lockers when not being used and should not bring expensive belongings or large sums of money to school in the first place. Students should report concerns about theft to the Main Office immediately for investigation. If any student loses his student Identicard, he should notify the Security office, the Dining Hall and the Upper School Blues Shop immediately, so that the card can be deactivated before any unwanted purchases are made. Theft and involvement in theft are considered most serious matters for disciplinary response, including expulsion. Serious cases of theft will be reported to the police for further investigation and action, in addition to any school response.

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BOARD OF GOVERNORS The Board of Governors has 15 members: eight are appointed by the Board for four-year terms; three are elected by the UCC Association for three-year terms; four are ex officio under the provisions of the Upper Canada College Act. The Chair of the UCC Foundation is invited to attend all meetings. The Board and its standing committees are representative of Old Boys and parents, as well as the broader College community. The Board establishes and directs policy for the College, oversees its financial affairs, and appoints the Principal. The current Board Chair is Andy Burgess ’83, who assumed this position in 2011. More information on the Board can be found at www.ucc.on.ca under the “About UCC” tab.

PRINCIPAL’S OFFICE School Organization

The Principal, Dr. James Power, is UCC’s chief academic and executive officer. Reporting to the Board of Governors, the Principal is the overall head, with responsibility for all aspects of the College’s programs and administrative operations. The Principal is a member of the Executive Committee, which is the senior management team of Upper Canada College. Membership on this committee includes the Chief Administrative Officer, Head of the Prep and Upper Schools, the Vice-Principal of Advancement, the Executive Director of the Wernham West Centre for Learning, the Executive Director of People and Organizational Development, and the Vice-Principal of Enrolment Management.

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY RELATIONS Ruth Ann Penny recently joined the College as its first Director of Community Relations. This position has been created out of a recommendation from the Board of Governors’ recent Governance Review and is unique in the independent school sector. The goal of the Director of Community Relations is to be an agent of continuous improvement. The Director acts as a confidential and neutral intermediary between the UCC administration and College community to enhance communication with parents and other members of the UCC community, assisting in seeking information and answers to questions and concerns. She also provides periodic reports to the administration that represent concerns brought to her attention. The aim is to help the College in its ongoing

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work to improve the delivery of services to its community and ultimately provide data that can inform strategic planning.

UPPER SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION HEAD OF THE PREPARATORY AND UPPER SCHOOLs Reporting to the Principal, the Head of the Prep and Upper Schools is Don Kawasoe, who oversees the UCC Program Team.

UCC PROGRAM TEAM The UCC Program Team consists of:

Division Heads: • Primary Years Program (SK–Form 5) – Tom Babits • Middle Years (Forms 6 and 7) – TBD • Intermediate (Years 1 and 2) – Derek Poon • Senior (FY, IB1, IB2) – Scott Cowie

Academic Dean – Julia Kinnear Dean of Students (Upper School) – Evan Williams Dean of Students (Prep School) – David Girard Director of Residential Life and University Counsellor – Boarding – Andrew Turner Executive Director of the Wernham West Centre for Learning – Mary Gauthier Director of University Counselling – Katherine Ridout

The team supports faculty and staff to provide a broad and rigorous program for UCC students.

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UPPER SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION COMMITTEE The Upper School Administration Committee (USAC) is comprised of the Upper School members of the Program Team, as well as the Associate Director of University Counselling, Upper School Counsellor and the Upper School Coordinator of the Wernham West Centre for Learning. This committee, co-chaired by the Intermediate and Senior Division Heads, meets regularly to approve all Upper School policy decisions and to review and monitor support strategies for students of concern who have been identified through Conduct or Academic Status, Teacher Grade Level Meetings or through house adviser communication.

THE ACADEMIC POLICY ADVISORY COMMITTEE School Organization

The Academic Policy Advisory Committee (APAC) is chaired by the Academic Dean and is comprised of department chairs, coordinators, the Librarian, the Executive Director of the Centre for Learning, Director of University Counselling and the Technology Integrator. The mission of APAC is to share subject and pedagogical expertise, to support the work of faculty and to shape and implement a shared academic vision for the Upper School. The group meets on a regular basis to review issues of academic policy and procedure and makes recommendations to the Head of the Prep and Upper Schools.

CHAIRS

English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Colleen Ferguson . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. 3334

Modern and Classical Languages . . Sophia Berezowsky . . . . . . . . . . . ext. 3387

Humanities and Social Sciences . . . Fiona Marshall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. 3427

Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Richard Turner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. 3415

Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deirdre Timusk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. 3370

Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Judith Macdonell . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. 3367

Physical Education Coordinator . . . . Mario Sturino . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. 3408

ToK Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gregory McDonald . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. 3330

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THE ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATION COMMITTEE The Academic Administration Committee is chaired by the Academic Dean and is comprised of the Intermediate and Senior Division Heads, the Executive Director of the Wernham West Centre for Learning and the Director of University Counselling. This group meets weekly to review matters related to Upper School academic policy and procedure. It identifies matters for the attention of the Academic Policy Advisory Committee and makes recommendations to the Head of the Prep and Upper Schools.

PREPARATORY SCHOOL, PREP OFFICE The Prep Primary Years (Tom Babits) and Middle Years Division (TBD) Heads are responsible for the academic programs at the Preparatory School, as well as all athletic, arts, leadership and service programs, student support, discipline, health and counselling, staffing and overall operation of the Preparatory School under the oversight of the Head of the Prep and Upper Schools. This includes a close working relationship with the Office of Admission.

FACILITIES AND THE CENTRE FOR ENVIRONMENT AND SUSTAINABILITY Steve Thuringer, Executive Director, Facilities, oversees Facilities and the Centre for Environment and Sustainability. His department is responsible for the day-to-day operations of our buildings and grounds, and it is involved in planning and developing new facilities, as well as redeveloping existing buildings and physical resources, including the William P. Wilder ’40 Arena and Sports Complex, with the overarching goal of greening and improving the environmental performance of all facilities. Security services are managed through contracts with external suppliers reporting to Facilities.

FINANCE OFFICE The Finance Office is responsible for the fiscal management of all aspects of the College’s operations. Patti MacNicol, Chief Administrative Officer, oversees the day-to-day functions of the Finance Office, which include accounting services for the College, UCC Summer Programs and the College’s rental operations, excluding the arena. The Finance Office also oversees the operations of the Upper School Blues Shop and the Prep Blues Shop, and it manages the contractual agreements for food services and housekeeping at UCC. Please

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direct any Finance Office questions to Colleen Papulkas. Colleen may be reached at cpapulkas@ucc.on.ca or at extension 2250.

HUMAN RESOURCES The Executive Director of People and Organizational Development, Lara Koretsky, and the HR Coordinator, Sabba Khokhar, provide the College with a full range of integrated human resources and organizational development services that link with organizational planning and strategic and operational needs. The office provides advice and counsel on a variety of employment matters to ensure the College continues to attract, develop and retain top faculty and staff.

OFFICE OF ADMISSION School Organization

The Vice-Principal of Enrolment Management, David McBride, oversees boarding and recruitment at UCC. David’s primary responsibility is the development and management of active recruitment programs, both nationally and internationally. The Executive Director of Admission, Chantal Kenny, is responsible for all aspects of the admission process for day and boarding at the Preparatory and Upper Schools. David and Chantal manage College-wide enrolment, candidate assessment, financial aid, recruitment and admission communications.

ADVANCEMENT AT UCC The Office of Advancement is responsible for fundraising, communications, alumni relations and friendraising for UCC. The staff members and volunteers involved in advancement are committed to attracting support for UCC in the form of donations, volunteer participation and goodwill in order to achieve the College’s mission. Advancement staff members work with the UCC Association, the parents’ organizations at the Prep and Upper School, volunteers and donors to foster involvement in the community through a myriad of events and activities such as Association Day (A-Day), Founder’s Dinner, class reunions and branch events. Fundraising for the College is directed by the College’s strategic plan. Private funding affects all aspects of school life, including financial assistance, facilities and programs. The

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College’s alumni, parents, faculty and staff have a reputation for giving generously, and they’re responsible for much of the fabric of UCC today. In September 2012, UCC launched the $100-million Think Ahead Campaign, the most ambitious fundraising effort in Canadian independent school history. The Campaign supports the priorities as set out in the College’s strategic plan, specifically renovations to the Upper School facility, financial assistance, boarding, and teaching and program development. Donations to the UCC Fund, our annual fundraising initiative, are counted within the Think Ahead Campaign and involve the collective effort of alumni, parents, faculty, staff and friends to provide crucial support for school-wide priorities that are not funded by tuition and through the operating budget. All members of the community are asked to contribute every year, to the extent that they can. Each year, the Leaving Class — both students and parents — raise funds for the Leaving Class’ gift to the College. Students typically raise between $2,000 and $3,000 for a tangible item. Parents are asked to donate to a Leaving Class scholarship fund. This fund, distributed with preference to a boy demonstrating the greatest need, provides a vehicle for future donations from the class as they celebrate their reunions as Old Boys. Both the Leaving Class students and parents are recognized with a plaque at the College.

UCC ASSOCIATION The following members of the UCC community are considered to be members of the UCC Association: • Old Boys • Parents • Members of the board of governors • Members of the board of trustees of the UCC Foundation • Members of the board of directors of the Upper Canada Educational Foundation and the UCC United Kingdom Foundation • The principal, faculty and staff members • All others who have shown sufficient interest in the welfare of the College

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The UCC Association Council is the governing body of the UCC Association and has 21 elected council members and eight ex-officio council members elected by the community. Old Boys representing various decades and the president or chair of the parent organizations, which are constituent parts of the Association, are included on the Association Council. The purpose of the Association Council is: • To serve as a link between UCC and its members; • To provide programs and services for its members; • And to engage its members in the service of UCC. The role of the Association Council is: School Organization

• To provide governance-level recommendations to the College for major priorities and policies regarding external relations, including friendraising, fundraising and communications. The council also provides advice to the Advancement Office on overall strategies and priorities. Senior staff members present reports and annual objectives to the council. • To actively gather views on broader governance issues at UCC and serve as the major conduit for advocating these positions on behalf of the membership to the board of governors and principal • To be available, individually or in groups, to provide situation-specific advice and assistance in the implementation of friendraising, fundraising and communications programs • To fulfill its constitutional responsibilities and appoint three governors of the College. The Association president also serves as a governor. • To select the annual recipient of the John D. Stevenson Award for outstanding volunteer service to the College and the Harold A.D. Roberts Circle Awards for volunteerism • To identify and cultivate potential volunteers, donors and advocates for UCC. This may include nominating additional individuals for the board of governors, the UCC Foundation board or other groups. Contact Constituency Relations Director Jody Jacobson at 416-488-1125, ext. 2235 for further information.

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COMMON TIES MENTORSHIP PROGRAM The Office of Advancement runs the UCC Common Ties Mentorship Program. The mission of the program is to facilitate mentoring relationships between senior students, alumni (Old Boys) and parents to develop the skills, knowledge and expertise needed to excel educationally, professionally and personally. There are two programs within it: the Alumni Career Mentorship Program and the IB University Mentorship Program. Resume and interview workshops are provided by Common Ties to students in their IB1 year. Mock interview opportunities are available to boys in their IB2 year to prepare them for university entrance as well as future job interviews. Common Ties hosts industry-specific and professional development events each year. Past events have included: • Finance LunchNet; • Legal LunchNet; • MBA Admissions Tips and Tricks; • Green/Sustainability Cocktail; • Effective Networking; • Medical Dinner with 12 Strangers; • Career Management: Thinking Ahead. Contact Lindsay Tarvit at 416-488-1125, ext. 3357 for more information.

THE FOUNDATIONS The UCC Foundation manages and stewards the College’s endowment. The foundation was incorporated under the laws of the Province of Ontario in 1962 and is a charity that’s registered apart from the College. An 11-member board of trustees — drawn from Old Boys, parents and friends of UCC — guides and directs the foundation. The foundation has an endowment of more than $61 million, almost three-quarters of which is held for purposes restricted by donors in various named funds. An annual contribution is made from the endowment to the College based on a formula approved by the board of trustees. The Upper Canada Educational Foundation is incorporated in the State of New York and registered with the Internal Revenue Service (501-C-3). It provides a vehicle for United States-based members of the UCC community to support the College and receive an IRS

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tax receipt. The Upper Canada Educational Foundation is guided by a board of directors and managed by UCC staff members. The UCC United Kingdom Foundation is incorporated in the United Kingdom and registered with Inland Revenue. It provides a vehicle for U.K.-based members of our community to support the College. It’s guided by a board of directors and managed by UCC staff members.

UCC ASSOCIATION EVENTS 2014–2015 Please check the UCC website, www.ucc.on.ca, for updates on all of these and other great events: Reception for members of the Council of 1829, Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2014: The Council of 1829 is the College’s society for individuals who give $1,000 in a fiscal year. School Organization

Association Day, Saturday, Sept. 27, 2014: Don’t miss “A-Day,” UCC’s homecoming and one of the biggest days on the College’s calendar. Come out and enjoy live music, sports, the “KidZone,” club displays, a chess challenge, silent auction, organic market and a barbecue lunch for the entire family. School teams will play football, soccer and volleyball. It’s a great day for alumni, UCC boys and their families to celebrate a great school and community. UCC Association annual general meeting, Wednesday, Oct. 8, 2014 (in conjunction with the College’s community meeting): Members of the Association are encouraged to attend the annual general meeting. In addition to the election of the board, the evening provides an opportunity for members to express their views on the activities of the Association. Founder’s Dinner, February 2015 (date TBD): Founder’s Dinner features a prominent keynote speaker and is the highlight of the Association’s calendar. It’s held annually for all members of the UCC community in the Hewitt Athletic Centre. Reception for College volunteers, Tuesday, May 12, 2015: This reception thanks the College’s Old Boy and parent volunteers.

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Leaving class of 2015 dinner, Tuesday, May 26, 2015: The Association hosts an annual dinner to recognize members of the leaving class. Grandparents and Special Friends Day at the Prep (Forms 6 and 7– Wednesday, May 13, 2015); (SK to Form 5 – Thursday, May 28, 2015): Grandparents (or special friends) of all Prep students are encouraged to register for this fun event that’s held each spring. It includes classroom visits, a concert, tours, refreshments and photographs. Joe Cressy Memorial Golf Tournament, June 2015: This annual tournament includes lunch, 18 holes of golf, barbecue steak dinner and prize presentations. All Old Boys, current and past parents, faculty, staff and friends of the College are welcome to participate. UCC Association branches around the world: The Association operates branches in several locations outside Toronto. All members of the UCC community are welcome at branch events. Consult the UCC website or call the Association offices (416-484-8629) for information regarding locations and times. Listed below are just a few of the cities that will host branch events:

• Kingston, Ontario

• Los Angeles, California

• London, Ontario

• San Francisco, California

• Ottawa, Ontario (every other year)

• Boston, Massachusetts

• Montreal, Quebec

• New York City, New York

• Edmonton, Alberta (every other year)

• London, England

• Calgary, Alberta (every other year)

• Hong Kong, China

• Vancouver, British Columbia

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UPPER CANADA COLLEGE ARCHIVES The UCC archives are a fascinating repository of photographs, documents and artifacts. Under the direction of archivist Jill Spellman (jspellman@ucc.on.ca), the archives promote and preserve UCC’s heritage and serve as its “institutional memory.” Hours: Monday through Friday 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. by appointment only.

What you’ll find: The College’s archival records date back to the mid-19th century and trace the history of UCC. They offer a wealth of information about the history of Upper Canada College, the province of Ontario and the City of Toronto. UCC graduates, faculty members and the College itself have all played an active role in Canadian politics, education, the arts and sports. The current archival collection includes:

School Organization

Access to archival records: Inquiries from the entire UCC community and the general public are welcome. Access to the College’s records is open to authorized College employees who require them to fulfill their responsibilities and when consistent with applicable legislation and appropriate policies of the College. Access to archival records by the UCC community and the public is provided whenever possible. Access may be restricted and require review and approval by the archivist and/or principal.

• Textual records: These are documents produced by the UCC board of governors, the principal, the head of the Preparatory School (at the time) and College associations. The collection also has student records and publications; College Times is the oldest continuously running student publication in Canada, dating back to 1871. • Audio-Visual records: This collection has more than 20,000 photographs, slides, negatives, films and tapes depicting students, faculty members, UCC buildings, theatre productions, sports and UCC’s Norval Outdoor School. • Artifacts: This includes medals, trophies, sweaters, caps, ties, pennants, sports equipment and battalion uniforms.

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UCC PARENTS’ ORGANIZATION Welcome to all new and returning Upper Canada College families. The UCC community revolves around our boys, who are the main focus of every effort of the Upper School Parents’ Organization (PO) and of the Prep Parents’ Organization (PPO), which act as liaisons between faculty, staff, parents and students. By default, all UCC parents already belong to their respective Parents’ Organization. On behalf of the PO, it is my pleasure to invite each of you to become an active participant in our community. The opportunities for volunteering are endless and your experience can be tailored to your availability of time and to your unique talents or interests. All we need is you! Your presence will enhance your son’s experience at the College, your participation will lead to a better understanding of the school environment and I can promise that you will be rewarded with many personal connections and lasting friendships with kindred spirits. You can find complete descriptions of volunteer opportunities under the PO section of the UCC website. To get involved, simply complete the online volunteer form or email the PO volunteer coordinator for more details. Please be sure to visit the Events section of this website regularly, as it provides important school dates, ongoing events and lists many chances to participate or volunteer. Heads Up is a weekly electronic newsletter which will be the primary and official source of information for parents within the UCC community. If you are willing to accept just one piece of advice... my recommendation would be to read Heads Up every week! This will keep you in the know on all things UCC and your boy(s). The PO parent network committee also provides parents with a forum to communicate and receive news and information. The parent network may contact parents throughout the year with new information or reminders, and also helps year reps and house reps to organize parent social events for their sons’ respective years. Many different acronyms may create confusion, but the reality is very simple: PO, PPO, ABC and BBC are all organic parts of UCC which work in unison with the single goal of making Upper Canada College the most fulfilling place for our boys to attend school and become tomorrow’s leaders and great men. Warmest Regards, Barbara Bottini Parents’ Organization president 2014-15

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UCC Parents’ Organization 2014–2015

Barbara Bottini . . . . . . . . . . bb.bottini@gmail.com Karen Arnone . . . . . . . . . . . karnone@bell.net Neera Chopra . . . . . . . . . . . neerachopra@rogers.com Carita Sheehy . . . . . . . . . . . csheehy@rogers.com Liza Murrell . . . . . . . . . . . . . lizapsyd@rogers.com Priti Kawale . . . . . . . . . . . . pritikawale@rogers.com Karen Watson . . . . . . . . . . . karen@watsonhome.ca Stefanie Mahon . . . . . . . . . stefanies@bellnet.ca Patricia Morrison . . . . . . . . . patricia.morrison@rogers.com Jill Adolphe . . . . . . . . . . . . . jill.adolphe@rogers.com

ADVISORY Year 1 Representative . . . . . . . . . . . . . Year 2 Representative . . . . . . . . . . . . . FY Representative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IB1 Representative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IB2 Representatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Community Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Festive Co-Chairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Festive Vice-Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Library* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PPO Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rings and Frames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special Events Co-Chairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Assistant Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Jane Kilburn Boyle . . . . . . . jane@kilburncommunications.com Manasi Paliwal . . . . . . . . . . Manasi_paliwal@hotmail.com Vivi White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vivi.white@rbc.com Julie Rao . . . . . . . . . . . . . . julierao@rogers.com Cathy Tong . . . . . . . . . . . . . cathytong2013@gmail.com Gina Burton . . . . . . . . . . . . gburton@bell.net Roz Heintzman . . . . . . . . . . rjheintzman@gmail.com Jan Harkness . . . . . . . . . . . janharkness@sympatico.ca Elaine Taylor . . . . . . . . . . . . elainemwtaylor@gmail.com Caroline Whitten . . . . . . . . . cwhit10@rogers.com Julie Longhurst . . . . . . . . . . julielonghurst@rogers.com Sandra Cowan . . . . . . . . . . cowanmsandra@gmail.com Stephanie Coffey . . . . . . . . stephaniecoffey@rogers.com Carolyn Everson-Irwin . . . . . ceverson@eversoncompany.ca Perry Lupyrypa . . . . . . . . . . plupyrypa@gmail.com Scott Enman . . . . . . . . . . . . scott.enman@bell.net Noreen Williams . . . . . . . . . nooreen.williams@me.com

School Organization

EXECUTIVE President* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vice-President* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Past President* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Treasurer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parent Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Secretary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Volunteer Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . .

(UCC PO continued)

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TUBS Used Sales Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Leslie Giroday . . . . . . . . . . . Lmgiroday@sympatico.ca Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amelia Rattew . . . . . . . . . . amelia.rattew@gmail.com Used Books Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Janet Dunbar . . . . . . . . . . . janet.dunbar@rogers.com

*appointed positions

THE USED BLUES SHOP (TUBS) The Used Blues Shop (TUBS), operated by parent volunteers, sells used uniforms (shorts, gym T-shirts, grey pants, blazers, dress shirts, khaki pants, etc.) and a limited supply of used textbooks and English/French novels and plays. In addition to supplying students with well-priced uniform items, proceeds from sales at TUBS are used to fund PO initiatives for the benefit of students. All sales at TUBS are on an “As Is” basis, and there are no refunds or exchanges of purchased items.

LOST AND FOUND TUBS is also the home of Lost and Found. The College strongly recommends that all articles of clothing, sports equipment, books and binders be clearly marked with the student’s name and House. Found items are stored in The Used Blues Shop (TUBS), located in the basement across from UCC Press. If a lost item is labelled, TUBS volunteers will attempt to contact boys directly via school email. Lost items are stored in TUBS for the remainder of the term in which they are found; however, 30 days after the end of each term, all unclaimed items become the property of TUBS. These items are then sold by TUBS, with the proceeds going to support the school wish list, or are donated to charity.

TUBS Hours:

Monday – Friday

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Morning

Lunch

Afternoon

8:00 – 9:00 a.m. (except Wednesday)

12:00 – 1:00 p.m.

3:00 – 4:00 p.m. (except Friday)

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DONATIONS/CONSIGNMENT Donations of used uniforms are always gratefully appreciated and are accepted throughout the school year after Labour Day. All donations of clothes must be uniform items, and must be clean and in good repair. TUBS will sell blazers on consignment. Blazers to be consigned for sale must be delivered with cleaners tag attached, in good repair, and with buttons and crest attached. Once a consigned blazer is sold, the consignor’s student account will be credited with 50 per cent of the sale price. In the case of an Old Boy, a cheque will be mailed.

NEW AND USED UNIFORM SALE

School Organization

Every year in the fall, the Parents’ Organization holds a sale where students and parents can buy new and used uniform items required for the school year (blazers, dress shirts, grey flannel pants, khaki pants, socks and belts). New crested navy golf shirts are sold through the Upper School Blues Shop. Purchases are billed to the student’s account, and the profits are used to benefit the school community. A tailor will be on site during the sale for alterations. The altered clothing can then be picked up after Labour Day at The Used Blues Shop (TUBS) (basement across form UCC Press) when completed (see TUBS hours, below). The sale of new and used uniforms will be held in the David Chu Theatre on the following days: Back to School Sale: Thursday, August 28, 2014: 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Tuesday, September 2, 2014: 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Boarders: Sunday, August 31, 2014: 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

TUBS will be open the following days for alteration pick-up, donations and purchases: • Thursday after Labour Day (i.e. the first day of classes): 8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.; 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.; 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. • Friday after Labour Day (i.e. the second day of classes): 8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.; 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

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UCC ARTS BOOSTER CLUB (ABC) The UCC Arts Booster Club was created in 2009 with a mandate to deepen appreciation and understanding of the arts at UCC’s Upper School. Members include parents, faculty, students and Old Boys. Its primary purpose is to bring the “small school” successes of arts students and arts events to the attention of the broader “whole school” community at UCC. It also aims to contribute to school spirit by enlivening school events through the involvement of the arts. The ABC’s specific goals are to: 1. Give recognition to the many boys who participate in the arts at UCC. This is accomplished with the help of the following: • The ABC section of UCC’s Connection e-newsletter, with news, photos and video of arts students and events. This “People magazine” of UCC is distributed to parents, students and a select group of Old Boys each month during the school year. • Regular arts news updates on UCC’s website and Facebook page • Showcasing the activities of arts students at three end-of-term Arts Assemblies each year. • The inclusion of arts students in the Terry Fox Run, Association Day, Festive Marketplace, Winterfest, Founder’s Dinner, spin-a-thons and other school events 2. Celebrate the specific accomplishments of arts students at the annual Spring Arts Festival, Nuit Bleue. This festival showcases the cumulative works of arts students in music, film, visual art, literature, theatre, languages and performance clubs at UCC. 3. Expose students to successful role models with Arts Speakers at three Assemblies each year. The ABC actively encourages Old Boys, parents or other community members active in any area of the arts to share their experiences with the boys.

UCC ARTS BOOSTER CLUB (ABC) BOARD The Arts Booster Club Board includes Parent Representatives for each art at UCC. Each art has a single Parent Representative. The Music parent representative has the additional responsibility of chairing the Music Parent Council which includes Parent Reps for the

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Senior, Intermediate and Junior Jazz Bands, Concert Band, Symphonic Band, Wind Ensemble, String Ensemble and Blue Notes Vocal Ensemble. The Art Parent Representatives are the foundation of the Arts Booster Club. They fulfil a key role, keeping arts parents informed of upcoming activities. They also liaise with arts faculty to gather information and relay important events and successes to the broader UCC community. The ABC relies on parents, faculty, staff and Old Boys to share news, photos and video of successes in the arts inside and outside the walls of UCC. The ABC also works with the Head Steward, Creativity Steward and UCC Administration to coordinate the participation of arts students in school events and assemblies.

ABC BOARD 2014–2015 Co-Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Susan Eplett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .susaneplett@rogers.com

Co-Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lisa Rose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . lisarose624@gmail.com

Vice-Chair and Treasurer . . . . . . . . . . . Olla Birman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ollabirman@gmail.com

News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laura Dallal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mediation@sympatico.ca

Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amelia Rattew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .amelia.rattew@gmail.com

Debating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laura Dallal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mediation@sympatico.ca

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carolyn Everson-Irwin . . . . . . . ceverson@eversoncompany.ca

Film . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marianna Fong . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . jempbbq@yahoo.ca

Literature and Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrea Yap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . andreayap1@gmail.com

Languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jennifer Bell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .rob-jenbell@sympatico.ca

Model UN and OMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lisa Rose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . lisarose624@gmail.com

Music* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Susan Farrow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . sfarrow@4hutch.com

School Organization

Theatre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amelia Rattew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .amelia.rattew@gmail.com

Visual Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TBC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TBC

Special Adviser, Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ofra Harnoy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . harnoy@rogers.com

*denotes additional parent support

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UCC BLUES BOOSTER CLUB (BBC) The Blues Booster Club was established in the fall of 2008 to foster school spirit through athletics. Comprised of parents, Old Boys, faculty and students in the Prep and Upper Schools, the BBC boosts awareness of athletic events and celebrates athletic performance. More specifically, the goals of the BBC are: 1. To increase UCC fans’ (parents, students, faculty and alumni) enjoyment of, and visibility at, athletic events 2. To increase communication regarding, and visibility of, UCC athletics 3. To increase attendance at all athletic events, including Association Day, Friday Night Lights, Winterfest, May Day and Spirit of Athletics 4. To celebrate team, individual and coaching athletic performance The foundation of the BBC is the Team Parent Program. Every team in the school is assigned one or two Team Parents who act as the liaison between the coach, the team and the parents. Their main areas of responsibility include communication and spirit-raising activities. In addition, the BBC supplements the team pages of UCC’s athletics site, which is filled with stories, photos and highlights of all athletic teams within the UCC community. The BBC works closely with the Head Steward, the Athletic, Creativity and Social Stewards, and the Blue Army Generals to plan and coordinate spirit-raising activities for parents and students at all major athletic events. Go Blues!

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UCC BLUES BOOSTER CLUB (BBC) EXECUTIVE 2014–2015

PRESIDENTS

Mitty and Peter van der Velden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mittyvan@rogers.com

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . plv@lumiracapital.com

VICE-PRESIDENTS

Carita and Neil Sheehy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . csheehy@rogers.com

PAST PRESIDENT

Donna Simpson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . johndonnasimpson@aol.com

Joanie Sternthal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . joansternthal@gmail.com

Julie Norton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . jewel7@rogers.com

Janice Bastow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jlbastow@hotmail.com

School Organization

EVENT COORDINATORS

Sandi Meyrick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . sjmeyrick@meyricklaw.com

Marci Muchnik . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Muchnik@rogers.com

Sue Murphy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . suesteve@rogers.com

VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR

Ruth Gould . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ruthgould@rbccm.com

TEAM PARENT COORDINATORS

Upper School:

Priti Kawale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pritikawale@rogers.com

Julie Rao . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .julierao@rogers.com

Prep School:

Lisa Assaf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . lassaf@bell.net

Michelle Meneley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . michelle@meneley.com

(booster club continued)

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COMMUNICATIONS

Beth Burgess . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . bethburgess@rogers.com

PHOTOGRAPHY

Rajbir Ahluwalia, Photographer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . rajbirahluwalia@rogers.com

Sophia Yip, Photographer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .sophia.yip@rogers.com

MERCHANDISE

Lillian Chan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .lillianchan@rogers.com

ALUMNI

Cindy Secord . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . cindysecord@yahoo.com

Susan Bodie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .sbodie@bosleyrealestate.com

Mary Bartlett-Keating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .keatlett@rogers.com

FACULTY AND STUDENT ADVISERS

Dave Shaw, Admissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . dshaw@ucc.on.ca

Brent MacKay, Athletic Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .bmackay@ucc.on.ca

Nigel White, Athletic Director, Prep School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . nwhite@ucc.on.ca

Ben Mahon, Head Steward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ben.mahon@ucc.on.ca

Tyler Burns, Athletic Steward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . tyler.burns@ucc.on.ca Eric Rogic, Blue Army General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . eric.rogic@ucc.on.ca

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Cam White, Blue Army General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . cameron.white@ucc.on.ca

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Section 10: Residential Life section 10

Upper Canada College has accommodated boarding students since its founding in 1829. Since then, the boarding program has served Canadian and international families who seek a rigorous liberal education for their sons. The boarding community today provides unparalleled opportunities for personal growth and the unique advantage of experiencing College life to its fullest. Boarding students at UCC enjoy the benefits of a close-knit residential community and the advantages of the rich academic and co-curricular programs of the wider school. Boarding students, in fact, consider themselves to be the heart of the College. This section of the Upper School Family Handbook describes the boarding program and support services. It also provides a survey of the expectations, regulations and rules that govern boarding life.

RESIDENCE PERSONNEL Faculty members and staff who participate in the residential program are responsible for the supervision and counselling of students. They strive to create a family atmosphere based on mutual respect, support and caring. Residential Life

Senior Residential House Adviser: Four senior residential house advisers, along with the four residential assistants, oversee the well-being of each boarding student, and supervise the smooth and orderly operation of the residence and its services. Senior residential house advisers encourage each student to broaden and deepen his talents and interests and to participate fully in the life of the College community. They communicate with parents on the socio-emotional issues that may require collaboration with the Health Centre and the Centre for Learning. They work collaboratively with day house advisers to oversee the academic development of each student. The senior residential house adviser will communicate home at least once per month. Day House Adviser: The day house adviser will be the chief contact with boarding students on day-to-day academic matters. The day house adviser will collaborate with the senior residential house adviser and the Administration Coordinator, Upper School to arrange teacher meetings when residential parents visit the campus during the school year. These

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meetings are designed to replace parent/teacher evenings, which usually do not fit well with residential parents’ visits to campus. Associate House Adviser: Associate house advisers, who reside on the College grounds or in residence, assist the senior residential house advisers. They provide guidance, support and encouragement for students; they will provide an essential tutoring and supervisory role on weekdays and weekends and are accountable to the senior residential house adviser and the Director of Residential Life. With the senior residential house advisers, they serve as advisers on duty during the week and on weekends. The associate house advisers are expected to be part of the team that organizes and supervises weekend programs. Residential Assistants: Residential assistants work closely with the senior residential house advisers to provide a strong advising team. They also play a supervisory role in the boarding community and provide individual and group tutoring. Residential assistants also assist with and lead weekend and other enrichment activities for boarding students.

BOARDING CONTACT NUMBERS BOARDING—SENIOR RESIDENTIAL HOUSE ADVISERS

Director of Residential Life and University Counsellor – Boarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Andrew Turner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. 2500 Seaton’s House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gareth Evans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. 4151 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Amit Morris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. 3174 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Weekday Cell . . . . . . . . . . . 647-294-5305 Wedd’s House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carl Beaudoin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. 4054 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mark Baxter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. 4094 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Weekday Cell . . . . . . . . . . . . 647-294-5306 Seaton’s and Wedd’s . . . . . . . . . . . Weekend Cell . . . . . . . . . . . . 647-294-5306

For any emergency during the weekend, please call the weekend cell number. A residential staff member is available 24 hours a day.

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THE FIVE ESSENTIAL AGREEMENTS 1. Communication: Cell phones, email and text messages must be used to keep in contact with residential staff (e.g.: leaving campus or missing breakfast). All students signed in for the weekend must text the associate house adviser (AHA) during the weekend meals (Saturday and Sunday) when they are not attending in person. 2. 11:00 p.m. Curfew (weekday): Students are not to engage in activities that will disturb an environment conducive to study or sleep (Skype, cell phones, co-operative study, etc.) 3. Breakfast, Assembly, Day Advising, House Meeting, Community Meeting, Curfew: Attending to all these commitments is mandatory. 4. Co-curricular (3:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.): Students must be involved in a school activity two terms out of three; the first term is mandatory. The House must be empty from 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. 5. Clean Rooms: Beds made, desk tidy and mess removed from the floor Residential Life

EXPECTATIONS As members of the College community, boarders are expected to uphold the principles of Our Shared Ideals. Further, as members of a community that prizes above all personal responsibility, respect for others and citizenship, boarding students are expected to: • Be respectful and thoughtful of each other. • Encourage, support and celebrate the achievements of others. • Demonstrate personal responsibility. • Meet all standards and rules, and be good citizens. • Be respectful of boarding staff and faculty.

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COMMUNICATION With the Student’s House Adviser: Parents are encouraged to contact the senior residential house adviser to discuss any matter related to their son’s personal well-being and progress. With Students: Family communication is important to boarding students. Parents are encouraged to keep in touch with their son. In cases of emergency, the senior residential house adviser can expedite contact. Personal Cell Phones: Students are required to have cell phones to field incoming calls, as well as have the ability to communicate with UCC staff members whenever there is a need. Although the College requires parents to provide their sons with cell phones for regular communication, the use of cell phones is considered to be a privilege and is subject to the basic rules of courtesy and respect for others in shared living. Cell phones should be used responsibly and always in a manner that does not disturb the rights and comfort of other students. The senior residential house adviser reserves the right to restrict or remove this privilege. Skype: Many students have chosen to use Skype technology to communicate with their families. Families at home are encouraged to download Skype technology so they can have visual and verbal communication with their son. Be aware that the senior residential house advisers are comfortable using Skype technology to communicate with parents. Mail: A senior student brings the mail to the residence each day and distributes it to individual students. Email: Each student is given a computer network account with email access activated at the beginning of the Fall term. Students are expected to check their UCC email accounts each day. Haiku: House advisers and Residential assistants will post announcements that apply to grade levels or the entire House. Each student is expected to check their respective House course sites each day.

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Facebook: Network services for boarders include responsible use of Facebook technology. To date, many students and families use this technology as a means of communication. Education regarding use of Facebook is ongoing; community meeting time has been devoted to ensuring all students understand the potential dangers of posting photographs and messages. By Fax: Students can send faxes from the Seaton’s senior residential house adviser’s study. Incoming faxes sent to the senior residential house adviser’s fax number will be placed in students’ mailboxes.

SUPPORT SERVICES FOR BOARDING STUDENTS ACADEMIC SUPPORT

Residential Life

Senior and associate residential house advisers and residential assistants represent most of the academic disciplines and are available for remedial help and guidance when on duty. Residential students are also encouraged to seek extra help from their teachers. If needed, the senior residential house adviser will work collaboratively with the day house adviser to arrange for tutoring or assistance from the Centre for Learning and/or external services. Additionally, Centre for Learning support will be available during evening study. The Upper School Library is open to all students Monday to Thursday from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. On Fridays, the library opens at 8:00 a.m. and closes at 6:00 p.m. On Sunday, the Library is open for Year 1 to Foundation Year students for compulsory evening study from 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.. When residential students come to the library on weekday evenings for Study Hall, senior student assistants on duty can provide assistance with library orientation and research.

COMPUTER SERVICES Students will be equipped with MacBook laptop computers for use in the classroom as well as the Boarding Houses. Each Boarding House is equipped with a print station. It is strongly recommended that students do not bring their own computer. There will be no Internet access provided for these computers, and no IT support. There will be a full wireless network available to all students living in Seaton’s and Wedd’s. Residential

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students are reminded that access to the network is a privilege and is subject to the Acceptable Use Policy for Students – Use of Computer Technology. Students must always use computers in a manner that respects roommates, especially during study and after “lights out.” Students should never allow their computers to become “game centres” that disturb others through excessive noise. Students should also be aware that federal and provincial laws apply to activities on the network. Laptop computers are collected for boys in Year 1, Year 2 and Foundation Year students at their designated curfew time and are stored safely until the morning. The senior residential house adviser reserves the right to restrict or withdraw network access and to apply appropriate disciplinary action.

FOOD SERVICES Cafeteria food service is provided under contract by Aramark Campus Services. Senior residential house advisers and senior student representatives meet with the Director of Food Services to review menu planning, organize special dinners and events, and address residential students’ needs and requests. Special dietary requirements should be discussed with the senior residential house adviser and the Director of Food Services. The College Food Committee, including representatives from the residential community, meets with the Director of Food Services. Food Services staff are to be treated with the respect and cooperation due to all members of the College community. Following meals, students are required to take cutlery, dishware and trays to the appropriately marked areas provided, and to leave their tables neat and tidy. Breakfast: Breakfast is served each school day at 7:30 a.m. in the Upper Dining Hall. Unless otherwise stipulated, all residential students are to report for breakfast, and attendance is taken by the supervising residential assistant on duty. Students are required to be in appropriate dress. Student Identicards must be presented. Lunch: At lunch on school days, residential students join day students and may use the Upper Dining Hall for a complete hot meal or the Lower Dining Hall for a range of prepared hot or cold fast foods. In both areas, Student Identicards must be presented. In the Lower Dining Hall, residential students are set a cost limit per meal as determined by Aramark Food Services, and purchases above the limit will be charged to the student account. In the Upper Dining Hall, all students are required to be in school dress.

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On Saturdays and Sundays, brunch is served from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Casual dress may be worn. Dinner: Dinner is served each weekday from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. in the Upper Dining Hall. On Saturdays and Sundays, dinner is served in the Upper Dining Hall from 5:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Dress is casual. Snack Bars: During regular school days, residential students may use the Snack Bar in the Lower Dining Hall or the Student Centre during scheduled hours. Purchases are by Student Identicard. Toast and Milk Room: For light snacking, Toast and Milk Rooms are stocked with appropriate snacks, including a fresh fruit bowl. These rooms are available on the main floor in both Boarding Houses throughout the school day, but closed during weekday breakfasts. Users of the Toast and Milk Rooms are responsible for keeping the room clean and tidy for others, and must use the facility safely.

Residential Life

Common Room Cold Drink Refrigerator: A variety of juices and water are stocked daily to allow the students easy access to refreshments following the school day or during evening study. After Regular Meal Hours: Residential students returning from games, after-school activities or practices after meal service are eligible to receive meal money for the purpose of purchasing a meal missed for school-related activities. Use of Quadrangle Barbecues: Boys in Seaton’s and Wedd’s are welcome to use the barbecues that are located outside Seaton’s and Wedd’s Houses. Use of the barbecues is restricted to before 10:00 p.m. Food Deliveries: Students who wish to order food by delivery in the evening should do so only after evening study and no later than 10:00 p.m. for all grades. Restrictions on the possession of food storage and cooking appliances are described later in this section.

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HEALTH AND COUNSELLING SERVICES

Nurses: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Avia Peacock, RN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. 2270

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cindy Lima Rivera, RN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ext. 2270

Founded in 1952, our Upper School Health Centre has evolved into a multi-faceted Health Centre addressing the individual needs of all of our students. Taking a holistic approach to the physical and emotional well-being of the boys, we have nurses, a School Counsellor, an Athletic Therapist and a doctor available and eager to address the challenges presented by some of our boys as they journey through the Upper School. When hospital visits are required, residential assistants are available to accompany the student to and from the hospital.

OUR GOALS • To provide services that address the physical, emotional and mental health and safety of our students • To provide our boarding community with professional health care services • To create an atmosphere of acceptance and harm reduction; our doors are open to any student, with any problem, and all services are confidential • To work collaboratively as a team of health professionals and, as appropriate, with teachers, parents, students and administration to serve our students

THE RIGHTS OF OUR STUDENTS • The right to confidentiality • The right to make their own decisions • The right to accurate medical information Through in-class teaching, individual sessions, confidential support groups and the services of registered nurses, a School Counsellor, an Athletic Therapist and a doctor, we at the Health Centre do our very best to provide every boy who comes through our doors with the care he seeks and needs.

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SCHOOL COUNSELLOR The School Counsellor, Susan Boeckh, is available during school hours, Monday to Friday, in the Health Centre for confidential counselling. No appointment is necessary. The School Counsellor also assists house advisers, staff and parents in promoting the well-being of the students and advises as necessary on external referral and assessment. Telephone: 416-488-1125, ext. 2263.

SUPPORT GROUPS

Residential Life

Since 1993, teachers and Health Centre staff have led support groups for students. The groups are voluntary and confidential in nature, and are intended to provide a safe and caring environment in which students can support each other regarding issues in their lives. To date, groups have focused on the themes of substance use, changing families, grieving and motivation. The UCC staff involved in organizing and running the support groups form the Core Team. Core Team members who serve as co-facilitators of each support group do not act as counsellors or therapists and therefore do not counsel students or give them advice. Rather, they use open-ended questioning techniques that help students reflect individually and collectively on their lives, their behaviour, their options and their choices. A student’s participation in a support group is considered confidential and, while we encourage students to discuss their participation with their parents, we do not actively seek parental consent. Questions or concerns about the support group program should be directed to the Health Centre.

CONFIDENTIALITY We want to ensure we uphold the standards and guidelines of our profession in respecting confidentiality of our students. Beyond situations where we suspect harm to self or others, abuse (sexual or otherwise), or abuse of professional boundaries by other members of the faculty or staff towards a student, all visits to the Health Centre are held in the strictest confidence. This is communicated clearly to all students visiting the Health Centre.

SPORTS INJURY CLINIC The College’s Sports Injury Clinic is located in the basement of the Upper School, Room 077. The clinic is open Monday to Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., and on Saturdays

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for UCC sports fixtures only. The clinic has full athletic rehabilitative facilities for the school’s athletes. Assessments and rehabilitation are undertaken by appointment only. The clinic is staffed by Head Athletic Therapist Sonya Pridmore, CAT(c), with assistance from two yearly athletic therapy co-op student therapists. The clinic’s extension is 2278.

PERSONAL FINANCIAL SERVICES Parents are required to make arrangements for student banking through an ATM and/or one of the very numerous Canadian bank branches in nearby Forest Hill Village, Avenue Road at St. Clair or Yonge Street at St. Clair commercial areas. Discretionary personal expenses are considered to be a matter between parents and son, monitored by easily accessible banking statements. Senior residential house advisers will assist with guidance about expenditures as requested. As an approximate guide, the College recommends the following as reasonable weekly personal allowances for residential students: $30.00 for Year 1 and 2, $35.00 for Foundation Year, and $40.00 for the senior grades for movies, refreshments and other discretionary costs.

RESIDENTIAL STUDENTS’ TRAVEL ARRANGEMENTS Parents are advised to make travel bookings and plans well in advance, so as not to conflict with class time and examination schedules. The schedule of major dates and events should be consulted. Passports should be left in the care of the senior residential house adviser for safekeeping. Concerns and questions about travel arrangements should be discussed with the senior residential house adviser, who will involve other offices as required. Upon request, senior residential house advisers will ask the residential assistant to accompany the student to and from the airport in a cab.

STUDENT EDUCATIONAL VISAS Families are to be reminded that student visas may need to be renewed for each academic year. Students or families that have questions about the process should consult with Tricia Rankin in the Admissions Office. Please note that a multi-entry visa may be necessary for school academic or co-curricular programming outside of Canada.

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HEALTH INSURANCE Health insurance requirements for residential students are reviewed in Section 7.

LAUNDRY SERVICE Year 1–Foundation Year students are provided with a laundry service, whereby their clothing and bedding is cleaned regularly by a staff member who operates washing machines and dryers in Seaton’s and Wedd’s. Many boys prefer to bring their own linen, pillows and duvets from home. The Houses are also equipped with washers and dryers for senior-level students to use in the evenings and on weekends. There is a swipe card protocol for the use of the machines available for senior-level students. The use of the swipe-card machines is encouraged in order to help the students make the transition to university life. We strongly encourage boys to have their name clearly identifiable on their clothing. The College does not assume responsibility for articles lost or damaged in the laundry. Heavy sweaters, wool pants, jackets, blazers and some sports apparel should be dry-cleaned. Residential students may use dry-cleaning services nearby in Forest Hill Village or in the Yonge and St. Clair area. Residential Life

THE UPPER SCHOOL BLUES SHOP The Upper School Blues Shop is located on the lower level of the Upper School. School and athletic supplies and UCC clothing are available. Students must present their UCC Student Identicards for purchases and are given a receipt for all purchases made at the shop. The Finance Office issues monthly itemized accounts for payment.

School Facilities Outside of class time, all students are encouraged to make full use of school facilities, including the playing fields, track, swimming pool, tennis courts, the SAS Fitness Centre and training rooms, music practice rooms, art room, science project rooms, computer labs and the Creativity Centre. During the school year, at specific hours on Sunday, Monday and Thursday, the William P. Wilder Arena is available for skating and shinny hockey.

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COMMON FACILITIES IN THE BOARDING HOUSES Within each residence are the following common spaces: • Storage and trunk rooms (boxes, suitcases, skis, bicycles, etc.) • General meeting and TV room • Common Room (billiards, games, books)

DRESS FOR SCHOOL AND BOARDING Requirements for school dress, found in Section 7, should be carefully reviewed. All residential students are expected to meet the standards for regular school dress and First Dress (required for special ceremonies, when representing the College, or on specific field trips). Blue-crested UCC track suits are worn at games.

CASUAL AND LEISURE DRESS Outside of school hours and on weekends, residential students may wear casual attire. Students should bring a full range of comfortable casual clothing, sufficient for about eight days (to allow time for laundering).

CLOTHING GUIDELINES The College suggests the following guidelines for weekly school dress and casual dress.

WEEKLY SCHOOL WEAR • Crested school blazer and two pairs of grey flannel pants • Sports jacket • Dress shirts (white, plain light colour, quiet stripe or pattern) • Pairs of dark socks • Pairs of white socks • Running shoes • Underwear or boxers • Belts

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• Dress and casual shoes • Pairs of gym shorts (blue or white) • Gym T-shirts (UCC-specific only) • House and school ties • Bathing suit

CASUAL WEAR • Pajamas • Sandals • Bathrobe • Wash cloths • Bath towels • Rainwear • Toiletries (shampoo, soap, shaving equipment) • A selection of after-school and weekend casual wear (at the discretion of the individual) Residential Life

• Warm winter clothing (winter coat, hat, gloves)

OPTIONAL ATTIRE • Skates, cleats

OTHER ITEMS • Laundry bag

PERSONAL APPEARANCE AND HYGIENE Students are to be clean-shaven at all times. Hair must be neat, well-groomed and off the face. Students are to have regular haircuts. Barber shops are available in Forest Hill Village and the Yonge and St. Clair area. At all times students are to be clean in person and apparel.

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ROOM DECORATION, FURNISHINGS AND APPLIANCES FURNISHINGS The College provides a bed, desk, desk chair, study lamp and a whiteboard for individual use. Each student is also assigned an individually keyed closet and a chest of drawers for personal storage. Additional furniture is not necessary; however, some students bring their own desk chairs. Other special requests must first seek the permission of the senior residential house adviser. Furniture should not be moved to another room without the permission of the senior residential house adviser.

POSTERS AND DECORATIONS Students are allowed to decorate their personal space, but the following basic rules apply: • Respect for Others: Posters and other decorations must respect the fundamental standards and values upheld by the College and by the residential community. While we encourage personal expression, the rights and values of others who live in and serve the residential community — which includes roommates, other residential students, house advisers, staff, parents or other visitors — must be respected at all times. Because all residential students live in and are responsible to a community, they must restrain what they, and in some instances their parents, may consider a personal “right” out of respect for the dignity of others. In particular, posters that portray gender and race in a manner that offends the standards of the community are unacceptable. While every effort is taken to educate residential students, the senior residential house adviser and his associates are final arbiters in these matters, and residential students and parents are expected to respect their judgment. • To prevent damage to walls, only semi-transparent tape or non-staining adhesives should be used to affix posters. • Because of fire hazards and maintenance problems, articles may not be hung from the ceiling.

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RADIOS, TELEVISIONS AND COMPUTER MUSIC PLAYERS Radios and computers used for music or movie watching purposes should be equipped with headphones so as to not disturb others. Television sets in student rooms are not allowed. The most appropriate location for computer gaming is in the basement entertainment areas.

COOKING APPLIANCES Because of the obvious risks, no cooking is allowed in student rooms, corridors and other public areas. Students should therefore not bring cooking appliances. Milk and Toast Rooms are equipped with toasters and microwave ovens and may be used, with care, by residential students for heating packaged foods. With the permission of the senior residential house adviser only, students may acquire or share small, low-wattage refrigerators, which should always be used with health and safety standards in mind.

SECURITY, HEALTH AND SAFETY SECURITY Residential Life

Every effort is made to ensure the security of personal property. The residences are equipped with exterior door locks that have card swipe access and security cameras on every door. Within the residences, for safety reasons and to promote and enhance a community environment, there is an “open door” policy for all bedrooms and common areas. Students are not provided with locks to the doors of their rooms, but each boy has a key to a personal closet where valuable items should be kept. Keys: The key to the personal closet is the responsibility of the student. There will be a charge to the student’s account if keys are not returned at the end of the school year. Valuables: It is strongly recommended that students do not bring large amounts of cash or valuable jewelry into the residence at any time. Students are responsible for the safety of their possessions. The College’s insurance policy does not cover loss or damage to personal property. Valuables, money and passports should be kept locked in a student’s

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closet or given to the senior residential house adviser for safekeeping. Every article must be clearly labelled. Storage: All suitcases, trunks, skis and bicycles should be clearly labelled and stored in the basement rooms provided.

FIRE SAFETY Residential students are required to respect fire safety standards and regulations at all times. Tampering with fire safety detectors and equipment is strictly prohibited. Serious offences could result in possible expulsion. Fire safety will be reviewed during the New to Blue Orientation Program and practiced during the school year when all students are in residence. Cooking: Activities such as the use of hotplates for cooking or any other cooking device is prohibited except in specific areas (Milk and Toast Rooms). There will be an escalating level of disciplinary measure for using these sorts of items in the Boarding House, which could lead to suspension. Open Flame: The use of open flame in the residential community is strictly prohibited. The health and safety of all persons in the residential community is at risk when the students choose to use lighters, light candles, use incense burners or smoke in the Boarding Houses. Students caught engaging in any of these activities will likely be expelled from the College.

FIRE ALARM AFTER SCHOOL HOURS IN THE BOARDING HOUSES When the alarm sounds, the following routine is to be followed: 1. All windows and doors are to be closed. 2. Lights are to be turned off. 3. Students and any visitors are to walk (not run) and assemble quickly in the main school entrance under the Clocktower for an attendance check. 4. Students are not to return to the residence until the Fire Warden gives permission.

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ROOM INSPECTION The College has a responsibility to ensure that health, safety and fire code standards are maintained in the Boarding Houses, as in all areas of the school, and that school regulations and rules are met. Members of the College Health and Safety Committee, in the company of the Director of Residential Life, carry out regular inspections of the Boarding Houses, including public areas, rooms and sports lockers, to ensure that health and safety standards are met. The Boarding Houses are also routinely inspected by housekeeping staff to ensure that standards of cleanliness and order are maintained.

VISITOR PERMISSION POLICY The Visitor Permission Policy gives direction to residential students who wish to invite guests, while respecting the safety and rights of other residential students. 1. Parents are encouraged to visit their son while he is living in the residences. Family members must remember that they need to be accompanied by a residential student upon entering the facilities to help ensure that the safety and rights of other residential students are met. Residential Life

2. Day students may not enter the Boarding Houses unless they are accompanied by a residential student. On weekdays, no visitors are allowed after 10:00 p.m. On weekends, no visitors are allowed after 11:00 p.m. 3. Under no circumstances are strangers allowed to gain entry to the Boarding Houses. Their presence in the boarding vicinity should be reported immediately to a house adviser, a residential assistant or Security. 4. Female visitors: At most times, female visitors are not permitted in the Boarding Houses; however, special invitations for social gatherings will occur over the course of the school year.

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CARE AND MAINTENANCE OF ROOMS AND COMMON AREAS PERSONAL SPACE To provide a comfortable and orderly place in which to live and study, and to enable the cleaning and maintenance of the facilities in the residence, students are reminded of the following rules and expectations: • Beds are to be made before Assembly each weekday, with the exception of the day on which linen is changed. • Soiled laundry should be kept in laundry bags. • Desks, personal areas and cupboards should be kept tidy to promote personal responsibility and good study habits, respect roommates, and allow housekeeping staff to clean. • Room configuration should be maintained in such a way as to enable cleaning staff to dust, sweep and polish readily. • Wires and extension cords relating to technology should not inhibit cleaning and should be taped above the baseboard.

ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP Students are expected to demonstrate environmental responsibility in their actions by using natural resources such as water and energy wisely and efficiently. In student rooms where motion sensors are not in place, students must get into the habit of turning lights, computers and other technology off.

RECYCLING All students are expected to separate waste according to glass, cans, plastic, paper and cardboard, and to use the marked receptacles.

DAMAGE Students are reminded that the boarding facilities must be treated with the same respect that would be expected at their family home. Damage must be reported immediately to

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the senior residential house adviser or residential assistant. Any damage to personal or common rooms will be repaired and the cost charged to the student’s account.

REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE Maintenance and housekeeping staff routinely inspect common areas and washrooms. Students should report items for repair or replacement, and maintenance concerns, to the senior residential house adviser. Replacement light bulbs may be obtained from staff.

ACCESS TO MAIN BUILDING AFTER REGULAR SCHOOL HOURS The following guidelines are in place to provide boarding students with convenient access to the Main Building, while maintaining security and safety for everyone. Boarding students are reminded that they should carry their Student Identicards with them at all times, and use these Identicards responsibly. In particular, boarding students must report the loss of Identicards to their senior residential house adviser and to the Security office immediately. Identicards are for personal use only and should never be loaned or given to another student. Residential Life

Regular School Days: The Access Policy for students is described on page 120. After the Main Building is locked, boarding students may gain access up to 10:30 p.m. by using their Identicards at designated Quadrangle doors, as well as the Basement Clocktower door. All boarding students are required to leave the Main Building by 11:00 p.m. and are to cooperate fully with Security staff and follow their direction. Weekends and Holidays in Term: The Main Building is normally locked during weekends and holidays in term. Boarding students may gain access to the Main Building by using their Student Identicards at the Quadrangle doors or the Basement Clocktower door. All boarding students are required to leave the Main Building by 11:00 p.m., and are to cooperate respectfully with Security staff and follow their direction. On long weekends, residents’ rooms will be locked at 6:00 p.m. on the last school day (half day or regular day) prior to the long weekend. Students are not allowed back to residence until 4:00 p.m. on the Monday.

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DAILY SCHEDULE AND STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY In addition to meeting the standards and rules expected of all students at Upper Canada College, residential students are held responsible to the following daily schedule.

REGULAR SCHOOL DAYS Breakfast: On school days, all residential students are expected to attend breakfast in the Upper Dining Hall, where attendance will be taken. Before Assembly, students should tidy their rooms and work spaces. Attendance at Assemblies: Residential students will attend school Assembly at 8:30 a.m. in Laidlaw Hall. Attendance at Class: If a residential student accumulates three unexcused absences, he will receive a three-day boarding suspension. Return to the Boarding Houses during the School Day: Residential students may return to the Houses at recess and during the lunch period. While on spare periods, Foundation Year and IB students may return to their rooms, but are expected to engage in quiet study or relaxation. Lunch: All students will take lunch in the Upper Dining Hall, Lower Dining Hall or Student Centre, as described in the section on Food Services. End of the School Day: Students will be involved in school athletics, music, theatre and service events for two terms out of three, and everyone will be involved in term one. House Meetings: House Meetings occur after dinner, Monday to Thursday (with a full community meeting of Seaton’s and Wedd’s and the Director of Residential Life on Wednesday evenings), and later in the evening on Sundays. Attendance is compulsory and an attendance check is conducted. Absence from a House Meeting is only permitted with the prior permission of the adviser on duty or the senior residential house adviser. Normal protocol for receiving permission would be a face-to-face meeting or a call to the adviser on duty’s cell phone.

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Dinner: All students will take dinner in the Upper Dining Hall, as described in the section on Food Services. Students should be in neat, casual dress. Evening Study: During evening study, Monday to Thursday, there will be a two-hour compulsory study period. Students are to work consistently and quietly in individual study in their rooms or designated study areas. Students in Year 1 and Year 2 are normally required to attend supervised evening study. At the beginning of study, every student will be expected to confirm their goals for the two-hour period. At the end of study, students will need to confirm whether their goals were completed. This information will be documented by the residential assistant on duty. Other students may be required to attend evening study for a designated period of time so that support and monitoring can be provided. Students studying in their rooms are allowed to visit other rooms only for consultation and must not disturb others. Students who wish to use library resources, computers or the Student Centre should first inform the adviser on duty. Absence from evening study is normally allowed only for research at local public libraries or for approved school, cultural or recreational events.

Residential Life

Evening Free Time: After evening study, students may continue with their work and seek extra help. They are encouraged to use the school athletic, cultural and recreational facilities, according to availability and conditions for use. Year 1 and Year 2 students may not leave College grounds during this time without a face-to-face meeting with the adviser on duty, the senior residential house adviser or the residential assistant. All students leaving the grounds must follow proper sign-out procedures as posted and must always be available to be in contact by cell phone, email or text message. Lights Out: Students in Year 1 and Year 2 must be in their rooms and in bed by 10:45 p.m. Students in Foundation Year to IB2 must be in their rooms for evening check by the adviser on duty at 11:00 p.m. Students in Foundation Year are expected to have lights out at 11:30 p.m. unless given prior permission by the adviser on duty. All IB students are allowed to work later in the evening. Late night study is monitored by the residential assistant until 1:00 a.m. It is expected at this time that all students will be in bed with their lights out.

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Friday and Weekend Leave: All students will apply for, and meet the terms of, leave arrangements on Fridays and weekends. The Leave Policy is described below.

WEEKEND ACTIVITIES While classes are not held on Saturdays, a wide range of co-curricular, athletic, social and community activities occur on weekends, and residential students are expected to be fully involved. In addition, there are planned weekend events and activities for residential students, and many opportunities for entertainment and enrichment in the surrounding community. Some of these weekend activities are compulsory (community service), and others are chosen from a menu of possibilities. Senior residential house advisers will oversee and participate in many of these activities and will ensure that there is a balance between activities that have no expense and others that may have a cost attached. Costs for activities will be advertised prior to sign-up. Organized House Events: On a number of weekends during each term, specific grades or sometimes all students may be required to stay either on Friday or Saturday night to participate in organized House events. Some events are highly structured, such as the New to Blue Orientation Program for new students at UCC’s Norval Outdoor School, an orientation tour of the city and its transit system, and visits to such sites as Canada’s Wonderland. Other possible planned activities include bike tours, rock climbing, a winter ski program and outings to various cultural events, community service and environmental activities.

WEEKEND SCHEDULES FRIDAY NIGHT

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5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Dinner

6:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m.

School activities or free time

11:00 p.m.

Attendance check will be taken by the adviser on duty for Year 1 and Year 2 students.

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FRIDAY NIGHT 12:00 midnight

Bed and lights out for students in Year 1 and Year 2. Attendance check will be taken by the adviser on duty for Foundation Year students. House quiet.

1:00 a.m.

Entire House accounted for by the adviser on duty and Duty Senior.

1:00 a.m. – 1:30 a.m.

The house adviser and Duty Senior will ensure that the entire House is settled.

SATURDAY 11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Brunch in the Upper Dining Hall. Student attendance is taken over the brunch period.

1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

School activities, organized weekend programs or free time

5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Dinner. Attendance check

6:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m.

School activities, House events or free time

10:00 p.m. – 1:30 a.m.

Same as Friday schedule

SUNDAY Brunch in the Upper Dining Hall. Student attendance is taken over the brunch period.

1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Free time; school facilities are available, weekend programming may be occurring.

5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Dinner

6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

Free time, study

9:00 p.m.

All weekend leave ends; attendance check and House Meeting

9:30 p.m. – curfew

Study (as on week nights)

10:45 p.m.

All students in Year 1 and Year 2 are to be ready for bed and lights out.

11:00 p.m.

Lights out for Foundation Year and IB1, and IB2s to their rooms. All students to be in their rooms for attendance check by the senior residential house adviser or the residential assistant

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11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

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LEAVE POLICY FOR BOARDING STUDENTS Residential students are expected to be full and active participants in all aspects of school life. At the same time, it is realized that the College is situated in the centre of a vibrant city, and students are allowed reasonable access to the important opportunities available there. The Leave Policy is flexible and is designed to promote responsible use of leisure time. The guidelines in granting leave are based on the assumed maturity of different age groups. However, leave is always granted on an individual basis and always at the discretion of the senior residential house adviser. The senior residential house adviser bases the decisions on the following criteria: academic progress, citizenship within the House, a student’s responsibility to school activities and the suitability of the proposed leave. Poor citizenship or disciplinary action may result in a restriction of leave. Local Leave: This is defined as leaving College grounds for personal reasons after school and before dinner and House Meetings. Residential students are always accountable to the senior residential house adviser and the adviser on duty for their after-school activities, and prior permission must be sought for Local Leave. Procedures for this accountability are communicated to students in September. One important piece of communication is that students are required to have a cell phone and to program the cell phone number of the adviser on duty. Leave Involving Missing an Attendance Check: Residential students are required to be present for all attendance checks at times specified. If a student requires leave to miss an attendance check, he must first receive permission from the adviser on duty. If the adviser on duty is unavailable, the student must consult his senior residential house adviser. Monday to Thursday Evening Leave: The two hours specifically set aside for study on these evenings are obviously most important. For this reason, leave at these times is granted only under very special circumstances and only with the prior permission of the adviser on duty or the senior residential house adviser. Weekend Leave: Students may request permission for weekend leave during Thursday study period by completing the online Weekend Leave Sheet. Leave requests must be

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approved by the senior residential house adviser, and students must adhere strictly to all Leave arrangements. A student who fails to complete the online Weekend Leave Sheet on Thursday night may be denied leave. The hour of return is established for leave on weekend evenings. Unless otherwise approved, students in Year 1 and Year 2 must return no later than 11:00 p.m., Foundation Year students by midnight, and IB1 and IB2 students by 1:00 a.m. All students must check in with the adviser on duty upon their return. The location will be posted. If weekend plans change, the student must contact the adviser on duty first, then the senior residential house adviser if necessary. The host, whether it is a parent or a guardian, must confirm the change to the adviser on duty.

• In special circumstances, students may be granted late leave at the discretion of the senior residential house adviser. • Students with late leave after 11:00 p.m. must check in with the adviser on duty upon returning to the House. The location of the duty adviser is posted in each House. Residential Life

• Leave for the entire weekend or overnight is granted only at the discretion of the senior residential house adviser. If weekend or overnight leave is granted, the host family must call the senior residential house adviser by 9:00 p.m. Thursday evening. The student must also provide a contact address and phone number for the home where he will be staying. • Weekend leave officially terminates at 9:00 p.m. on Sunday. All students are expected to be in the House by 9:00 p.m. for an attendance check and House Meeting. Any variation in this schedule is to be established with the senior residential house adviser in advance. • The school typically closes for four long weekends (Thanksgiving weekend, November weekend, Founder’s weekend in February and Easter weekend). The school is also closed for two weeks during the December and March breaks. The Boarding Houses will also be closed to students in Y1 to IB1 on the Victoria Day weekend, but will

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remain open for IB2 students who will be writing their exams. Boarding students have the opportunity to join family, friends or guardians at their homes at this time. On long weekends or at the conclusion of holidays, students are expected to return to the House no later than 9:00 p.m. on the last day of the holiday or, if suitable arrangements have been made in advance with the senior residential house adviser, by 8:15 a.m. the following morning.

DISCIPLINARY ACTION Residential students are expected to meet the same standards and rules as for the entire school community, and disciplinary responses apply to promote responsible behaviour and to protect the interests of others. These are described in Section 8 and should be reviewed carefully. In particular, theft, violence, bullying and harassment have no place in the boarding community and are very serious disciplinary matters. A bond of trust must be formed in the boarding community; if the trust is broken in one of the aforementioned ways, a student can expect disciplinary consequences consistent to the severity of the offence. These offences could lead to consequences ranging up to expulsion.

ALCOHOL AND DRUGS Residential students are especially reminded that the Drug and Alcohol Policy applies to the boarding community at all times. In particular, the possession, use, being under the influence of alcohol or illegal drugs, or making alcohol or drugs available to others will result in serious disciplinary consequences, ranging from Boarding House suspension to school expulsion. Additionally, students who are under the influence of alcohol in the Boarding House are in breach of College policy and are liable for Boarding House suspension. As much as possible, residential student discipline has been separated from whole school discipline. However, where the “duty of care” line has been passed, whole school discipline will likely take priority. Residential students possessing drug paraphernalia may also be liable for suspension. Students who demonstrate the inability to comply with the Drug and Alcohol Policy are liable for expulsion. A student who provides alcohol to minors is also liable for expulsion. Please refer to Section 8: Student Expectations for the full Drug and Alcohol Policy and information on Prescription Medication.

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In addition to school disciplinary action and respecting the unique environment of boarding and the personal responsibilities which accompany life in a residential community, the following disciplinary responses may be applied, at the discretion of the College, to residential students. House Restriction: A student may be placed on House Restriction for minor offences or violation of the standards and rules of the boarding community, and to promote personal and academic responsibility. House Restriction may include limitation or loss of normal privileges or mandatory check-in or reporting to the senior residential house adviser or adviser on duty outside of school hours. In some cases, the student may be assigned work detail or other requirements as a component of House Restriction. During House Restriction, the student is expected to meet the standards and rules of the boarding community. House Restriction will be removed at the discretion of the senior residential house adviser.

Residential Life

House and Leave Restriction: For repeated or for more serious breaches of standards and rules, including violation of Leave privileges, a student may be placed on House and Leave Restriction. In addition to or as an alternative to House restrictions, a student may be denied leave for part or all of a subsequent weekend, or for longer duration, and be required to check in or report to the senior residential house adviser or adviser on duty while under Leave Restriction. Additional requirements may be specified as a component of House and Leave Restriction. During House and Leave Restriction, the student is expected to meet all standards and rules for the boarding community. House and Leave Restriction will be removed at the discretion of the senior residential house adviser. House Suspension: In an attempt to separate residential conduct from whole school disciplinary measures, a level of consequences exists that would cause a residential student to be suspended from the Boarding House but required to attend all classes and be allowed to continue in the co-curricular program. Students who show a pattern of inability to live up to the Five Essential Agreements, or students who demonstrate minor breaches of whole school discipline could be suspended from the Boarding House for up to five school days. This could include a pattern of missing school assemblies, advising sessions, choosing not to attend academic support sessions in the Centre for Learning and

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not obeying weekday or weekend curfew. It could also include minor alcohol offences that do not surpass the duty of care line or the misuse of school technology that harms others. House and School Suspension: For repeated or serious breaches of standards and rules, for failure to meet the conditions of House and Leave Restriction, and to promote personal responsibility as a member of the boarding community, a student may be suspended from the Boarding House and required to return home. As a result, he would not attend classes or participate in co-curricular activities during his House and school suspension. The senior Residential house adviser will confer with and receive the permission of the Director of Residential Life and/or the Dean of Students and appropriate Division Head before the penalty of House Suspension is applied. House Probation with Restrictions: A student returning from House Suspension will be placed on House Probation. House and Leave Restriction may apply for a specified time. House Probation will be reviewed each term. If the student has demonstrated his personal commitment to meet all rules and expectations, he will be removed from House Probation. Required to Withdraw or Denial of Return: For a serious breach of the standards and rules of the boarding community, or for failure to meet the terms of House Probation, a student may be required to leave the College or be denied registration for the next grade level.

FINAL IB EXAMINATIONS AND THE BOARDING HOUSE STUDY ENVIRONMENT The International Baccalaureate examination period represents the final academic challenge for graduating students at Upper Canada College, and it is the responsibility of the school to ensure the best possible study environment for all students in the boarding community. Due to the three-week IB examination period, there are often large gaps of time between examinations and, as a result of the schedule, some students could complete their exams up to 10 days before Leaving Class Graduation Ceremonies occur. In our effort to ensure a positive study environment for our boarding community, please be aware that the school reserves the right to direct IB2 students who have been on Conduct Status at any time during their graduating year or who are not adhering to the citizenship expectations of the boarding community to return to their family home or the home of a

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guardian when they have extended breaks or an early completion of their final examinations. All graduating residential students are expected to make travel arrangements and depart from the Boarding House within 24 hours of the Leaving Class Ceremony. Students still actively involved in the whole school co-curricular program will negotiate their departure date with their senior residential house adviser. The reason for immediate departure is to properly facilitate exam preparation for all students in younger grade levels.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ROOM SEARCHES Regular checks of rooms and closets will be done to ensure that alcohol is not present, and that there are no violations of fire or safety regulations. While respecting the privacy of residential students, the College also reserves the right to gain access to and inspect personal areas in student rooms when there are reasonable grounds to believe that a serious disciplinary infraction has occurred. Residential Life

FEMALE VISITORS Over the course of the school year there will be opportunities for female visitors to participate in weekend movie nights and other supervised social events. Unapproved female visitors in the House constitute a potential liability issue for the school by compromising the “duty of care” objective for anyone overseeing the safety of any person present in boarding. Thus, a student violating this policy will face consequences ranging from suspension to expulsion.

FIRE This has been addressed in detail earlier in this section.

TEXTBOOK PURCHASING Textbooks for all new boarding students will be ordered on your behalf through the Canadian School Book Exchange (CSBE) and delivered to Upper Canada College prior to

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the start of the school year. During the summer, new boarding families can expect communication by CSBE to confirm the book order and book payment.

HOUSE FUND A sum of $75.00 is charged to every student’s account to initiate a House Fund. This fund is used at the discretion of the student Head of House, the House Treasurer and the Residential Life Committee. The senior residential house adviser oversees the responsible decision-making undertaken by the student leaders.

VEHICLES Because the school is unable to assume related liabilities, residential students may not have cars or any other motorized vehicles at school, nor may they have regular use of a vehicle parked off the school grounds. A student wishing to bring a family vehicle for a specific event or purpose (such as taking home possessions at the end of term) must: • Obtain permission from the senior residential house adviser. • Report the presence of the vehicle and the license number to the senior residential house adviser. • Provide all keys to the vehicle to the senior residential house adviser. • Park only in a designated space.

LEADERSHIP All residential students are to act upon high standards of responsibility and leadership and to conduct themselves in a manner that reflects respect for others, for different religious and cultural backgrounds, and for each other’s property. Senior students are assigned the following leadership responsibilities: • Head of House • Membership on the House Residential Life Council • New Student and Weekend Representatives • Entertainment Representative • Games Representative

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• Clubs Representative • Floor Seniors: First Floor, Second Floor, Third Floor, Foundation Year Counsellors • House Duty Senior • Safety Representative • Health Representative • House Organization Representative • Day Boy Representative • Community Service Representative • Environmental Representative • Media Representative • Cultural Awareness Representative • Technology Representative • Other

ROOM ASSIGNMENTS

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Residential Life

At the conclusion of each academic year, returning students are asked to submit their choices for roommates and rooms to the senior residential house adviser for his consideration. There will always be an opportunity for veteran students to room with new residential students arriving each year. Room assignments are posted upon arrival in September. First, the members of the Leaving Class are assigned their rooms. Then, the remaining returning students’ requests are assigned by the senior residential house adviser. A student’s ability to live up to the Five Essential Agreements will be a factor in helping to determine final room assignments. New students are assigned rooms based upon grade, interests, personal information and advice provided from the Office of Admission.

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Notes:

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UCC: STRATEGIC PLAN SMALL SCHOOL ENVIRONMENT WHAT

·All boys have a strong sense of connection to the school and the people HOW

·Boys will have at least one trusted advisor they can count on ·Learning and growth are based on an evolving and personal development plan

“MY ADVISOR REALLY GOT ME — AND GOT ME TO WHERE I AM TODAY.”

BIG SCHOOL CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES WHAT

·UCC offers the broadest range of high-calibre programs HOW

VISION 2008–2015

HOW WILL WE REALIZE OUR GOALS?

The $100-million Think Ahead Campaign supports the objectives of the strategic plan and will be the means by which the College will achieve its long-term vision.

REVITALIZING BOARDING WHAT

·UCC offers a world-class boarding program that is recognized and valued HOW

·High satisfaction among students and parents ·Boarding students are well integrated and perform as strongly as day students

“I FOUND MYSELF — AND FRIENDS FOR LIFE — AT UCC BOARDING.”

ROLE OF FACULTY WHAT

·Teachers are crucial to the UCC experience and are valued and supported HOW

·100% of boys are involved in co-curriculars at Upper School ·High satisfaction and interest in programs ·Graduates are well prepared

·High satisfaction and connection among faculty and staff ·Every teacher has a professional development plan ·Strong performance across advising, coaching and teaching

“ I FOUND MY PASSION AT UCC. WORLD, HERE I COME!”

“ E VERYONE HAS A TEACHER THEY’LL REMEMBER FOREVER — I ALREADY HAVE FIVE.”

ACCESSIBILITY WHAT

·The school is accessible and affordable to the very best students in Toronto and beyond HOW

FACILITIES AND TECHNOLOGY WHAT

·High-calibre facilities and technology enhance UCC’s academic, arts, boarding and athletic programs HOW

·20% of all students are on some form of financial assistance ·The quality of boys receiving assistance is stronger than the average ·Recipients contribute significantly to school life

·Renovations to the Upper School will provide optimal learning environments in classrooms, labs and common areas ·The boarding facilities will receive a significant facelift ·Expanded use of technology for learning and curriculum development

“I’M SURROUNDED BY REALLY SMART AND TALENTED GUYS.”

“S OMETIMES I LOOK AROUND AND I CAN’T BELIEVE THIS IS MY SCHOOL.”


Upper Canada College 200 Lonsdale Rd. Toronto ON M4V 1W6

www.ucc.on.ca

Upper School Family Handbook 2014-2015  
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