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UPMG UNIVERSITY PRINT MANAGERS GROUP

UPMG NEWSLETTER EDITION 5 • SPRING 2012

IN THIS ISSUE: Message from the Chair Your Newsletter Team Who has left and who has joined? UPMG Visit the Far East News from our institutions Email News Overseas friends Conference 2012 Sustainable procurement Congratulations to Carol

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Letter from the editor

Special thanks and acknowledgements for this edition of the newsletter go to the following: Rebecca Hanlon, Martin Parker, Sarah Gibbon, Paul Bishop, Steve Marlow, Andrew Scott, Mark Ramsay, Brian Pickles, Paul Tetley, Ian Hickman, Bob Neubauer, Jimmy Friend, Lisa Hoover, Richard Price and Carol Aleknavicius.


Message from the Chair . . . . Welcome to our Spring Newsletter. Spring seems to have sprung early this year, with warmer weather than normal for the time. As I write this article the students are in their last week of term here in Cardiff Metropolitan before their Easter break, and this term seems to have flown by (does that mean I am getting older?!). The nights are getting lighter and the daffodils are in flower. It’s 2012, and the whole country is gearing up for a fantastic year, with the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee and the Olympics to look forward to. In Wales, we are having an eventful Six Nations in the rugby, although as I write this the final game against France is still to play and although the Championship is likely, the Grand Slam is still for the taking. To top it all off we are hosting the UPMG conference just outside Cardiff in May, with our Olympic theme, ‘Going for Gold’. I am certainly hoping it’s going to be a year to remember for all the right reasons. The season for exhibitions is soon upon us, and like many of you, I am hoping to visit Sign UK in a couple of weeks, and to attend DRUPA in May. I love finding new ideas at these exhibitions, and seeing all the new technology that is available. I have been described as ‘a kid in a sweetshop’ by my colleagues’, because I still find it exciting when I see new and innovative products.

One of the best parts of being involved in print, in my opinion, is that you never stand still for long; there are always new technologies, with developments in equipment and software that challenge the way you work. Visiting the University of East London in January it’s great to see that other members have the same enthusiasm to continually improve and develop the services they offer to their universities. I feel very fortunate, in my role as Chair, to have a regular contact with many of our members throughout the year, and I regularly hear about other members meeting up, sharing information and best practice, if you are a new member of the group and haven’t visited other members before I would encourage you to contact and meet up. At the moment I am getting regular emails and enquiries about the conference from delegates and suppliers alike, and I am very much looking forward to hosting it this year, just a few miles from my home here in South Wales. The agenda this year is full of current topics to support you in the year ahead, but I have to admit that I am also looking forward to the networking, especially the 1970’s fancy dress on Monday evening, I haven’t quite finalised my costume yet but I have a few ideas. For those who missed last year’s medieval night it certainly promises to be a night to remember, and I guarantee that you will see your colleagues as never before. Don’t forget to bring your camera as the pictures are guaranteed to bring a smile to your face.

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I would also encourage members to enter our Annual Design and Print Awards that we announce and celebrate at the Annual Awards Evening on Tuesday 29th May. Please contact Simon Hampton- Matthews if you require an entry form. I hope you enjoy this edition of our newsletter, and I look forward to welcoming many of you to the conference here in May.

Rebecca


Who has joined and who has left?

Your Newsletter Team Nigel Phillips, Editor

Alan Lee (on left, at last years conference)

(Nigel’s job is to collate all articles for the newsletter, writing up and commenting and acting as journalist too. Labelling the photographs and laying out the initial copy.)

Sarah Gibbon, proof reader

On 01/03/2012, the email circuit had the sad news that Alan Lee of London Southbank University, was to leave his job role and consequently the UPMG. For those of us who knew Alan I know that you will also join with me as we say how saddened we are that Alan has left us. Alan was always a keen supporter of the UPMG with a keen eye on the email circuit, replying with valuable comments, as well as, contributing well in discussions too.

(Sarah needs to make sure that De Montfort is not spelt ‘De Montford’, as per the previous newsletter, and starting this edition will scan her eyes over the final version before it goes to Martin Parker for design.)

As I said to Alan in my email: ‘I’m not only losing a valuable UPMG member but also a very good friend’. It was always good to see Alan at conference and catch up with him. Hopefully, many of us can still keep in touch with Alan via his own email.

Martin Parker, Graphic Designer

Best wishes for the future Alan from all UPMG members!

Paul Bishop, email circuit collator (Paul has got his eye on what’s going on regarding the email circuit. Who began a particular discussion and keeping track on those who have commented.)

(Martin’s job is the most important out of all of us, as Martin brings the newsletter to life. Pagination, inserting the photos around, text and the colour of the newsletter, is all down to Martin.)

Nigel Phillips

Rebecca Hanlon, Sub-Editor (It’s always a good idea to have an extra pair of eyes look over the content and Rebecca’s input, support and ideas have been invaluable to the success of the newsletter. Rebecca also looks over my final version for final approval before it goes to Martin. )

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UPMG Journey to the Far East Goldsmiths 19th – 20th January saw the UPMG travel to east London, where we held our Executive meeting at Goldsmiths College (University of London) hosted by Sarah Gibbon and the next day we took part in the regional members meeting hosted by Steve Marlow at the University of East London. Sarah, warmly welcomed us to Goldsmiths and again, there was a full agenda for us to go through as we looked at: UPMG Finance, Membership Flyer, Newsletter, Training, New Constitution etc. There was also time to go through conference planning for Cardiff 2012 and conference planning for 2013. Oh yes! Time and tide waits for no UPMG executive member. During the afternoon we had a presentation by Daniel Godden, SW Regional Director of BPiF, (British Printing Industries Federation) followed by a general discussion, with the prospect of automatic BPIF membership being given to all UPMG members. I won’t say too much at this stage as we aim for further discussion amongst members; however, I will include this brief introduction to the BPiF, as given from Daniel’s notes:

Left to right: Janine Barraclough, Carol Aleknavicius, Simon Hampton Matthews, Andrew Scott, Rebecca Hanlon, Francis Reis, Paul Bishop, Peter Davey, Sarah Gibbon and Roy Stares.

The BPIF is the Print Industry’s trade body providing promotion, lobbying, business support services and training and apprenticeships. • The BPiF represents 1,400 UK printers, 15% by number of companies, 45% by number of employees, 50% by turnover. • The BPiF promotes the Industry. • The BPiF lobbies on behalf of the Industry. • The BPiF provides support services – HR, H&S, environmental and technical. • The BPiF provides print specific training and apprenticeships. • The BPiF has information and knowledge about the Industry – salary and industry performance information.

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The Newsletter is going extremely well and special thanks to all members who have so far contributed. As mentioned earlier, we have now included several others into the Newsletter team, which consists of: Nigel Phillips (editor), Martin Parker (graphic designer), Paul Bishop (email discussion collator), Sarah Gibbon (proof reader), Rebecca Hanlon (sub-editor). If anybody else wishes to join the team or has any ideas/feedback good or bad for the newsletter then please don’t hesitate to contact me: n.phillips@exeter.ac.uk . The newsletter is a great resource for all of us, so let’s use it to its full potential. PB

UPMG

UNIVERSITY PRINT MANAGERS GROUP

UPMG NEWSLETTER EDITION 4 • DECEMBER 2011

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IN THIS ISSUE:

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P2 Who’s Who on the Executive P4 Message from the Chair P5 Welcome to new members P7 Meeting at the Vale P8 News on Conference 2012 P11 Life as a University Print Manager P12 Visiting the NIPPA Conference P13 UPMG Design and Print Awards 2012

g E F in N F R D I S o g O A LE C

P14 Print & copy service gets a facelift P15 News from overseas friends P16 Letter from the editor (Special thanks and acknowledgements for this edition of the Newsletter go to: Rebecca Hanlon, Martin Parker, Paul Bishop, Michelle Barraclough, Sue Dummett, Peter Davey, Chris Hawkes, Simon Hampton-Matthews, Andrew Scott, Roy Stares and Ray Chambers)

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During the afternoon the regional meeting took place and the following topics were discussed by members:

The University of East London Fantastic! Yes, and I sum up the view from all members who made the visit to the University of East London’s, Print Services, headed up by Steve Marlow.What a wonderful opportunity to see how a University print service can operate and reach its full potential when given the backing and buy in from its given institution. It was indeed, a vibrant working atmosphere and obvious to all members that Steve has taken this unit from strength to strength. Last year saw Print Services produce 12 million mono images and 3.6 million colour. However, what also amazed members was how many other services are covered such as: large format printing, combining a litho service with digital and personalised prospectus printing, to an online book ordering service.

Steve Marlow discusses with Andrew Scott the ordering procedure for online personal prospectuses

Andrew puts the on-line ordering procedure to the test.

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• • • •

Economic challenges for HE sector and implications for UPMG members. External income generation. Managing peak demand. Innovation and service diversification.

UPMG members take their places to begin the regional members meeting


Steve Marlow Head of Print Services (Brief Biography) Steve Marlow has been employed in printing and print related and marketing fields for 25 years. He graduated from the University of the Arts London (formally LCP) in 1988 and is currently studying for a Masters Degree in International Marketing Management. He joined the University of East London in January 2002 prior to which he had been the Production Editor for a national newspaper. He has accumulated a wealth of knowledge and experience in not only print management and delivery, but also specialises in corporate marketing strategies and project management. Steve is a member of the University Print Managers Group and an affiliate member of the Chartered Institute of Marketing and has directed and managed projects which have won four industry awards. Steve is married with 2 children.

The new digital printing kit consists of; a Xerox Docucolor 1000 high volume colour engine with a clear toner for glossing, two Xerox Nuvera 144EA mono production printers (one with an in-line Watkiss Power Square Booklet Finisher), a Xerox Docucolor 700 system, a Xerox 4127 mid-volume mono unit and a Xerox 8264E eco solvent large format printer. The digital equipment compliments the existing 2 colour Ryobi 512 litho press coupled with an Itek DPM 2505 CTP system. Additional finishing equipment has been brought in to support projected demand.

For further information please contact: Steve Marlow Head of Print Services Print Centre, Docklands Campus University of East London Brief history Print Services were formed from three separate campus based reprographic units situated at Barking, Docklands and Stratford campuses. In 1999 Print Services moved from Estate Services to Corporate Marketing and in 2003 the satellite units were consolidated under one roof at the Barking Campus. When that campus was sold for development in 2006, a brand new bespoke Print Centre (35,500 square meter floor space) was built at the Docklands campus where Print Services have resided ever since. Equipment specification and remit The University of East London Print Services department supply learning resource materials to 28,000 national and international students (both campus based and distance learners) and are responsible for the in-house production of the majority of marketing publications. The Print Services team comprises of a team of eight full-time members of staff all trained to a high standard with many years of industry experience. The University of East London’s Print Services department has recently undergone a complete refit and machine refurbishment at its Print Centre based at the Docklands Campus.

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The centre piece being a Duplo 5000ProSCC booklet making line. This is a modular system that includes a sheet-feeder with barcode reader for variable print, an inline top and tail slitter and creaser, which in turn feeds sets into a stitcher / booklet maker and fore-edge trimmer, books are finished with a squareback device. The line is capable of producing 1000 finished books per hour. Other finishing equipment comprises of Renz wiro binding systems, Muro Fastback thermal binding, Morgana PrintBind KB2000 Perfect binding equipment, Morgane CardX Business card cutting system and various folding, collating, perforating and drilling systems. The university Print Services and our business partners KnowledgePoint Limited have jointly developed an industry award winning innovation in print with the bespoke online Build Your Own Prospectus service. See link: www.uel.ac.uk/myprospectus/ undgrad/


Book ordering service

Developments for the future?

UEL Connect Dispatch Assistants, Olalowo Olaitan and Festus Eboigbe

In Steve’s own words: I see our perceived remit as purely being printers becoming blurred. Increasingly we are being asked to support communication campaigns using channels other than purely print based. There is now a strong overlap between digital outputs – we provide PDF’s and scans, manage databases, manage copyright, provide design and typesetting services, provide global distribution services, act as buyers for folders, banner stands, large display materials, print and material buying etc. All of which, add value to the chain and increase our revenues.

Two years ago Print Services were approached by UEL Connect (our equivalent of the Open University) to investigate the feasibility of providing distance learning materials to students globally. A simple explanation of the process; students enrol and pay online for selected undergraduate and postgraduate programmes on a roll-on / roll-off basis. Spreadsheets for module guides and matching text book requirements are forwarded to Print Services by UEL Connect on a daily basis. The module guides are then printed to order on demand and matching required text books are sourced from an inventory of stock books or ordered via any of 3 book suppliers. The team then securely pack the learning resources with a branded polypropylene module guide folder, letter and resource guide and send out to the recipient via DHL (a global distribution service). The added service has contributed a significant income and is expanding rapidly. Online prospectuses ordering The future expansion of the VDP prospectus is currently under discussion but we are moving to targeted and personalised printing which will be created in-house now we have full machine capability. We are currently testing Design Merge software but need to further explore software support for the Xerox Docucolor 1000 machine and the Duplo finishing line to obtain complete system integrity.

Miriam Watt (Pre-Press and Design Supervisor) demonstrates the Xerox DC1000 to Rebecca Hanlon

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The tour continues . . .

Robert Taylor - Senior Litho Printer

Group demonstration of the Xerox DC1000

Peter Brown (Digital Print Supervisor) shows the group how they calibrate the binding system on the Xerox Nuvera 144EA mono production printer, with on-line Watkiss Power Square Booklet Finisher.

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News from our institutions

Mark Ramsay – Loughborough University. Dear UPMG members, I’d like to introduce myself to you all. I’m Mark Ramsay the new Print Services Manager at Loughborough University. I took over the role in August 2011 from Glenys Morley, whom you all may remember retired from the University last year. As part of Design and Print Services that’s under the arm of Marketing and Communication, I run a team of 15 members of staff who all contribute to delivering our print solutions to University staff and students. We are also excited about taking on a school leaver to join us as a digital print apprentice and I’m sure I’ll let you all know how things are going when we meet in May at the annual conference. At Loughborough, we have a strong appetite to encourage university schools and departments to use Print Services for volume copying and drive work back through a central print resource. We’ve had remarkable results to date and have seen a dramatic increase in colour and mono copies. However, not to be complacent, we have also invested in DSF to increase our print audience and streamline workflow. If you have any questions about the services at Loughborough University, please do get in touch.

Mark

Mark Ramsay Print Services Manager Design and Print Services Marketing and Communications Department Loughborough University

t. 01509 222249 w: www.lboro.ac.uk/designandprint 9


PRESENTATION to SHARED SERVICES GROUP YORKSHIRE COLLEGES Brian Pickles, Inprint Design, University of Bradford

Back row: Brian Pickles; Mervyn Jones (Pre Press); Colin Greenwood (Litho/Finishing); Matthew Lupton (Design); Mark Davies (design); Umar Hafeez (Wide Format) Middle Row: Emma Jones (Design); Alex Taylor (Litho/Finishing); Guy Wallman (Finishing); ON BIKE – Steven Wilcox (Finishing); Ruth Kelly (Customer Services); Anna Wadsworth (design) Front Row: Ish Hussain (Digital); Barry Waterhouse (Digital); Stuart Hutchinson (Litho / Finishing); Jeff Brookes (Print Buying / Customer Services) Paul Singh (STANDING) (External Sales & Deputy Director)

at Galpharm Stadium, Huddersfield February 3, 2012 PURPOSE To exchange our experiences of Shared Services within Design & Print over the first 10 years How it began The challenges faced The benefits to our shareholders Hopefully to allay some fears BACKGROUND Approximately 11 years ago the University of Bradford and Bradford College each had an Inplant Print Unit operating 400 yards from each other offering identical services with the same skills and each only filling the capacity of the equipment and staff fully in three months of the year and then only on a single shift with some overtime. If a commercial company traded like this they would be out of business Luckily and what proved to be the vital trigger, one of the two print managers was due to retire in the following year and the question was asked: “Do we need two units?”. After much discussion, it was agreed to conduct a Joint Feasability Study to look into sharing one resource.

In today’s world the Institutions would have called in a consultant (minimum cost £10k)

However, the senior management fully supported a study and it was charged with delivering a business case. The team consisted of managers in finance/ personnel /estates and print, as well as Union officials. In view of obvious concern from staff regarding job security, the Senior Management made a very crucial decision at an early stage, to ensure the project had every opportunity to succeed, they clearly stated that in view of obvious concern from staff and unions about job security, the only way to make real progress was to clearly state that any initial agreement would NOT involve staff reduction at the outset, but identify all other savings and benefits from sharing. Any staff reductions would where necessary, be made through natural wastage. After an extensive process and delivery of a business case, it was agreed between the two Institutions that the two services would merge and share 1 facility. At that point KPMG were consulted to identify the most tax efficient way to proceed with the agreement. The advice was to set up a Limited Company and second the staff from each Institution to work for the Company. The Company would be a full cost recovery and pay “commercial” rates for all costs incurred, eg Space , utilities and internal services such as Finance (management accounts), IT, Personnel, Estates etc. Our objective was to produce or manage ALL design and print needs within both Institutions and fill spare capacity with work from external sources and deliver a targeted profit each year, which would be Gift Aided back equally to each shareholder. The Company would be managed by a Board of Directors consisting of myself and 3 members from each Institution including representation from University Council & College Corporation.

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CHALLENGES FACED Given the fact we were breaking new ground with this model, there were many challenges faced, but certainly the main two to overcome were :-

outset this would be done by loans from the joint shareholders from suitable and agreed business cases and they would be paid back within agreed timescales and on agreed interest rates based upon Bank of England rates.

STAFF INTEGRATION

BENEFITS

At the outset of the feasibility study we ensured staffs were fully informed of progress, decisions and opportunities to engage in the process. This was achieved in several ways: • Regular briefing meetings with senior management and project team • A series of get togethers with each set of staff • Swapping staff to work in each other’s environment • Involvement with Personnel and Staff development to develop a “culture” of sharing Although the majority of these initiatives worked well, in truth it would take a year before we enjoyed proper and full integration. SPACE

Shared Services in this environment always made sense on paper, but had to be proved. Some of the main benefits enjoyed by our shareholders were:• Considerable improvement in utilization of equipment • Reduced Capital and Leasing costs (not duplicating purchase of the same equipment) • Reduced software and annual support costs • Reduced Outwork costs (utilizing dedicated Print buyer & bringing more work in house through investment) • Full VAT recovery • Release of space back to College Estate • More committed and dedicated Staff

Prior to the merger, as with most inplants within education, space allocation to print was limited. So to combine both units as well as create a space suitable for future growth and development was to prove a challenge. Although finding a site “on campus” was preferred we had to look at offsite options as well.

• Opportunities for investment to offer improved & new relevant services

Following a period working with both Estate Departments and again an important trigger to our eventual success, the University Engineering School were suffering with reducing student numbers and were requested to reduce their footprint on Campus by 20%. This allowed the Estates dept to offer us a 8500sq ft area within the Workshop Block which sat between both University and college campuses, an ideal location.

Having merged the service in February 2002, we are now 10 years old. We currently turn over just under £2m per annum with external income accounting for £450k per annum (23%). Our main clients include:

FUNDING In order to achieve a commercial company which could grow and develop relevant services to both institutions as well as external clients, it was imperative that we received funding for re-investment in modern equipment and software and suitable staff training. It was agreed at the

rent, utilities and utilization of internal services. CHALLENGES FOR THE FUTURE

1. With both technological advances

coupled with the current financial climate, customers want to deliver their “message” in other ways rather than just print. With support and investment from our shareholders we are having to evolve our company into a “Communication Company” learning new and relevant skills & thereby offering relevant and innovative services in conjunction with print.

2. In order to fully achieve the ideal

Print Strategy and deliver “true” overall value for money in print within each Institution we are trying to gain control of MFD (multi functional devices) throughout the Campuses to deliver a full managed service.

3. With ever improving

equipment and workflows as well as improved staff performance we are producing work far more efficiently and hence creating additional capacity throughout the year and are looking at developing further partnerships

SUMMARY

• Increased customer satisfaction (Marketing Departments now want to use Design & Print Services)

In our experience to achieve any significant progress in Shared Services there must be:

• Environmental benefits

1. Full commitment and support from

WHERE ARE WE NOW

senior management

2. A positive and committed team to

drive through the many objections / problems that will be raised throughout the process

3. Full and effective communication with all related staff

• Kirklees College

ANY QUESTIONS

• Shipley College

We will be more than happy to discuss our experiences in more detail if anyone wishes, please contact me as below either to ask a question or arrange a tour of Inprint in Bradford.

• NHS • Incommunities (Bradford Housing Trust) We also have produced work for Thomas Danby College, Joseph Priestly College & Keighley College prior to the Leeds Merger. During this time we have gift aided over £2m back to our shareholders as well as the University & College benefiting in £900k in recovery of 11

Brian Pickles T: 01274 235301 M: 07540 706884 E; brian@inprintdesign.com W: www.inprintdesign.com


Print and Design Solutions Paul Tetley, University of Sheffield. During the last 12 months we have seen a steady increase in the volume of posters and roller banners requested by students, faculties and departments. We were also getting asked to print jobs on various new mediums coming on to the market place. Students in particular were asking if we could provide a value poster for their course work. Taking all this into account it was decided to do a review of our wide format service with a view to trading in our 42” printer and replacing it with a 61” wide printer. After looking in the market place and numerous meetings and a print trial we invested in a cutting edge HP Design jet 61” latex printer which was installed on the 12th January purchased from CWE Solutions.

This new equipment and wider range of materials has enabled us to look at our manufacturing cost enabling us to reduce the cost of the end product by up to 30%. This will make our service and products more attractive to a wider audience; for instance the cost of standard roll up banner has been reduced from £120 to £90 Our web site has been updated to reflect the new product ranges at www.sheffield.ac.uk/cics/printanddesign

The new equipment will give us a wider scope of materials to print on such as canvas, plastics, polyester and never tear material; it also gives us the opportunity to produce tablecloths, large hanging banners and tram Stop posters.

Poster Production Aug to January. 2010/11 944

value £39,861

2011/12 1074. Value £46,359

Paul Tetley Print and Design solutions Manager The University of Sheffield.

HP Design jet 61” latex printer

All the inks are water based but after the imaging process they are water resistant so in certain applications there is no need for lamination. Plus the inks are odourless during printing eliminating the need of an extraction system. When the products are printed they emerge from the machine completely dry and are ready for any conversion process that is required... 99% of the material that can be used on the machine is environmentally friendly and will disintegrate in landfill sites.

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Intelligent Finishing Systems Ltd Press Briefing

University of Leicester Ian Hickman University of Leicester Improves Capacity with Horizon StitchLiner Automated saddle stitching line speeds up throughput to meet tighter deadlines When the University of Leicester print department took the decision to re-invest in its book production capabilities there was one solution that stood out from the crowd – the Horizon StitchLiner 5500 from Intelligent Finishing Systems (IFS). “We had been considering a replacement for our aging stitch/fold/ trim line for some time and we looked at what was available from all the usual suppliers,” comments head of print services Ian Hickman. “There was absolutely nothing in the same league as the StitchLiner. It gives the best speed and quality of product. It folds-inline as well which means there is no need to pre-fold or crease and that saves time.” It joins a Horizon BQ270 single clamp perfect binder and a B2 AFC566 automated folder.

Fully automated, the 11,000bph Horizon StitchLiner is the UK’s topselling saddlestitcher. It works from flat four-page sections and has an integral three-knife trimming station so there is no need to pre-fold into signatures or pre-trim top and tail – resulting in significant time, waste and energy savings. A high profile icon-based colour touchscreen gives automated set-ups in less than two minutes with instant job storage and recall, ideal for short runs.

Anthony Munday - Senior Print Finisher

University of Leicester’s StitchLiner is equipped with two Turbo Vac 1000 ten-bin collating towers. They feature a user-friendly icon-based colour touchscreen control, remote control handset and superior high speed PowerCollating performance. The new addition has enabled the department to branch out: “We can now offer a trade service,” says Hickman who adds: “We have also reduced overtime.” BACKGROUND University of Leicester Print Services Established in the 1970s, University of Leicester Print Services mainly produces work for the University but also serves external businesses. It offers a trade service too. The £1.5m turnover operation runs three Shinohara presses, a B2 five-colour, a B3 two-colour and a B3 single colour. It also runs five Xerox copiers including two Xerox DocuTech 6180s. There are a total of 14 employees.

The print department runs three Shinohara presses and five Xerox copiers including two Xerox DocuTech 6180s. Around 70% of its work is for the university while the rest is for external businesses. “We needed something that could handle both litho and digital work and turn it around quickly to meet tight deadlines,” explains Mr Hickman. “The StitchLiner is ideal.” 13

Back row James Grundy, Ian Hickman, Martin Sharpe. Front Row Vitin Sudra, Anthony Munday, Julian Bates, Philip Robertson, Glyn Johnson.


SUPMG

The SUPMG meeting was hosted at the University of Stirling by Margaret Angell and chaired by Andrew Scott. The meeting was also attended by Francis Reis and Nigel Phillips having flown up from Bristol.

Left to right: Margaret Angell - Stirling, Francis Reis - Plymouth, Steven McCar t-GCU, Andrew Scott, Duncan Hurst-Heriot Watt, Janet Dalgarno - Edinburgh, Avril McSorley - Edinburgh Napier, Stuart McLean- Edinburgh, Richard Barrett-GCU, Nigel Phillips – Exeter

After general introductions there were round the table updates and general discussion on several issues facing us in our varying institutions, as well as print trends: Managed print; the growth in wide format printing; Helix store front and other software. There was also further discussions around a general decline in mono digital but colour digital was on the rise. During the afternoon session Nic Dabanovic of ITS spoke to the group regarding PaperCut job tracking software which is being trialled at Stirling. An Australian product with a client base of 50,000 customers, which can track back both local and networked printers. The group were then treated to a demonstration of PaperCut in action.

Andrew Scott and Francis Reis A visit to Loch Lomond en route to Stirling

After the demonstration Margaret took us on a tour of the Library, where many of the mulfifunctional machines are located and finally to Stirling University’s own print service facility. The day had been extremely worthwhile and was well worth visiting. Thanks go to Margaret Angell for hosting the event and for her excellent hospitality.

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Nick Dabanovic, Sales and Operations Manager, Margaret Angell, University of Stirling, at Info Technology Supplies Ltd demonstrates PaperCut print prepares for the PaperCut print management management software in action. software demonstration.

Every university should have one! Margaret Angell demonstrates the adjustable table, which enables wheelchair users to copy, print and scan.

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Email News Paul Bishop (Please note:The email circuit is for UPMG member use and circulation only; therefore, surnames and institutions have been removed in most cases in order to prevent any offence to members.)

UPMG - EMAIL SUMMARY TRAINING FOR PRINT STUDENTS . . . is looking into setting up an inhouse Print Unit to deliver training to their printing students as well as production services to staff.

CANON PRINTER ISSUES (7086, 4080 & 5075) Graham - an annoying problem on a regular basis! If we are sent an A5 booklet which is set-up as A4, we can print it fine using the booklet option in the Canon print driver. However, if we receive the file and it’s already set up as an A5 booklet we cannot print it, as the booklet mode in the print driver reduces it again! Canon haven’t been very helpful and have told us the solution is to ask everybody to send work set-up in A4.

VARIABLE DATA JOBS Alan - Currently we use the MS Office Suite for printing simple mail merge, InDesign and Quark for design and page assemble. Imposition and page assembly are my current main labour intense challenges. I’m looking at doing lots more of variable data mail merge, imposition and page assembly, so TWO questions: 1.    are there any add-ons to my existing software (as above)? 2.   which imposition and page assembly software do you use and would your recommend it for the job above?

Dave, We use fusion pro for our variable data jobs and is quick and easy to set up. It can also cope with more complex VDP jobs.

OLYMPIC GAMES TICKET PRINTING C. . ., asked did any of your University Print Services get the opportunity to quote for this? http://www.printweek.com/Business/ article/1116219/unite-slams-16molympic-ticket-printing-contract-awardus-firm/ Alan, replied does anyone know the qualifying criteria for this tender was? There may have been a caveat that a supplier needed to be outside the hosts country for security reasons. If there wasn’t and it was completely open then it reflects badly on our own printing industry. I come to this conclusion fresh from reading over 71 tender application myself for a more modest contract but I was appalled at the standard of answers given, in many cases, by some very large print companies. It may be time to stop blaming the government for what may be our own short sightedness or even arrogance and re-examine our processes and systems and make sure the next time we tender for work we give the client no opportunity to say, ‘No!’. Sorry if I sound like I am preaching but if you had read and seen what I have in the last 18 months I am sure many of you would come to the same conclusion. Paul , replied, Alan, sorry but in part I cannot agree with you. I have done many tenders in the last 20 years and have been very successful. I have instilled the same working practices at The University of . . . . Yes I am blaming the government because as I said in my 16

previous e mail they are not interested in supporting British Businesses. As long as they make sure they give all these foreign nations hand outs that’s all they are interested in. As to security we are as secure as any other country.

PRINTER JAMS AFTER USING EVOLUTION Paul We have recently been forced to switch from EP4 to Evolution and have seen an increase in call reporting paper jams. Evolution seams to be ok on our Oce 6250, but our MFD’s are struggling to run it. One of our Oce engineers has recommended that we don’t use it because it is an inferior quality paper. We will I think be starting the process of finding an alternative. Paul ,replied, So Oce engineers now have degrees in paper making. What a cop out its nothing to do with the paper Evolution is made for the photocopying market. The only time you might get feed problems is  if the paper has not been stored correctly. K . . ,replied, When we used EP4 we had trouble running it through the machines we now use Image Volume with no problem I whichever machine we put it in.

SCANNING A... I have been asked to provide a rough assessment of the resources required to scan 7000 theses. We don’t currently have people, space or possibly equipment to perform this but proposed outsourced costs are significant, and as such senior managers are interested to see whether this is something we could deal with. We have recently taken on the scanning of module feedback forms which has been very successful, helped by the excellent working relationship


with have with IT Services. I would anticipate their involvement and support in setting up a large scale scanning service. Has anyone set a large scale scanning service up from scratch? or do you act on behalf of your institution as a broker? Could anyone share a ‘specification’ for such a service either in-house or outsourced? Any advice would be very gratefully received. Ian, replied, . . . has its own scanning unit for this type of work it has three trained staff and uses two KM copiers for the speed of scanning and two large format specialist book scanners for old archive scanning. Alan replied We scan almost 4 x 2000 assignments/ thesis every term before they go for external mediation. We do this on a Konica Minolta C550 with document feeder and scan to compact pdf. There does however, need to be a method of control. To facilitate this, all work is submitted single sided on A4, in project folders or 2 ‘D’ ring binders with no plastic sleeves, staples or dividers. The control is necessary because it was taking longer to prepare the work for scanning than the scanning process itself. We still get the odd stapled item which slows downs the process but we find it works very well in the main. Other issues you may want to consider are: • scanning to a secure server • copyright • document naming • storage and distribution/ transmission

We also have a wide format scanner which is commissioned on a bespoke basis and mainly used by local authorities (plans and old maps), archivists (fragile books and documents) and local companies (historical information which is not A4). We have this facility on campus and offer these services to the local community and tends to be used infrequently.

safeguard against students work going astray. Only the person who placed the work can retrieve it – this is a very important element. Most of the scanning is done within 24hrs of the work coming into the department but we do ask for 4 days for the work to be done.

I say at a time because it does get very boring doing the same thing over and over and we found alternating every hour is a good policy.

The administrators are informed via email when the scanning is complete and we do insist that the hardcopies are removed from the department soon after completion purely because we have no room to store them for long periods of time. As you can imagine you are looking at a space that is equivalent to 40 boxes or one pallet of copier paper.

This is a full on process and sometimes I admit it does sometimes go into a second day where necessary.

The storage structure we use is based on individuals on courses, courses within departments, departments

(Not sure of the source) We allow approximately 1 day for each lot of 2000 and there is normally only one person doing it at a time.

200 pages of compact PDF at 200dpi x 200 dpi creates a file that is about 10mb but this is on the large size for us and normally we are handling files that are no bigger than 5mb. Still, 2000 x 5 MB is a terabyte which is really 2 terabyte by the time you have backed it up and stored it off-site. You can compress the files but we found that just slows down the retrieval rate. No, we don’t have a dedicated member of staff doing this and tend to do it as part of our normal job. The activity however, is restricted to the Reprographics Team as we have the necessary skills and clearance. We insist that hardcopy is sent to and then later on collected by the course administration staff who are charged in keeping accurate records of what has been put into Reprographics for scanning. This information is recorded against the student record and is a 17

within hubs and hubs within schools.

Sounds complicated but it works. P - replied, we are based in . . . and provide a scanning service for the research

councils using Kofax software and a Bell & Howell high speed scanner. One fulltime person operates the service providing c1.3 million scans per year, mostly delivered into a combination of SharePoint and Objective records management systems and Oracle E-Business suite, although some files are emailed and some delivered on CD. Our system creates an audit trail for legal admissibility purposes and delivers compressed PDF’s in PDF/A format that is not directly editable (and so is secure). PDF’s are text searchable rather than just being the usual PDF images from JPEG. Because we are scanning to records management and potential on screen viewing rather than


printing, we use a compression system that would create a file size of c2.4mb for 200 pages at 200dpi. D - replied, Sorry, I should have clarified. We have a Professor who wants a number of his research papers scanned - they are around 10 years old, most were written by him and all were published by him. He wants them to be readable by students and we have scanned and produced a sample e-Flipbook (with software developed by us). He is delighted with the sample but he is apprehensive of plagiarism and does not want students to be able to download or print the files. We have disabled this option within the e-Flipbook but, for those who would like a printed copy, we will insert a hotlink to our Print Room storefront and we will charge, print and deliver to them. My question was driven by all of this. I asked advice on how you secure your PDFs to enable viewing but prohibit printing. A little investigation shows that the encryption that Adobe build into Acrobat is not particularly good the bulletin boards reckon it takes not much more than 30 seconds to crack - but even if it was better you can download free software that strips out any encryption from PDFs! Does everyone else know this and, if so, what if anything do you do about it? 

KEY STATS SUMMARY Alan • 71% of office workers consider themselves environmentally conscious

Full details http:// printingefficientlygreener.blogspot. com/2012/02/rethinking-printingkyocera.html

IN-PLANT GRAPHICS, FREE SUBSCRIPTION Bob Neubauer - In-plant Graphics Since In-plant Graphics is the only magazine in the world written exclusively for in-house printers, we thought that in-plants outside the U.S. might be interested in receiving it. Though postage costs restrict us from mailing it overseas at no charge to you, we are happy to provide a free subscription to our digital edition. Here’s a look at the current issue: http://digitaleditions.napco.com/ publication?i=99178 To obtain your very own subscription, please use the link below: http://sub.inplantgraphics.comB1/?PMC =WEB&PUB=IPG&DEMO=ABBR To make sure you continue to receive the interactive digital edition, please add the email address below to your email address book, spam software, whitelist or email system. inplantgraphics@digital.inplantgraphics. com You will start to receive an email each month that includes a link to view the latest issue. Visit www.In-PlantGraphics.com for thousands of resourceful articles, blogs, educational white papers, e-Learning events, videos and more.

• 14% of workers have increased the amount of printing they do in the last year

STUDENT PRINT

• Workers print 6,000 sheets a year on average, of which 3,720 are wasted or unnecessary

Since we started our service & incorporated Student Print (mainly dissertation & Thesis printing & binding) this area is the only one where I feel we have not progressed sufficiently to give the sort of service that I would expect, we wish to streamline the process of receiving files (usually wrong) getting to print ready PDF with minimum labour and then printing & binding.

• Only 25% of companies have a formal, written print policy • 21% of IT time is spent dealing with printer issues • 62% have audited their print services in the past year • Nearly half (48%) of workers claim to have no knowledge of their companies’ carbon offset policy

B

I am looking for those of you who feel they have cracked this & already offer an excellent cost effective service with a view to visiting & “pinching” some ideas (I’ll pay for lunch) 18

P- replied, I don’t think there is a quick fix for this unless you intend using job submission software, I have to be honest at . . . we tend to do a lot of “hand holding” which can be labour intensive and its something on my “to do list” to look at. Our job submission software is only used by staff, they have to input their cost code, something we haven’t setup for students yet. We notice that our overseas students come to us to print their work rather than use the Multifunctional Devices in the labs and Libraries.  Last Friday we must have had 30 students in our reception waiting to print and bind, the only positive is that they then pick something up from our retail shop to purchase, however the downside is the students perception of the service there are receiving. C- replied, At . . . we have had a student submission website for a year; this was linked in with the University Sitebuilder infrastructure and proved successful but limited in the functionality and scope of products available to the students. February of this year we went live with a site developed by our in house web developer giving us flexibility to update regularly and add additional services as and when. Early signs are good and production staff within . . . are happy with the workflow and submission process, no complaints from the students either! This is the link . . . the payment system is tied in with the University approved process, so cash flow is good and student work is not processed until online approval by the University system (this process takes seconds) (As aforementioned:The email circuit is for UPMG member use only; therefore, surnames and institutions have been removed in most cases in order to prevent offence to our members.)


Overseas friends Bob Neubauer Editor, In-plant Graphics 1500 Spring Garden St., 12th Floor Philadelphia, PA 19130 Like most of the world (including my friends and family), I had no idea what an “in-plant” was when I took over as editor of In-plant Graphics magazine back in 1994. I had been writing for Printing Impressions magazine for three years, covering the U.S. commercial printing industry, and I assumed in-plant printers were just smaller versions. What I found, though, was an industry that was much tighter-knit, much friendlier and far more willing to share information than the commercial printers had been. Many of these inplant managers knew each other, and it wasn’t long before I knew them too. I attended their conferences, visited their shops and before long I began to feel I was one of them (minus any practical knowledge of how to run a press, or even a punch). In the 17 1/2 years I’ve been editing IPG, I’ve become more of an advocate for in-plants than simply a graphic arts technology writer. I give presentations to in-plant groups to help them better prove their value and justify their operations, I answer questions from managers who feel their in-plants are threatened, and I occasionally stick my neck out to defend in-plants when associations or politicians act against them—all this because I genuinely like the managers who make up IPG’s readership, and I think they deserve a little respect. So I try to use the pages of the magazine to bring them some of that respect. Nothing pleases me more than recognizing a small in-plant tucked away in a small town, where it may be completely overlooked by its own parent organization.

A few years ago, I started sending the digital version of IPG to Andrew Scott, whom I’ve known for years. (His bad puns aside, his arrival is always one of the highlights of our ACUP conference.) Recently I realized there may be other managers in the UK who would like to read it as well. True, we do focus on U.S. operations, as that is most of our readership. Still, Andrew seems to find it useful:

“I have found IPG hugely interesting

and valuable over many years,” he says (and I didn’t pay him to say it either). “It’s good to hear about other in-plants in the US to discover they have the same issues as us in the UK. It’s also been really useful to read different perspectives and get ideas to solve problems.” I thought that was very kind of him to say. But then he went on to flatter me more: “Bob is a real champion of in-plants through his articles, editorials and attendance at conferences like ACUP, IPMA etc. He has been a great resource for US colleagues on the Hardcopy listserv, and has offered valued advice over more than a decade.” Oh, stop, I’m blushing. But seriously, thanks Andrew. So if any UPMG members are interested in receiving the free digital version of In-plant Graphics, just follow this short link and sign up: http://bit. ly/xdwB4s You will receive an e-mail each month that includes a link to view the latest issue. Here’s our February issue to help you decide if it’s worth it: http://digitaleditions.napco.com/ publication?i=99178 (I would love to send you all the printed version, but postage costs restrict us from mailing it overseas at no charge.) One last thing: we do try to offer a global perspective on the inplant industry, so I’m happy to hear any news about your in-plants’ accomplishments. Feel free to e-mail me at bobneubauer@napco.com. I hope someday to meet all of you at a UPMG conference.

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Conference ’12 introduction

Jimmy Friend Jimmy Friend is Director of Printing and Distribution Solutions, (PDS), at the University of North Texas in Denton, Texas. He has been in graphic arts for some 43 years. For the past 28 years he has been involved in the university in-plant community, with 5 years at SMU and the past 23 years at University of North Texas. Jimmy currently directs the UNT in-plant operations, including Print Services, Eagle Images Digital Print Centers, UNT Inter-campus Mail Services, and RMDS – Recruiting Mail Distribution System, the recruiting fulfillment operation.

Under Jimmy’s direction UNT Intercampus Mail Services and UNT Print Services joined forces 17 years ago to better serve the university community mail and print needs as well as to create a more customer focused service operation. The UNT Recruiting Mail Distribution System – RMDS, was developed and implemented in 1994 under Jimmy’s direction and continues to be a valuable service to UNT Enrollment Management, Undergraduate Admissions and Graduate Admissions. Known as a top quality in-plant operation, PDS has been honored as recipient of Best of Show-Digital at the IPMA In-Print competition for both 2010 and 2011, and in the past 8 years have won a total of 44 awards, 33 Gold, in this prestigious print competition. Jimmy is a charter and past member of the HP-Digital Publishing Advisory Council 2002-2004, and has long held membership and served in many officer roles with IPMA, NAPL, ACUP, TACUP, SWACUMS, NACUMS, NACAS and the North Texas Region PCC.

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Lisa Hoover Lisa Hoover is the Director of Publications, Print and Mail at Bucknell University in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, and is responsible for managing graphic design, lithographic and digital print production, print procurement, mail services, a copy center and fleet copiers. Lisa has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Communications, and has worked at Bucknell University for 13 years. Lisa began her career as a typesetter, and has held a variety of positions in the printing industry, including layout artist, pre-press technician, and production management for a culmination of more than 20 years’ experience in graphics and printing. Lisa is a member of ACUP (Association of College and University Printers), IPMA (In-Plant Printing and Mailing Association) and NACUMS (National Association of College and University Mail Services).


it was agreed that the Student’s Guild would adopt its principles. University & the Student’s Guild catering outlets have committed to serving 100% fair-trade coffee and tea and to stock other fairtrade products. The University has had Fair-trade status since 2007.

Sustainable Procurement Richard Price — Procurement Officer The University has been working towards Flexible Framework objectives supported by UK Government. To ensure that these objectives are embed within the University a 5-year strategy has been taken forward within six key risk/opportunity commodity areas: Food; Construction; Paper; Travel; Energy; IT. Each commodity champion has been engaged to look at ways to improve the sustainability of the goods and services that we purchase. Commodity champions have received awareness training and the University’s main staff induction website incorporates Sustainable Procurement through our Procurement Website. All Procurement staff were trained as part of a national project, NSPPP (National Sustainable Public Procurement Programme). Suppliers have been engaged by commodity champions to make them aware of what the University is doing with regards to buying sustainably and their opinions have been sought on where improvements can be made within the supply chain. Some examples of where there has been specific action that supports sustainability: The University has developed a Sustainable Food Policy: • 90% of fresh meat products sourced from the South West • All milk is sourced from the South West • All eggs are sourced from the South West. Free range has been

sourced for some catering events, but are not widely used across

campus due to increased cost considerations.

• No fish are purchased from the MSC endangered / red list – fish to avoid. MSC accreditation planned for 2012/13.

• The University promotes the use of national purchasing frameworks,

and suppor local companies to become listed, enabling the

University to purchase from local sources, this also introduce our

suppliers to a wider customer base.

• Local companies have been introduced to larger UK companies an

example of this is 3663 now stock Luscome drinks and Clipper Tea.

• In house bottled water available to customers instead of buying in

Biodegradable packaging was developed with a local sandwich supplier and they are also sourcing more of their ingredients locally. Local suppliers benefited from free training and one to one assessments through a Local Area Agreement with other local public sector organisations e.g. ECC, DCC, D&C Police and Environment Agency. Our local meat & poultry suppliers have adopted a Government Scheme for Safe Driving (SAFED), saving 1020% fuel / transport costs.

• All fresh poultry products sourced from the South West.

Our local fruit and vegetable supplier now stocks Fairtrade bananas at the same price as non-Fairtrade. Retail/ catering outlets purchase above 50% fair-trade with a long term aim of buying only fair-trade. A website to provide a monthly newsletter for chefs and other customers, promoting local produce and special offers has been developed by this supplier.

plastic bottles.

The Self Service Print and Copy project has improved the recycling of MFD toners by establishing a closed loop system. The awarded company ‘Xerox’ has provided innovative Multi Functional Devices that are toner less. These devices use wax cartridges instead of traditional toner cartridges. Also the University is now able to set rules to default MFD devices to double sided print and locked printing and provide budget areas specific management information for them to manage their printing & copying in a more sustainable way. We have influenced our local poultry supplier to install wind turbines and PV tubes that supply power to their premises. When the university’s sustainable procurement policy was reviewed in 2009/10, 21

Retail Services supplier review

meetings with key catering

suppliers incorporate sustainability/ environmental awareness as a standard agenda item. Sustainability is discussed at every review meeting and we review each supplier’s achievements with recycling, energy saving/CO2 reduction, etc and encourage them to improve. Specific questions are asked in our tender documents for example; • Have suppliers been in breach of environmental regulations within the last 5 years? • What areas can suppliers provide evidence on sustainable approaches which they have implemented and how can these be of a benefit to the University.

We also request environmental policy/ awards and how supplier manage their environmental responsibility’s eg. Environmental Management System (EMS) implemented.


Congratulations !! go to our very own Carol Aleknavicius: As some of you know, my sport is

Each year Crufts host a cani-cross

cani-cross, which is cross country

competition, the race being in time trial

running with your dog. The dog wears

format. We start with a lap of the main

a cross-backed harness and is attached

arena, then we run outside and around

by a bungee line to its human partner

the perimeter of the NEC, finishing up

who wear a special waistbelt. It’s a

by the lake where the dogs take a well

brilliant way to get out in the fresh

earned dip. The 2km race is a short

air and spend quality time with your

distance compared to our usual cross

dog, hopefully keeping you both fit as

country races, it’s fast and furious, and

a bonus.

pretty nerve racking at the start in front of the huge crowd in the main

I compete with my border collie,

arena. This was 2 year old Gracie’s first

Gracie, in a national championship

appearance at Crufts, and she was a

league each year, the season being

handful at the start, raring to go. We

September through to May, and we

had a really good run finishing third to

do quite well in the veteran ladies

win the ladies bronze medal....way to

category!

go Racie Gracie.

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Conference 2012

OUR ANNUAL CONFERENCE GOING FOR GOLD IS NOW ONLY TWO MONTHS AWAY. The executive have worked hard this year to deliver a fantastic full agenda which includes popular members sessions, international Speakers from ACUP and NIPPA, and more leading edge training sessions than ever before. Each of these training sessions would cost well in excess of the cost of attending the whole of conference.  So get the most from your membership and book a place today. OUR KEYNOTE SPEAKER IS OLYMPIC SILVER MEDALLIST JAMIE BAULCH, 400M AND 4 X 400M RELAY.  Jamie competed at the top level of athletics for over 10 years and he will use his sporting experience to motivate us all at the start of the conference in this Olympic year.  Our members seminars include Social Media; Large Format, ideas to inspire and create; and the New Government Procurement Services. Our international speakers this year are: Rob Roberts, Massey University, New Zealand; Jimmy Friend, University of Texas; and Lisa Hoover, ACUP President and of Bucknell University.  THE TRAINING SESSIONS THIS YEAR INCLUDE:

SELLING THE PRINT MARKET TO THE INTERNAL MARKET AND INCREASING INCOME STREAMS FROM THE EXTERNAL MARKET Two training session delivered by Jo Lloyd of Cotmandene Training, a specialist training company for publishing and print businesses.

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Two Training sessions from Ted Osuch of Tidalfire. As tablets and eBook readers become the norm, printing technologists need to consider how they can use their skills for the purpose of delivering online and mobile content. Ted will show how the use of Adobe InDesign to provide an array of output formats can enhance the printed layout by adding value to customers.

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FROM A4 TO IPAD

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Two training sessions provided by Ann Holman of the Ann Holman Company, who specialises in guiding brands through the process of becoming social, and are leading edge thinkers in the field of social business.

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O g N C F fo A ER r W RD E g A N 2 0 L I F C ol ES F E d U P 12 M

YOUR BRAND IS YOU

As always the conference will include the Annual Design and Print Awards, and an exhibition with leading suppliers. If you haven’t already booked your place please complete the attached booking form and return to Roy Stares.

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Letter from the editor Nigel Phillips Phew ! As I come to the end of this particular Newsletter I’m probably thinking, like many of yourselves? That I deserve a Medal ? So sorry though folks! I’ll let all of you fight over Silver and Bronze. There is only one Gold and that is mine . . . for the simple reason that I got here first !!

Seriously though, out of the four newsletters which have gone before it, this one must hold the record for the most contributions and pages. Again, can’t thank you all enough for the support you have given all newsletters and particularly this issue. I really don’t know how we used to manage without them? However, it’s still all down to you, the members. For without you there wouldn’t be any news to publish. Looking back since the Christmas edition much has happened already in UPMG circles. There was the SUPMG meeting at Stirling in December 2011, which I found an excellent opportunity to meet with friends north of the border and hear first-hand the news regarding the print services they operate and have involvement with. Particularly interesting was the PaperCut demonstration and the tour of the Library given and hosted by Margaret Angell.

This was followed by the executive and regional members meeting in January 2012, taking place at Goldsmiths and the University of East London, which again was extremely worthwhile and a great opportunity of see other establishments at work. It can sometimes mean quite an effort to get out of the office and make these meetings but believe me, they are invaluable! You will have noticed that in both meetings I took my camera with me? Please do also act as reporters too! Any exhibitions or meetings you go to, take your camera with you and write an article for members. It would be greatly appreciated and I’m on hand to assist in any way I can. I’m now looking forward to the Conference in Cardiff, which again is always a ‘golden’ (sorry!) opportunity to catch up with friends old and new, as well as, come away with several ideas. If you haven’t booked yet, I would certainly encourage you to do so and grab one of the last remaining places. All that’s left for me now is to thank you all again for your contributions, as I look forward to seeing many of you at the 2012, Going for Gold Conference at Cardiff in May.

Kind regards, Nigel 24

UPMG Newsletter 5 Spring 2012  

UPMG Newsletter 5 Spring 2012

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