Issuu on Google+

Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

CS 133 : Automata Theory and Computability Context-Free Grammars and Languages Henry N. Adorna Nestine Hope S. Hernandez Algorithms and Complexity Laboratory Department of Computer Science University of the Philippines, Diliman {hnadorna,nshernandez}@dcs.upd.edu.ph

LEC 4


Context-Free Grammars

Introduction

Designing CFGs

Context-Free Grammars and Languages

Introduction Context-Free Grammars Formal Definition Derivations using a Grammar Context-Free Language Designing CFGs Ambiguous CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs


Context-Free Grammars

Introduction

Designing CFGs

Context-Free Grammars and Languages

Introduction Context-Free Grammars Formal Definition Derivations using a Grammar Context-Free Language Designing CFGs Ambiguous CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Context-Free Grammars • a more powerful method of describing languages

Ambiguous CFGs


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Context-Free Grammars • a more powerful method of describing languages • describe certain features that have a recursive structure

Ambiguous CFGs


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Context-Free Grammars • a more powerful method of describing languages • describe certain features that have a recursive structure • first used in the study of human languages (noun, verb,

preposition)

Ambiguous CFGs


Context-Free Grammars

Introduction

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Context-Free Grammars • a more powerful method of describing languages • describe certain features that have a recursive structure • first used in the study of human languages (noun, verb,

preposition) • application: specification and compilation of programming

languages


Context-Free Grammars

Introduction

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Context-Free Grammars • a more powerful method of describing languages • describe certain features that have a recursive structure • first used in the study of human languages (noun, verb,

preposition) • application: specification and compilation of programming

languages • parser - extracts the meaning of a program prior to generating

the compiled code or performing the interpreted action


Context-Free Grammars

Introduction

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Context-Free Grammars • a more powerful method of describing languages • describe certain features that have a recursive structure • first used in the study of human languages (noun, verb,

preposition) • application: specification and compilation of programming

languages • parser - extracts the meaning of a program prior to generating

the compiled code or performing the interpreted action • context free languages - collection of languages associated with

CFGs


Context-Free Grammars

Introduction

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Context-Free Grammars • a more powerful method of describing languages • describe certain features that have a recursive structure • first used in the study of human languages (noun, verb,

preposition) • application: specification and compilation of programming

languages • parser - extracts the meaning of a program prior to generating

the compiled code or performing the interpreted action • context free languages - collection of languages associated with

CFGs • pushdown automata - a class of machines recognizing the CFLs


Introduction

Example A → 0A1 A→B B→#

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs


Context-Free Grammars

Introduction

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Example A → 0A1 A→B B→#

Definition • A grammar consists of a collection of substitution rules, also

called productions


Context-Free Grammars

Introduction

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Example A → 0A1 A→B B→#

Definition • A grammar consists of a collection of substitution rules, also

called productions (symbol → string)


Context-Free Grammars

Introduction

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Example A → 0A1 A→B B→#

Definition • A grammar consists of a collection of substitution rules, also

called productions (symbol → string) • The symbol is called a variable (represented by capital letters)


Context-Free Grammars

Introduction

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Example A → 0A1 A→B B→#

Definition • A grammar consists of a collection of substitution rules, also

called productions (symbol → string) • The symbol is called a variable (represented by capital letters) • The string consists of variables and other symbols called

terminals (input alphabet)


Context-Free Grammars

Introduction

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Example A → 0A1 A→B B→#

Definition • A grammar consists of a collection of substitution rules, also

called productions (symbol → string) • The symbol is called a variable (represented by capital letters) • The string consists of variables and other symbols called

terminals (input alphabet) • One variable is designated as the start variable (usually, the

left-hand side of topmost rule)


Context-Free Grammars

Introduction

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Example A → 0A1 A→B B→#

Definition • A grammar consists of a collection of substitution rules, also

called productions (symbol → string) • The symbol is called a variable (represented by capital letters) • The string consists of variables and other symbols called

terminals (input alphabet) • One variable is designated as the start variable (usually, the

left-hand side of topmost rule)


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Grammar −→ Language

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Grammar −→ Language 1. Write down the start variable.

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Grammar −→ Language 1. Write down the start variable. 2. Find a variable that is written down and a rule that starts with that variable. Replace the written down variable with the right-hand side of that rule.


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Grammar −→ Language 1. Write down the start variable. 2. Find a variable that is written down and a rule that starts with that variable. Replace the written down variable with the right-hand side of that rule. 3. Repeat step2 until no variables remain.


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Grammar −→ Language 1. Write down the start variable. 2. Find a variable that is written down and a rule that starts with that variable. Replace the written down variable with the right-hand side of that rule. 3. Repeat step2 until no variables remain. The sequence of substitutions to obtain a string is called a derivation.


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Grammar −→ Language 1. Write down the start variable. 2. Find a variable that is written down and a rule that starts with that variable. Replace the written down variable with the right-hand side of that rule. 3. Repeat step2 until no variables remain. The sequence of substitutions to obtain a string is called a derivation.

Example (G1) A → 0A1 A→B B→#


Context-Free Grammars

Introduction

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Grammar −→ Language 1. Write down the start variable. 2. Find a variable that is written down and a rule that starts with that variable. Replace the written down variable with the right-hand side of that rule. 3. Repeat step2 until no variables remain. The sequence of substitutions to obtain a string is called a derivation.

Example (G1) A → 0A1 A→B B→# A ⇒ 0A1 ⇒ 00A11 ⇒ 000A111 ⇒ 000B111 ⇒ 000#111


Context-Free Grammars

Introduction

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Grammar −→ Language 1. Write down the start variable. 2. Find a variable that is written down and a rule that starts with that variable. Replace the written down variable with the right-hand side of that rule. 3. Repeat step2 until no variables remain. The sequence of substitutions to obtain a string is called a derivation.

Example (G1) A → 0A1 A→B B→# A ⇒ 0A1 ⇒ 00A11 ⇒ 000A111 ⇒ 000B111 ⇒ 000#111

May be represented by a parse tree


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Context-Free Language Any language that can be generated by some context-free grammar is called a context-free language.


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Context-Free Language Any language that can be generated by some context-free grammar is called a context-free language.

Example (G2) <sentence> <nounphrase> <verbphrase> <prepphrase> <cmplxnoun> <cmplxverb> <article> <noun> <verb> <prep>

−→ −→ −→ −→ −→ −→ −→ −→ −→ −→

<nounphrase> <verbphrase> <cmplxnoun> | <cmplxnoun> <prepphrase> <cmplxverb> | <cmplxverb> <prepphrase> <prep> <cmplxnoun> <article> <noun> <verb> | <verb> <nounphrase> a | the boy | girl | flower touches | likes | sees with


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Context-Free Language Any language that can be generated by some context-free grammar is called a context-free language.

Example (G2) <sentence> <nounphrase> <verbphrase> <prepphrase> <cmplxnoun> <cmplxverb> <article> <noun> <verb> <prep>

−→ −→ −→ −→ −→ −→ −→ −→ −→ −→

the girl likes the flower

<nounphrase> <verbphrase> <cmplxnoun> | <cmplxnoun> <prepphrase> <cmplxverb> | <cmplxverb> <prepphrase> <prep> <cmplxnoun> <article> <noun> <verb> | <verb> <nounphrase> a | the boy | girl | flower touches | likes | sees with


Context-Free Grammars

Introduction

Designing CFGs

Context-Free Grammars and Languages

Introduction Context-Free Grammars Formal Definition Derivations using a Grammar Context-Free Language Designing CFGs Ambiguous CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Formal Definition

Definition A context-free grammar is a 4-tuple (V, Σ, R, S), where 1. V is a finite set called the variables, 2. Σ is a finite set, disjoint from V , called the terminals, 3. R is a finite set of rules, with each rule being a variable and a string of variables and terminals, and 4. S ∈ V is the start variable.

Example (G3) G3 = ({S}, {(, )}, R, S) R: S → (S)|SS|ε


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Formal Definition

Definition A context-free grammar is a 4-tuple (V, Σ, R, S), where 1. V is a finite set called the variables, 2. Σ is a finite set, disjoint from V , called the terminals, 3. R is a finite set of rules, with each rule being a variable and a string of variables and terminals, and 4. S ∈ V is the start variable.

Example (G3) G3 = ({S}, {(, )}, R, S) R: S → (S)|SS|ε

Example (Gpal ) Gpal = ({P }, {0, 1}, R, P ) R: P → ε | 0 | 1 | 0P 0 | 1P 1


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Formal Definition

Definition A context-free grammar is a 4-tuple (V, Σ, R, S), where 1. V is a finite set called the variables, 2. Σ is a finite set, disjoint from V , called the terminals, 3. R is a finite set of rules, with each rule being a variable and a string of variables and terminals, and 4. S ∈ V is the start variable.

Example (G3) G3 = ({S}, {(, )}, R, S) R: S → (S)|SS|ε

Example (Gpal ) Gpal = ({P }, {0, 1}, R, P ) R: P → ε | 0 | 1 | 0P 0 | 1P 1 A CFG for palindromes


Introduction

Derivations:

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Derivations: B Sentential Form

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Derivations: B Sentential Form B Parse Tree

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Derivations: B Sentential Form B Parse Tree

Example (G) S → A1B A → 0A | ε B → 0B | 1B | ε

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Derivations: B Sentential Form B Parse Tree

Example (G) S → A1B A → 0A | ε B → 0B | 1B | ε Give leftmost derivations of the following strings: 1. 00101 2. 1001 3. 00011

Ambiguous CFGs


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Derivations: B Sentential Form B Parse Tree

Example (G) S → A1B A → 0A | ε B → 0B | 1B | ε Give leftmost derivations of the following strings: 1. 00101 2. 1001 3. 00011 Give parse trees for each of the strings above.

Ambiguous CFGs


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Definition If G(V, Σ, R, S) is a CFG, the language of G, denoted by L(G), is the set of terminal strings that have derivations from the start symbols. That is, L(G) = {w ∈ Σ∗ |S ⇒∗ w}


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Definition If G(V, Σ, R, S) is a CFG, the language of G, denoted by L(G), is the set of terminal strings that have derivations from the start symbols. That is, L(G) = {w ∈ Σ∗ |S ⇒∗ w} Any language that can be generated by some context-free grammar is called a context-free language.


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Definition If G(V, ÎŁ, R, S) is a CFG, the language of G, denoted by L(G), is the set of terminal strings that have derivations from the start symbols. That is, L(G) = {w â&#x2C6;&#x2C6; ÎŁâ&#x2C6;&#x2014; |S â&#x2021;&#x2019;â&#x2C6;&#x2014; w} Any language that can be generated by some context-free grammar is called a context-free language.

Example (Gpal ) Gpal = ({P }, {0, 1}, R, P ) R: P â&#x2020;&#x2019;  | 0 | 1 | 0P 0 | 1P 1


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Definition If G(V, ÎŁ, R, S) is a CFG, the language of G, denoted by L(G), is the set of terminal strings that have derivations from the start symbols. That is, L(G) = {w â&#x2C6;&#x2C6; ÎŁâ&#x2C6;&#x2014; |S â&#x2021;&#x2019;â&#x2C6;&#x2014; w} Any language that can be generated by some context-free grammar is called a context-free language.

Example (Gpal ) Gpal = ({P }, {0, 1}, R, P ) R: P â&#x2020;&#x2019;  | 0 | 1 | 0P 0 | 1P 1 L(Gpal ) is the set of palindromes over {0, 1}.


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Definition If G(V, ÎŁ, R, S) is a CFG, the language of G, denoted by L(G), is the set of terminal strings that have derivations from the start symbols. That is, L(G) = {w â&#x2C6;&#x2C6; ÎŁâ&#x2C6;&#x2014; |S â&#x2021;&#x2019;â&#x2C6;&#x2014; w} Any language that can be generated by some context-free grammar is called a context-free language.

Example (G) G = ({S, A, B}, {0, 1}, R, S) R: S â&#x2020;&#x2019; A1B A â&#x2020;&#x2019; 0A |  B â&#x2020;&#x2019; 0B | 1B | 


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Definition If G(V, ÎŁ, R, S) is a CFG, the language of G, denoted by L(G), is the set of terminal strings that have derivations from the start symbols. That is, L(G) = {w â&#x2C6;&#x2C6; ÎŁâ&#x2C6;&#x2014; |S â&#x2021;&#x2019;â&#x2C6;&#x2014; w} Any language that can be generated by some context-free grammar is called a context-free language.

Example (G) G = ({S, A, B}, {0, 1}, R, S) R: S â&#x2020;&#x2019; A1B A â&#x2020;&#x2019; 0A |  B â&#x2020;&#x2019; 0B | 1B |  L(G) is the language described by the regular expression 0â&#x2C6;&#x2014; 1(0 â&#x2C6;Ş 1)â&#x2C6;&#x2014; .


Context-Free Grammars

Introduction

Designing CFGs

Context-Free Grammars and Languages

Introduction Context-Free Grammars Formal Definition Derivations using a Grammar Context-Free Language Designing CFGs Ambiguous CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

1. Certain CFLs contain strings with two substrings that are linked in the sense that a machine for such a language need to remember an unbounded amount of info about one of the substrings to verify that it corresponds properly to the other substring.


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

1. Certain CFLs contain strings with two substrings that are linked in the sense that a machine for such a language need to remember an unbounded amount of info about one of the substrings to verify that it corresponds properly to the other substring. {0n 1n | n â&#x2030;Ľ 0}


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

1. Certain CFLs contain strings with two substrings that are linked in the sense that a machine for such a language need to remember an unbounded amount of info about one of the substrings to verify that it corresponds properly to the other substring. {0n 1n | n â&#x2030;Ľ 0} 2. If you must construct a CFG for a CFL that you can break into simpler pieces, do so and then construct individual grammars for each piece.


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

1. Certain CFLs contain strings with two substrings that are linked in the sense that a machine for such a language need to remember an unbounded amount of info about one of the substrings to verify that it corresponds properly to the other substring. {0n 1n | n ≥ 0} 2. If you must construct a CFG for a CFL that you can break into simpler pieces, do so and then construct individual grammars for each piece. {0n 1n | n ≥ 0} ∪ {1n 0n | n ≥ 0}


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

1. Certain CFLs contain strings with two substrings that are linked in the sense that a machine for such a language need to remember an unbounded amount of info about one of the substrings to verify that it corresponds properly to the other substring. {0n 1n | n ≥ 0} 2. If you must construct a CFG for a CFL that you can break into simpler pieces, do so and then construct individual grammars for each piece. {0n 1n | n ≥ 0} ∪ {1n 0n | n ≥ 0} 3. To construct a CFG for a regular language, convert a DFA for that language into an equivalent CFG.


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

â&#x20AC;˘ First construct a DFA for that language.

Ambiguous CFGs


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

• First construct a DFA for that language. • Make a variable Ri for each state qi of the DFA.

Ambiguous CFGs


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

• First construct a DFA for that language. • Make a variable Ri for each state qi of the DFA. • Add the rule Ri → aRj to the CFG if δ(qi , a) = qj is a transition

in the DFA. Add the rule Ri → ε if qi is an accept state of the DFA.


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

• First construct a DFA for that language. • Make a variable Ri for each state qi of the DFA. • Add the rule Ri → aRj to the CFG if δ(qi , a) = qj is a transition

in the DFA. Add the rule Ri → ε if qi is an accept state of the DFA. • Make R0 the start variable of the grammar, where q0 is the start

state of the machine.


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

• First construct a DFA for that language. • Make a variable Ri for each state qi of the DFA. • Add the rule Ri → aRj to the CFG if δ(qi , a) = qj is a transition

in the DFA. Add the rule Ri → ε if qi is an accept state of the DFA. • Make R0 the start variable of the grammar, where q0 is the start

state of the machine. Design CFGs for the following languages: 1. {ai bj ck |i, j, k ≥ 0} 2. (0 ∪ 1)∗ 111


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

1. Certain CFLs contain strings with two substrings that are linked in the sense that a machine for such a language need to remember an unbounded amount of info about one of the substrings to verify that it corresponds properly to the other substring. {0n 1n | n ≥ 0} 2. If you must construct a CFG for a CFL that you can break into simpler pieces, do so and then construct individual grammars for each piece. {0n 1n | n ≥ 0} ∪ {1n 0n | n ≥ 0} 3. To construct a CFG for a regular language, convert a DFA for that language into an equivalent CFG. 4. The strings may contain certain structures that appear recursively as part of other (or the same) structures. To achieve this effect, place the variable symbol generating the structure in the location of the rules corresponding to where that structure may recursively appear.


Context-Free Grammars

Introduction

Designing CFGs

Context-Free Grammars and Languages

Introduction Context-Free Grammars Formal Definition Derivations using a Grammar Context-Free Language Designing CFGs Ambiguous CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Definition A string w is derived ambiguously in CFG G if it has two or more different leftmost derivations. Grammar G is ambiguous if it generates some string ambiguously.


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Definition A string w is derived ambiguously in CFG G if it has two or more different leftmost derivations. Grammar G is ambiguous if it generates some string ambiguously. Note: B Sometimes when we have an ambiguous grammar we can find an unambiguous grammar that generates the same language.


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Definition A string w is derived ambiguously in CFG G if it has two or more different leftmost derivations. Grammar G is ambiguous if it generates some string ambiguously. Note: B Sometimes when we have an ambiguous grammar we can find an unambiguous grammar that generates the same language. B Some CFLs, however, can be generated only by ambiguous grammars (inherently ambiguous).


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Example (A grammar for expressions) GE = ({E}, {+, ∗, (, ), a}, R, E) R: E → a | E + E | E ∗ E | (E)

Ambiguous CFGs


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Example (A grammar for expressions) GE = ({E}, {+, ∗, (, ), a}, R, E) R: E → a | E + E | E ∗ E | (E) Consider a + a ∗ a.

Ambiguous CFGs


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Example (A grammar for expressions) GE = ({E}, {+, ∗, (, ), a}, R, E) R: E → a | E + E | E ∗ E | (E) Consider a + a ∗ a. derivation?

Ambiguous CFGs


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Example (A grammar for expressions) GE = ({E}, {+, ∗, (, ), a}, R, E) R: E → a | E + E | E ∗ E | (E) Consider a + a ∗ a. derivation? parse tree?

Ambiguous CFGs


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Example (An unambiguous grammar for expressions) GEU = ({E, F, T }, {+, ∗, (, ), a}, R, E) R: E → T | E+T T → F | T ∗F F → a | (E)

Ambiguous CFGs


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Example (An unambiguous grammar for expressions) GEU = ({E, F, T }, {+, ∗, (, ), a}, R, E) R: E → T | E+T T → F | T ∗F F → a | (E) Parse tree of a + a ∗ a?

Ambiguous CFGs


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Inherent Ambiguity

Example L = {an bn cm dm | n ≥ 1, m ≥ 1} ∪ {an bm cm dn | n ≥ 1, m ≥ 1}.


Context-Free Grammars

Introduction

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Inherent Ambiguity

Example L = {an bn cm dm | n ≥ 1, m ≥ 1} ∪ {an bm cm dn | n ≥ 1, m ≥ 1}. S→ A→ B→ C→ D→

AB | C aAb | ab cBd | cd aCd | aDd bDc | bc


Context-Free Grammars

Introduction

Designing CFGs

Ambiguous CFGs

Inherent Ambiguity

Example L = {an bn cm dm | n ≥ 1, m ≥ 1} ∪ {an bm cm dn | n ≥ 1, m ≥ 1}. S→ A→ B→ C→ D→

AB | C aAb | ab cBd | cd aCd | aDd bDc | bc

Consider aabbccdd.


Introduction

Context-Free Grammars

Designing CFGs

Questions? See you next meeting!

Ambiguous CFGs


Cs133 lec04