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The Chimes Vol. XXXVIII No. 5

May 2013

Dear Friends, It is a substantial understatement to say that not everyone shares our faith assumptions. Indeed, mentioning “our faith assumptions” makes an assumption that it likely less than true. But we all know that in a culture that celebrates pluralism and believes that it doesn’t matter what one believes as long as he or she is sincere, it may seem a bit pushy or even rude for us Christians to profess our faith. Even when we do so quietly and humbly, we may find ourselves ridiculed or scorned, for there is nothing shy, subtle or humble about many of the contemporary purveyors of secularism or atheism.

Our Church Family

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PYC May Calendar

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Pentecost Offering: May 19

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Fatherhood Discussion: May 9

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We Celebrate New Members

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Presbyterian Women Spring Dinner: May 14

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Memorial Garden Update

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Youth Choir Leadership Team

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Youth Choir Sings: May 19

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Are We There Yet? Cast and Crew; Choirs Sing: May 12

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Adult Christian Education

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Faith Forward Update

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Much of the time, I suspect, we simply remain silent in the face of such challenges. We may not want to risk a friendship. We may not want to stir the pot too much. And there’s that other problem: we may not feel well-enoughequipped to respond when someone raises questions or challenges regarding what we believe. At University Church, we’ve been working on that third reason for hesitation, offering seminars, classes and other opportunities to explore our faith—primers in what Christians (and, more particularly, Presbyterians) believe. We are convinced that one means of equipping us with the grammar of faith for such conversations is to engage in table talk within our faith community. The Presbyterianism 101 class, Dick Prust’s church school seminar on “God and the problem of evil,” and other such opportunities are regular staples of our adult education program; I hope you have embraced such opportunities already or will begin to take full advantage of them. During the Sundays of May, I will be offering a series of sermons I’m calling simply “Credo” (Latin, as you know, for “I believe”). The series will not so much propose answers to the critics of Christianity as it will seek to offer straightforward statements of the faith to which the church holds. I will organize the series around some common critiques and some possible responses: Is there a God? Is Jesus really God? Is Scripture trustworthy? How about the church and all those hypocrites? What about evil?

Session Digest

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Middle School Ministry Trip to Washington DC

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Presbyterian Campus Ministry

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I have no illusion that a short sermon series will settle all those big questions. I know it won’t. I hope only that the sermons will stir enough conversation to generate interest in exploring such matters at greater depth. I look forward to the conversation.

We Thank Our Church Office Volunteers!

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Grace and peace,

Haiti Mission Trip Reflections

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Local Outreach News

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New Hope Camp and Conference Center: May News

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Global Outreach News

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Montreat Worship and Music Family Meeting: June 2

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Robert E. Dunham UPC Capital Campaign UPDATE! Learn what’s happening with the UPC Capital Campaign, Faith Forward, including what members can expect, the church organ renovation and a report from the building committee, as well as how you can pledge! See pages 7-10 for our special Faith Forward update!

University Presbyterian Church is affiliated with the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) and is a Stephen Ministry Congregation


The Chimes

Volume XXXVIII, No. 5

May 2013

Our Church Family “Are any among you sick? They should call for the elders of the church and have them pray over them, anointing them with oil in the name of the Lord,” James 5:14. Due to privacy concerns and HIPAA laws, there are no notifications or lists at any local hospitals or clinics which would inform the church if you are hospitalized, receiving treatment or undergoing surgery.

The UPC congregation and its pastors take seriously the call to pray and be present with those who are in need, so we encourage you, a friend or a family member to let us know if you have scheduled surgery or have been admitted to the hospital. During the week, please call the church office at (919) 929-2102, and over the weekend, please call one of the pastors. Thank you.

Visit our Website: www.upcch.org

H ow to S u b m i t A r tic le s fo r T h e S u n d a y B u lle ti n’s Announcements O r fo r th e M o n th ly New s le t te r, Th e Chimes Please submit articles for the monthly newsletter (The Chimes) or announcements for the worship bulletin (Weekly Announcements) to our Publications Coordinator, Jennifer Potts. Email her at potts@upcch.org or call (919) 929-2102, extension 113.

Th e Ch im es i s a p u b l i c a t i o n o f U n i v e r s i t y P r e s by t e r i an C h u r c h The Chimes is published monthly. Deadline for submission of articles is the 15th of each month for the following month’s edition (with a few exceptions to accommodate holiday schedules). Please include your name, phone number and email address. The newsletter is posted on the church’s Website (www.upcch.org) and on www.issuu.com/upcch. Send article submissions and inquiries to Newsletter Editor, University Presbyterian Church, P.O. Box 509, Chapel Hill, NC 27514-0509, or email potts@upcch.org. The church office may be reached by telephone at (919) 929-2102, by fax at (919) 929-7669 or by email at upcch@upcch.org. Visit the UPC Website (www.upcch.org) or the UPC Facebook page (www.facebook.com/upcch) for more information. ** Deadline for the June edition is noon on Wednesday, May 15, 2013. University Presbyterian Church Staff: Robert E. Dunham, Pastor; Anna Pinckney Straight, Associate Pastor; John Rogers, Associate Pastor for Campus Ministry; Heather Ferguson, Staff Associate for Education; Kim McNeill, Staff Associate for Youth and Congregational Life; Thomas Brown, Minister of Music; Beth Auman Visser, Youth and Children's Choir Director; Ellen Parker, Director, UPPS; Jeanette Schmidt, Office Manager; Cristen Mugford, Financial Administrator; Karen Fisher, Director of Membership; Jennifer Potts, Publications Coordinator; Dennis Dallke, Property Manager; Rob Kurtz, Sexton.

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The Chimes

Volume XXXVIII, No. 5

May 2013

P r e s by t e r i an Yo u t h Co n n e c t i o n i n M a y All 6th-12th graders are invited to attend PYC from 6-8 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall (drop-off at 6 p.m.) and Youth Center (pick-up at 8 p.m. in the parking lot). This amazing group of teens meet every week as they help one another strive to be faithful Christians in the world. For more information contact Kim McNeill, Staff Associate for Youth and Congregational Life, at kim@upcch.org. We invite youth and parents to follow our Twitter page @UPCPYC. Go to https://twitter.com/upcpyc

M a y C al e n d ar a n d P YC T h i s S u m m e r PYC is held on Sundays from 6-8 p.m. and begins in the Fellowship Hall unless otherwise noted. Sunday, May 5: The Gospel in Seven Words Sunday, May 12: Last PYC at Maple View Farms Sunday, May 19: Senior Dinner for Senior families hosted by Junior Families Please keep our youth and adults in your prayers this summer as they travel for service and conferences that will deepen both their faith in God and their relationships with one another. June 9-15: Montreat Youth Conference June 16-22: Montreat Worship and Music Conference July 14-20: Appalachia Service Project

Pe n t e c o s t O f f e r i n g: S u n d a y, M ay 1 9 On Pentecost Sunday, May 19, University Presbyterian Church will receive the Pentecost Offering in addition to regular tithes and gifts. The Pentecost Offering is one of four annual special offerings received by the Presbyterian Church (USA). Sixty percent of the offering received is utilized by the denomination to support the Young Adult Volunteer program, ministries with youth and the church’s child advocacy work. The other forty percent is retained by the local congregation to support local programs for youth. This year, your offerings will go to aid the work of the Blue Ribbon Mentor Advocate program through their Sponsor a Scholar initiative, which helps students in BRMA believe that college is in their future through the promise of tuition assistance. For more information about the program, please visit http://goo.gl/P7dL3.

C o n g r e g a t i o n s, F a t h e r h o o d a n d C l y d e E d g e r t o n : M a y 9 Join Clyde Edgerton and Durham’s Partnership for Children as he reads from his new book, Papadaddy’s Book for New Fathers: Advice to Dads of All Ages, on Thursday, May 9, at 4 p.m. at Duke Memorial United Methodist Church, 504 West Chapel Hill St. Jeff Quinn, a dad from Duke’s Center for Child and Family Policy, will share the importance of the “The Father Factor” on early development. Creative ways for congregations to involve fathers will be included. The best gift you can give the mother of your children for Mother’s Day is an involved father. Along with the Durham’s Partnership for Children, The Regulator Bookshop and Duke Memorial United Memorial Church are co-sponsoring the event. This is a free event that is open to the public, but RSVP is recommended and appreciated. Please contact Winnie Morgan at winniewmorgan@juno.com. Page 3


The Chimes

Volume XXXVIII, No. 5

May 2013

We C e l e b r a t e O u r N ew M e m b e r s In April, University Presbyterian Church welcomed the following new member into the life of the church. The neighborhood assignment is designated within brackets. Allison Dixon—Allison comes to UPC by transfer of her membership from St. Andrews Presbyterian Church in Raleigh, where she grew up. Allison attended Roanoke College and then UNC Wilmington (where she received her undergraduate degree) before moving to Chapel Hill to pursue a masters degree in Library Science. Allison is currently working for the Wake County Public Library system, but she is looking for a full-time position after her graduation in May this year.

P r e s by t e r i an Wo m e n S p r i n g D i n n e r : M ay 1 4 Please save the date of Tuesday, May 14, for the next annual Presbyterian Women Spring dinner! All women from the church are welcome! The dinner will take place in the Fellowship Hall from 6 to 8 p.m.. The cost is $12 for a catered meal and evening of fun! This event is for all women of UPC. Whether you’ve attended many of these events or this will be your first one, please come! The guest speaker will be Margot Starbuck. Learn more about her at www.margotstarbuck.com. Please RSVP by May 10 to rsvp@upcch.org. If you have questions, please call Kathy Shaw (919) 929-1587. Thank you!

A S p r i n g Up d a t e o n t h e A n n e M c C l am r o c h M c F a l l M e m o r i a l Ga r d e n True to its beginning purpose, the garden continues as a sacred space to bury or scatter the remains of our lost loved ones. It also is a place to remember them and to find a haven for prayer, reflection and meditation. It calls us during this spring blooming season to witness once again and be awed by the wonder and beauty of God’s creation. During most months of the year, the garden treats us with something blooming often with delightful fragrance. The sweetbox on the upper level lead the way with their tiny white, sweet scented flowTriumph Tulips ers as early as December. The camellias and cherry trees have followed with their beautiful pink display. The garden has five different species of viburnums all with distinctive blooms. The aptly named ‘Spring Bouquet’ is a special early bloomer and has now been followed by ‘Conoy,’ ‘Eskimo’ and, on either side of the parlor window, ‘Chinese snowball’. Aiming to add interest to the garden while maintainEskimo Viburnum ing its formality, we have planted a number of bulbs, including Narcissus ‘tete-a-tete’, Ipheon (Spring Starflower), Leucojum and Arum. Caladiums will again be included for summer. For those with an interest, the Garden Committee will furnish botanical names or a tour of the garden. The Fellowship Hall landing has recently been furnished with a table and two wing chairs adding warmth and seating at the garden entrance. The chairs are a gift from Evelyn Sims through her daughter, Nancy Preston. Our recent pictorial history of the garden is now displayed there along with a picture of Sprunt Memorial Presbyterian Church, our previous sanctuary. The Memorial Garden History and other information can now be accessed on the church’s Website (www.upcch.org).

Chinese Snowball Viburnum

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Some may have noted the small pot of river stones near the base of the steps. Based on an old tradition thought to imply the permanence of our memory, these are provided for anyone wishing to mark a visit and remember a loved one by placing a stone on the ledge of the granite panels.


The Chimes

Volume XXXVIII, No. 5

May 2013

2 0 1 2 - 2 0 1 3 Yo u t h C h o i r L e a d e r s h i p Te a m Alyssa Oppewal and Katie Edmiston, presidents Justin Morrell and Philip Straughn, vice presidents Kim Rubish and Lucy Wooldridge, secretaries Sam Sisk and Garrett Pearce, treasurers Grace Gollmar, rehearsal accompanist Chandler Younts and Wade Wilson, members at large Thank you for taking the time to work as leaders and directors this year! You are terrific!

T h e Yo u t h C h o i r S i n g s M a y 1 9 a t 1 1 a . m . On Sunday, May 19, the Youth Choir will be singing River in Judea by John Leavitt on Sunday at 11 a.m. worship, and the Youth Choir High School Ensemble will be singing Come Holy Spirit, Heavenly Dove by Joe Cox and Jody Lindh. Youth Choir alumni are welcome to join us at 10 a.m. that morning for rehearsal. Following worship, seniors will be recognized and presented the Chorister’s Guild Cross Pewter Necklace, and sixth graders will receive a copy of the Presbyterian Hymnal. Join us!

It’s time to graduate another outstanding group of seniors at UPC!

The Are We There Yet? cast and crew would like to thank you for your support! Everyone had so much fun, and we learned a lot about Moses and the Exodus! The Junior and Children’s Choirs sing next in Sunday worship on May 12 at 11 a.m. Page 5


The Chimes

Volume XXXVIII, No. 5

May 2013

Adult Christian Education All are welcome to adult education classes at UPC! All are welcome to adult education classes at UPC! If you missed a previous term or week, no worries! Participation and enjoyment are not dependent upon previous classes. We hope to see you Sundays in May as we continue our last term before the summer. Classes will resume in September, 2013. Watch for more details for each class and a detailed reading list in the Weekly E-News, the Sunday morning bulletin and the UPC Website. Visit www.upcch.org and click “Education.” To sign up for E-News, click “Subscribe to E-News” at the bottom of the Website. You can also find information about upcoming education opportunities on the UPC Facebook page. Visit www.facebook.com/upcch and click “Like” to join.

Term 6: Through May 19 So You’re Presbyterian…What do you believe? Some of the things we believe are held in common by all Christians. Other things are more particular to the Reformed TradiMay 5: Beth Visser and the Gollmar family tion. Still others are unique to Presbyterians. So, what do we will share their experiences of faith and believe? Are questions and doubts allowed? After participating music. in this class, people are sure to notice you and say, “My goodness, you look very Presbyterian today!” May 12: We will explore the new Presbyterian Hymnal due out this summer. Class Schedule: May 19: Minister of Music Tom Brown will May 5: Priesthood of all believers; led by Heather Ferguson. reflect on his career in church music and his life as a musician. May 12: Worship and the Sacraments; led by Randy Kabrick.

Glory to God: Music in Worship and in the Life of Faith Class Schedule:

Location: Terrace Room The Presence of Evil: What are We to Say? The presence of evil has always been puzzling to Christians. How can Almighty God, whose character defines what it means to be good, allow evil to befall innocent people either from natural disasters or the wickedness of other people? We will continue to explore some faithful responses to this puzzle. Part of our inspiration comes from Thomas G. Long, whose book What Shall We Say? Evil, Suffering, and the Crisis of Faith has served as a guide for our discussions. It is not assumed that participants have read the book. Class Schedule: May 5: How the ancient Church Fathers responded to the problem of evil. May 12: Exploring what the Book of Job has to tell us about evil. May 19: What does Jesus’ Parable of the Wheat and the Weeds (in Matthew 13) tell us about evil? Location: Vance Barron Hall Facilitator : Dick Prust, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy, St. Andrews Presbyterian College (now St. Andrews University) and author of Wholeness: the Character Logic of Christian Belief

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May 19: The importance of the mind in the life of faith; led by Anna Pinckney Straight. Location: Garden Room Feasting on the Word Feasting on the Word is a resource that incorporates the uniqueness of the award-winning Feasting on the Word commentaries to explore one of the weekly Lectionary passages in ways that engage participants in faithful learning and discussion. The lessons provide comprehensive, accessible biblical background for facilitators from four theological perspectives. The passage for study is often the same text used in Sunday worship and offers more reflection and conversation. Class Schedule: May 5: Acts 16:9–15; participants will worship, seek the Spirit’s leading and practice hospitality. May 12: Acts 16:16–34; participants will seek to praise God and witness in difficult circumstances. May 19: Acts 2:1–21; on Pentecost, participants will rejoice in the Holy Spirit and consider their responsibilities as members of the church. Location: Education Office


The Chimes

Volume XXXVIII, No. 5

May 2013

University Presbyterian Church 2012-2015 Capital Campaign UPDATE

Faith For ward C a p i t a l C a m p a i gn Thriving, Inspiring, Hopeful, Timely, Necessary, Important, Committed, Profoundly Grateful—these are all words that describe the Faith Forward Capital Campaign (FFCC) at University Presbyterian Church! What is the Campaign? The goal of the campaign is to raise 4.2 million dollars in the next three years (2013, 2014, 2015 ) for renovations, site improvements and a building addition to UPC. How does the Campaign operate? During these three years, the FFCC Leadership Follow-Up Team will be keeping the congregation up to date on the progress and activities of the campaign. The Leadership Follow-Up Team consists of: ◊ Follow-Up Directors: Pamela and James Smith, Linda and Matt Arnold, who will lead the overall effort; ◊ Commitment/Cultivation Coordinators: Bob Woodruff, Bill Whisenant, Kelly Ross and Jim Copeland, who will provide initial and follow-up contact to new members; ◊ Communication Coordinators: Lee White, Matt Marvin and Jeff, Howard, who will maintain a high level of information about promotion of the campaign; ◊ Mailing Coordinators: Martin and Barbara Hedgepeth, Linda Plunkett and Shelley Adams, who will manage all mailings from the Follow-Up Team; and ◊ Building Committee Co-Chairs: John Blythe and Rickie Howard, who will provide information on the projects. The principles of the Follow-Up Team are to make it easy for people to give to the Capital Campaign, to make announcements to keep people informed and encouraged, to provide regular follow-up newsletters, to provide visual displays prominently displayed with up-to-date progress of giving and to assimilate new members into the giving of the church. What can members expect? The congregations will be informed by the following: Two visual displays depicting current giving “roaming” the church; Letters with envelopes mailed in April, August and December for the duration of the campaign; Faith Forward announcements during worship the Second Sunday of each month; Updates in The Chimes, UPC’s monthly newsletter, three times per year; Updates in the bulletin announcements and Weekly E-News at least once a month; and Ongoing updates on the UPC Website (www.upcch.org/info/capital_campaign.html), on the Faith Forward blog (http://faithforwardupc.wordpress.com), and on the UPC Facebook page (www.facebook.com/upcch). Please feel free contact the Follow-Up Directors at any time: Pamela Smith James Smith Linda Arnold Matt Arnold plmsmith@yahoo.com jaysmith12001@yahoo.com linda@lindaarnold.net mca@mattewarnold.net (919) 408-0035 (919) 408-0035 (919) 933-5965 (919) 933-5965

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The Chimes

Volume XXXVIII, No. 5

May 2013

Faith Forward Capital Campaign UPDATE

O r g a n Re n ova t i o n Re p o r t By Tom Brown, Minister of Music, University Presbyterian Church The Organ Renovation component of the Faith Forward Capital Campaign has begun! The first portion of the renovations saw the installation of our new Zimbelstern in April. The second portion, the replacement of the organ’s 32’ stops, will be completed later in the spring or early summer. During my two sabbatical trips to Europe, I played many old and new organs that contained examples of historic imitative “specialty” stops popular in German organs of the 16th, 17th and 18th Centuries. These included stops imitating cuckoos and nightingales, and I encountered several examples of drums and even tympani (played by mechanical angels controlled by levers from the organ console). By far the most popular of these stops was the Zimbelstern (literally “bell-star”). Small bells are mounted to the points of a star and when the stop is engaged, the star rotates producing a continuous ringing sound that adds a delightful dimension to lively Baroque music. As our organ was built in Germany, it seems fitting that it might have a zimbelstern, too. Serendipitously, I met the General Manager of one of Canada’s premier organbuilding firms, Orgues Létourneau, during my tour of historic organs in Europe last summer. When I spoke to Andrew about my interest in adding this new stop to our organ, he graciously offered to help. As it happened, two of his organbuilders would be coming to North Carolina after Easter to prepare Organbuilder, Eric Campbell, with their large instrument for the Sanctuary renovations in Greensthe star of our new Zimbelstern boro’s First Presbyterian Church, and he was happy to make them available to install our new stop. It seemed prudent and even providential to proceed with this project now so we can benefit from the Canadian organbuilders’ expertise and skill. His company procured the new zimbelstern from Germany which was made, in fact, just a few months ago by the same firm that originally built our organ in 1982. Through photographs of the organ’s interior and various dimensions provided by me (including the use of the Pythagorean Theorem, something I hadn’t done since high school geometry class), the project was meticulously planned in Canada. In mid-April, Andrew’s two organbuilders, Michel and Eric, came to Chapel Hill and spent a day installing it during a surprisingly complex procedure. A shelf and four supports were assembled into place high in the cramped organ case. The center pipe of the organ’s façade was removed; a one-inch hole was drilled through it, and a tube connecting the two holes through the pipe was soldered into place. A steel shaft was inserted through the tube to connect the zimbelstern mechanism to the traditional gold star that now adorns the organ’s

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Installation underway!


The Chimes

Volume XXXVIII, No. 5

May 2013

Faith Forward Capital Campaign UPDATE

O r g a n Re n ova t i o n Re p o r t , c o n t . façade. Finally, the stop was wired into the organ’s electrical system and tested. It was fun and gratifying to watch Eric and Michel and witness their perfect work. Clearly, much effort and planning had taken place in Canada so the installation here was completely successful. In addition to their efforts on our behalf, much work went into this project before they arrived: the many emails to and fro from Canada and Germany; the tricky drilling of several holes in the console for new stop knobs; the sending of stop knobs to Germany for duplication so the new would match the old; the installation of temporary scaffolding in the choir loft; the expansion of the organ’s “memory” to accommodate several new stops and re-programming it afterward … and much care everywhere and throughout. Our new “historical” stop is now in place. Complete with a handsome gold star, its “festive clamor” will enhance our worship for years to come. Pipe organs have the widest range of pitch of any acoustical instrument. The lowest notes extend nearly an octave below the Tube that will go through the façade pipe lowest note on the piano, and the highest pitches challenge the connecting the Zimbelstern to the star range of human hearing. The organ’s lowest tones that shake the floor and rattle the windows require very large pipes indeed; over 32’ long, they take up enormous space and are very expensive. As the available height behind the Sanctuary organ is only about 21’, the only way to add these massive sounds to our organ is virtually. This was first done sometime in the mid-1980s (the exact date is unknown) with the addition of two electronic “32’ stops.” These stops add a tremendous gravity and weight to the organ’s pedals, but they’re now nearly 30 years old … which is extremely old for anything electronic. The second portion of the organ renovations is to replace the existing 32’ stops with new units that deliver a far more realistic sound (at a fraction of the cost of real pipes), and that will provide the organ with reliable 32’ tone for years to come. These stops will be made and installed by the Walker Technical Company, the premiere builder of electronic organ voices, sometime this spring or early summer. Although the final costs of these two projects is not yet known, I am happy to report that their total cost will be less than the budgeted amount of $50,000 provided for in the campaign. I’m often asked how our organ ‘measures up.’ Pipe organs are like diamonds … they don’t have to be huge to be beautiful and extremely valuable. I’ve had the real privilege of playing many of the world’s greatest organs, yet I’m not exaggerating when I say that, pipe for pipe, I can think of few organs I’d rather play week in and week out than ours. Apart from our church buildings, the Sanctuary organ is by far the most valuable thing our church owns. I’ve been very gratified during my tenure at University Church that the organ is not only appreciated and valued, but that it has been properly maintained and even occasionally improved. I am grateful to the Capital Campaign for allowing these latest enhancements to be possible. I’m always happy to answer any questions about our marvelous pipe organ! ~ Thomas Brown, Minister of Music

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The Chimes

Volume XXXVIII, No. 5

May 2013

Faith Forward Capital Campaign UPDATE

B u i l d i n g C o m m i t t e e Re p o r t The Building Committee continues to refine plans for renovation of the existing church facility and the addition of a 5,400 square foot building. The two-story addition will include a more accessible entry and two first-floor, multi-purpose rooms that can be used for adult classrooms and meeting space. A glass atrium will serve as a welcoming entry from Robertson Lane, and an elevator will add to the church’s accessibility on its eastern side. The second floor will include a dedicated choir room. Each floor will feature men’s and women’s restrooms. The Rosemary Street side of the addition will include a landscaped courtyard for outdoor gatherings. Renovations will include the replacement of the main entry doors to the narthex with doors with glass panels. This will provide a more welcoming entry to the church and increase light in the narthex. Also the doors separating the narthex and sanctuary will be changed to ones with glass panels, and windows will be installed on the wall separating the narthex and the Sanctuary. We will add fire sprinklers throughout the entire church facility and an upgraded fire alarm system. Several bathrooms in the church will be upgraded and made more handicap-accessible. Improved, energy-efficient lighting and windows will be installed in some classrooms. Finally, the church’s HVAC system will be upgraded to include more energy-efficient equipment. In January, the Building Committee began meeting monthly with the project’s design team and general contractor. The design team includes DTW Architects and Planners of Durham; Coulter Jewell Thames, P.A. of Durham; and Edmondson Engineers, P.A. of Durham. The general contractor is C.T. Wilson Construction of Durham. C.T. Wilson has determined the presence of asbestos in ceilings throughout the church. The asbestos is well-encapsulated, but abatement will be required to install the sprinkler system. This process is not expected to significantly affect the overall cost of the project. The committee continues to work toward the commencement of construction and renovations in spring 2014. This start date relies on the Town of Chapel Hill granting UPC the necessary permits and permission to re-route Robertson Lane. In February, UPC appeared before the Chapel Hill Town Council for a courtesy review of the church’s plans. Council members reacted favorably to rerouting Robertson Lane and to the design of the two-story addition. Their comments are being incorporated into plans the church expects to submit in April as it begins the formal process to seek a Special Use Permit. This permit is required for the church to expand its footprint.

S ta y C o n n e c te d w ith th e Fa ith Forward C a p ita l C a m p a ig n ! Always stay connected and up-to-date with the UPC Capital Campaign by joining us online! Visit the Faith Forward WordPress blog at http://faithforwardupc.wordpress.com Visit and “Like” the UPC Facebook page at www.facebook.com/upcch It's not too late to pledge! Indeed, new pledges are encouraged and welcomed. There are two ways to make a pledge: You may visit the Faith Forward page of the UPC Website at www.upcch.org/info/capital_campaign.html and click "Pledge Online." You may also contact the church office at (919) 929-2102 and request to be mailed a pledge card. Simply fill out the card, sign it and return it to University Presbyterian Church, PO Box 509, Chapel Hill NC 27514-0509, c/o Finance Office. Thank you!

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The Chimes

Volume XXXVIII, No. 5

May 2013

Session Digest At the April meeting of Session, we: • listened to a devotion and prayer by Karen Vandersea on living with purpose based on Barbara Brown Taylor’s book: An

Altar in the World; • approved William Griffin as the UPC representative on the New Hope Camp and Conference Center Board; • approved the Reverend Katie Owen, the Presbyterian campus minister at Duke, as a guest preacher on June 16, 2013; • listened to a report from Kim McNeill on the recent mission trip to Washington, D.C. with the middle school youth; • approved retaining the services of LeAnn Brown (Brown and Bunch, PLLC) to handle work on an easement needed for

rerouting Robertson Lane for our expansion project; • learned the Capital Campaign Tithe Task Force will be meeting later this month and will have a recommendation for the

Session’s May meeting; and • watched the video “How Great Leaders Inspire Action” by Simon Sinek (a TED Talk), which we then followed with a

discussion. ~Mary Ellen Olson, Clerk of Session

S e r v i c e a n d L e a r n i n g i n Wa s h i n g t o n D C During spring break this year, fifteen middle schoolers and five adults from UPC traveled to Washington DC to learn about homelessness and poverty. They met, befriended, and served those who are currently facing the hard realities of life on the street. Our youth spent an evening with Andre, who is currently homeless, and Eric who has struggled with homelessness for much of his life. Our young people were shocked when they heard just how easy it was for Eric and Andre to become homeless. They were appalled to hear what they each go through living on the street. They were saddened to learn how cruel others can be to those who have so little. As they talked with Eric and Andre, I witnessed their stereotypes of “the least of these” shatter right before my very eyes. By getting to know these two incredible guys, homelessness became less of a problem to be solved by adults. Homelessness became their problem to face head on because it was happening to their new friends.

Our middle schoolers with their new friends, Andre and Erick

After connecting with Eric and Andre, these sheltered youth served in the city with new eyes. Those in line for meatballs and mashed potatoes weren’t just an issue, they were people, children of God, with gifts and personalities just like those middle school youth. In hearing Eric’s and Andre’s stories, they learned that human connection and seeing the image of God in others is the first step in serving one another and living out their faith. They greeted those in line for food with eye contact and a smile. They sat down at table with those they had just served to talk and connect. These youth, who are often quiet and shy, leapt out of their comfort zones to live out their faith. May we all be so bold! ~ Kim McNeill, Staff Associate for Youth and Congregational Life PYC youth Peeling and chopping over a hundred pounds of sweet potatoes for DC Central Kitchen

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Volume XXXVIII, No. 5

May 2013

P r e s by t e r i a n C a m p u s M i n i s t r y In just a few weeks, our senior class will be donning their Carolina blue gowns and drawing to a conclusion their undergraduate memories of Chapel Hill. Looking at the three photos below, it is hard to imagine the time has come and gone since their first beach retreat at Caswell in April 2010! I am impressed with how far these students have come and how they have matured into adulthood. Some have traveled to far off places with the study abroad program; some have changed majors (maybe twice); some have led worship; some have traveled to foreign countries giving freely of their time and talents; and some have participated in local service opportunities, ranging from preparing breakfast at IFC to volunteering at TABLE. There are so many things to celebrate about this class of students. They have been a big part of my life for four years, and I will surely miss the joy, drama, and exhilaration that has come with being their pastor as they move from one home to another. I will be heading off with many of them on May 16 for the United Kingdom for one last PCM trip. I will borrow from the Celtic Blessing as I bid them with God’s peace:

“May the road rise up to meet you, may the wind be always at your back. May the sun shine warm upon your face, may the rain fall softly upon your fields. And until we meet again, may God hold you in the palm of his hand.” ~ John Rogers, Associate Pastor for Campus Ministry

2010 Beach Retreat Class Photo

2011 Beach Retreat Class Photo

Presbyterian Campus Ministry (PCM) offers programming for undergraduate, graduate and professional students and welcomes new participants at any time. The programming is supported by the outreach of University Presbyterian Church. For more information see www.uncpcm.com or contact John Rogers at jrogers@upcch.org or (919) 929-2102.

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2013 Beach Retreat Class Photo


The Chimes

Volume XXXVIII, No. 5

May 2013

T h a n k Yo u , O f f i c e Vo l u n t e e r s ! The staff of University Presbyterian Church are supported by a host of gracious and capable office volunteers. On Tuesday, April 16, the UPC staff hosted a Volunteer Appreciation Tea to say thank you to these volunteers who help us do the work of the church. Thank you for all you do! The photo shows the church office volunteers who attended the event on April 16, gathered on the steps in the Anne McClamroch McFall Memorial Garden. If you would like to learn more about volunteering in the church office, please call Shelley Adams, Volunteer Coordinator, at (919) 942-2525.

Re f l e c t i o n s o n t h e 2 0 1 3 H a i t i M i s s i o n Tr i p, by To m O p p ew a l This spring marked the eighth year that UPC members and friends traveled to Haiti to conduct teacher education workshops in three Haitian cities. Participating Haitian teachers represented five different schools from different parts of the country. A total of ninety teachers participated, with the newest group of teachers coming from a small town in the mountains called Fort Jacques. As in previous years, our workshops focused primarily on literacy. We worked with Haitian teachers to explore new ways to teach their students how to read and write Haitian Kreyol. Activities included book making, word searches, word completion, learning songs to teach about the alphabet and playing a game called Bananagrams. Over the last three years, the UPC team has learned some important lessons and we have refined our approach to teacher education. This year, we identified teachers willing to conduct a teacher workshop after they participated in the workshop we gave. It was exciting to watch a group of teachers from Wings of Hope plan and Small group word games conduct a workshop with basically no help from our UPC group of teachers. We felt profoundly happy when watching the Haitian teachers conduct a workshop for their peers. They used what they learned in a workshop a few days earlier and expertly taught in ways that connected with their peers and engaged them fully in the learning process. It was clear that this model was successful and one that is more sustainable and capable of extending more professional development to teachers in Haiti. Our workshops have always required traveling with a number of Wings of Hope teachers conducting the workshop large plastic bins filled with educational supplies. We extend our thanks to the UPC men’s group for carrying many of these bins to Haiti in January. We also give our thanks to the many people who collected materials and pictures that we used for the activities and for all of our church friends who helped cut out different pictures or who helped collect other supplies, clothing and toys that we distributed to Haitian friends and colleagues.

Teacher workshop at Wings of Hope

A special part of the workshops in Haiti was opening the day with singing and prayer. No doubt this helped our group each day. We will always remember the Easter Sunrise service on top of the St Joseph’s guest house, which was truly a joyous occasion where we enthusiastically greeted each other with “Christ is Risen!” ~ Tom Oppewal, Global Outreach

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The Chimes

Volume XXXVIII, No. 5

May 2013

L o c a l O u t r e a ch N ew s : A M e s s a g e f r o m Ka r i n a O. The Chatham Youth Development Center (CYDC) in Siler City is operated by the North Carolina Department of Justice and Delinquency Prevention. The CYDC houses youth who have committed some type of crime and provides mentoring, education, and therapeutic treatment to prepare youth for a fresh start when they re-enter their communities. The Local Outreach Committee (LOC) has partnered with the CYDC by providing clothing for the youth and yarn for crocheting projects to reward their successes. CYDC youth and staff visited UPC on April, 14, 2013 and presented the LOC with two crocheted items. “My name is Karina O. I am 17 years old and residing at Chatham Youth Development Center (CYDC). CYDC is not what students imagined it to be. The center has rules and routines that students will have to follow throughout their stay. The center uses the Model of Care Program, which students will work hard through its four stages that are: Preparation, Skill Building, Skill Mastery, and Community Reintegration. With the assistance of staff and administration, students learn and apply skills that will help them transition back into their community.

On a personal note, my experience here at CYDC has been excellent and challenging; even though I’ve been here since October 3, 2011. I must admit it took me a long time to get myself together to where I am now. It was a long process, but I think I finally made it through my biggest struggles.

The Model of Care has helped me to overcome many challenges in many ways. I’ve been able to learn and use the Model of Care skills appropriately here and off campus when we go out on trips. During my stay here at the center, I have received the greatest blessing in the world, which was being able to deWhile residing at the CYDC, students will have the opportuliver my baby girl safely. I am proud to be a mother and know nity to participate in different group settings such as: Psycho- that I have a huge responsibility ahead of me. As a single Education, Anger Management, Relapse Prevention, Counsel- mother, I will be using the skills I am learning here to a posiing, Goodbye Circles, Crochet Projects, and Substance Abuse. tive role model in my child’s life now and beyond. An optional setting is Spiritual in nature from different volunRecently, I successfully completed and graduated from a comteers who come from different communities. They have also munity college with the General Education Diploma (GED) provided various items to us like yarn, hygiene products, books, Bibles, mentoring, counseling sessions, and a variety of and I am now taking two online courses. I can proudly say that I am the first person in my family to graduate from high snacks. We have opportunities to learn to crochet various school and hopefully I’ll be able to go to college soon, too. items for ourselves and for donation projects to give back to The Model of Care Program has really impacted my life posicommunities. tively and my daughters’ life, too. I am very grateful for being The important thing is that every student will have a different here and able to share with others about this program. If I treatment plan and circumstances from other students. They never had the opportunity to have this experience I don’t will be able to continue their education and receive proper know where my life would be headed in the future. I recommedical care. By the time any student is ready to leave, the mend Chatham Youth Development Center to any teenager center makes sure that she or he has all the resources she or he who is willing to change her or his life for good.” needs in order to be successful out in the community. ~ Karina O., CYDC student

N ew s f r o m N ew H o p e C a m p a n d C o n f e r e n c e C e n t e r Here it is, May at New Hope Camp and Conference Center! That means summer camp is right around the corner. We have an excellent staff coming in this summer, and they are excited with the prospects for this season. If you have a child, grandchild or neighbor who could benefit from a week or two of summer camp, please join us! Everything is in place, and all we await is your registration form. You can find that on line at www.newhopeccc.org. We had a wonderful night at the Auction and Appetizers event on April 6. The music and food were great, and we had a lot of great auctioned items. We raised over $10,000! Thank you to all who donated items and to all of you who took them home. This will be a great help in the completion of the Fleming renovation. If you could not get to this event or if you’d like to help more, we are still glad to accept donations for this most-needed project.

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The Chimes

Volume XXXVIII, No. 5

May 2013

G l o b a l O u t r e a ch N ew s : “ O u t r e ac h ” Re a c h i n g O u t t o Z a m b i a ! In 1991, with early treatment for leprosy now routine, the Zambian government decided to close its leprosaria and send disabled persons back to their native villages. However, this posed many challenges for the patients, including the difficulties of social reintegration and the need for continuing treatment. Recognizing the impracticality of this, Kathy Harding became involved and through a charity she established, over eighty patients with serious physical or mental problems were cared for in an Invalid Compound, Liteta. She also made provisions for their families, thinking about their children, who are not affected. Trying to provide a future for them together with their parents, Kathy negotiated a ninety-nine year lease on 500 acres of rural land belonging to the late Chief of Liteta, Senior Chief Mukuni, who responded enthusiastically, stating, “I have always longed for development to come to my people and you are bringing it!” There, she established The New Jerusalem Kachele Village with some of the families from Liteta, raising funds to build homes, a school which now has 192 students, teacher accommodations and a clinic, which arrived thanks to a Florida pastor in a fully equipped 40-foot shipping container! In 2002, Kathy was invited to Buckingham Palace where Queen Elizabeth bestowed on her an MBE (Member of the British Empire), a high honor indeed for her work. UPC has had the privilege of working with this project for a number of years, with Brian Kileff serving as our congregational liaison. In Kathy’s words, “We value enormously […] support by the University Presbyterian Church—in fact you have spearheaded much of the work in Kachele Village that has brought life to an otherwise lost and impoverished chunk of Central Province. I mention in particular the wonderful school that embraces all ten rural villages round Kachele Village. At the present time we have pre-primary to grade 7 and we must focus ahead to increase to grade 12. There is only one secondary school 25 kilometers north of Kachele Village. The next nearest secondary school is 45 kilometers away in the town of Kabwe, also north of Kachele. We need to construct another two classrooms if we are to add grades 8 and 9. Meantime, these would be used for home economics with the present grades 5 through 7 wherein they will learn needlework,

use of sewing machines, craft and art. These skills are sadly lacking in schools here in Zambia. Many children are unable to proceed to grade 8 because the cost of education becomes beyond the reach of a high percentage of Zambians. However, if children learn these skills at least there is a chance they will be keen enough to advance to making saleable items and thus earn something to support themselves!” Kathy’s next project is to build vocational training facilities in the village, where pupils who have acquired basic education up to grade 7 can obtain further training and become selfsupporting. With the help of agronomists and support of the US government, ten acres are being cleared for peanut production. This is a pilot scheme that we hope will be replicated elsewhere in Zambia to empower rural women, who, in Zambia, do most of the agricultural work. What we at UPC send Kathy is more significant for its moral, rather than monetary, support. She gains great strength from knowing her work in this distant land is recognized and supported by our Christian community in Chapel Hill and those elsewhere, too. Let me end with Kathy Harding’s recent email:

“Just home from the Bank and I am delighted to confirm the $1,500 was credited to the NASAD US$ Account on the 21st March. I will keep you posted as to how the gift is used in Kachele Village; but please bear with me for a while, till the road surface is able to take heavy vehicles carrying building blocks, sand and stone for the construction program for 2013. Once on site, it will be ‘all go’ with determination this year we will be more productive than last year! I need to now also look at bringing SOLAR ENERGY to the Village—with emphasis on the school as I am eager to introduce computer literacy to the children—are you able to imagine how these little rural kids will respond, never having seen TV—some hardly knowledgeable of how the radio works: there will be big wide eyes! With warmest regards and deepest gratitude to you and EVERYBODY supporting The New Jerusalem Kachele Village.” ~Brian Kileff, Global Outreach

Learn More About Local and Global Outreach at UPC The Global Outreach Committee coordinates the mission and outreach work we do with partners around the world and works to educate the congregation about the lives of people in other nations. To learn more, contact Mark Peifer at peifer@unc.edu. UPC also has a long tradition of extensive local outreach, including work with the Inter-Faith Council, Habitat for Humanity, the CROP Walk and more. If you would like to become a member of the Local Outreach Committee, adding your voice and vision to the group, contact Pamela Smith at plmsmith@yahoo.com. Visit the “Outreach” page of the UPC Website (www.upcch.org) to learn more. Page 15


We w e l c o m e a l l f a c u l t y, s t u d e n t s , n e w c o m e rs and v i s i t o rs . University Presbyterian Church is affiliated with The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) and is a Stephen Ministry Congregation. On Sunday mornings, worship services are held at 8:30 and 11:00 and church school for all ages at 9:45 a.m. Children of all ages are welcomed and cherished by this congregation. Childcare for infants through kindergarteners is provided on Sunday mornings by our paid sitters and parent volunteers.

University Presbyterian Church 209 East Franklin Street P.O. Box 509 Chapel Hill, NC 27514

Non Profit Org. Permit No. 78 U.S. Postage Paid Chapel Hill, NC

M a y 2 0 1 3 T he Chimes Ne w s l e t te r

The Sanctuary is wheel-chair accessible. Handicapped parking spaces are available, and a parking assistant will be available to help you out of your car. Assistive hearing devices and large-print bulletins and hymnals are available during worship. Office hours: Monday—Friday 8:30-4:30. Call (919) 929-2102 for more information. Learn more about our programs from the church Website (www.upcch.org) and Facebook page (www.facebook.com/upcch).

Time to Plan Some Montreat Fun! The Montreat Worship and Music Family Meeting will be held on Sunday, June 2, at 9:45 a.m. in the Fellowship Hall. All singers attending the conference and their parents are invited to come to this informational meeting. At the meeting, singers will meet Montreat leaders. You will also have the opportunity to turn in forms, along with final payment of $185. Countdown to Montreat!

S o ci a l M e d i a a t U P C ! Stay up-to-date with everything happening at the church, including information about programs, events and special services, by joining the UPC Facebook page! Visit www.facebook.com/upcch and click “Like” to join. Follow Presbyterian Youth Connection (PYC) on Twitter @upcpyc. Go to https://twitter.com/upcpyc and click “Follow.” Through this page, you’ll learn what’s happening each Sunday at PYC, as well as other youth events.


Chimes May2013