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Great

Storytelling Starts Here


W H AT S T O RY W I L L Y O U T E L L?

We believe that informed public discourse is the lifeblood of democracy. Our key mission is to teach students to research, report, and communicate well—to tell stories accurately and responsibly, in all forms of media.

F O R S T U D E N T S AT T H E SC H OO L O F JOU R NA L I S M A N D CO M M U N IC AT IO N, I T’S A L L A BOU T STORY T EL L I NG.

S O J C SNAPSHOT 2016-2017 U N DE RG R A DUAT ES

2,126 Never before have there been more opportunities to speak truth to the world. Through our nationally accredited advertising, journalism, media studies, and public relations programs, you will produce and distribute multimedia content while developing cutting-edge techniques alongside awardwinning professionals and scholars. You will learn how to make your work meaningful and appealing to diverse audiences as you become a highly skilled communicator in the well-rounded tradition of a liberal arts degree. And you will get the chance to apply these new skills in the field on student-run publications, in agencies with real-world clients, during professional internships, and on trips around the globe. Come to the SOJC to help us invent the future of media and communication. Here you will be guided by teachers who care deeply about their students, scholars who travel the world to research and share their knowledge, and professionals who use a full complement of digital and traditional tools—from drones and 360 video to community engagement—to tell stories that matter in ways that inspire and inform. Together you will learn how to apply time-honored reporting, research, strategic, and critical-thinking skills in new ways to new careers in the growing creative and media economy. The NOW chapter of your life’s story begins here.

BY MAJOR ADVERTISING 446 JOURNALISM 396 MEDIA STUDIES 20 P U B L I C R E L A T I O N S 372 PRE-JOURNALISM 892 D EG R E E S AWA R D E D

517 E S T I M A T E D SOJC SCHOL A RSH I PS AWA R D E D

$441,819 FEMALE

1,442 Juan-Carlos Molleda, PhD Edwin L. Artzt Dean and Professor

MALE

684 I N S TAT E

1,111 OU T OF S TAT E

Whether you major in advertising, journalism, media studies, or public relations, you will learn to

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courageously pursue the best solution and ground your efforts in the ethical standards of high-quality, fact-

DOM EST IC

based communication. We are committed to teaching you how to communicate your message effectively.

1,976 I N T E R NAT IONA L

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W H AT W I L L YOU BR I NG TO T H E WELCOME TO ALLEN HALL You can find the reason for our success right where we are, at the heart of the University of Oregon. Our building is located in the center of campus, and our curriculum is grounded in a broad-based liberal arts education. Allen Hall, home to the School of Journalism and Communication in Eugene, exemplifies our approach to teaching and production. Our students and faculty collaborate and innovate across disciplines and media

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platforms, supported by a $15 million building upgrade and expansion completed in 2013. The flexible design of our Digital Commons connects classrooms, labs, and informal collaboration spaces so students can easily transition between guided instruction and student-driven activity.

TA BL E?

“Allen Hall is a crucible for the I independent N S P thinkers, I R E idealists, and creative talents who challenge the status quo. At the SOJC, we strengthen the core values and tenets of journalism while finding new ways to unleash it in forms unimaginable a generation ago. This is where we create the next generation of storytellers who will inform and inspire the world.”

SCOTT BEDBURY, BS ’80 FOUNDER, BRANDSTREAM MEMBER, SOJC HALL OF ACHIEVEMENT

At the SOJC—an integral part of a great research university—our students and faculty are inventing the future of journalism and communication.

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K Y L I E J U G G E R T, B A ’ 17 Kylie Juggert never pictured working anywhere other than Portland. Shortly after graduation, her plan is on track so far: She works as an editor and content producer for Blue Chalk Media in the Rose City.

JOURNALISM

Of course, if you would have told her two years ago that she would be a videographer, she might not have believed you. Before finding her way to the SOJC, Juggert was an international studies major. But in her senior year, she had an a-ha moment that led her on a new path toward multimedia journalism.

“In journalism, you learn to uncover new information, to conduct revealing interviews, to write with authority, and to tell—in words and images—compelling stories that really matter. These are all skills that serve you well across media platforms and professions.”

“I bought a camera and thought, ‘I’m going to do it,’” she said. “Then I went through Gateway, where they forced you to do video. I was terrified at first, like hands shaking and having incredible anxiety before a shoot. But just something about the greatness afterwards and saying I’m the one who did that— I got hooked on it.”

Scott Maier Professor of Journalism Journalism Area Director

During Juggert’s year and a half as a journalism major, she accrued an impressive portfolio of video production work. She went from gathering experience with her own camera to helping develop videos for SOJC projects, including Press Forward—last year’s SOJC-produced documentary about the Umpqua Community College shooting—and multimedia stories she shot on the Global Stories trip to Sri Lanka. This past year, the work Juggert has developed at Blue Chalk has been an extension of her learning curve in the SOJC. “It’s demanding, and it’s commercial-level work,” she said. “And a lot of it is just making it up as you go.” While the work’s been challenging, Juggert says she enjoys coming in every day to develop professional content that, she believes, marks only the beginning of an exciting career. “I want to be in the field producing and be the one behind the camera,” she said. “Right now, I’m editing and learning a lot in the office. It’s the first step.” Story by Aaron Weintraub, BA ’17

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STUDENT GROUPS

P U B L IC AT ION S

Association of Women in Sports Media Envision National Association of Black Journalists National Broadcasting Society Society of Professional Journalists UOHack

FLUX OR Magazine

S T U D E N T- R U N AGENCY Allen Hall Studios

ADDITIONAL OPPORTUNITIES Annual Journalism Trip to NYC Daily Emerald DuckTV News Lab Oregon News Oregon Documentary Project Science & Memory

C O N N E C T “I am a make-a-difference journalist. Growing up, I learned about the civil rights movement, the women’s movement, the gay rights movement, and Watergate. All of those things shaped me. Watching what was going on in Vietnam shaped me. And it made me realize that journalism could be incredibly powerful in opening people up— not only to the world, but to new ideas. And that lifts us to a greater civilization.”

ANN CURRY, BA ’78, JOURNALIST MEMBER, SOJC HALL OF ACHIEVEMENT

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T I M O T H Y FA R A H , B A ’ 17 In Timothy Farah’s sophomore year, he decided to follow advice from a friend that changed everything for him. Farah met with Carolyn S. Chambers Distinguished Professor of Advertising (and advertising area director) Deborah Morrison to find out about the SOJC and its advertising major. Inspired by her words, he immediately registered for the school’s prerequisite courses.

ADVERTISING

Farah says that throughout his time in Allen Hall, he knew he would need to find opportunities to gain hands-on experience so he could practice what he was learning inside the classroom.

STUDENT GROUPS “The word ‘advertising’ no longer encompasses what we do. We responsibly use critical, conceptual, and creative skills to solve problems for people and brands in a global economy. That gives us permission to drive new thinking and big ideas.”

He traveled with the SOJC’s study-abroad program Media in Ghana, which landed him an internship with a small advertising and multimedia services firm in Accra. And when he returned to Oregon, he joined Combined Culture, an independent group of advertising students whose inspiring multimedia work focuses on raising awareness around social issues, including sexual assault prevention, mass shootings, poverty, and racial inequality.

Deborah Morrison Chambers Distinguished Professor of Advertising Advertising Area Director

According to Farah, one of the most important steps in his academic career was joining the Ad Team his senior year. “That experience taught me more than I ever could have imagined,” he said. “It taught me to push my ideas forward and to never settle, because there is no point in putting that much time and effort into work that you can’t be proud of.” Farah began his professional career as a summer intern for the digital advertising agency 360i, a position he says he never could have earned without the experience he gained in the SOJC. “This school gave me a reason to believe that I could find myself in an amazing position, just like everyone who graduated before me,” he said. “And I owe it a lot for that.” Story and photo by Aaron Nelson, BA ’17

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Ad Society Ad Team

S T U D E N T- R U N A G E N C Y Allen Hall Advertising

ADDITIONAL OPPORTUNITIES Ad Night Agency tours Creative Week in NYC National Student Advertising Competition New Venture Championship Portfolio Reviews Science & Memory

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“I see a huge gap in most advertising programs between academia and the real world. The SOJC does an outstanding job of filling that gap because it teaches students how to think, not what to think. This approach gives them the best tools to thrive in an industry that is constantly adjusting to rapid changes in consumerism, popular culture, and technology. The SOJC proves there is always a place for the best and brightest.”

TRACY WONG, BA ’81 EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR & FOUNDING PARTNER , WONGDOODY MEMBER, SOJC HALL OF ACHIEVEMENT

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M A R I T Z A R E N D O N , B A ’ 17 When Maritza Rendon came to the University of Oregon from her home in Mexico City, her love for design and story led her directly to the SOJC. “I found that I really enjoyed the strategic part of public relations,” Rendon said. “I love telling people’s stories, and I have a passion for being involved in the community. I found that PR would be an awesome avenue to do that.”

PU BL IC R EL AT IONS

Rendon promptly took advantage of a variety of opportunities to gain experience and develop her abilities.

“Public relations is a dynamic career arena that spans nonprofit and for-profit industries, such as entertainment, sports, fashion, and many others. Practitioners enable organizations to build and manage relationships with important stakeholder groups, including employees, communities, customers, stockholders, and media. In our PR program, students learn how to assess an organization’s communication needs—and then write, implement, and measure plans.”

“I wanted to put the skills I had learned in class somewhere else, somewhere they would really matter,” she said. Rendon competed in the 2016 Public Relations Student Society of America Bateman Case Study Competition and served as vice president, then president, of the group. She also worked in the community as an intern for the Eugene Water & Electric Board.

Donnalyn Pompper Endowed Chair in Public Relations Public Relations Area Director

STUDENT GROUPS IR Futures Public Relations Student Society of America

S T U D E N T- R U N A G E N C Y Allen Hall Public Relations

ADDITIONAL OPPORTUNITIES Bateman Case Study Competition Know PR Night Portfolio Reviews Portland Paddle Windy City Ducks PR trip to Chicago

In addition to giving her the unique experience of working with real-world clients, the SOJC helped Rendon develop her writing, critical-thinking, and teamwork skills—all of which she believes are vital in the public relations industry. After graduating this spring, Rendon took on a full-time internship with FleishmanHillard in San Francisco, where she works with clients focusing on corporate reputation and social responsibility. She said the SOJC played a major role in helping her secure the position, and she hopes it will be a first step toward living and working as a PR professional in her home country. Story and photo by Aaron Nelson, BA ’17

A D A P T “Yes, the Internet, and more recently social media, fundamentally changed how we get and share information. What hasn’t changed? Understanding the very people you are trying to reach, connecting, and creating the messages that will resonate. We have extremely powerful tools to reach people today. Using them to build relationships, create campaigns, and shape perception makes this one of the most exciting times to be in public relations.”

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KARI (SKOOG) AAKRE, BS ’00 SENIOR DIRECTOR, EXECUTIVE COMMUNICATIONS & GLOBAL EVENTS, INTEL CORP

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M EG RODGE RS, CL ASS OF ’ 18 As the daughter of two academics, research is in the blood of media studies student Meg Rodgers. “My parents have had an influence on me—seeing them work as professors and just as people of the world,” she said. “But I grew up on stories and around people teaching stories as well. My mom’s a creative writing professor, and that definitely shaped me.”

MEDIA STUDIES

Rodgers’s plan to join the media studies quadrant of Allen Hall solidified after taking Assistant Professor Peter Alilunas’s Intro to Media Studies class.

“The media studies concentration focuses on the understanding and appreciation of communication and communication technologies, historically and in their contemporary forms. Media studies provides a humanities/social sciences/liberal arts background, plus necessary analytic skills, for a broad range of employment possibilities.”

“I was initially drawn to the SOJC because I really like the idea of working and collaborating with people,” she said. “But I tried out PR and realized I was more interested in thinking about media than producing it.” Since that first media studies class, Rodgers has taken on a leadership role in her major. She and her classmate, Ben Pettis, created the Media Studies Student Group so Allen Hall would have a place for students to not only produce content, but also study the effects it has on society. She’s excited to expand the group—and the entire media studies major—in the coming year.

Janet Wasko Professor Knight Chair in Communication Research Media Studies Area Director

FA C U LT Y R E S E A R C H A R E A S Communication and democracy Cultural studies Games studies Gender, race, and class in the media Global media, technology, and social justice Media history, law, and ethics Media literacy Media and society Political economy of media

“My major has changed my day-to-day life—I no longer passively consume media,” she said. “In a world that’s so media saturated, it’s important to have these conversations and digest some of the things we’re seeing.” Rodgers, who hopes to graduate this spring, already has big plans for her senior year. She is writing a thesis about the anti-heroine as an emergent TV character trope, which reflects her interests in television studies and representation in the media. “I love that the media studies program surrounds me with bright students who challenge and inspire me,” Rodgers said. “I’m not sure what the future will hold, but I’m confident my education at the SOJC has prepared me for whatever may come!” Story by Aaron Weintraub, BA ’17 Photo by Bryan Rodriguez, advertising major

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“I gained a great understanding of the breadth and rigor of communication theory and research. At the same time, the program was strategically structured for the development of strong research and teaching portfolios. These were highly beneficial as I entered the job market.” BENJAMIN BIRKINBINE, PHD ’14 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, THE UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, RENO PHOTO BY MELODY STONE

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MOVE FROM CLASSROOM TO CAREER

#LifeAsAJGrad begins on your first day of #LifeAsAJStudent. Each new experience leads to new opportunities beyond the classroom. The steps are small at first—going to office hours, meeting a professional advisor, attending a meeting—but every action builds on itself. You’ll take larger steps—a committee role, a published piece, an informational interview, your first internship. Then you’ll lengthen your stride. Soon, as graduation looms, you will look back on the distance you’ve covered from leadership positions and multiple internships to a robust portfolio and an ever-widening network of friends and colleagues in the field.

SCHOLARSHIPS HELP SHIRLEY CHAN, BA ’17, TAKE ON THE WORLD One of the many inspirational moments Shirley Chan experienced during her time at the SOJC was meeting one of her idols, fellow Duck and renowned broadcast journalist Ann Curry ’84.

in Ghana program for internships with the University of Ghana’s Radio Univers 105.7 and the Alliance for Reproductive Health Rights. She received the 2015 Benjamin A. Gilman Scholarship to help fund her summer study abroad.

“She gave me incredible advice about not being afraid to dig deeper and tell the truth, doing what you have to do to get the story, and doing the story you want,” Chan said. “And that you are a human before you are a journalist.”

That was just the beginning of Chan’s worldwide adventures in multimedia journalism. Last summer, she was a Charles Snowden Program for Excellence in Journalism intern at Oregon Public Broadcasting in Portland, where she worked as a digital production assistant. In the fall, she traveled to Morocco with the School for International Training’s Journalism and New Media program, and in December she went to Sri Lanka with the SOJC’s Global Stories program.

As the donor who founded the Ann Curry Endowed Scholarship—which Chan received the past two years in a row—Curry gave Chan more than just words of wisdom. She and the SOJC gave the recent graduate the means to build the multimedia journalism skills that have already launched her on a promising career. Chan is a great example of what students can achieve when they use the SOJC’s resources to the fullest. During her time in the SOJC, she worked as video editor for the student-run digital publication OR Magazine, multimedia producer for the student print magazine FLUX, and assistant editor for production company AO Films. Last year, Chan won a Columbia Scholastic Press Association Crown award in the Video Feature Package category for her work in OR Magazine and helped the publication take home a prestigious Gold Crown. Chan also took advantage of a number of hands-on internship opportunities. In the summer of 2015, she traveled to Accra, Ghana, with the SOJC’s Media

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“I think the SOJC provides a lot of opportunities and resources, and I don’t think enough students take advantage of what’s there,” Chan said. After graduation, all of the skills Chan developed during her time at the SOJC helped her land another internship at Slate.com in Brooklyn, New York—a position that has since become permanent. “I want to be working in environments where I am trying out new ways of storytelling,” Chan said. Thanks to the SOJC and generous scholarship support, she is getting the chance to do just that. Story by Becky Hoag, journalism and marine biology double major

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SHOWCASE YOURSELF

PU BL ICAT IONS

Portfolio development is a vital part of your education at the SOJC. We promote a symbiotic relationship between classroom projects and media-related extracurricular activities. Each enhances the other while honing your skills and building your brand. Graduating with a strong portfolio will set you apart in today’s job market.

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FLUX

OR MAGAZINE

25 YEARS OF PUBLICATION EXCELLENCE

THE FIRST COLLEGE TABLET PUBLICATION

FLUX magazine is an award-winning print publication that delivers gripping feature stories and stunning photos. The student-run publication’s website, FLUXstories.com, is its multiplatform media channel. In 2017, FLUX won a Columbia Scholastic Press Gold Crown.

SOJC students are redefining digital publishing with OR Magazine, the first university student-produced magazine designed for the iPad using Adobe Systems’ Digital Publishing Suite. Students created the magazine in a 2011 mobile media production course, shortly after iPads came to market. Since then, its student staffs’ innovative work has won numerous awards, including a 2017 Columbia Scholastic Press Gold Crown.

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CHALLENGE YOURSELF

INTERNSHIPS

Some things you just can’t learn in a classroom. Internships are a hands-on way to road-test your career while gaining marketable experience. You get extensive mentorship and training from seasoned professionals, the opportunity to put classroom learning into practice, and an invaluable preview of your chosen career path. In addition to Eugene-area experiences during the school year, SOJC students intern regionally, nationally, and internationally to improve their career readiness and build their portfolios. As one of the premier journalism programs in the nation, we have extensive partnerships with media organizations around the world where students participate in established competitive internship programs.

CH A R L ES SNOW DE N P ROGR A M FOR EXCELLENCE TRANSFORMING OREGON JOURNALISM The Charles Snowden Program for Excellence in Journalism has placed students in summer internships in media outlets throughout Oregon for 20 years. More than 80 percent of “Snowdens” land jobs at top media outlets because they embrace and excel at great storytelling.

PORTLAND SENIOR EXPERIENCE TAPPING INTO THE PORTLAND MEDIA MARKET Seniors from all SOJC majors are eligible to apply for the Portland Senior Experience. Administered by SOJC faculty at the school’s Portland location, this term-long internship in Oregon’s media capital offers the opportunity to participate in specialized career-development and networking programs. With more than 100 participating employers, the program boasts a job-placement and internship-extension rate greater than 60 percent.

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Photo by Ryan Kang ’16

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DISCOVER YOURSELF

#LIFEASAJSTUDENT

What will you do to add value to your classes? What will be your #LifeAsAJStudent moments? The possibilities include double majors, minors, research projects, internships, leadership positions, study abroad, student groups, experiential learning trips, and more. The choices you make and the experiences you seek create your own unique tapestry. The story you tell will be your own.

A DV E RT I S I NG C R E AT I V E W E E K N YC Each year, over 100 advertising students grab the opportunity to attend Creative Week in New York City. Agency visits, professional critiques, and alumni networking connect students to advertising’s biggest stage, and many return with job offers.

JOURNALISM IN NYC In 2016, journalism majors started a new tradition of traveling to New York City to network with journalism professionals at such traditional and emerging media powerhouses as the New York Times, ProPublica, Parse.ly, Empathetic Media, HuffPost, and Columbia University.

W I N DY CI T Y DUCKS PR I N CH ICAGO In 2015, the public relations major started an annual pilgrimage to Chicago to allow PR students to get a foot in the door and meet with professionals at top agencies throughout the city as well as the Chicago Tribune, the Chicago Field Museum, Google, and Major League Baseball’s Chicago Cubs.

SPORTS MEDIA WORKSHOP

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Student journalists and student athletes come together to conceptualize, shoot, edit, produce, and publish online sports stories for one week each year. High-level sports and sports-marketing guest speakers contribute their expertise to this collaborative, portfolio-building experience.

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IMMERSE YOURSELF

AROUND THE WORLD

Choose your destination. Where you go will determine when you go, how long you go, and what courses you take. The SOJC sponsors programs in Alaska, Chicago, New York, Ghana, and Argentina, and you can select from almost 200 programs in more than 90 countries offered through the university. SOJC students also explore the world through international internships and the Global Stories annual trip. Great storytelling—global storytelling—begins at the SOJC.

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GLOBAL STORIES

MEDIA IN GHANA

SCIENCE & MEMORY

To uncover and tell powerful stories, journalists need to be comfortable with getting outside their comfort zones. That is the driving idea behind Global Stories, an SOJC study-abroad program that takes students to far-flung places to cover tales of recovery and transformation. In 2016–17, 25 students traveled to Sri Lanka, and previous trips have taken groups to Cuba and Nepal.

The Media in Ghana program carries the lessons of the SOJC from Allen Hall to West Africa, where students work in a variety of media outlets. Engaging with media in different cultural contexts pushes students to challenge and expand their ideas about effective communication.

This unique experiential learning program has taken nearly 100 SOJC students to sites around Oregon and Alaska, where they learn how to report on complicated scientific topics while exploring the wilderness, collaborating with researchers, interviewing salmon fishermen and native Alaskans, and working long hours in harsh conditions. They blog about the effects of climate change they witness— both ecological and economic—and tell innovative multimedia stories.

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MAKE THE CALL— BE A DUCK

JOIN THE LEGACY OF INNOVATION. Nothing gives you a better feel for #LifeAsAJStudent than a personal visit. We welcome the opportunity to show you firsthand how our faculty and students are inventing the future of media.

BELONG

#LifeasaJStudent Ethics, Innovation, Ac

tion

The University of Oregon School of Journalism and Communication is a nationally and internationally recognized program on a mission to develop the communicators of the future. Students come to the SOJC from all over the world to experience an exceptional education driven by faculty and staff who are known for their creative and professional work, scholarship, innovative teaching, and passionate engagement.

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S O J C Q U I C K FA C T S

1916

Mailing Address:

Founding Year

1275 University of Oregon Eugene, OR 97403-1275

101 Years of Excellence

Juan-Carlos Molleda, PhD

• Advertising • Journalism • Media Studies • Public Relations

journalism.uoregon.edu

SOJC in Eugene—Allen Hall

uosojc @uosojc @uosojc University of Oregon School of Journalism and Communication

SOJC in Portland— George S. Turnbull Center

2,126

116

Graduate

2,064

Domestic

Resident

2,242

Total Students

Domestic and International Students

International

Undergraduate: 150 Graduate: 28

8%

15 19 18 19 45

Take a learning trip

Journalism Master’s (13%) Media Studies Master’s (16%) Multimedia Journalism Master’s (16%) Strategic Communication Master’s (16%) Doctoral Students (39%)

MA or MS in:

Undergraduate Race/Ethnicity

Graduate Race/Ethnicity

• Advertising and Brand Responsibility (New in 2018!) • Journalism • Media Studies • Multimedia Journalism • Strategic Communication

66% White 26% Students of Color 7% Nonresident Alien 1% Race/Ethnicity Unknown

56% White 44% Students of Color and Race/Ethnicity Unknown

1,082

Nonresident

Domestic

Undergraduate: 1,976 Graduate: 88

Graduate Majors (116)

12.6% Work on a student publication, agency, group, or competition

PhD in Media Studies

1,160

178

International

66.4% Graduate with at least one internship experience

BA or BS in Journalism with a concentration in:

Accredited by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications

446 Advertising (21%) 396 Journalism (19%) 20 Media Studies (1%) 372 Public Relations (17%) 892 Pre-Journalism (42%)

79% of SOJC undergraduate students participate in experiential learning

Degrees

Edwin L. Artzt Dean and Professor

Two Locations

Undergraduate

Undergraduate Majors (2,126)

Experiential Learning

1,442

684

63

53

Female

Male

Female

Male

249

600

SOJC Students with a Dual Degree (11%)

SOJC Students with a Minor (27%)

Resident

Resident and Nonresident

Undergraduate: 1,111 Graduate: 49

Nonresident

Undergraduate: 1,015 Graduate: 67

Top Double-Major Areas

Top Minor Areas

1. Business Administration 2. Cinema Studies 3. Political Science 4. International Studies 5. Spanish

1. Business Administration 2. Multimedia 3. Spanish 4. Political Science 5. English

Scholarships and Funding Through generous donor support, the SOJC provides nearly $450,000 in annual student scholarship awards benefiting more than 125 SOJC students. The school also provides full funding for PhD students. Source: UO Office of Insitutional Research, fall term 2016 fourth-week enrollment


FOR MOR E I N FOR M AT ION Student Services School of Journalism and Communication University of Oregon sojcadvising@uoregon.edu journalism.uoregon.edu 541-346-3738 PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS journalism.uoregon.edu/prospective FACU LT Y DI R ECTORY journalism.uoregon.edu/people STUDENT GROUPS AND CAMPUS MEDIA journalism.uoregon.edu/student-organizations SCHOLARSHIPS journalism.uoregon.edu/scholarships UO Office of Admissions admissions.uoregon.edu 1-800-Be A Duck 541-346-3201 UO FACT S admissions.uoregon.edu/profile

facebook.com/UOSOJC

@UOsojc

#LifeasaJstudent

journalism.uoregon.edu

@UOsojc

2017-18 UO School of Journalism and Communication Viewbook  

Are you considering undergraduate study in advertising, journalism, media studies, or public relations? Check out our latest viewbook for a...

2017-18 UO School of Journalism and Communication Viewbook  

Are you considering undergraduate study in advertising, journalism, media studies, or public relations? Check out our latest viewbook for a...