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CHAPTER EIGHT

clothes away, so as to prevent them from returning to their families and their homes. In al-Jawbars eyes, their asceticism was feigned, and their extraordinary powers but a trick: they were heretics, ibåªs (literally, those who permit things forbidden by the religious law; licentious men), sexually and morally corrupt, the very negation of an Islamic model of piety.80 Ibn al-Íalåª al-Shahraz¨r uses the same term—ibaªs, or ikhwån ahl al-ibåªa (the brethren of licentuousness)—to denote those men and women who dress like ascetics (he refrains from calling them ͨfs) and participate in sessions of singing and dancing accompanied by musical instruments, which they scandalously claim to be the best kind of worship (min afal al-ibådåt). In his description they appear as men who reject the authority of the prophets and scholars, hold heretical doctrines and perform wicked acts.81

80 81

Al-Jawbar, Kashf, 12–20. al-Shahraz¨r, Fatåwå, 499–501.

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Jsrc 007 talmon heller islamic piety in medieval syria mosques, cemeteries and sermons under the zan  

Jsrc 007 talmon heller islamic piety in medieval syria mosques, cemeteries and sermons under the zan  

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