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Saving Sunshine for a Rainy Day: New Catalyst Offers Efficient Storage of Alternative Energies A multinational collaboration led by Professor Ted Sargent (ECE) has resulted in the most efficient catalyst for splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen. This process, which mimics that of plants during photosynthesis, allows the storage of electricity from intermittent sources, such as wind and solar, in chemical form. The new catalyst is made of the abundant metals tungsten, iron and cobalt, making it much less costly to produce than state-of-the-art catalysts based on precious metals. It showed no signs of degradation over more than 500 hours of continuous activity, unlike other efficient but shortlived catalysts. Their work was published in the leading journal Science. This research united engineers, chemists, materials scientists, mathematicians, physicists, and computer scientists across Canada, the United States and China. The team includes researchers at Stanford University, East China University of Science & Technology, Tianjin University, Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Canadian Light Source and the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility.

Food & Nutrition Security Engineering Initiative The Centre for Global Engineering (CGEN) is bringing together researchers from across the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering in a multidisciplinary collaboration to address hunger and malnutrition, which affect billions of people around the world. The Food & Nutrition Security Engineering Initiative (FaNSEI) seeks to leverage the Faculty’s diverse expertise to advance engineering solutions to these issues. Its multidisciplinary approach recognizes that food and nutrition are complex challenges that are often intertwined with other issues such as agricultural productivity, water availability, energy resources, food preservation, transport and storage — areas in which the Faculty has outstanding strengths. The group has received seed funding from the Dean’s Strategic Fund, which supports strategic collaborations that have a broad impact in the Faculty. FaNSEI members include CGEN Director Professor Yu-Ling Cheng (ChemE) and Associate Director Professor Amy Bilton (MIE), and Professors Edgar Acosta (ChemE), Stewart Aitchison (ECE), Timothy Chan (MIE), Levente Diosady (ChemE), Elizabeth Edwards (ChemE), Chi-Guhn Lee (MIE), Emma Master (ChemE) and Arun Ramchandran (ChemE).

The team has also partnered with U of T researchers outside engineering, including plant biologists and experts in food security and nutrition.

Improving Global Health Through Micronutrients Researchers at U of T Engineering are fortifying universally consumed foods such as tea and salt with critical micronutrients to improve public health in the developing world. Micronutrients, such as iron, folic acid and vitamin B-12, are needed in only small quantities but are crucial for good health, particularly among women and babies. Professor Levente Diosady (ChemE) and his team have created tiny edible particles that are rich in iron. The particles are mixed with traditional iodized salt to create double fortified salt (DFS). Diosady has teamed up with the Micronutrient Initiative to distribute DFS to more than five million children a day in India’s Tamil Nadu province, with an initial trial showing a 35 per cent reduction in anemia within eight months. The project is expanding to the province of Uttar Pradesh, where it will be given to between 10 million and 20 million people. Diosady is also working on incorporating folic acid and vitamin B-12 into salt, and iron into tea. Both salt and tea are consumed in predictable amounts in the developing world, regardless of economic status.

International Capstone Course Challenges Students to Design Across Cultures More than a dozen U of T Engineering students and professors spent four days in China in November 2015 collaborating with colleagues from two universities on projects ranging from satellite design to assistive devices. The trip was part of the Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering’s fourthyear international capstone course, which allows students to work collaboratively across continents and cultures on industry-sponsored engineering projects. The course, which is celebrating its fifth anniversary, includes partnerships with Peking University (PKU) in Beijing, the National University of Singapore, the University of California, Irvine and, new this year, Beijing’s Tsinghua University. Industrial partners in Canada or the partner country sponsor the projects. The students, who conducted most of their work via e-mail and other online tools, met in Toronto in April 2016 to present their final designs.

Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering | Annual Report 2016 | Chapter 9: International Initiatives 109

Annual Report Performance Indicators 2016  

This is the annual report of performance indicators for the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering at the University of Toronto.

Annual Report Performance Indicators 2016  

This is the annual report of performance indicators for the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering at the University of Toronto.

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