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Workplace Climate This snapshot focuses on workplace climate for staff and faculty. Although some employees at UMass Amherst may consider the entire campus to be their workplace, most work within smaller spheres (e.g. a work unit, an office, or an academic department). Consequently, staff and faculty perceptions of the campus climate overall are influenced by experiences and interactions they have in their immediate work environment.

SAMPLE STAFF QUESTIONS

The staff and faculty versions of the Campus Climate Survey devoted substantial attention to workplace climate. Some questions were directed to both staff and faculty, whereas others were specific to each population. Both staff and faculty were asked to respond to a set of “agree/disagree” items pertaining to their work environment (see opposite page). In addition, both were asked about feelings of connection to their specific work unit or department, whether they have a mentor or role model on campus, how likely they are to recommend the university as a place to work, and how often they hear negative comments in their workplace that relate to social identity. Staff only were asked the extent to which their supervisor pays attention to how people in their workplace are treated (see sidebar), as well as how often they experience mistreatment in their job (see opposite page). Faculty only were asked how much service they do relative to others in their department (see opposite page), as well as whether they experience being excluded or marginalized on the basis of social identity.

From your perspective, how committed or uncommitted to inclusion are the people at UMass Amherst with whom you work most directly?

The data visualizations featured here illustrate staff and faculty responses to only a few of these many questions—broken down by race/ethnicity, gender identity, sexual identity, political view (faculty only), and job type or rank. For both staff and faculty, percentages agreeing and disagreeing that “there is a spirit of cooperation” in their immediate workplace are similar across the social identity categories—with majorities agreeing either strongly or somewhat. More than one-third of staff overall indicated that they experience mistreatment in their campus job “often” or “sometimes,” with modest differences among identity groups. Faculty perceptions of how much service they do relative to others varies a bit across social identity groups— most notably by rank. However, across nearly all social identity categories, majorities of faculty perceive that they do “a bit more” or “much more.” The comprehensive Campus Climate Survey will include an extensive set of results pertaining to workplace climate for staff and faculty.

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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS AMHERST I CAMPUS CLIMATE SURVEY ABRIDGED REPORT

From your perspective, to what extent does your supervisor pay attention to how people in your workplace are treated? To a Very Great Extent To a Great Extent To Some Extent To a Little Extent To a Very Little Extent I’m Not Sure

Very Committed Somewhat Committed Somewhat Uncommitted Very Uncommitted I’m Not Sure

SAMPLE FACULTY QUESTIONS How likely or unlikely are you to recommend UMass Amherst to others as a good place to work as a faculty member? Very Likely Somewhat Likely Somewhat Unlikely Very Unlikely How satisfied or dissatisfied are you with your ability to balance your work priorities and personal life priorities? Very Satisfied Somewhat Satisfied Somewhat Dissatisfied Very Dissatisfied

University of Massachusetts Amherst Climate Survey Abridged Report  

UMass Amherst conducted a Campus Climate Survey, a web-based questionnaire that asked students, staff, and faculty about: Perceptions of th...

University of Massachusetts Amherst Climate Survey Abridged Report  

UMass Amherst conducted a Campus Climate Survey, a web-based questionnaire that asked students, staff, and faculty about: Perceptions of th...