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Student Affairs

Student Affairs Annual Report 2012-2013

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About Student Affairs Our Mission The Division of Student Affairs mission works to provide students with effective services and developmental opportunities that augment their academic experience and enhance the quality of their lives while enrolled at the University of Louisville. When coupled with a challenging academic experience, these services and opportunities facilitate the students’ total development so that they attain their educational goals as individuals prepared to function successfully as leaders within a diverse, multicultural and international world. In support of this mission, the Division provides essential services to the faculty and academic units.

Our Vision To be acknowledged for our outstanding service to students; recognized as responsible servants to our communities; known as innovative and studentcentered practitioners; and regarded as one of the premier student affairs programs in the country.

Our Goals • To inspire a vibrant campus life and engaged student body.

• To celebrate tradition and create a sense of purpose. • To enhance services that meet the needs of students. • To transform theory into practice to support student learning.

Our Values We value students. We value their ideals, dreams, aspirations, and challenges as they seek to find meaning and their voice. We value learning and individual potential. We value the process of acquiring knowledge and developing skills to reach individual potential, and support opportunities for understanding unique talents and passions while becoming part of an educated citizenry. We value the spirit of community. Like a small neighborhood, we value open dialogue, mutual respect and trust, commitment to long-term relationships, tradition, and a sense of belonging that inspires Cardinal pride. We value service to students and society. We assist students in defining, refining, and achieving their goals through programs and services designed to help them succeed and become contributing members of society. We value professionalism. We encourage professional growth, development, and ethical conduct of our staff and strive for collaboration to create an environment supportive of student learning.

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Table of Contents

Career Development Center 4 Dean of Students 6 Disability Resource Center 8 Housing and Residence Life 10 Intramural-Recreational Sports 13 Student Involvement 15 Student Counseling Center 19 TRIO Student Support Services 21 Additional Highlights 23 Staff Snapshot 24 Performance Metrics 25

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Career Development Center MISSION: The Career Development Center must support the mission, academic programs and advancement of the institution. Within this context, the primary purpose of the Career Development Center is to assist students and alumni in developing, evaluating, and/or implementing career, education and employment decisions.

DEPARTMENT OVERVIEW The UofL Career Development Center operates as a centralized career center consisting of a main office with satellites to all schools and colleges of the University, with the exception of the Business School, which operates their own career center. A career coach is assigned to work with the students, staff and faculty of each of the schools within the university. Their role is to provide self-exploration, career exploration, experiential education, job search, employer development, and graduate school exploration guidance and resources to their assigned school or college.

CONTACT INFORMATION Director: Leslye Erickson Location: Houchens Building LL03/04 Phone: 502-852-6701 Website: www.louisville.edu/career

GOALS (2012-13) 1. Increase outreach/employer development. 2. Expand Alumni Career Services Program as a way to indirectly increase employer outreach/ development. 3. Shift delivery of student services to focus on career exploration phase of career development process in support of Flight Plan initiative. 4. Improve job related knowledge and skills of all staff with special emphasis on improving technology skills. 5. Document all related policies and procedures relative to new service model.

POINTS OF PRIDE 1. Cards Career Navigator - Completed our first year of the Cards Career Navigator initiative. Successfully served 2,700 freshmen during orientation presentation and 685 freshmen through the individual counseling process. 2. Interview Stream - Using Interview Stream, the mock interview program has grown to include engineering, speech pathology, nursing, communications, sports administration, and music. 3. President of CPAK - Matt Real was elected incoming president of College Personnel Association of Kentucky (CPAK). 4. ACPA Leadership Role - Matt Real was selected to serve as the Chair of the Career Development Commission for College Student Educators International (APCA).

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Career Development Center

COLLABORATIVE EFFORTS 1. Cards Career Navigator - Worked with Academic Advising, created idea for Cards Career Navigator and began the design of the freshman program initiative. 2. Federal Work Study (FWS) - Worked with Financial Aid staff to completely edit and update the FWS postings within Cards CareerLink to ensure that the information posted was up to date for incoming students. 3. Professional Presentation to NACADA - Becky Clark co-presented with staff from the Nursing School and Dental Hygene on the benefits of advising and career working together to serve students at the professional association National Academic Advising Association (NACADA).

STRATEGIC GOALS (2013-14)

3,030 Students Registered in Cards Career Link 38% Increase Over Last Year

1,797 Student Individual Appointments 40% Increase Over Last Year

1. Increase employer awareness of our graduates’ capabilities and participation in on-campus recruiting, career fairs, job postings, advertising possibilities, and information presentations. 2. Increase student awareness and use of the programs and services offered by the Career Development Center. 3. Increase faculty and staff awareness of the Career Services Office. 4. Improve job related knowledge and skills of all staff with special emphasis on improving technology skills. 5. Improve data collection on career program/ services and outcomes.

467 Career Assessments

DIVERSITY & INCLUSION 1. Cardinal Covenant - The Career Development Center provided individualized career assessments and interpretations for economically disadvantaged students enrolled in the Cardinal Covenant program. 2. Porter Scholars - The Career Development Center provided individualized career assessments and interpretations for African American students within the Porter Scholar program.

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Dean of Students Office MISSION: The Dean of Students Office serves the University’s most valuable asset - our students. We promote a positive learning experience and make opportunities available for students to achieve their full academic and personal potential by: promoting a vibrant student experience; building relationships among students, faculty, staff, and the community; upholding University standards and protecting student rights; and empowering students to promote positive change in our community and in our world.

DEPARTMENT OVERVIEW

CONTACT INFORMATION

Our office provides a variety of services in support of students, including student non-academic grievance services, Recognized Student Organization (RSO) funding, student conduct services, crisis assistance, extended absence notifications, SGA advising, Student Care Team, and other programs designed to help create and promote a vibrant campus community. We try to positively impact the lives of our students and this accomplishment is always at the core of what we hope to achieve in the Dean of Students office.

Director: Michael Mardis, Ph.D. Location: Student Activities Center, W301 Phone: 502-852-5787 Website: www.louisville.edu/dos

GOALS (2012-13) 1. Complete Policy and Program Review. 2. Implement Maxient Student Conduct Database. 3. Continue professionalization of the Student Care Team and Crisis Response program. 4. Establish the Athletics and Student Affairs Advisory Group (ASAAG). 5. Reorganize Student Activities/Civic Engagement and construct Student Recreation Center.

Club Programing Committee Money Awarded to Student Groups 2012/13 2011/12 2010/11

$$$$$ $90,398

POINTS OF PRIDE

$$$$

1. Student Recreation Center - Construction of the new Student Recreation Center opened fall 2013. 2. Student Care Manager - Hired Geri Morgan as new Student Care Manager and “professionalized” student care services. 3. Hospital Protocol - Developed and implemented new student hospital protocol. 4. Emergency Response Protocol - Developed and implemented new emergency response protocol. 5. ASCA National Coordinator for Communities of Practice - Dr. Mardis was appointed Association of Student Conduct Administrators (ASCA) National Coordinator for Communities of Practice (COP) for behavioral intervention and threat assessment.

$86,763

$$$$$$$$$$$$$ $119,275

2009/10

$$$$$$$$

2008/09

$$$$$

$101,745 $90,150

TOTAL AWARDED from 2008-2013

$488,331

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Dean of Students Office

COLLABORATIVE EFFORTS 1. Student Engagement Record (SER) - Collaborated with the Registrar’s office, Information Technology, Institutional Research, Community Engagement, and others to develop and implement the SER. 2. Student Care Team (SCT) - Collaborated with representatives from various campus and community entities, including the Counseling Center, University Police, Health Sciences Campus, Housing & Residence Life, Enrollment Management, Kent School, University of Louisville Properties, Inc., Campus Health, and Academic Advising to provide a regular opportunity for communication between departments, ensuring that all the resources of the University are available to students in distress or crisis. 3. Hospitalization, Emergency Response and Crisis Protocols - Collaborated with University Police, Student Care Team, University Hospital, Campus Health, and various campus and community constituencies to develop and implement these protocols to improve the safety and well-being of UofL students. 4. Emergency Contact Information as Required Update for Student Records - Collaborated with Student Records, Registrar’s office, Information Technology and Undergraduate Affairs to implement requirement that students must update and provide their emergency contact information during registration. 5. Athletics & Student Affairs Advisory Group - Formed this advisory group that meets regularly to discuss issues and make decisions about areas of mutual interest between Student Affairs, Athletics and SGA.

DIVERSITY & INCLUSION 1. Club Programming Committee (CPC) - The CPC provided funding for 141 events in 2012-2013 that contributed to vibrancy and diversity efforts on campus. 2. NPHC Advisor - In collaboration with the Director of Student Activities, we were able to identify the necessary resources to develop a full-time National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) coordinator position. 3. Religious Life Association (RLA) - This year the Dean of Students (DOS) continued outreach to the campus ministers and attended several meetings with this group to share information. The DOS staff worked with the Card Office and RLA members to develop a University RLA ID card that could be used by RLA members. 4. International Service Learning (ISL) – Belize This year Dr. Mardis lead the 2013 ISL Belize spring break trip. The interdisciplinary service learning teams included students and faculty from Dentistry, Education, Communication, and Justice Administration. The team implemented a number of projects: Dental Clinic, Workshops on Bullying and Conflict Resolution, Teaching and Work in Schools, In-home Wellness Check and Health Information, basic eye exams, and distribution of non prescription reading glasses and sunglasses.

STRATEGIC GOALS (2013-14) 1. Establish learning outcomes for students referred to the office for student conduct concerns. Develop an assessment mechanism to evaluate the efficacy of achieving the desired learning outcomes. 2. Establish student learning outcomes for case management of students in distress. Evaluate student learning outcomes and retention efforts through case management and survey instrument. 3. Work with the Undergraduate Council, Undergraduate Affairs and academic units to evaluate the current record-keeping process for Academic Integrity incidents. 4. Work with Intramurals, SGA, Budget Office, and Physical Plant to ensure effective opening and operation of the new Student Recreation Center. 5. Incorporate Student Advocacy process and responsibility into DOS Office. 6. Work with campus constituents to evaluate the newly-released Violence Against Women Act and Title II clarification to incorporate necessary revisions to policies and protocols. Evaluate Title II policies regarding direct threat and mental health to ensure appropriate use of behavioral agreement.

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Disability Resource Center MISSION: The mission of the Disability Resource Center is to coordinate services that ensure that individuals with disabilities have equal access to take full advantage of the University’s educational, social, and cultural opportunities.

DEPARTMENT OVERVIEW

CONTACT INFORMATION

The Disability Resource Center (DRC) staff coordinate support services for qualified students with disabilities, serves as a resource to other units on disability compliance issues, and advocates for systemic change to enhance the accessibility of our campus. We continue to collaborate with virtually all units within the University. The DRC is a strong partner with academic units identifying access barriers for students and working collaboratively with students and faculty to reduce or eliminate these barriers.

Director: Cathy Patus Location: Stevenson Hall Phone: 502-852-6938 Website: www.louisville.edu/disability

GOALS 1. Assist with recruitment of qualified students with disabilities and provide services and information to ease the transition into postsecondary education. 2. Provide and coordinate support services for enrolled students with disabilities. 3. Develop and administer assessment instruments/ activities with emphasis on continued modification and improvement of services for students. 4. Facilitate development of leadership, self-advocacy and independent living skills of students with disabilities. 5. Assist with University-wide efforts to comply with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.

POINTS OF PRIDE 1. Disability Symposium - DRC collaborated with the State Americans with Disabillities Act (ADA) Coordinator, the State ADA Task Force, and the Kentucky Association on Higher Education and Disability to plan and deliver the Disability Symposium in November, 2012. 2. iCOUNT and launch of Disability Advocacy Project - DRC collaborated with the Diversity Committee of SGA and several students to plan and deliver iCOUNT, a disability awareness activity in March, 2013. This event also served as the launch of the Disability Advocacy Project which consists of on-line training modules designed to increase knowledge of disability issues and to gain allies for a more accessible campus. 3. Purchase of Clockwork Database - Researched and made final purchase of online database system to track students in the program and improve assessments.

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Disability Resource Center

COLLABORATIVE EFFORTS 1. ADA Amendments Webinar Accessible Technology webinar - DRC collaborated with Vice President for Business Affairs and Office of ADA Coordinator (HR) staff to advertise and offer a webinar on the ADA Amendments. DRC collaborated with VP for Business affairs, Delphi Center staff, and IT to advertise and deliver accessible technology webinar. 2. Purchase of reading software license DRC purchased a site license for Read Write Gold reading software and began to roll out the software to the University community. 3. Workforce Recruitment Program, Virtual Career Fair, Center for Accessible Living Job Readiness workshop, Brown Forman internships - DRC collaborated with Department of Labor (federal), College of Business (university) and Center for Accessible Living and Brown Forman (community) to provide opportunities/ activities to enhance career opportunities for students with disabilities. 4. Let’s Talk program at Cultural Center - DRC staff collaborated with Cultural Center to host disability-focused discussions.

COMMUNITY SERVICE & CIVIC ENGAGEMENT ACTIVITIES 1. Continued Membership on JCPS (Jefferson County Public Schools), OVEC (Ohio Valley Educational Cooperative), and RITT’s (Regional Interagency Transition Teams). 2. Consulted with OVR (Office of Vocational Rehabilitation), OFB (Office for the Blind), KSB (Kentucky School for the Blind), and KSD (Kentucky School for the Deaf). 3. Served as liaison to JCPS PACT (Providing Access to Community Transition) Program. 4. Continued Supplemental Note-taker Services.

DRC Student Tests Administered for Academic Units 2,895

Tests Administered

3,000

2,477

2,500

2,161

2,000

DIVERSITY & INCLUSION 1. Basically, All DRC Activities Support Diversity and Inclusion. 2. Service on Commission On Diversity and Racial Equality (CODRE) - DRC Director serves on the CODRE as a representative of the DRC; in addition to general membership, the Director chaired the Staff Concerns Committee for academic year 2012-13. 3. Collaboration with C.O.N.E.C.T. Peer Mentors DRC staff provide training for Caring Of New students Experiencing College Transitions (C.O.N.E.C.T.) Peer Mentors regarding mentoring students with disabilities. 4. Veteran Services - Served on Vet Services advisory group.

2,229

1,896

1,500 2008/09

2009/10

2010/11 2011/12

Year

2012/13

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Housing and Residence Life MISSION: Housing and Residence Life promotes a safe, convenient, inclusive, and healthy living-learning environment which provides opportunities that help engage students, facilitate student and faculty connections, and encourage student success.

DEPARTMENT OVERVIEW

CONTACT INFORMATION

The core values of our program mirror our mission statement which focuses on safety, comfort and academic success. Specifically, we focus on student development and growth as they transition to campus and continue through their UofL experience. We provide opportunities for community living, service to others, campus involvement and learning independent living concepts.

Director: Shannon Staten Location: West Hall Phone: 502-852-6636 Website: www.louisville.edu/housing

GOALS (2012-13) 1. Increase living learning or themed communities by at least one new community. 2. Continue to update traditional facilities providing student-friendly and welcoming environments. Continue work in Miller Hall, replace HVAC units in Unitas Tower, replace the Louisville Hall roof, and update Bettie Johnson Hall (BJH) apartments. 3. Continue to explore and evaluate methods for using technology in all of our operations: upgrade RMS (Residential Management System) to correct difficulty with student self-assign, install computers at front desks for student guest sign in and other options, identify electronic support for on-call staff and other service based staff such as facility assistants and RATS (Residential Area Technology Specialists), and take student staff application process to electronic format. 4. Reduce overhead expenses for facilities and operations: outsource some maintenance, combine efforts with University of Louisville Housing (ULH) and Housing and Residence Life. 5. Formalize our learning outcomes and assessment for student leadership skill development and the first year programming model.

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Housing and Residence Life

POINTS OF PRIDE 1. First Year Live On Program - In our first year implementing this initiative we gained over a 99% compliance. The process went extremely smoothly with significant advance notice through Admissions recruitment events, campus tours, and email communications. Staff continued to follow through with communicating throughout the spring and summer to students about the new policy and the steps they needed to take. The results were increased number of first year students living on campus and significantly reduced number of students living in off campus apartments, which assists in overall student G.P.A. and retention. 2. Professional Development Committee - Successfully implemented internal professional development group (ProDevo) with twice-per-month initiatives for helping develop full-time staff. As part of this committee, implemented a Mentor/Mentee program which had 12 total participants and was very successful. 3. Crisis Management - Successfully worked through temporary closing of entire residence hall and displacement of 288 students from October to December 2012 because of mold issues. Was able to get 65% of the students to move back to campus in January. 4. Facilities Resident Assistant Initiative - The Facilities Resident Assistants (FRAs) initiative placed two facility assistants living in UTA to focus on maintenance concerns and student education in UTA and Louisville Hall. They participated in hall staff meetings and worked some evening hours on the front desks to be visible for students who needed help with maintenance. 5. Educational Grant - Won an educational grant through Southeastern Association for Housing Officers (SEAHO) for third year in a row to support the programmatic initiatives tied to raising awareness through dialogue on issues affecting Urban Living on campus.

COLLABORATIVE EFFORTS 1. Crisis Management - Collaborated with Business Affairs, Academic Affairs, Financial Affairs, Provost’s Office, Parking, Purchasing, Physical Plant, ULP, Department of Environmental Health and Safety, Student Activities, Dean of Students office, Health Services, Vice President for Student Affairs office, affiliate housing properties, and other external groups (e.g., hotels) in order to successfully work through the mold issues and temporarily close a building and displace 288 students. 2. Move-in Welcome Weekend 2012 - Provided staff support from the first year guides (55) and professional staff at the events and to ensure first year residents were present at the events. Collaborated with Student Affairs Parent Programs, Parking, Baptist Student Union, and UPS to provide move in assistance to FY families. 3. President’s Ice Cream Tour - Resident Students Association (RSA) worked with UPS and the President’s office to host the annual President’s Ice Cream Tour around the residence halls. Had a great turnout at each location. 4. Red Barn Comedy Series - RSA collaborated with the Student Activities Board on this programming theme providing volunteers and financial support to the program. 5. Serving on committees - Full-time staff served on 27 university work groups and committees and 12 professional organizational committees and groups.

HOUSING OCCUPANCY

Number of Beds

5k

5,089

4k

3k

5,157

4,206

4,013 3,300

2008/09

2009/10

20010/11

Year

11

2011/12

2012/13


Housing and Residence Life

STRATEGIC GOALS (2013-14)

DIVERSITY & INCLUSION

1. Residents: Honor that our residents are our strongest asset by consulting with residents, encouraging student responsibility in the community, providing positive living environments that support academic success, and focusing on providing quality service. 2. Staff and student leaders: Provide leadership and development that creates opportunity to prepare for the next career or education step for our staff and student leaders. 3. Administrative: Continue to update our administrative processes and options through innovative and user friendly technology, efficient sustainable processes, and improved communications with our students and families. 4. Overall program: Continue efforts that provide a unified campus housing program with the appropriate level of services and resources for students living in the various on and off campus communities.

1. Rustin Community - Successfully implemented a new theme community related to Social Justice and Inclusion. 2. Urban Living 101 - A program series for firstyear students about living safely on campus. The program also features topics ranging from student services to diversity and preparing for issues that might spring up when dealing with campus life. 3. The Gray Area - This new hit series explores topics at the heart of late adolescence, including perceived gender-role expectations, sexual decision-making, relationships with family and peers, personal experiences and more. The format of The Gray Area consists of two panels of male and female students, randomly selected to facilitate a forum on a specific topic. 4. Meat and Potatoes (M&P) educates college men in the hope of preventing rape, sexual assaults or any form of relationship violence. The program features guest panelists and serves as an opportunity for male mentoring to increase educational success of students who regularly attend. 5. Queen of Sheba - In response to an increased awareness of unhealthy relationship signs and dating violence, this series has time and again helped young women who are in, have been, or will be in an abusive relationship get the support they need. Students are engaged and empowered to be active citizens against relationship violence.

COMMUNITY SERVICE & CIVIC ENGAGEMENT ACTIVITIES 1. Hall Councils / Staff activities - Residence hall students participated in 11 events involving 8 different charities or organizations. 2. RSA / National Residence Hall Honorary (NRHH) activities - Residence hall leaders participated in 11 events involving 10 different charities or organizations.

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Intramural-Recreational Sports MISSION: The Department of Intramural and Recreational Sports’ goal is to improve the quality of life and sense of belonging for all members of the University of Louisville community. Through participation in a variety of sports and fitness activities, participants achieve an improved level of physical, emotional, and social well being within a welcoming environment.

DEPARTMENT OVERVIEW

CONTACT INFORMATION

The Department of Intramural and Recreational Sports (IMRS) serves to improve the quality of student lives using sports and fitness activities to achieve that goal. Intramural and Recreational Sports encourages students to get involved in activities that will enable them to develop a healthy lifestyle. Students can choose from a wide variety of activities including fitness classes, competitive Intramural Sports, and Sport Clubs. Our motto is “A Sport for Everyone and Everyone in a Sport.”

Director: Dale Ramsay

GOALS (2012-13) 1. Continue to work on the planning of the new Student Recreation Center. Our focus this year is equipment selection, finalizing the Student Recreation Center (SRC) budget, developing operational/staffing plans, and selecting a software platform. 2. Implement mock emergency training to enable our staff to respond more effectively in emergency situations. 3. Continue to work with Nelligan Sports Marketing in securing sponsorships. 4. Collaborate with the Athletic Department to assist with the maintenance of our Intramural (IM) Field complex. 5. Re-design the IM Sports website.

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Location: Student Recreation Center Phone: 502-852-6707 Website: www.louisville.edu/intramurals

POINTS OF PRIDE 1. Student Recreation Center - Construction began on the new $37.5 million Student Recreation Center (SRC) in May 2012. SRC opened fall 2013. The IMRS staff has had an extremely busy year working on the plethora of details necessary in the planning of the SRC. We have conducted numerous tours of the SRC with campus groups. 2. Faculty/Staff Golf Scramble - The Intramural and Recreational Sports Department sponsored the 21st Annual Faculty/Staff Golf Scramble, which was held on Friday, June 8th at Nevel Meade Golf Club. 3. Participation Levels - Almost 400,000 people used gym facilities and 9,000 people participated in Intramural Sports programs during 2012-13. 4. Blue Chip Basketball Tournament - Each year we host the Blue Chip Youth Basketball Tournament in the SAC. Approximately 2000 students and their parents attend this 3-day event. By hosting the event, we also expose potential future UofL students to our campus and provide a great community service. 5. Project Graduation - This past year the Department of Intramural Sports hosted the Male High School Project Graduation lock-in. The evening event brought over 350 high school graduates to campus.


Intramural-Recreation Sports

COLLABORATIVE EFFORTS

Intramural Sports Program Participants

1. Nelligan Sports Marketing - Our arrangement with Nelligan continues to be a financially successful one for our department. 2. Athletics - We work closely with Athletics in cooperatively sharing the use of each other’s facilities. 3. University Emergency Medicine - We have a partnership with University Emergency Medicine to enable us to have Automatic External Defibrillators in our facilities. This relationship is important because of the necessity for our staff to be able to respond to a cardiac emergency. 4. Physical Plant - We have an excellent relationship with the various trades in Physical Plant. In an effort to show our appreciation, we work closely with them on our Faculty/Staff Golf Outing. Many Physical Plant employees participate in the tournament. They assist us in obtaining sponsorships for the event. 5. Financial Aid - Our department works closely with Charlie Schnell in the Financial Aid Office to recruit Federal Work Study students to work in the Intramural Department.

2012/13

2011/12

Year

2010/11

2009/10

2008/09

9,528 9,400 8,824 7,697 7k

STRATEGIC GOALS (2013-14) 1. Finalize the planning of all aspects associated with the impending opening of the SRC in the fall of 2013. 2. Facilitate the full implementation of IM Leagues online software in all divisions of the intramural sports competitive leagues. 3. Work with University Archives to digitize previous year’s All-Campus Champions Boards as we transition into the SRC. 4. Coordinate the transition of the administration of the Cardinal Corner Game Room to the Office of Student Involvement. 5. Continue to conduct criminal background checks on Sports Club volunteers and instructors.

9,056

8k 9k Participants

10k

DIVERSITY & INCLUSION 1. International Nights - We worked with the International Center, who helped us market the event directly to the various international clubs. 2. Student Employee Picture Display - This board reflects the diversity of the university community. 3. Intramural Champions Board - Celebrates the diversity of our participants. 4. Badminton Club - Membership in the club has included a strong international contingent, with members from various countries around the world.

COMMUNITY SERVICE & CIVIC ENGAGEMENT ACTIVITIES 1. Participated in Tae Kwon Do Club Holiday Food Drive. 2. Worked with Tai Chi Club, Louisville Tai Chi Day and World Tai Chi Day. 3. Worked with Rugby Club to organize the first Crusade for Children Firetruck Pull.

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Student Involvement MISSION: Student Involvement fosters engagement in student-led programs and services that enrich the education experience by maximizing the capacity of students to learn, serve and lead.

CONTACT INFORMATION Director: Tim Moore Location: Student Activities Center W310 Phone: 502-852-6691 Website: www.louisville.edu/studentinvolvement

DEPARTMENT OVERVIEW

GOALS

The University of Louisville Office of Student Involvement provides activities and services for the university community. The program areas of the Office of Student Involvement include: Fraternity and Sorority Life, Student Leadership, Student Activities Board, Student Activities Center Operations, Conference Services, Recognized Student Organizations, Community Service, Engage Lead Serve Board, Red Barn Programming, and Off Campus Student Services.

1. Civic Engagement - Provide students with a variety of opportunities for service and civic engagement. 2. Expand Greek Life. 3. Serve as UofL’s primary resource to engage all UofL students to be involved in out-of-class activities; provide an outstanding professional preparation experience for graduate students entering the field of campus activities. 4. Cultivate a favorable environment that is welcoming and offers desired programs and services to create a dynamic campus life program for UofL students. 5. Expand and renew facilities to create a vibrant campus “living room.”

Through these functional areas, the office seeks to engage students to add value to their experience at UofL. The office serves as a hub for student involvement on campus. By helping students to become engaged, students will be retained and graduate from the University.

Total Student Service Hours 25k

22,303

Hours

20k

18,480

15k

12,136

10,934

10k

6,930 5k

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

Year

15

2011/12

2012/13


Student Involvement

POINTS OF PRIDE 1. Major Events - Brought Kendrick Lamar to UofL for performance, and held the SAB’s Block Party. 2. LEAD and TFF - SGA agreed to work with us on combining their emerging leaders program TTF (Task Force Freshmen) with the Freshmen LEAD program. These programs provide outstanding opportunities for student leadership development. 3. Conferencing - Hosted many groups in our facilities such as the ERA group, Texas Roadhouse, UPS, the Kentucky Historical Society, ASCA (Association of Student Conduct Administrators) Gehring Academy, and NACA (National Association for Campus Activities) National Leadership Symposium. 4. Engage Lead Serve Board (ELSB) - Additional funding from the President’s office increased program opportunities and student participation. 5. RSOs and HSC - Thirty-six new Recognized Student Organizations (RSOs) were created this year, 13 of which came from HSC (Health Sciences Campus). Over the course of two years, Julie’s presence on the HSC two days a week has made great strides in the vibrancy of those campus student organizations. The year ended with the first ever School of Med’s Field Day event which was very well attended. 6. Membership - Increased overall membership in our fraternities and sororities.

COLLABORATIVE EFFORTS 1. Alternative Service Break NOLA (New Orleans, Louisiana) - Collaborated with the National Relief Network, Western Kentucky University, and the UofL School of Education in planning the Alternative Service Break program in New Orleans. 2. MLK Day of Service - Collaborated with the Network Center for Community Change and Councilwoman Attica Scott’s office to work on one area of the city (Parkland Neighborhood) and held the event at Maupin Elementary School. We had about 125 participants. 3. PEACC Training - Trained Intrafraternity Council new members in collaboration with the Men of PEACC and Sally Evans about PEACC (Prevention, Education and Advocacy on Campus and in the Community). Sally Evans also provided Green Dot training to Greek Students. 4. RSO Summit - Provided additional insight and information for Alcohol Education session and shared the alcohol policies pertaining to student organizations at the RSO Summit. 5. WFPK Live Lunch - Collaborated with WFPK public radio to present three Live Lunch radio broadcasts. 6. Corn Island Storytelling Festival - Collaborated with the Office of Communications and Marketing and the SAB (Student Activities Board).

SAC Traffic (number of people through building) SAC Reservations

2.5 m 2.0 m 1.5 m

1.9 million

2.02 million 1.7 million

1.5 million

1.21 million

1m 10 k 5k

5,639

2008/09

6,505 2009/10

8,339

7,9 9 9

20010/11

2011/12

Year

16

9,099

2012/13


Student Involvement

STRATEGIC GOALS (2013-14) 1. Training and Leadership 1. Continue to collaborate on TFF and LEAD curriculum with SGA – improve satisfaction of participants. 2. Focus on financial training at RSO Summit – improve satisfaction of participants. 3. Increase attendance for leadership programs and don’t just focus on RSO members. 4. Evaluate better ways to deliver leadership training with an emphasis on the how-to basics. 5. Develop Alternative Spring Break (ASB) leader manual and training. 6. Create RSO portal on OrgSync to manage resources for RSOs, including on line leadership information. 2. Student led 1. ASB – create student leadership team, connect with Engage Lead Serve Board (ELSB). 2. MLK – invite students to be part of the planning group, involve ELSB for Martin Luther King Day of Service. 3. ELSB – continue to prepare and empower these students to be the best. 4. SOB – work with SGA to change the name from Student Organization Board (SOB) to Student Organization Advisory Board and increase their responsibility to include assisting with training and policy development. 5. Training corps – the summer intern is developing a model for us to use to get students trained to do leader sessions with campus groups. 3. Assessment, marketing and recognition 1. Technology - increase and better manage photos, increase usage of OrgSync. 2. Recognition - increase programs and activities to enhance recognition throughout the year. 3. Cardinal Partner Program - continue to expand this program and enhance relationships with community partners to provide more and better opportunities for our students. 4. Increase accessibility of Greek - Provide additional leadership development training for more students in Greek Life. 5. Continue to foster involvement across the three Greek governing councils to work toward a more cohesive Greek Life at UofL.

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Student Involvement

COMMUNITY SERVICE & CIVIC ENGAGEMENT ACTIVITIES

1. Community Involvement Fair - SAB worked with ELSB to provide opportunities for service organizations and students to connect. Collaborated with Peace Studies program. 2. SOUL Saturday Events include - November - Project Warm; October - Boys and Girls Club playground build; and September - Network Center for Community Change neighborhood cleanup and chalking. 3. MLK Day of Service - Continuing our collaboration with Network Center for Community Change, we focused our service in the West End with our new partner, Maupin Elementary School. We had 127 student, staff and faculty volunteers and got great press when the Mayor attended. 4. Alternative Service Break Trips - We had alternative break trips to New Orleans, LA (disaster relief – specifically demolition on two houses) and India (assisted with two medical camps). 5. American Heart Association “HeartWalk” Joni Burke served on the UofL Steering Committee for the American Heart Association’s “HeartWalk” and as captain of the Student Affairs Heartwalk Team that raised $731.00.

DIVERSITY & INCLUSION 1. Elect Her Campus Women Win - UofL was selected as a host site for this year’s American Association of University Women (AAUW) sponsored program. A trained facilitator, food and materials were provided by AAUW with the intent of preparing young women to run for on campus elected positions. 2. MLK Day of Service - The focus of the program was on the UofL Signature Partnership area in West Louisville. 3. Welcome Week SOUL - Fairness Campaign is an annual site and the LGBT office leads the group at that site each year. 4. NPHC Suite Advisory Board - Jeffrey Cross chaired the board which met monthly during the academic term to manage the NPHC (National Pan-Hellenic Council) Suite in Community Park. 5. International Fashion Show - Student Organizations come together annually to produce a show that celebrates multiculturalism.

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Student Counseling Center MISSION: The Counseling Center supports the academic mission of the University of Louisville by providing quality mental health services and programs to assist students in achieving their personal and educational goals. We also contribute to the broader mission of the University by providing training to new mental health professionals.

DEPARTMENT OVERVIEW

CONTACT INFORMATION

The Counseling Center provides short-term mental health counseling (individual and group) for all currently enrolled students. We also serve as a practicum site for the Counseling Psychology program at UofL, the Clinical Psychology program at Spalding University, and an internship site for Kent School of Social Work. We also provide testing services for learning disabilities and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. In addition, the Counseling Center provides consultation and outreach to the campus community.

Director: Kathy Pendleton, Ph.D. Location: Student Services Annex Phone: 502-852-6585 Website: www.louisville.edu/counseling

POINTS OF PRIDE 1. Updated DVR Equipment - The new equipment allows practicum supervisors to provide live supervision without being in the room and can be viewed on the computer from the supervisor’s office. Students can also review their session via the computer. 2. Direct Clinical Services - Scheduled 7,435 appointments, 976 new intakes, 139 emergency/crisis appointments, and 100 hours of outreach programs/events. 3. Practicum site for UofL and Spalding University - Provided 710 hours of supervision for practicum students and graduate assistants. 4. Emotion-Focused Therapy (EFT) Regional Workshop - One day workshop by Dr. Rhonda Goldman which focused on helping therapists work with the problematic emotional processes that drive problems and bring clients into therapy. There were 30 participants that attended from as far away as Nashville. 5. LD/ADHD Testing Services - The Counseling Center provided 24 Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and 4 Learning Disabilities (LD) assessments. The funds generated from the assessments were used to purchase assessment protocols, upgrade the DVR equipment and fund professional development activities.

Sessions

8k

Scheduled Counseling Sessions 7,063

7k

7,435

6k

4,758

5k 4k 3k

3,087 2008/09

3,570 2009/10

2010/11

Year

19

2011/12

2012/13


Student Counseling Center

GOALS (2012-13) 1. Implement the web-based component of electronic records system to streamline the intake process. 2. Complete the conversion of all current records from paper to electronic files. 3. Update the Counseling Center website. 4. Implement a student satisfaction survey. 5. Create additional office space for graduate assistants.

STRATEGIC GOALS (2013-14) 1. Continue implementation of web-based intake with Titanium. 2. Revise intake form and intake process to reduce wait times. 3. Increase satisfaction survey participation to 30% of the clinical caseload. 4. Broaden variety of topics offered for outreach presentations. 5. Increase number of clinical staff.

COLLABORATIVE EFFORTS 1. Yoga Anxiety Group - Collaboration with Health Promotions. Yoga was used as a method to reduce stress and anxiety. 2. Health Literacy Focus Group - Collaboration with Health Promotions to help identify gaps in existing efforts to promote a healthy lifestyle. 3. Therapy Change Study - Collaboration with Dr. Jesse Owen, School of Education. A two year study which involved 200 students receiving counseling. The study aimed to understand the clients’ reaction to psychotherapy.

DIVERSITY & INCLUSION 1. LGBT Therapy Group - Established a group for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgendered, queer, questioning or other individuals to discuss sexual orientation and gender identity issues. 2. Women’s Therapy Group - Created group to discuss issues related to life transition, intimate relationships, depression, anxiety, self-esteem, family, and other interpersonal issues related to women.

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TRIO Student Support Services MISSION: The University of Louisville’s Student Support Services program is designed to assist first-generation, lowincome, and or students with disabilities towards the successful completion of their postsecondary education, while promoting a supportive institutional climate.

CONTACT INFORMATION

DEPARTMENT OVERVIEW

Director: Nadine Petty

TRIO Student Support Services (SSS) is a Title IV academic retention program designed to assist first-generation, low-income, and/or students with disabilities toward the successful completion of their postsecondary education. Our staff provides one-onone personal and academic assistance and advocacy for students on their caseload. Our services include free tutoring, mentoring, leadership opportunities, cultural enrichment activities and events, graduate school visits and application assistance, financial support to help reduce educational loan burdens, and a variety of workshops and seminars that address study skills, financial literacy, goal setting, and personal development. We implement individualized academic improvement plans when needed and provide access to graduate school resource materials. We also provide opportunities for students to volunteer within the community and assist them with writing their resumes, finding employment, crisis intervention, and serve as a referral source for support services outside of our scope of operation. All of our services are provided free to participants.

Location: Davidson Hall, Room 106 Phone: 502-852-1406 Website: www.louisville.edu/trio

POINTS OF PRIDE 1. Second Annual Student Awards Ceremony TRIO students were recognized for academic achievement and other honors at this ceremony. 2. TRIO Student Support Services has consistently exceeded its retention objective 83% of its students were retained in the 2012-2013 reporting period. During the 2012-2013 reporting year, 84% of TRIO students were in good academic standing.

COLLABORATIVE EFFORTS 1. Think Before You Ink - A collaboration with Office of Health Promotions, African American Male Initiative (AAMI), Porter Scholars, and Tattoo Charlies to encourage thinking critically about tattoos. 2. Healthy Lifestyles Series - A collaboration with the Cultural Center and Office of Health Promotions to hold a six-series workshop promoting healthy life choices in the areas of diet, exercise, sex, and sleep. 3. Summer Bridge - A collaboration with Arts & Sciences Advising and the College of Business (Paige Hincker) to provide new TRIO students information on UofL advising and the importance of maintaining professional online profiles (Facebook, Twitter, etc.) and thinking carefully about pictures being posted on social networking sites. 4. TRIO Unity Cookout - A collaboration with Jefferson County Technical College (JCTC) to unite their TRIO program with ours via a cookout at Waterfront Park. 5. TRIO Volunteers Day - A collaboration with JCTC to have TRIO students volunteer within the Louisville community. Students volunteered at Supplies Overseas helping to pack medical supplies to distribute to medically impoverished communities overseas.

GOALS (2012-13) 1. Secure sponsorship to send students to a TRIO Student Leadership Conference in the spring of 2013. 2. Collaborate on a service or civic engagement project with another Kentucky Student Support Services program by summer 2013. 3. Inform faculty and academic staff of our services through classroom presentations in the fall 2012 as a means of developing further recognition and support from the Division of Academic Affairs.

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TRIO Student Support Services

STRATEGIC GOALS (2013-14) 1. Ninety percent or more of new participants will be freshmen or sophomores. This will be addressed through deliberate screening of intakes and recruiting the majority of students from freshman events, e.g. orientation, firstyear seminars, recent Upward Bound graduates, etc. 2. Award at least 98% of grant aid to freshmen and sophomores. This will be addressed by increasing the number of freshman and sophomore participants (see goal #1) as well as by marketing grant aid to underclassmen, encouraging them to apply. 3. Eighty percent or more of total participants will receive financial literacy services through workshops or completion of online modules. 4. Students with cumulative GPA’s at or below a 2.40 will be required to meet with support specialists more than twice a semester to address 80% good academic standing requirement from Department of Education. More deliberate and intrusive advising to these students will also include direct faculty contacts, additional phone calls and emails, etc. 5. Facilitate a TRIO Orientation at the start of each spring semester to provide an efficient and systematic approach to orienting new participants (fall intakes) to the requirements and services of our program and reinforcing information provided during intakes.

DIVERSITY & INCLUSION 1. Rock of Ages and Parthenon - Cultural trip to see the Rock of Ages musical and the Parthenon art museum in Nashville, TN. Diverse student population attended and non-white participants were exposed to music outside of their culture. 2. Spirits of the Passage - Took students to Frazier History Museum to see the Atlantic Slave Trade exhibit. 3. Underground Railroad Museum and Genealogy - A diverse group of students travelled to Cincinnati to visit the Underground Railroad Museum and to map their own personal ancestry in the Genealogy department. 4. Greek Step Show - Provided tickets for students to attend the National Pan-Hellenic Council Step Show. 5. International Fashion Show - Provided tickets for students to attend the International Fashion Show.

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Additional Highlights

From the Division of Student Affairs International Service Learning Program

Student News and Social Media The Division of Student Affairs publishes a weekly email to all 22,293 students and maintains the campus wide student event calendar to let students know what’s going on across campus. Members of the campus community submit upcoming events and news items for the newsletter and campus-wide calendar. We are also active on social media sites, engaging students and sharing campus news and events.

We continue our commitment to providing students with opportunities for community service and international travel. Ninety-five students participated in six programs coordinated by the Division of Student Affairs. This past year students traveled to Africa, Asia, Central America, Europe, West Indies, and India.

Development Efforts Our university staff, alumni, and friends continue to be supportive of university student programs and initiatives. We were thankful for $48,740 in individual contributions this year as well as $85,000 in corporate support. Much of this support went into student endowments that generated partial scholarships for 90 students this year totaling more than $23,000. In addition to direct student tuition support we provide direct emergency aid to students in crisis and coordinate efforts to provide students opportunities to travel to professional conferences and workshops that enhance leadership development and support their classroom work.

Parents Program This year, the Parents Program continued to engage parents through Orientation, and Welcome Week programs; created an electronic newsletter sent out to more than 5,000 parents each month; and created ways for parents to interact with the University via social media and Family Weekend programs. Our parent facebook page is extremely active with over 1000 users who provide feedback to us about all aspects of campus life.

Commitment to the Profession

Our Commitment to Serving Students

As one of the premier Student Affairs programs in the country we take seriously our commitment to give back to the profession. We actively seek out opportunities to host national events including the Association for Student Conduct Administration’s Don Gehring Institute, the National Association for Campus Activities National Leadership Conference, the Veteran Symposium for Higher Education, and a variety of state and regional meetings and workshops. Our staff continue to assume leadership roles in national organizations and share research and best practices through presentations at national, state, and regional meetings.

As part of our continued commitment to students, we have instituted a number of changes this year to enhance efficiency and improve service to students. These changes include consolidating our business operations within the division, streamlining student travel process to provide students with funds before they travel rather than through reimbursements, moving some programming funds to academic units to enhance collaboration between student groups and academic units and make it easier for students to facilitate programs for their students, reduced administrative paperwork associated with funds distributed to student organizations for programming, and we continue to evaluate service hours and programming offerings to ensure we are continuing to meet the needs of our students.

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Staff Snapshot

Staff Type

Full-time Professional/Classified Staff:

No. 82

Part-time Professional/Classified Staff:

1

Graduate Assistants:

18

Student Staff on Payroll:

359

Student Interns:

11

Practicum Students:

11

TOTAL:

482

PROFESSIONAL AND CLASSIFIED STAFF GENDER Gender

No. of Staff

% of Staff

Male

34

41%

TOTAL

83

100%

Female

49

51%

ETHNICITY Ethnicity

No. of Staff

% of Staff

African American

20

24%

Hispanic

1

1%

Other

0

0

TOTAL

83

100%

White

62

24

75%


Student Affairs

Performance Metrics Metric

2008-2009

2009-2010

74

76

88

86

83

Students Employed by Division – Fall Semester

480

318

367

323

359

Professional Meetings/Programs Hosted

2

6

6

5

4

Voting in SGA Elections

3,050

2,363

2,778

2,435

2,767

Housing Beds

3,300

4,013

4,206

5,089

5,157

% of Freshman on Campus

64%

59%

61%

71%

67%

% Students on Campus

20%

24%

32%

30%

29%

71

102

56

71

90

Scholarship Dollars Awarded

$20,321

$22,750

$18,450

$21,900

$23,655

New Development Funds Collected

$16,403

$15,648

$94,257

$23,333

$133,740

$4,381

$5,220

$5,710

$6,854

$7,435

28

25

36

52

28

Counseling Center Scheduled Sessions

3,087

3,570

4,758

7,063

7,435

Total # of Students on Greek Rosters Fraternities on Campus

1,369

1,490

1,494

1,665

1,772

16

16

17

18

18

10

10

10

12

12

259

351

394

400

345

20,412

27,615

25,636

21,347

31,000

230

130

182

178

173

1,896

2,161

2,477

2,229

2,895

459

528

479

492

471

NA

NA

NA

2,313

2,850

Total Professional Staff

Scholarships Awarded

Student Affairs Dollars Generated from UofL Cares Counseling Center Assessments

Sororities on Campus RSO’s on Campus Student Activities Board Program Attendance Family Weekend Attendance - # of Families DRC - Tests Administered DRC - # of Classes Note Taker Services Provided DRC – Accommodation Letters Provided to Students

25

2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013


Performance Metrics (Continued) Metric

2008-2009

2009-2010

NA

NA

NA

244

233

2,989

3,139

2,639

2,199

3,030

1,267

839

981

545

1,082

2,801

1,898

2,338

1,991

1,095

1,421 1,404

1,365 1,218

624 1,299

581 1,286

467 1,797

Intramural Traffic – # of People Using Gym Facilities Intramural Sports Program Participants Intramural Sports Clubs SAC Game Room Usage

450,000

469,785

470,586

434,958

395,888

7,697

8,824

9,400

9,528

9,056

17 40,198

18 37,537

23 37,383

20 40,932

20 39,424

CPC Events Funded CPC Dollars Awarded

124 $90,150

161 $101,745

184 $119,275

149 $86,763

141 $90,398

29

80

99

102

95

161 19

598 34

608 33

594 36

640 45

6,930

12,136

10,934

22,303

18,480

105

84

31

24

21

1,467

1,523

4,163

4,244

5,430

$240,000

$240,000

$240,000

$263,500

$379,500

$11,856,893

$11,586,670

$11,862,999

$11,901,112

$12,049,812

Student Care Team - Student Issues New Students Registered in Cards Career Link New Employers Registered in Cards Career Link New Posted positions in Cards Career Link Career Center Assessments Career Center Coaching Sessions

International Service Learning Student Participants SOUL Participants Alternative Spring Break Participants Total Student Service Hours – Student Involvement Speech and Literature Distribution Requests Parents Receiving Newsletter – Mailing List Student Programming Budget SGA, SAB, ELSB Total Budget (General, Program, Housing, SGA)

26

2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013


Student Affairs Vice President for Student Affairs Dr. Tom Jackson, Jr.

(502) 852-6933 louisville.edu/studentaffairs

Dean of Students/Associate Vice President (502) 852-5787 Dr. Michael Mardis louisville.edu/dos Departments and Directors: Career Development Center Leslye Erickson Counseling Center Dr. Kathy Pendleton

(502) 852-6701 louisville.edu/career (502) 852-6585 louisville.edu/counseling

Development and Parents Programs (502) 852-6933 Dr. Glenn Gittings louisville.edu/studentaffairs Disability Resource Center Cathy Patus Housing & Residence Life Shannon Staten

(502) 852-6938 louisville.edu/disability (502) 852-6636 louisville.edu/housing

International Service Learning Program (502) 852-6933 Dr. Joy Hart and Dr. Kandi Walker louisville.edu/islp Faculty Coordinators Intramural Sports & Recreation (502) 852-6707 Dale Ramsay louisville.edu/intramurals Special Programs and Development (502) 852-7467 George J. Howe louisville.edu/studentactivities/redbarn Student Involvement/Student Activities Center (502) 852-6691 Tim Moore louisville.edu.studentactivities Student Leadership Pam Nessle Curtis

(502) 852-6691 louisville.edu/leadership

Student Rights and Responsibilities Angela Taylor Assistant Dean of Students

(502) 852-5787 louisville.edu/dos

TRIO Student Support Services Nadine Petty

(502) 852-1406 louisville.edu/trio

27


The Division of Student Affairs

Student Activities Center W301, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292 Phone: 502-852-6933 Website: http://louisville.edu/studentaffairs

28

The University of Louisville is an equal opportunity institution. This publication was prepared by the University of Louisville and printed with state funds KRS 57.375.

Annual Report 2012-13  

Student Affairs Annual Report 2012-2013