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E T H I C S I N N O VAT I O N A C T I O N

G R E AT S T O R Y T E L L I N G S TA R T S H E R E


W H AT S TO RY W I LL YO U T ELL?

We believe that informed public discourse is the lifeblood of democracy. Our key mission is to teach students to research, report and communicate well — to tell stories accurately and responsibly, in all forms of media.

Whichever major you choose — journalism, advertising, media studies or public relations — what matters is that you courageously pursue the best solution and ground your efforts in the ethical standards of high-quality, factbased communication. Our commitment is that you will learn to communicate your message effectively. 2


FO R ST U D EN TS AT T H E S CH O O L O F J O U R N A LIS M A N D COM MU N I C AT I O N , I T ’ S A LL A B O U T STO RY T ELLI N G .

S O J C ------------------------------SNAPSHOT 2013-2014

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2,097

BY M AJOR ------------------------------------------------------------------------Never before have there been more opportunities to speak truth to the world. Through our nationally accredited programs, you create and publish your work while developing cutting-edge technique alongside award-winning professionals and scholars. Equally important is that you learn to make your work meaningful and appealing to diverse audiences as you become a broadly educated and highly skilled communicator in the strong tradition of a liberal arts degree. Come invent the future of media with teachers who care deeply about their students, scholars who travel the world to research and share their knowledge and professionals who use helicopter cameras and tablets as well as pencil and paper to tell stories that matter. Together you learn to apply time-honored reporting, research and creative/critical thinking in new ways to new careers in new media. Come learn how best to use your unique talents and abilities to make a positive difference as a media leader for our evolving world. The NOW chapter of your life’s story begins in Allen Hall.

Julianne H. Newton Edwin L. Artzt Interim Dean & Professor

J O U R N A L I S M 449 A D V E R T I S I N G 474

P U B L I C R E L AT I O N S 391 M E D I A S T U D I E S 59

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527 E S T I M AT E D

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$427,704

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715

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1,382

I N -S TAT E -------------------------------------------------------------------------

1,137

O U T- O F-S TAT E -------------------------------------------------------------------------

829

D OM E S T I C -------------------------------------------------------------------------

1,966

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W H AT W I L L YO U B R I N G TO T H E W ELCOM E TO A LLEN H A LL 3 .0 . The reason for our success can be found right where we are, in the heart of the University of Oregon. Just as our building is central to the campus, our curriculum is grounded in a broad-based liberal arts education. Allen Hall, home to the School of Journalism and Communication, exemplifies our approach to teaching, collaboration and production. Our students and faculty collaborate and innovate

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across media platforms and across disciplines, aided by a $15-million building upgrade and expansion completed in 2013. Our Digital Commons’ flexible design connects classrooms, labs and informal learning spaces so students can transition between guided instruction and student-driven activity. At the SOJC – part of a great research university – our students and faculty are launching the future of journalism.


TA B L E ?

I N S P I R E ------------------------------“Allen Hall is a crucible for the idealists, independent thinkers and creative talents who challenge the status quo. At the SOJC, we strengthen the core values and tenets of journalism while finding new ways to unleash it in forms unimaginable a generation ago. This is where we create the next generation of storytellers who will inform and inspire the world.”

SCOTT BEDBURY ‘80 FOUNDER, BRANDSTREAM

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CONNECT ------------------------------“I am a make-a-difference journalist. Growing up, I learned about the Civil Rights Movement, the Women’s Movement, the Gay Rights Movement, Watergate. All of those things shaped me. Watching what was going on in Vietnam shaped me. And it made me realize that journalism could be incredibly powerful in opening people up — not only to the world, but to new ideas. And that lifts us to a greater civilization.” ANN CURRY ‘78 JOURNALIST

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JOURNALISM S T U D EN T G R O U P S “J O U R N A LIS M ED U C AT I O N TO DAY IS A B O U T A PPLY I N G T H E E T H I C S A N D VA LU E S O F T RA D I T I O N A L J O U R N A LIS M W H I LE LE A R N I N G TO D E V ELO P STO R I E S ACR O SS MU LT I PLE – S OM E T I M E S E M ER G I N G – PL AT FO RM S , A N D B U I LD I N G SPECI FI C SK I LL S I N W R I T I N G , V ISUA L M ED I A A N D D E SI G N .”

Duck TV Envision Ethos UOHack

JOURNALISM SENIOR INSTRUC TOR AND ARE A DIREC TOR M ARK B L AINE

FLUX News Lab OR Magazine

Society of Professional Journalists National Broadcasting Society National Association of Black Journalists

S T U D EN T- R U N AG EN CI E S OR Media Allen Hall Studios

P U B LI C AT I O N S Oregon News The Oregon Documentary Project

A L A N S Y LV E S T R E ’ 1 4

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------H OM E TOW N Veneta, Oregon

M A J O R ( S) Journalism

L AT E S T I N T ER N S H I P E X PE R I E N CE SOJC Snowden intern, multimedia producer and journalist, The Register-Guard, Eugene, Oregon S O J C AC T I V I T I E S PR Owner, Alan Sylvestre Video Productions; multimedia producer, Flux Magazine; student producer, OR Media; co-founder, NeedtoKnow.tv; multimedia producer, OR Magazine; freelancer, The Daily Emerald

“I had the opportunity to spend two consecutive weeks traveling on behalf of the school. First, we went to Roosevelt High School in Portland, Oregon. We taught kids in limited-income families the basics of multimedia journalism. It really made me challenge myself: I could learn this to get a grade, but when you have to teach it to somebody else, you really have to know it yourself. The end of that week the school sent me to Paris to attend a conference at UNESCO on freedom of the press. I got to meet the director of Al Jazeera and have lunch with him and meet journalists from more countries than I can count. Those are things I don’t think I would have gotten if I weren’t in a school that was so open to research and learning.” 7


T H I N K ------------------------------“I see a huge gap in most advertising programs between academia and the real world. The SOJC does an outstanding job of filling that gap because it teaches students how to think, not what to think. This approach gives them the best tools to thrive in an industry that is constantly adjusting to the rapid changes in consumerism, popular culture and technology. The SOJC proves there is always a place for the best and brightest.” TRACY WONG ‘81 CHAIRMAN WONGDOODY

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ADVERTISING S T U D EN T G R O U P “THE WORD ‘ADVERTISING’ NO LONGER ENCOMPA SSES WHAT WE DO. WE RESPONSIB LY USE CRITICAL, CONCEPTUAL, AND CRE ATIVE SKILLS TO SOLVE PROB LE M S FOR PEOPLE AND B RANDS IN A GLOBAL ECONOMY. THAT GIVES US PERMISSION TO DRIVE NE W THINKING AND B IG IDE A S.” CHA MB ERS DISTING UISHED PROFESSOR OF ADVERTISING AND ARE A DIREC TOR DEB ORAH MORRISON

Ad Society

S T U D EN T- R U N AG EN C Y Allen Hall Advertising

A D D I T I O N A L O PP O RT U N I T I E S Ad Night Agency tours Creative Week NYC National Student Advertising Competition New Venture Championship Portfolio Reviews

S PEN CER A D R I A N ’ 1 4

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------H OM E TOW N Portland, Oregon M A J O R (S) Advertising and Journalism L AT E S T I N T ER N S H I P E X PE R I E N CE

Strategy intern, 72andSunny, Los Angeles

S O J C AC T I V I T I E S Ad Team leader; writer, Ethos Magazine; member, Allen Hall Advertising, Society of Professional Journalists, Ad Society and National Press Photographers Association

“The SOJC is the school that will push you and push your skills to be the best that you can be and they won’t accept anything less than the best. The family there expects that from you so you won’t be afraid to fail and pick yourself back up.”

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A D A P T ------------------------------“Yes, the Internet – and more recently social media – fundamentally changed how we get and share information. What hasn’t changed? Understanding the very people you are trying to reach, connecting and creating the messages that will resonate. We have extremely powerful tools to reach people today. Using them to build relationships, create campaigns and shape perception makes this one of the most exciting times to be in public relations.”

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KARI SKOOG AAKRE ‘00 DIRECTOR OF PRODUCT PR, INTEL CORP


P U B L I C R E L AT I O N S S T U D EN T G R O U P S “THROUGH RESE ARCH, CRITICAL THINKING AND STRATEGIC PROB LE M SOLVING, PR DE TERMINES HOW TO DELIVER THE RIGHT MESSAGE TO THE RIGHT AUDIENCE THROUGH THE RIGHT CHANNELS AT THE RIGHT TIME.”

Public Relations Student Society of America

PUB LIC REL ATIONS INSTRUC TOR AND ARE A DIREC TOR KELLI M AT THE WS

Bateman Case Study Competition Portfolio Reviews Portland Paddle

IR Futures

S T U D EN T- R U N AG EN C Y Allen Hall Public Relations

A D D I T I O N A L O PP O RT U N I T I E S

C A LLI E G I S LER ’ 1 4

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------H OM E TOW N Macleay, Oregon M A J O R (S) Public Relations and Journalism L AT E S T I N T ER N S H I P E X PE R I E N CE

PR intern, The Hoffman Agency, Portland, Oregon

S O J C AC T I V I T I E S PR director and president, PRSSA; account supervisor, Allen Hall Public Relations; social media coordinator, UO Cinema Studies program

“You are absolutely going to get a good education, but the school offers so much more than just an education. Yes, I walked away with a degree, but I also walked away with the confidence to pursue a career, and a network of peers and professionals that is always going to be there for me, and a resume that’s going to carry me through my first position. SOJC gives you the tools and the skills and the foundation that you need to start your life and career after college.” 11


S H I N E ------------------------------“My responsibility as a journalist is to always be fair. That means standing up for those who are powerless or forgotten, sharing inspiration when it’s deserved, and having courage to seek the truth even when it’s challenging. None of this is possible without a commitment to accuracy, and in the end, motivation to help other people live better lives.”

HILLARY LAKE PH.D. ‘09 REPORTER, KATU

SOJC HONORS The SOJC Honors Program offers selected, high-achieving students the opportunity to further develop their analytic, critical thinking and research skills. As juniors, Honors Program students take three writing- and research-intensive courses on media theory, research and issues. A thesis workshop prepares students for an independent project of original scholarship or creative work during the senior year. The Honors Program’s unique courses help participants connect across the School’s majors.

“THE SOJC HONORS PROGRA M GIVES THESE STUDENTS A S M A L L- C L A S S , CO H O R T E X P E R I E N C E W H E R E T H E Y I M P R OV E T H E I R R E S E A R C H , W R I T I N G A N D P R E S E N TAT I O N S K I L L S – T H E S K I L L S T H AT A L L CO M M U N I C AT I O N S P R O F E S S I O N A L S N E E D.” 12

P R O F E S S O R K I M S H E E H A N , S O J C H O N O R S PR O G R A M D I R EC TO R


MEDIA STUDIES FAC U LT Y R E SE A R CH A R E A S “THE MEDIA STUDIES M A JOR PROVIDES A HOLISTIC APPROACH TO LE ARNING BY ALLOWING STUDENTS TO ACHIE VE A DEEP UNDERSTANDING OF MEDIA WITHOUT SPECIALIZING IN ANY SINGLE ARE A OF PROFESSIONAL STUDY. IT INTEGRATES THE LIB ERAL ARTS A SPECT OF EDUCATION WITH THE PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS THAT PREPARE STUDENTS FOR JOBS IN THE 2 1ST CENTURY.” PR O F E S S O R , J O H N L . H U LT E N G CH A I R IN MEDIA ETHICS AND MEDIA STUDIES A R E A D I R EC TO R TOM B I V I N S

Communication and Democracy Cultural Studies Gender, Race and Class in the Media Globalization and New Media Media Ethics Media History Media Law Media Literacy Media and Society Political Economy of Media

K A I T LY N CH O CK ’ 1 4

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------H OM E TOW N Hilo, Hawaii M A J O R (S) Media Studies, Public Relations and Humanities L AT E S T I N T ER N S H I P E X PE R I E N CE

PR intern, Mobility Public Relations, Lake Oswego, Oregon

S O J C AC T I V I T I E S External Relations Committee project manager, PRSSA; business communications director, Allen Hall Public Relations; intern, adidas America, Portland Experience program

“It’s an amazing journalism school at the heart of this amazing community that is the University of Oregon. It’s big enough that you can find your niche, but small enough that you’re not just a number. I can’t imagine being happier anywhere else.”

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M OV E F R OM CL A SS R O OM TO C A R E E R

#LifeAsAJGrad begins on your first day of #LifeAsAJStudent. Each new experience leads to new opportunities beyond the classroom. The steps are small at first – going to office hours, meeting a professional advisor, attending a meeting – but every action builds on itself. You’ll take larger steps – a committee role, a published piece, an informational interview, your first internship. You lengthen your stride, then graduation looms and you look back on the distance you’ve covered – leadership positions, multiple internships, a robust portfolio, an ever-widening network of friends and colleagues in the field.

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Ellie Boggs ’13 decided to pursue the public relations sequence after attending a Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) meeting. She joined the UO chapter and ultimately served on the National PRSSA Committee as national vice president of career services in her final terms at SOJC and for several months after she graduated. In that role, she helped oversee more than 300 PRSSA chapters with 11,000 students across the U.S. “PRSSA trained me as a professional and a leader, exposed me to the larger public relations industry and allowed me to meet some very close friends (and now fellow PR professionals) from across the country,” she said. “Involvement in PRSSA influenced the course of my career and opened up many doors in the professional world.” Ellie also interned at several organizations and businesses during college, which she believes was beneficial for securing later internships and jobs. “Skills build over time, so gaining experience in college is important for growing into a professional who can perform at the level necessary to get a public relations job full-time after graduation,” she said. After graduating, Ellie continued to gain internship experience at the U.S. Army’s Leader Development and Assessment Course communications team and Edelman’s corporate and public affairs team in Seattle. She is now a legislative assistant for Oregon State Sen. Richard Devlin, handling all aspects of his office including communications, policy, scheduling and constituent relations.

“ W I T H A J O U R N A LI S M D EG R EE , YO U H AV E T H E SK I LL S TO EN T ER M A N Y, M A N Y D I FFER EN T FI ELD S .”

Ellie advises upcoming SOJC graduates not to limit themselves in their job searches. “With a journalism degree, you have the skills to enter many, many different fields,” she said. “Just because you thought you would land at a global agency doesn’t mean those are the only jobs you should go after.”

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ETHICS I N N OVAT I O N ACT I O N

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1930: Dean Allen established the first graduate program in journalism in the Northwest at the school. 1931: Students began airing radio broadcasts, with the first radio course added in 1938. 1944: Allen died, after serving as dean for nearly 30 years, the longest tenure of any dean since. He oversaw the study of journalism change from a mechanical, skills-oriented practice to a professional experience requiring the kind of knowledge gained through a complete education.

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1950: FCC authorized a campus radio station where students worked for credit and experience. 1954: The first Allen Hall was built; at the time, it was one of the largest journalism education buildings in the U.S. and one of first constructed especially for journalistic training.

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1962: First communications research faculty hired. 1964: Development of existing public relations courses into a full, accredited sequence started. 1971: The Daily Emerald became student-controlled and student-operated, independent of the university. MID-1970s: Public Relations Student Society of America chapter established, the first in the Northwest District.

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LATE 1970s: First computer lab opened at school. 1980: First female professor to hold fulltime, tenure track position. 1986: Allen Hall Advertising, a student-run agency, established. 1980s: Undergraduate curriculum revamped to prepare students for more advanced work in writing, information gathering and visual communication.

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1990 - 1999

1990: An open computer workroom for general student use built. 1994: Ph.D. program debuted. 1998: The Ancil Payne Awards for Ethics in Journalism and The Charles Snowden Program for Excellence in Journalism established.

2000 - 2009

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2004: Media in Ghana program became a UO-only program after operating jointly for four years with University of Kansas. 2006: Portland Senior experience program launched at the Turnbull Center. 2009: Pilot of Gateway to Media, a multimedia storytelling course series to teach digital-age skills, required of all majors; it replaced a series of courses developed in the 1980s.

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2013: Allen Hall 3.0 opened, a $15 million expansion and upgrade for a growing program of journalism education in the digital age; UNESCO Institute for Intercultural Dialogue and Conflict-Sensitive Reporting at UO and the School of Journalism and Communication established. 2014: Two recent graduates shared in Pulitzer Prizes, bringing to 13 the number of winners with roots at SOJC. Former New York Times multimedia editor Andrew DeVigal hired as first Chair of the Center for Journalism Innovation and Civic Engagement to continue to advance SOJC as an international leader in media research and practice.

2010 - 2014

1976 - 1989

1960 - 1975

1945 - 1959

1930 - 1944

1901 - 1929

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1901: First course in journalism offered at the University of Oregon. 1912: Seattle newspaperman Eric Allen arrived to guide infant journalism program, among the first in the nation. 1916: Program raised to status of a School of Journalism by the university’s Board of Regents with Allen as the first dean; he and two part-time instructors also taught all five courses. 1923: The School moved into its first new building after making do in several old and ramshackle structures; it remained at that site until the original Eric W. Allen Hall was built in 1954.

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SH OWC A SE YO U R SELF Portfolio development is a vital part of your education here at the SOJC. We promote a symbiotic relationship between classroom projects and media-related extracurricular activities. Each enhances the other while honing your skills and building your brand. Graduating with a strong portfolio will set you apart in today’s job market.

FLU

SPRING 2013 UNIVERSITY OF OREGON SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATION

20 YEARS OF PUBLICATION EXCELLENCE FLUX Magazine is an award-winning print publication that delivers gripping feature stories and stunning photos; the associated FLUXstories.com is its multi-platform media channel. Most recently, FLUX won the 2013 Magazine Pacemaker Award from the Associated Collegiate Press, one of the most prestigious for college media, and a Gold Crown from the Columbia Scholastic Press Association.

OFF-CAMPUS

CLASH University neighborhoods struggle to balance demand with livability

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FLU X

O R M AG A ZI N E THE FIRST COLLEGE TABLET PUBLICATION SOJC students are redefining digital publishing with OR Magazine, the first university student-produced magazine designed for the iPad using Adobe Systems’ Digital Publishing Suite. Students created the magazine in a 2011 mobile media production course, shortly after iPads came to market. The SOJC is one of three universities whose students have access to the same enterprise software tools used by Conde Nast and Time Warner publishing. Our students’ innovative work in the Spring 2013 edition won four Columbia Scholastic Press Awards.


P U B L I C AT I O N S

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CHALLEN G E YO U R SELF The old adage “Try it; you might like it” holds true in career development, and internships are a hands-on way to road test your career. You gain extensive mentorship and training from seasoned professionals, the opportunity to put classroom learning into practice, and an invaluable preview of your chosen career path. In addition to Eugene-area experiences during the school year, SOJC students intern regionally, nationally and internationally to improve their career readiness. As one of the premier journalism programs in the nation, we have extensive partnerships with media organizations around the world, at which students participate in established competitive internship programs.

SN OW D EN TRANSFORMING OREGON JOURNALISM The Charles Snowden Program for Excellence in Journalism has placed students in summer internships in media outlets throughout Oregon for 17 years. “Snowdens” land jobs at top media outlets throughout the world because they embrace great storytelling.

P O RT L A N D SEN I O R E X PER I EN CE TAPPING INTO THE PORTLAND MEDIA MARKET Seniors from all SOJC majors are eligible to apply for the Portland Senior Experience. Administered by SOJC faculty at the school’s George S. Turnbull Center, this term-long internship in Oregon’s largest media center offers the opportunity to participate in specialized careerdevelopment and networking programs. With more than 100 participating employers, the program boasts a job-placement and internship-extension rate greater than 75 percent.

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INTERNSHIPS

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D ISCOVER YO U R SELF What will you do to add value to your journalism classes? What will be your #LifeAsAJStudent moments? The possibilities include double majors, minors, research projects, internships, leadership positions, study abroad, student groups, student trips and more. The choices you make and the experiences you seek create your own unique tapestry. The story you tell will be your own.

CR E AT I V E W EEK N YC Each year 100-plus SOJC students grab the opportunity to attend Creative Week in New York. Agency visits, professional critiques and alumni networking connect students to advertising’s biggest stage.

S CI EN CE & M E MO RY I N A L A S K A Journalism and advertising students and SOJC faculty are in the midst of a three-year project in Cordova, Alaska on the Copper River Delta, making multimedia stories that explain climate-change research and how climate change impacts communities. This storytelling camp is part of the SOJC’s Science Stories initiative, which brings students and scientists together to create credible, accessible stories about area environmental research.

SP O RT S M ED I A WO R K S H O P Student journalists and student athletes together conceptualize, shoot, edit, produce and publish online sports stories for one week each year between Commencement and the start of Summer term. High-level sports and sports-marketing guest speakers contribute their expertise to this collaborative, portfoliobuilding experience. 22


ACROSS THE COUNTRY

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IM MER SE YO U R SELF Select your geography. Where you go will determine when you go, how long you go and what courses you take. The SOJC sponsors programs in Ghana and Austria, and you can choose from almost 200 programs in more than 90 countries offered through the university. SOJC students also explore the world through international internships. Great storytelling – global storytelling – begins at the SOJC.

MEDIA IN GHANA The Media in Ghana program carries the lessons of the SOJC from Allen Hall to Accra, where students work in a variety of media outlets. Engaging with media in different cultural contexts pushes students out of their comfort zones, challenging and expanding their ideas about effective communication.

FO R EI G N CO R R E SP O N D EN CE IN VIENNA Students in the International Vienna Journalistic Interview Program intern at Austrian media outlets and then report stories for publication from Bratislava, Slovakia and Györ, Hungary, applying techniques learned in the classroom.

“ T H IS PR O G RA M O FFER ED T H E A M A ZI N G CH A LLEN G E O F PRACT I CI N G J O U R N A LIS M I N A FO R EI G N CO U N T RY. A F T ER ST R U G G LI N G TO CO N D U CT I N T ERV I E W S I N MY SECO N D A N D E V EN T H I R D L A N G UAG E, ST UM B LI N G T H R O U G H CU LT U RA L D I FFER EN CE S A N D G E T T I N G V ERY LO ST M A N Y T I M E S — A N D M A K I N G FR I EN D S W I T H A WO N D ER FU L G R O U P O F ST U D EN TS A N D PR O FE SS O R S — I FEEL MO R E CO N FI D EN T I N MY M A J O R, MY C A R EER A N D MY FU T U R E .” 24

V I EN N A I N T ER N AT I O N A L J O U R N A LI S T I C I N T ER V I E W PA R T I CI PA N T CH LO E H U CK I N S ’ 1 6 , A DV ER T I S I N G A N D C U LT U R A L A N T H R O P O LO G Y


AROUND THE WORLD

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M AKE THE CALL BE A DUCK

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JOIN THE LEGACY OF INNOVATION. Nothing gives you a better feel for #LifeAsAJStudent than a personal visit to Allen Hall. We welcome the opportunity to show you firsthand how our faculty and students are inventing the future of media.


B E LO N G

The University of Oregon School of Journalism and Communication is a nationally and internationally recognized program on a mission to invent the future of media. Students come to the SOJC from all over the world to experience exceptional education driven by faculty and staff who are known for their creative and professional work, scholarship, innovative teaching and passionate engagement. 27


F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N

------------------------------------------------------------------------Student Services School of Journalism and Communication University of Oregon advising@jcomm.uoregon.edu journalism.uoregon.edu (541) 346-3738

PR OSPEC TIVE STU D ENTS journalism.uoregon.edu/prospective

FA C U LT Y D I R E C T O R Y journalism.uoregon.edu/directory

STUDENT GROUPS journalism.uoregon.edu/student-organizations

SCHOLARSHIPS journalism.uoregon.edu/students/scholarships UO Office of Admissions admissions.uoregon.edu 1 (800) Be A Duck (541) 346-3201

UO DEMOGRAPHICS admissions.uoregon.edu/profile.html

CA MPUS MEDIA journalism.uoregon.edu/student-organizations

E T H I C S I N N OVAT I O N AC T I O N

facebook.com/UOSOJC

J O U R N A L I S M .U O R EG O N . E D U

instagram.com/uosojc

@UOsojc

2014 UO School of Journalism and Communication Viewbook  

For students at the University of Oregon School of Journalism and Communication, it's all about great storytelling.

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