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2013 Bachelor of Architectural Studies Graduation Projects Never Stand Still

Built Environment


34 46 54 110 16 98 99 47 26 90 100 55 66 122 78 17 10 101 67 35 111 36 48 91 27 56 102 79 92 93 124 80 37 28 57 94

Bridget Allen Rheidol Amin Steven Surya Angga Joshua Angsono Bojan Basara Joshua Bell Vincent Besch Yiqing Cai Ming Zhe Cao Hugo Chan Li Li Chan Brian Lok Man Chan Rina Chan Yvonne Chan Joanna Chen Shenghong Chen Wen Chen Nicole Chew Frank Chin Ryan Chung Wade Cogle Lisa-Maree Conlon Linqing Cui Christopher Day Xiaoran Ding Yi Ding Chung Hang Fung Oriana Garcia Patrick Gilling Daniel Harden Angus Hardwick James Hargrave Jeremy Hartono Gilbert Ho Anna Honan Siobhan Hudson

CRICOS Provider Code 00098G

126 81 29 112 82 68 83 18 69 11 38 103 104 70 58 113 19 84 114 12 115 85 39 49 20 13 40 71 59 72 73 41 50 30 116 128

Katherine Irwin Faulks Paul Jewiss Emma Jin Philip Junaeus Freddie Kareh Jonathon Kibble Hee Yeon Kim Lawrence Kim Benjamin Knowles Zixuan Lan Lilia Lanegra Cyril Leung Valerie Leung Jennifer Li Jessica Li Qing Li Ruoshu Lian Yanjia Liao Li Chi Lim Suek Yi Lim Winjing Lim Jacqueline Lindeman Ka Fung Liu Qian Liu Niloofar Meshgini Jacqueline Muliawan Thin Lei Nandar Bryan Nguyen Glecia Octora Junyi Pan Hyun-Min Park Tamara Prochnik Lin Qian Devon Rees Edward Rosier Luen Samonte

74 60 86 130 21 42 105 117 22 118 106 51 95 132 23 75 43 61

Weijie Shen Evan Xuanbo Shen Jock Sinclair Ana Subotic Kevin Suganda Rhys Symington Kieran Taylor Jiajun Tor Lingyu Wang Lu Wang Stephanie Wolff Ka Long Bryan Wong Meng Min Wong Cathy Xu Meng Xu Pui Ming Yeung Anthony Yick Yu Zhang


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Message from the Dean

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Supporters

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Message from the Program Dean Director

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Message Urban Studio from the Dean

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Message Studio Regional from the Dean

120 02

Message from the Dean Honours

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Message Alumni Profile from the Dean

KEEP IN TOUCH @UNSWBuiltEnv facebook.com/UNSWBuiltEnvironment www.be.unsw.edu.au 1


Message from the Dean Professor Alec Tzannes Dean UNSW Built Environment I congratulate all the students who have completed their degree at UNSW Built Environment and now become our alumni. This catalogue conveys through selected study themes and projects from our final year studios something about the unique student experience at UNSW Built Environment along with the outstanding skills of our students and academic staff. UNSW Built Environment is a knowledge leader in the design, delivery and management of the C21st city and its elements. Our research is directly relevant to the development of knowledge within built environment professions and underpins our curriculum. Embedded in the curriculum are core values centered on the thinking and practices required to deliver sustainable urban environments of deep cultural value. Design education in all of its forms, including evidence-based design processes is at the centre of our degrees. This is complemented by the development of discipline knowledge with interdisciplinary design and research orientated projects.

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These projects align with advanced contemporary practices in industry, ensuring that as graduating students you are at the forefront of the built environment professions as innovators and leaders. This year celebrated the establishment of our new school structure comprising ASA+D, the Australian School of Architecture and Design, and AGSU, the Australian Graduate School of Urbanism. ASA+D is the most comprehensive built environment school in Australia with a complete range of undergraduate and postgraduate professional degrees. ASA+D’s sister school, AGSU, is tailored to post-professional study. AGSU is the research engine of the Faculty and was created to fill the gap in the number of leading thinkers on urban issues. This is an exciting time to be part of the UNSW Built Environment community. I wish every graduate a successful and satisfying career. In many respects, our relationship is just beginning. As you travel the world through your work you will meet many alumni and make special bonds of lasting value. We look forward to your ongoing participation in the life of our university and the mutual benefits this brings.


“ I WISH EVERY GRADUATE A SUCCESSFUL AND SATISFYING CAREER. IN MANY RESPECTS, OUR RELATIONSHIP IS JUST BEGINNING. AS YOU TRAVEL THE WORLD THROUGH YOUR WORK YOU WILL MEET MANY ALUMNI AND MAKE SPECIAL BONDS OF LASTING VALUE.”

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Supporters MAJOR SUPPORTER

SUPPORTERS

Built Environment Alumni

EVENT PARTNERS

Built Environment thanks all the donors who support the graduating students’ community fundraising and fundraising events.

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Message from the Program Director Harry Margalit Program Director The educational model for architects followed in the Faculty of Built Environment at UNSW is two-tiered: students complete an undergraduate Bachelor of Architectural Studies, and then proceed to a postgraduate Master of Architecture program which is the pathway to professional registration, or undertake an additional research Honours year. This sequence dictates the kind of education received in the Bachelor of Architectural Studies, which aims to produce graduates who are skilled in the design of mediumscale buildings, and who have been exposed to many facets of the complex and fascinating business of designing, documenting and researching architecture.

and conventions of research. Paul Hogben, coordinator for the entire undergraduate program, has worked in the background, assisting with the preparation of the exhibition and this catalogue. In the end, though, it is about the students. Most enter the degree with a vague notion of what constitutes architecture. To see them, after three years, immersed in its possibilities, is gratifying indeed. To appreciate their varied and refined intentions, underpinned by a technological understanding, is to understand why academics and practitioners are drawn year after year to teaching architecture, and to the process of personal transformation it engenders.

This catalogue documents the culminating products of this first degree – the intensive Year 3 studios which serve to foster an early, idealistic engagement with architectural design and its evocative and poetic possibilities, as well as the research projects undertaken by students in the Honours year. In the studio students select between an urban project, or one sited in a rural landscape with traces of inhabitation. The former project has been conceived and sited by Mark Szczerbicki, a young Sydney architect with a passion for challenging students as they pursue a theme that cuts across the many aspects of urban life that bear upon the site on George Street in central Sydney. The “rural� studio is run, as it has been for a number of years, by distinguished alumnus Professor Glenn Murcutt together with Catherine Lassen. Glenn has an unquenchable enthusiasm for cultivating the heightened sensitivity required to place and develop a building design for a site of singular and sensitive beauty. This year students surveyed, sketched and absorbed a site in the Wollemi National Park west of Sydney to produce the designs within these pages. The tradition of this dual studio has been established over the past few years as a fitting culmination to the three years of the undergraduate architecture degree we offer. The exhibition of work, which takes place under the broader banner of LuminoCity as a faculty showcase, is also testament to the group of tutors who work within each studio. Their commitment to the aims of the studios is exemplary, and crucial to the success of the work. Catherine Bridge has overseen the Honours students, and guided them through the complexities

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COURSE CONVENOR’S STATEMENT

Architectural Studies Urban Studio Design Hub George Street, Sydney Current trends in specialisation of design disciplines, increasing media saturation, the proliferation of digital imagery, and the depersonalisation of individuals through social media and seductive gadgets and devices, have led to a lack of opportunity for creative face-to-face cross-disciplinary dialogue between individual designers. The students who chose the Urban Studio as their graduation project this year were asked respond to these issues by exploring a new type of hybrid building known as a Design Hub, on a vibrant but underdeveloped site on George Street. The main aim of the function of the Design Hub was to facilitate the interaction of designers and researchers with the public and the city in an open and flexible forum. Crucial to the project was a series of tasks exploring the built environment of the site and its surrounds, the history of the formation of the city, as well as current directions in finegrained urban interventions to allow more porosity in existing city blocks. The Urban Studio design process was structured with a series of focused design phases which included:

- The detailed study of the context though a guided walking tour, handdrawing exercises, large-scale group site models and individual research - The exploration of design options through diagrams, physical models and digital techniques - The representation of articulated and resolved buildings culminating in the spatial and material exploration of the schemes through a detailed 1:100 sectional model We commend the students on their dedication and energy, which led to the engaging and vibrant responses displayed in this exhibition catalogue and graduation exhibition. The Urban Studio challenged students with a project of an unfamiliar scale and complexity. It provided them with an opportunity to critically engage with exploring the interaction of architectural design, identity and urban design in the city of Sydney. As a graduation studio it is crucial for students to become more familiar with urban frameworks, contexts, systems and aspirations that inform ideas and underpin issues facing us now and into the future. Thank you to the students, tutors and studio guests for contributing to the achievements of this year’s Urban Studio.

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COURSE CONVENER Mark Szczerbicki STUDIO TUTORS Jason Border Reg Lark Vivianne Marston Suzannah Potts Ted Quinton Brent Trousdale

STUDIO GUESTS Ray Brown Richard Cole Peter Couvaris Sing Darcy Chris Freeborn Miriam Green Laura Harding Adele Issac Ramin Jahromi Galina Kuznetsova Andrew Lamond Albert Lopez Emily Maclurin Kevin Mak Harry Margalit James McCarthy Phil Moore Evan Pearson Brad Swartz James Tonkin Felipe Torrez Shaun Tran Lindsay Webb David Welsh Bruce Yaxley

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Jason Border Philip D Adams Du (Brendan) Bangzheng Yehuda Leib Bassin Wen Chen Shixiao Hao Xianju Huang Zixuan Lan Suek Yi Lim James Bernard Paviour Jacqueline Muliawan Zhiyuan Sun Zhefeng Xu

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Wen Chen Design Hub The main concept is ‘interconnection’. The Design Hub is separated into two parts with different functions, the aim of which is to bring together students, academics, researchers, professionals and industry representatives from a wide range of disciplines and provide opportunities for them to work together, and also facilitates interaction with the public and the city in an open and flexible form.

Email chenwen900614@sina.com Phone 0423 498 893 URL http://chenwen-wendy.blogspot.com.au

A. George Street perspective B. Ground floor plan C. Lobby

A

B

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C


Zixuan Lan Desigh Hub

Email Henrik-Lam@hotmail.com Phone 0433 003 227

Located between George Street and Wynyard Lane, this robust sandstone gateway responds to Sydney’s sandstone heritage, serving as a connection between hectic civic life and the quiet laneway. A sunken gallery becomes an intersection between the public realm and the academic section. The blurred distinction between public and private makes it an interesting place to be in.

A. Overall perspective B. Street level public piazza C. Sunken gallery

A

B

C

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Suek Yi Lim Urban Lightness The proposed building is seen as a body system that opens up relationships with the city, a fusion between architecture and context, people and design. The design embodies an interpretation of transparency and lightness in a dense, heavy and historical context.

Email sueyi0707@hotmail.com Phone 0416 884 267 URL www.sueyi0707.blogspot.com.au

A. B. C. D.

A

Front facade at night Entrance and the laneway Third level of the library Gallery and exhibition space

B

C

D

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Jacqueline Muliawan Design Hub

Email Jacqueline.muliawan@yahoo.com Phone 0430 185 019

Push and pull as the main concept of this project was inspired by the combination of green space and the busy road of George Street. The grand stairs are located outside the building to connect the ground floor to the upper gallery level. Interactive functions at ground level are intended to encourage people to use and activate the new laneway through the building.

A. George Street perspective B. View from above C. Building entrance and new laneway

A

B

C

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Reg Lark Bojan Basara Shenghong Chen Lawrence Kim Ruoshu Lian Niloofar Meshgini So Hyeon Park Gu Shou Kevin Suganda Lingyu Wang Meng Xu

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Bojan Basara Design Hub

Email bojanbasara@hotmail.com Phone 0435 023 915

This design was inspired by the existing composition of George Street and the desire to enhance the vertical and horizontal nature of the streetscape. Some of the materials at entry level pick up on the original brickwork seen in the older buildings. To modernise the buildings and interact with users, a composition of cubes is used for both outlook as well as artwork display.

A. View from George Street B. View into the foyer space C. Flexible gallery space

A

B

C

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Shenghong Chen Urban Design Hub

Email henry.chan@live.cn Phone 0430 189 068

This design attempts to create a contextual relationship between the new building and its neighbours. Louvres at mid-level are a form of passive environmental control.

A. B. C. D. E.

Library front Laneway Urban lobby View from street Facade

A

B

C

D

E

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Lawrence Kim Design Hub

Email law.k@hotmail.com

After identifying the site’s major issue as the limited amount of sunlight it receives (due to neighbouring buildings), the project’s central aim was to eradicate this problem. This approach resulted in a central void in the design, in an attempt to receive and maintain daylight within the site and building.

A. George Street perspective B. Daylight flow diagram C. Lobby view from main entrance

A

C

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B


Ruoshu Lian Design Hub

Email lianruoshu@gmail.com Phone 0424 696 937

The idea for this building was drawn from an interest in Nambo Park in Osaka, Japan. An organic curve was carved into the square site. The laneway was opened from the right bottom corner to the left top corner in order to draw people to the square. The curve was covered with a glass screen to reflect sunlight from the north.

A. Front elevation B. George Street perspective C. Interior hall

A

B

C

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Niloofar Meshgini Design Hub

Email niloomsg@yahoo.com Phone 0450 758 600

This project interprets aspects of the urban surroundings in the creation of the Design Hub. The design considers hidden and exposed qualities, solid and void patterns and materiality. The aim is to create a public domain which serves to amplify social and educational connections between people.

A. George Street perspective B. George Street section C. Model

A

B

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C


Kevin Suganda Design Hub

Email kevin_suganda@hotmail.com Phone 0487 346 772

Inspired by the rice terraces of Tegalalang in Bali as well as Rem Koolhaas’ Bordeaux house, the proposed building is an experiment in form and openness.

A. B. C. D.

A

Street view Foyer Bird’s eye view Site plan

C

D

B

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Lingyu Wang Light Hub

Email jingj1991@msn.com Phone 0401 870 811

This project is about light and contrast. The left tower, with a regular form, is clad with stone. The right tower, with an irregular form, is covered with shaped glass. The wall of the left tower provides reflected light to the right tower. Different materials and forms are meant to represent the contrast between the new and the old architecture in this part of the city.

A. George Street perspective B. Section C. Lobby view

A

B

C

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Meng Xu Design Hub - A live moment

Email moexu@yahoo.com Phone 0430 855 213

Following the peripheral circulation, you will explore a live moment different from the experience you might have of simply standing or sitting inside. Ramps, corridors and stairs allow people to walk outside and experience the sensations of the city. The outside circulation path is partly covered by louvres, which, whilst shading elements, also create a strong visual effect for the building.

A. Model B. Day-time view C. Night-time view

A

B

C

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Vivianne Marston Yunis Asaad Ming Zhe Cao Xiaoran Ding Gilbert Pak Yan Ho Weiwei Emma Jin Devon Rees Chen Tian Jiahang Wu Mengwen Zhang

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Ming Zhe Cao Design Hub

Email galencmz@163.com Phone 0430 730 088

For this building, a double-skin is used for environmental purposes. Columns lift the building up, creating a striking view into the building from George Street. A central cafeteria provides a focus point, drawing people into an enjoyable common area and into social contact with each other.

A. George Street facade B. George Street perspective C. Lobby

A

B

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C


Xiaoran Ding Urban Passage This Design Hub is based on an analysis of the surrounding urban context. In such a dense area of the city, the merging of natural greenery and the building will create a series of contiguous vertical gardens that will provide its users with important contact with nature and the pleasures and benefits that come with this.

Email xiaoran_cheerful@hotmail.com Phone 0452 077 168 URL xiaoranding.blogspot.com

A. Section B. View from George Street C. Laneway entrance

A

B

C

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Gilbert Ho Design Hub The Design Hub, situated in the busy CBD of Sydney, consists of brightly coloured and structurally exposed building blocks. Its multifaceted block design aims to inspire passersby and stir their imagination as to what other building forms might be created within this system.

Email gilbert.ho.architecture@gmail.com Phone 0450 231 448 URL http://gigglehoarchi.blogspot.com.au

A. View from George Street B. Foyer space C. Front section

A

B

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C


Emma Jin Design Hub

Email Emmajin386@hotmail.com Phone 0424 182 822

Design Hub should be a place for gathering, sharing ideas and bringing creative people together. The main concept behind this design is the creation of an open and transparent ground plane which will allow maximum pedestrian flow. For this, the building sits on a supporting structure that lightly touches the ground.

A. Perspective B. Activity within middle open space C. Main foyer

A

B

C

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Devon Rees Design Hub

Email devon.angela.rees@gmail.com

My key concept was to create three towers with voids separating them for sunlight and ventilation. The two end towers hold the secondary spaces within them. The glassy middle tower contrasts with the others and holds the primary creative (studio), learning (lecture theatre) and workshop spaces. A large tree in the studio voids creates a tranquil connection to the outdoors.

A. B. C. D.

A

View from George Street Section through primary building Studio space void Foyer and urban lounge

B

C

D

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Suzannah Potts Bridget Allen Ryan Chung Lisa-Maree Grace Conlon Jeremy Hartono Jae Hyun Hwang Lilia Ines Lanegra Ka Fung Liu Thin Lei Nandar Tamara Prochnik Rhys Sidney Symington Yuming Wei Ho Hei Yick

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Bridget Allen Design Hub

Email bridget.allen92@gmail.com Phone 0412 668 539

Design Hub, situated in George Street, Sydney, is a bold intervention which consists of one large folded concrete plate. The undulating wrapped structure creates an opportunity for unique architectural experiences, both on the sloping outside edges of the facade as well as the curved pockets of space within.

A. Approach to building B. Pool and entrance C. Elevation

A

B

C

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Ryan Chung Design+Hub Sydney Design+Hub Sydney is an exciting new commercial entity located along the central circulation spine of George Street near Circular Quay. It is a semieducational space that provides a place where creative minds can begin their journey towards a more creative world. It boasts a triple level gallery space and double height design library that promotes community interaction. The Design+Hub Sydney is a perfect place to begin unlocking your creative juices and reside in the heart of Sydney’s CBD with the provision of top end student accommodation, all of which attempts to maximise sustainable use through architectural orientation and communal activity.

A

B

A. B. C. D.

Front elevation Section 1 Section 2 Perspective

C

D

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Lisa-Maree Conlon The Hub

Email lisamareeconlon@yahoo.com.au Phone 0430 442 906

The Hub responds to Sydney’s central spine through the concept of movement and travel through the grid-like streets of Sydney. A break to this pattern at Old Governor’s House informs the design in the sense that it contains a series of learning platforms that open up the building in an outward civic gesture.

A. George Street perspective B. Conceptual images C. Ground floor/Laneway plan

A

B

C

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Jeremy Hartono Design Hub

Email jeremy.hartono@yahoo.com Phone 0450 883 859

The design incorporates all the needs of this hybrid building. The design approach started by dividing the building into three different sections: public, semi-private, and private. Public spaces such the lobby, cafeteria and gallery were placed at the podium. Above, semi-private and private spaces are towards the left of the site.

A. Main facade street view B. View towards the main entrance C. Overall view below the awning

A

B

C

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Lilia Lanegra Interactive Design Hub

Email lanegra.lilia@gmail.com Phone 0423 739 537

This design hub will be a place for creative design and design research in the heart of the city. My design ensures that students are provided with space in which to engage in collaborative, interdisciplinary thinking and learning. The lane has a strong relationship with the life of the city and passing crowds. My design concept is derived from interests in interaction and transparency.

A. B. C. D.

Front view Ground plan Internal space of lane Isometric

A

B

C

D

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Ka Fung Liu The Laneway The Laneway consists of two towers in order to open up the site to greater amounts of sunlight. Combining Sydney’s sandstone with a transparent glass box suggests an interaction between the past and future. The sandstone will stand out during the day while the vivid light in the glass box will stand out at night. The laneway under the glass box will provide its users with visual delight in seeing light and materiality at play at different times of the day.

Email jed-liu@hotmail.com Phone 0435 949 919 / +852 6278 3678 URL http://anselmjedliu.blogspot.com.au

A. B. C. D. E.

A

George Street perspective Gallery space and laneway underneath Grand lobby Laneway entrance on George Street Entrance in the laneway

C

D

B

E

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Thin Lei Nandar Design Hub

Email thinleinandar@gmail.com Phone 0423 033 328 URL thinleinandar.blogspot.com.au

A. George Street view B. Conceptual diagram C. Laneway

A

B

C

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Tamara Prochnik Sydney Design Hub

Email tamaraprochnik@gmail.com Phone 0406 625 537

This design was inspired by the history of George Street and aims to blend the old and the new together. Marking the entrance with the last remaining terrace from the 19th century, this design takes visitors through a historical experience. Using notions of proportion, repetition, pattern making and rhythm, this building uses materials and panelling to evoke a sensory experience.

A. External view B. Entrance C. Lobby

A

B

C

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Rhys Symington BARCODE

Email z3332778@student.unsw.edu.au

Through a reaction against the conformity of the context, BARCODE was born. Its design directly links user experience with spatial awareness, as each space is unique. To further provoke distinctiveness, an integration of public art as well as an alternation between heavy and light facade treatment is used. This visual interest draws the eye upward and beyond the ground plane.

A. Building facade as seen from eye level B. The internal urban lounge and reception C. Public art with George Street frontage

A

B

C

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Anthony Yick Design Hub

Email anthonyyhh@gmail.com Phone 0424 397 534

Design Hub is a place for interdisciplinary interaction among students, activated by workshops, studios and residences. Design products can be exhibited to the public as a synthesis of those activities embodied in the Hub.

A. B. C. D.

A

Section Concept drawings George Street elevation Perspective

C

D

B

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Ted Quinton Mohammad Rheidol Amin Yiqing Cai Linqing Cui Bin He Xue Jia Qian Liu Lin Qian Ka Long Wong Ziheng Zeng Xiaojuan (Christine) Yang

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Rheidol Amin The Hub The Hub is Sydney’s newest design precinct. It is a place for creative production and presentation. A flexible program is introduced to promote a collaborative approach to design and provide a forum for creative exchange. The Hub’s dynamic volume of shifting floor plates and large voids was inspired by the study of Sydney’s city edge and pedestrian movement.

Email rheidolamin@gmail.com Phone 0434 007 437 URL http://issuu.com/rheidolamin

A. Concept diagrams B. Front facade C. Library

A

B

C

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Yiqing Cai Running Hub This Design Hub is based on a simple interior arrangement, with a central service area and free space around it. Bookshelves are located beneath the main staircase, inviting people to sit and read in the open lobby space.

Email cyq9shadow@sina.com Phone 0403 114 639 URL http://cai3329099.blogspot.com.au

A. George Street perspective B. Model C. Interior lobby

A

B

C

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Linqing Cui Urban Playground This design hub is named ‘Urban Playground’, trying to delivery playfulness and fun to the busy city context. The key design features are two vertical gardens and two skylights. People on every floor can enjoy the freshness of airflow and the green garden. The titanium facade will create a play of light and shadow.

Email chobitsclq@gmail.com Phone 0425 211 014 URL http://linqingcui-chennedy.blogspot.com.au

A. B. C. D. E.

A

Perspective Ground floor cafe restaurant Glass circulation area First floor bookshop cafe Close-up view of bookshop cafe

C

D

B

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E


Qian Liu Design Hub

Email 359562202@qq.com Phone 0411 347 136

The facade of the Design Hub is the main visual element with its horizontal bands accentuating the structure; it is a sophisticated light regulator and classic sunshade. The laneway linking George Street and Wynyard Lane is designed like a city garden intended as a place of comfort and relaxation. Another feature is the seating space inside the building facing George Street and the city view.

A. Building facade B. Laneway C. Sectional model

A

B

C

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Lin Qian Design Hub

Email qqianlin@hotmail.com

The Design Hub is a new type of hybrid building which includes a series of functional areas. It is designed to become a communicational environment that facilitates research, exhibition, discussion and the critique of design. The ideas behind the building are transparency and flexibility. Corten steel is used in the building to represent the urban situation.

A. Perspective from George Street B. Break-out space for open studio C. Street perspective and laneway

A

B

C

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Ka Long Bryan Wong Sydney Design Hub

Email w_www234@hotmail.com Phone 0424 493 976

For this project, a particular language - ‘Line movement’ - is used throughout the building, a language drawn from the work of Enric Miralles and Carme Pinos. One of the main features of the building is the ‘Mixed studios’, two-storey high spaces with design studios on the bottom and ‘Tree-house accommodation’ at the top.

A. George Street perspective B. Concept drawing (Line movement) C. ‘Mixed studios’

A

B

C

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Brent Trousdale Steven Surya Angga Lok Man Chan Yi Ding Anna Honan Yangtian Jin Yuen Ki Jessica Li Yue Lu Glecia Octora Xuanbo Shen Duc Phuc Tran Yu Zhang

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Steven Surya Angga Design Hub

Email steven_angga@hotmail.com Phone 0430 829 993 URL stevenang93.blogspot.com.au

Establishing relationships between different spaces is crucial in creating a design hub. Separation of the programs, visible within the building facade, brings light and ventilation, as well as allowing the occupants to see activities occurring on other levels. The central circulation is exposed to the outside in order to further dramatise the internal life of the building. A. Exterior view B. George Street elevation, exposed central circulation C. View of the production and studio spaces

A

B

C

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Brian Lok Man Chan Design Hub Agglomeration and Interaction

Email brianclm@hotmail.com Phone 0406 195 761

Design Hub, a place for designers to meet the public. The building provides platforms for mutual interaction and promotes the exchange and sharing of ideas. In conjunction with Angel Place, where art shows and performances take place, the building seeks to enhance this artistic and creative pocket within the city. A. Section B. George street perspective C. Ground floor foyer

A

B

C

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Yi Ding Design Hub The core of the building is a central void cut through the volume from top to base, which helps to achieve good ventilation and sunlight penetration. The void also provides opportunities to organise circulation and spaces instead of using conventional walls for spatial separation. This serves to enhance interaction between the building’s users, which can be conducive to creative activity.

Email yiding04@gmail.com Phone 0449 526 288 URL http://dingyi04.blogspot.com.au

A. George Street perspective B. Lobby, the ‘urban lounge room’ C. Section through the central void

A

B

C

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Anna Honan Design Hub - Erudition

Email anna_honan@hotmail.com Phone 0410 200 889

Providing an interface between designers and the public, this building achieves its goal via five volumes; public, production, private, study and transition. These five volumes surround a skylight at the centre of the site. They are defined by green outdoor spaces and connected to two circulation voids, enabling a rich overlap between all zones.

A. Section parallel to George Street B. George Street perspective C. Concept

A

B

C

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Jessica Li Volumetric Tower

Email lyk.jessica@gmail.com URL artjli.blogspot.com

This design is comprised of slender towers (defined by two on-site laneways) connected by flexible horizontal floor plates. Learning, exhibiting and living areas are distributed throughout the three towers. Elevated podium space linking the towers at multiple points creates new flexible learning space, where the exchange of ideas and interaction among staff, students and artists can happen.

A. B. C. D. E.

A

Engaging with Wynyard Lane Engaging with George Street Interior gallery Section showing public spaces Connection of towers and plates

B

C

D

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E


Glecia Octora Design Hub

Email glecia.octora@gmail.com Phone 0430 888 351

The building is designed to invite the public to participate in experimentation and learning. The grand stairway connects to the gallery while also providing an opening to the theatre underneath. A central atrium, located between the two towers, opens up to spaces inside both buildings and also the city. The proposed laneway to Wynyard Lane houses a cafĂŠ designed to attract pedestrians coming from Wynyard Station. A. George Street perspective B. View to swimming pool above C. Entrance view to proposed laneway

A

B

C

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Evan Xuanbo Shen Design Hub Project

Email evanspiral@yahoo.com Phone 0433 317 198

The projected building consists of two parts, divided by the public laneway connecting George Street to Wynyard Lane, accommodating a variety of functions including gallery, library, shop, store, theatre, restaurant, fitness facilities, apartments, studios and workshops. The central aim is to provide a forum for the public to become more involved and closer to the production of art and design.

A. B. C. D.

A

George Street perspective Laneway central courtyard George Street elevation Back laneway elevation

C

D

B

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Yu Zhang Design Hub

Phone 0430 128 788 URL http://zhangyuvera.blogspot.com.au/

In this design, the site has been split into three main parts in order to separate the public and private spaces of this mixed-use building.

A. George Street perspective B. Section C. Ground floor plan

A

B

C

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COURSE CONVENOR’S STATEMENT

Architectural Studies Regional Studio Recreational Facility Dunn’s Swamp ‘Ganguddy’, Wollemi National Park, NSW Students who selected this studio had the opportunity to visit and study ‘Ganguddy’ or Dunn’s Swamp, a constructed waterway created in the late 1920s when Kandos weir was built to service the nearby Kandos cement works. Although this dam in the Wollemi National Park initially served local industry, it is now also valuable in the Rylstone, Kandos and Mudgee area as a significant landscape, important ecologically and in terms of regional tourism. Structured by roads, parking areas and existing camping facilities, the site for the students’ hypothetical project near the water’s edge is surrounded by towering sandstone pagoda rock formations. The physical conditions in combination with the striking beauty of this landscape offered specific criteria for testing students’ architectural thoughts. Each designed a recreational facility with accommodation for thirty-two visitors plus two researchers. Additional communal dining and relaxing, kitchen and service rooms were required as well as a small library. On-site caretaker accommodation formed another part of the overall complex, which was required to generate and store its own power and water as well as manage waste on site. Available technologies and their capacity to inform an overall

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architectural conception in coherent alignment with construction detail was an important consideration and students were asked to develop their projects to a substantial level of structural and material resolution. Students’ direct physical and aesthetic experience of a particular landscape, offering a more complex understanding of conditions such as temperature, wind patterns, local flora and fauna and visual qualities, is used in this studio in conjunction with traditional scientific and cultural research including recent and aboriginal history. This encourages an attitude of individual responsibility and critical understanding. Emphasis is placed on drawing as a mode of thinking, to promote thoughtful representation and architecturally embodied content. The students thus search for an argued architectural response to the situation, avoiding one of imposition.


As part of our close relationship with Tongji University in Shanghai, a select group of students accompanied by two tutors attended the regional studio for six weeks. This visit, organised by Professor Wu Changfu and hosted by the Dean, Professor Alec Tzannes, entailed participating in the site visit and camping trip, with an intensive design phase culminating in design presentations before returning to Shanghai. The group was also accompanied by Professors Li Xiangning and Wang Fangji for the first phase, as part of staff exchange initiatives with Tongji University.

COURSE CONVENERS Professor Glenn Murcutt AM Catherine Lassen STUDIO TUTORS Wendy Lewin Ashley Dunn Ian Martin Fergus Scott Jonathan Temple STUDIO GUESTS Angelo Candalepas Matt Chan Anna Ciliberto Kerry Clare Lindsay Clare Richard Cole Neil Durbach Maryam Gusheh Laura Harding James Stockwell Marcus Trimble Professor James Weirick Andrea Wilson Brian Zulaikha

TONGJI STUDIO TUTORS Angelo Candalepas (Sydney) Cen Wei (Tongji) Wang Kai (Tongji) Andrea Wilson (Sydney)

TONGJI STUDIO STUDENTS Zhou Yang You Wei Lu Yiyun Wu Shurui Liu Xiaoyu Zhou Xingrui Feng Qi Zhao Zhengnan Luo linlin Wang Zhili Yang Qianwen Zhu Jingyi Tang Yiming Liu Xu Zhang Yutian Xu Chenpeng Zeng Shun Ma Sai Chen Lingrong Tuo Zhaoxia

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Ashley Dunn Rina Chan Frank M Chin Jonathon J Kibble Benjamin P Knowles Yingyi Li Man Jennifer Li Bryan Nguyen Junyi Pan Hyunmin Park Weijie Shen Puiming Yeung

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Rina Chan Treading water

Email rinaychan@gmail.com Phone 0430 616 817

The site has a beautiful waterline wrapped with a thick layer of reeds. This building introduces a distinctive way to appreciate the surrounding environment. It sits in the water, allowing people to touch the water, see light reflected on the water, look out through the reeds, and feel the movement of nature.

A. Perspective drawing B. Section through accommodation C. Front elevation looking back to pagodas

A

C

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B


Frank Chin Module Integration The recreational centre is influenced by the formation of the sandstone rocks. It hugs and encloses the site, allowing occupants to enjoy the natural landscape. The structural system drives the planning, where a majority of the scheme is formed through modules, allowing prefabrication and flexibility for future site restoration.

Email frankming.chin@gmail.com Phone 0433 049 680 URL http://frankmingchin.wix.com/architecture

A. Site perspective B. Detailed section C. Front elevation

A

B

C

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Jonathon Kibble Dunns Swamp

Email Jonathon.kibble@gmail.com Phone 0431 389 527

Dunns Swamp in the Wollemi National Park is characterised by the unique volumes of the sandstone pagoda rock formations. These masses provide a powerful protective element within the landscape and invite an intimate physical engagement. Through careful incisions within the site a path is provided along the rock face to emphasise their texture and spaces created via inflections along the face.

A. Concept plan B. Sketch section C. Ground floor plan

A

C

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B


Benjamin Knowles Multisensory Interpretation Exploring multisensory interpretation of architecture, this project examines nature’s scale and density with specific regard to the visitor’s experience. Programmatic design, detail and materiality are intended to seamlessly manipulate the visitor’s engagement between the perceived envelope and surrounding natural fabric.

Email bknowles@live.com.au Phone 0410 144 938 URL http://issuu.com/benjaminknowles/docs/ currentundergraduateportfolio

A. Eastern elevation and perceived continuity B. Facade fenestration and layering C. Site position and building form

A

B

C

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Jennifer Li A Shelter

Email z3351525@zmail.unsw.edu.au URL http://jenniferarch1201.blogspot.com.au/

My concept is derived from the feeling of protection and comfort offered by the site. I am interested in creating spaces which capture different views of the landscape and integrate the vegetation into the building which allows visitors to appreciate the site through different perspectives and to create a relationship between the trees and the centre.

A. Concept drawing B. Floor plan C. View to the courtyard garden

A

C

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B


Bryan Nguyen Dichotomy

Email bryan.nguyen@live.com Phone 0432 486 233

Inspired by the rough and jagged nature of the bold rock face, this project explores notions of contrast between nature and built form. Established axes determine the spatial organisation and are highlighted through the use of large concrete walls consisting of waste, electric and water handling but also servicing the communal spaces that ‘hang’ off it.

A. Site approach and spatial organisation B. Ground floor plan C. Section of communal spaces

A

B

C

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Junyi Pan Transparency Elements from the site are reflected in the building. A sense of openness is created within the small volumes to celebrate the surroundings and to stage daily activities.

Email taffe.mil@gmail.com Phone 0449 770 946 URL http://memil.lofter.com

A. Water as an inspiration B. Ground floor plan C. Perspectives illustrating openness

A

C

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B


Hyun-Min Park Framing the Landscape

Email hyunmin.park01@gmail.com Phone 0402 038 398

The visual conflict between man-made linearity and the dishevelled appeal of the natural landscape allows the architecture to exist as a frame that translates the loftiness of the trees, the grandeur of the rocks and the long horizon of land into a human scale. Architectural frames continue into the circulation design where visual cues embellish the journey through the building.

A. B. C. D.

Ground floor plan First floor plan Reed bed waste management system section Bridge to library

A

B

C

D

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Weijie Shen Camp Recreation Centre The main concepts informing my project are the transparency of the site, legibility of the trees and the simplicity of the landscape. A framed view of the rocks and river is integral to the building’s design. The timber structure and courtyard highlight the values of relaxation and enjoyment.

Email mike1991625@hotmail.com Phone 0425 533 222 URL http://weijieshen-mike.blogspot.com.au

A. Hand sketch perspective B. Photomontage with physical model C. Master plan

A

C

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B


Pui Ming Yeung Ripples on Earth Inspired by the pagoda rock formations, this scheme attempts to capture the meandering qualities of the landscape.

Email ypuiming@gmail.com Phone 0450 832 689 URL http://ypuiming.blogspot.com.au

A. Site sketches B. Working section C. Plan

A

B

C

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Wendy Lewin Joanna Q Chen Jessica Ida Gottlieb James Arthur Clive Hargrave Oriana Carolina Garcia Hernandez Paul Jewiss Jacqueline Lindeman Yanjia Liao Frederick Francis Kareh Heeyeon Kim Jock Sinclair Kavya Srinivasan

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Joanna Chen Dunns Swamp Recreational Centre

Email joannaqnchen@gmail.com Phone 0424 205 522 URL http://joannaqnchen.blogspot.com.au/

Inspired by the idea of motion, as it is permeated through the interlayering of pagoda-tree-lake formation in Dunns Swamp, this design is to imitate the rhythm of movement between solid masses, as pathways branch out to different spaces in relation to psychological pattern and natural context.

A. Interior perspective B. Exterior perspective C. Plan

A

C

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B


Oriana Garcia Email orianagh1@hotmail.com Phone 0423 545 879

A. Concept sketch B. Concept sketch C. Plan

A

B

C

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James Hargrave The Ganguddy Education Facility

Email jachargrave@gmail.com

This project aims to provide a unique and private experience for each user of the facility while respecting its surroundings and the diversity of the landscape.

A. B. C. D. E.

A

B

C

D

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E

Plan Bathroom/Accommodation Site sketch Construction detail Double bed configuration


Paul Jewiss Redwood Original The concept of the scheme was two axes joining off centre, allowing the accommodation wing to follow the ever-changing river line and for the living and service wing to project into the river itself. Sited between the rocks and the river, the scheme allows for public and private realms to co-exist seamlessly in this native Australian landscape.

Email pjewiss@me.com Phone 0400 352 830 URL http://pauljewiss.blogspot.com.au

A. Perspective of accommodation wing B. Perspective of living and service wing C. Floor plan

A

B

C

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Freddie Kareh SAMCRO

Email 3372842@zmail.unsw.edu.au Phone 0424 188 299

The building’s siting allows served spaces to have a direct relationship with either the rock, water, or both. The vicissitudes of temperature see that communal living is not finite, and can be situated around indoor fireplaces or the adjacent sheltered deck. Caretaker/ teacher accommodation is at once private and accessible to provide guests and students with a sense of space and independence.

A. Plan B. Section C. Perspective

A

A

C

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Hee Yeon Kim Dunns Swamp Recreational Centre

Email heeyeon34@gmail.com Phone 0451 309 234 URL http://hykimarchitecture.blogspot.com

Inspired by the topography of the site where striking pagoda rocks harmonise with waterway, the project seeks to create a connection between them to celebrate the nature of the site. The entry of the building opens up the view towards the river and visitors are guided to private accommodation with close contact with the rock. A. On-site sketch B. Cross section through the bedroom C. Floor plan

A

B

C

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Yanjia Liao Nature, Permanence

Email katieykliu@gmail.com Phone 0404 476 994

In this project I aimed to integrate the building with the natural environment. In order to minimise conflict with the surrounding environment, rustic metal sheets and fibre cement cladding are applied. Inspired by the ‘framing’ method used within Chinese gardens, there are several openings to the natural environment which serve as windows and also as naturally decorative pictures.

A. ‘Framing’ window view B. Elevations and section C. Floor plan

A

C

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B


Jacqueline Lindeman Swamp Inn

Email jacqueline.lindeman@gmail.com Phone 0422 786 692

Responding to the strong sense of the horizontal that is central to the character of Dunns Swamp, my scheme attempts to forge an intimate connection to its site. Its strong linear form was conceived as a means to frame the landscape, allowing for one to attain an intimate yet individual experience of the site.

A. Section B. Site sketch C. East elevation

A

B

C

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Jock Sinclair Ganguddy Recreational Centre

Email jockasinclair@gmail.com Phone 0417 345 316

The recreational centre is located alongside the Ganguddy River, providing the accommodation spaces with views both out over the water and back into the bush. Materiality of the sandstone pagoda formations is reflected in the rammed earth construction while the continuous folded landscape is tied to the undulating roof form.

A. Main hall section B. Plan/elevation sketch C. Isometric view

A

C

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B


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Ian Martin Richard W Carter Hugo Chan Christopher J Day Patrick Gilling Daniel Christopher Harden Siobhan Hudson Alyse Hyman Steven W Lam Alisa Parveen Mengmin Wong

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Hugo Chan Shifting Plinths Set gently back against the ancient sandstone formations, a series of small plinths rise, supporting a line of concrete structures, punctuated occasionally by delicate timber structures. The design incorporates a series of strict rectilinear forms, the geometry breaking at set intervals for timber frame window boxes, a private enclosure within each bedroom allowing for contemplation within nature.

Email hugochan12@hotmail.com Phone 0450 393 788 URL www.archugotecture.weebly.com

A. Site plan B. Ground floor plan C. Northern and eastern elevations

A

C

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B


Christopher Day Wollemi

Email chrisjday@iinet.net.au Phone 0428 922 038

The building is embedded into the landscape at the highest point, and from there extends out over the slope. No part of the floor plane touches the ground apart from a series of parallel concrete blades which are used to accentuate the relationship between river and rock. It is heavy yet floats, and is solid, yet has elements of transparency.

A. Floor plan B. Interior of the dining space C. The main hall

A

B

C

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Patrick Gilling Edge

Email pat.gilling@gmail.com Phone 0407 489 544

Conceptually, this project consists of a linear element which redefines the water’s edge, anchored by a sandstone outcrop. A passage between natural rock and man-made concrete brings visitors into a sequence of expansive timber and glazed accommodation spaces which frame the waterway and mountain views beyond. As a counterpoint, a mass concrete wedge provides a ‘cave’ which offers a communal sense of enclosure and retreat. A. Entry perspective B. Concept model C. Entrance/hall sketch plan

A

C

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B


Daniel Harden Directions in Nature

Email danielharden0@gmail.com Phone 0401 036 061

Orientating my scheme north allows for effective sun control via the use of eaves and operable louvres which respond to the existing climate creating a pleasurable yet sustainable living environment. The use of a visually strong yet slightly transparent structure draws similarities to the juxtapositions between the stunning trunks of the angophoras and the profound rock formations on the site.

A. Northern elevation B. Relationship between building and rock formations C. Ground floor plan

A

B

C

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Siobhan Hudson Recreation Facility, Wollemi National Park, Ganguddy

Email Siobhan.h@hotmail.com Phone 0413 996 556

When you visit the quiet Ganguddy, nestling within fragments of Narrabeen sandstone, you can’t help but be moved by their powerful presence. Formed by years of compression, their bands of erosion invite you to reach out and touch. You want to explore the rock’s perimeter and the hollowed spaces between that are created. It was this sense of tactility and public courtyards that I responded to in my design. A. Living and dining pavilion, elevation and section B. Scheme elevation C. View from living and dining pavilion to Ganguddy Beach

A

C

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B


Meng Min Wong Serene Retreat

Email mengmin@live.com.my

This design scheme is to provide a living facility with a relaxed quality. This is done by dissolving the boundary between interior and exterior whereby the interior spaces are literally framed by the rocks and water.

A. B. C. D.

A

Site Model Perspective Plan Section

B

C

D

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Fergus Scott Joshua P Bell Vincent F Besch Lil Chan Nicole Chew Chunghang Fung Cyrilhinyan Leung Valerie Boman Leung Kieran Taylor Stephanie Wolff

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Joshua Bell In my studies I explored the way the natural rock face can help define a third wall of the built element, echoing back to native cave dwellings. Focus was placed on the communal experience of camping and designing a building that allowed its users to have maximum interplay with the site whilst remaining comfortable.

A. Section B. Perspective C. Model

A

C

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B


Vincent Besch Ganguddy

Email vincebesch@gmail.com Phone 0415 264 807

My experience of the site was that of a series of moments: moving between two masses of stone as the view to the site is revealed; a wombat emerging from its burrow nestled between the rocks and the trees; and a tree, its trunk twisted and broken, fallen as it reached north across the riverbank towards the sun.

A. Site plan B. Communal facilities C. River accommodation

A

B

C

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Li Li Chan Dunns Swamp Recreational Centre The concept of Dunns Swamp Recreational Centre is to draw the landscape into the interior with a progression of views. In planning design, two strong axes are used, directing significant views of the site. A courtyard separates the dining hall and library in order to provide a buffer zone between noisy and quite areas. A truss system within the dining hall has a diagonal focus. Materials used are mainly concrete and timber.

Email lcllcly@hotmail.com Phone 0405 088 187

A. B. C. D.

Front view of the building Rear view of the building Accommodation module Floor plan

A

B

C

D

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Nicole Chew A Built Dialogue, with the between and in-between

Email nicolechew9@gmail.com Phone 0406 998 632 URL http://nc-architecture.blogspot.com.au

My scheme explores the form and structure of barbed wire and how it can be sculpted and manipulated to define territory, serenity and space. Functions are strung off the main core/wire to create a skeletal vertebrae and isolation of spaces. Functions are pulled apart to create in-between open spaces for a deeper connection with the site. A. Overall perspective B. Detailed cross section C. Ground floor plan

A

B

C

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Chung Hang Fung The Long Building The Long Building has a minimal footprint and seeks to complement the beauty of nature. Using light timber construction, a long single-level building integrates structure, natural sunlight and rock forms to provide views of the Cudgegong River from most spaces within the building.

Email chfung1991@gmail.com Phone 0450 806 619 URL http://fchas.wordpress.com

A. The rock B. Riverside C. Plan

A

C

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B


Cyril Leung Barrier-free Recreational Centre

Email CyrilhyLeung@Gmail.com Phone 0403 631 998

A recreational centre in the Swamp should be designed to provide everyone, including people with less mobility, a brilliant experience of nature. Barrier-free design is the major approach used for this project. With clear and wide circulation paths and a ramp leading to a lookout six metres above the water, all visitors will have the same opportunity to enjoy the views and experience the place.

A. Parti diagram of circulation B. Detail of doors and signage C. Barrier-free circulation system

A

B

C

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Valerie Leung A Building that Captures Views

Email valleungbm@gmail.com Phone 0466 408 078

The recreational centre is situated in a sandstone region of Dunns Swamp. The elevated timber building is a lightweight construction which minimises any disturbance of existing native plants. The exposed horizontal and vertical structural elements create a series of frames in a linear manner, capturing the view of the river and the rock on both sides.

A. Floor plan B. Section C. Northeast elevation

A

C

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B


Kieran Taylor The Courtyard

Email taylor.krn@gmail.com Phone 0432 841 627

The Courtyard design is based on the generation of communal spaces. While the private bedrooms face a secluded landscape, the public spaces are focussed inward onto a natural bush courtyard. A high, operable rammed earth wall protects the privacy of the lightweight timber complex while echoing the monumentality of the rock face, leaving the waterfront for public use.

A. Site plan B. Courtyard perspective C. Site section with rock backdrop

A

B

C

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Stephanie Wolff Ganguddy Centre

Phone 0421 792 757

My scheme intends to present the inhabitants with an intimate connection with the site, in particular the rock face and swamp views. Inspired by the work of Andresen O’Gorman, I have explored the possibilities of timber and the notion of adaptable spaces.

A. Site sketch – design inspiration B. Site plan C. Elevation

A

C

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B


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108


Jonathon Temple Joshua Angsono Wade Cogle Philip Junaeus Linda Louise Kennedy Qing Li Lichi Lim Winjing Lim Edward Rosier Jiajun Tor Lu Wang

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Joshua Angsono Prospect, Refuge, Nature

Email joshuaangsono.weebly.com Phone 0425 550 092

The design proposal explores the relationship a person can have with the natural environment. It explores intimacy with the rock pagodas and with the forest. At the same time it provides flexibility and adaptability for different weather conditions.

A. Public perspective B. Accommodation perspective C. Plan

A

C

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B


Wade Cogle Bending to the Earth

Email wadecogle@gmail.com Phone 0433 775 490

Serpentine rock pagodas and delicate reeded riverbanks enclose this unique site. Linearity of plan contrasts nature’s curves, while the ground hugging form bends to the earth. The no maintenance, no fuss, steel and rammed earth huts protect and delight in this climate of extremes. With indoor/ outdoor sustainable living, the scheme strengthens the connection between inhabitant and nature.

A. B. C. D. E.

Perspective of public building Typical section through sleeping quarters Site plan Sketch of typical hut View from internal courtyard

A

B

C

D

E

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Philip Junaeus Connecting with Nature and Times Long Gone By The linear structure emphasises the curvaceous rock formations. Held together by its spine, the building ties together the new with the old, the water with the land. The lower deck, sunken down amongst the reeds, softens the contrast between nature and man. Bathed in light, the upper elevated deck provides prospect as well as interaction. As a constant reminder, the rock wall gently enters this space echoing of times long gone by.

A

C

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Email Philipj85@msn.com Phone 0420 604 472

A. Front facade B. Site plan C. Waterfront detail section

B


Qing Li Walking in the Bush

Email jenniqingli@gmail.com Phone 0420 432 227

The separation of accommodation and public areas forges an intimate interaction between people and the landscape. The inhabitants have to walk across the site in all kinds of weather to reach the library and dining area. The sleeping area is a refuge for the inhabitants surrounded by the beautiful rocks. The public area is exposed to the river.

A. Exterior view of the event hall B. Exterior view of the main entrance and library C. Plan

A

B

C

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Li Chi Lim Transparency and Refuge This design explores transparency. On the site, the trees are thin and their leaves are small. Both vertical and horizontal views are permeable. Hence, while providing a sense of refuge, this building also emphasises transparency and permeability of view and circulation.

Email alissa_llc@hotmail.com Phone 0450 882 042 URL lichilim.blogspot.com

A. Cross section of service area B. Cross section of sleeping area C. Floor plan

A

C

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B


Winjing Lim An Innate Experience

Email wjing_91@hotmail.com Phone 0470 645 344

The design of this scheme mainly revolves around the exploration of the aspects of refuge vs. prospect of the site. It proposes to retain the possible use and activities on site as innate as possible apart from providing its users and the general public unobstructed views towards both the rocks and the swamp.

A. Plan B. Site model C. Cross sections

A

B

C

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Edward Rosier Dunns Swamp

Email edward.rosier@bigpond.com Phone 0488 088 804

The rock provides a space that is protected, allowing views out to Dunns Swamp and the rising mountains beyond. This project aims to provide warm and wonderful spaces that give a connection to the natural environment. Views are focused, not only on the swamp, but also to the textural rock face that surrounds the site.

A. Concept model B. Main floor plan C. Section

A

C

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B


Jiajun Tor The Pagoda Retreat

Email torjiajun_0725@hotmail.com

My design approach is to explore the relationship between building and nature and the spaces between these two. The building orientation takes advantage of the panoramic view of the lake, the morning sun and cooling breeze from the east. The spaces between the building and the rocks are defined uniquely to give different spatial character and experience for the guest.

A. Site plan B. Detailed section of dormitory C. Working model

A

B

C

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Lu Wang The Horizon The design emphasises the linear connection between two entrances formed by natural pagodas, and divides the view into two parts. The long span of the accommodation core provides freedom of choice as to the view.

Email arawang1116@gmail.com Phone 0430 860 022 URL http://arawang.blogspot.com.au

A. Plan B. Detailed section C. Sectional view

A

C

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B


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CONVENOR’S STATEMENT

Honours Program Bachelor of Architectural Studies and Architectural Computing

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The 2013 Bachelor of Architectural Studies and Architectural Computing Honours Program represented a year-long research exploration into an area of architecture of particular interest to the six students whose work is outlined here. While the majority of students enrolled in the Bachelor of Architectural Studies and Architectural Computing programs are professionally practice focussed, these same degree programs are also a wonderful springboard for further academic study at postgraduate level and other forms of career development. Researchers within the Faculty of Built Environment are known for high-quality internationally recognised research in a wide range of subject areas including city building, architectural history, sustainability and design-led research. Students’ supervisors are active researchers who are involved in a wide variety of research activities relating to many aspects of architecture and the built environment. So it is not surprising that the 2013 cohort of honours students’ research theses represents a broad range of subject matter ranging from pure, practice-led and applied approaches to more traditional qualitative, quantitative and mixedmethods techniques, with many seeking to apply architectural scholarship for the betterment of society.

The Bachelor of Architectural Studies and Architectural Computing honours program was designed to enable students to reach a high level of independent critical inquiry, scholarship and to build competence in selecting and applying appropriate research methods. The research work undertaken by our honours students was supervised by a member of our academic staff with research expertise and affords a one-on-one mentoring and learning by doing approach, which is further supported by each student’s selection of a relevant elective. Additionally, running alongside individual supervision is a year-long program of participation in small group work that is designed to foster the skills involved in scholarly enquiry; an in-depth engagement with the relevant disciplinary knowledge in its interdisciplinary context; the ability to engage in independent and reflective learning; information literacy - the skills to appropriately locate, evaluate and use relevant information; a respect for ethical practice and social responsibility; and the skills of effective communication demonstrated and nurtured via a lively discussion and seminar series.

Catherine Bridge Associate Professor

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Yvonne Chan Email yvonnechan.cyw@gmail.com Phone 0430 142 101 URL http://issuu.com/yvonnechancyw/docs/portfolio

The Effect of Urban Open Space Configurations on the Microclimate and Outdoor Thermal Comfort during Winter The increase of ambient temperatures in urban areas (known as an urban heat island (UHI) effect) is strongly correlated with growing urbanisation. Users in urban open spaces are constantly exposed to the dynamic weather conditions, affecting their thermal comfort. Outdoor thermal comfort requires deeper investigation as urban open spaces are an integral part of cities which encourage community engagement and improve users’ physical and mental well-being. The objective of this study is to identify the key variables that influence outdoor human thermal comfort as mediated by different urban open space types during winter in Sydney, Australia. A mixed-method approach is devised for this descriptive study to explore six case study sites with the space types of plaza, pedestrian mall and densely vegetated park. Field measurements of microclimatic conditions, questionnaire surveys on users’ comfort levels and unobtrusive observations were conducted throughout July/August 2013. As opposed to becoming mini cool islands as found in studies conducted during summer in other climate zones, these open spaces are mini heat islands during winter in Sydney and offer greater thermal comfort. Additionally, other variables such as recent thermal experience also influence users’ thermal comfort. Comparisons across the study sites suggest that the height and orientation of surrounding buildings affect the microclimate of urban open spaces and subsequently the users’ overall comfort levels. Further research into this area could potentially develop evidence-based strategies for designers and planners to improve users’ thermal comfort and more importantly, mitigate the UHI effect.

Research supervisor: Dr Paul Osmond A. Study sites located in Sydney, Australia B. Relationship between comfort and sites’ characteristics

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A


B

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Angus Hardwick Email angus.hardwick@gmail.com URL http://lnkd.in/TqtCi6

Children’s Learning Spaces: Pedagogy and Architecture, Two Case Studies in Australian Schooling This thesis was an investigation of architect designed and awarded settings for children’s school learning framed by recent Australian contextual considerations. The lived quality of a child’s learning places is positioned as my investigative ‘matter of concern’. I use the constructive and gathering orientation of Bruno Latour’s actor network theory as a framework for a multimodal inquiry approach. In addition to investigating the literature, the framework allows a case study approach to ground this inquiry. The two case studies selected were the All Saints Grammar Junior School, Sydney, designed by Candalepas Associates, and Penleigh and Essendon Grammar Senior School, Melbourne, designed by McBride Charles Ryan. The case studies were investigated by: engaging children to draw and write about their experiences within their learning setting; empowering teachers to visually document, describe and express their experiences within their workplace; conduct semi-structured extended interviews with architects, school principals, members of a school’s administration, and builders to reveal a project’s intent, development and use; and analyse published material and perspectives on these architecturally awarded spaces and places. In the activity of investigation I became alert to the shifting changes educational organisations and their players endure. This investigation reveals the children respondents to have pointed and firm opinions about their learning place informed by their experiences and that architecture projects would benefit from hearing their voices. The investigation also serves as a reminder alerting architects in their practice to be mindful and inclusive of all players and actors and their voices within a project. Research supervisor: Ann Quinlan A. Investigative model for gathering multiple perspectives B. Drawing by Nicholas, Year 6

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A


B

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Katherine Irwin Faulks Email kate_if@hotmail.com

Designing for Embodied Experience: Sensory Experience and Bodily Engagement in Memorial Architecture Since the twentieth century, a profusion of rhetoric on the relationship between memory and architecture has risen with an increase in the number of memorials being built around the world. In contemporary memorial design in the West, the visitor is increasingly encouraged to engage with the memorial on a multi-sensory level: in this way, the embodied experience becomes an important part of the memory making process. This research-through-design thesis explores how sensory experiences of the body and ritual acts of commemoration can be invoked in memorial architecture. Existing case studies of memorials and memorial museums are analysed, and proposals are then tested through the design process. As the centenary of the first ANZAC’s landing in Gallipoli approaches, the ANZAC Memorial in Hyde Park, New South Wales’ principal State War Memorial, was selected as an appropriate site to test embodied experience, through proposed extensions to the memorial and landscape, that provide meaningful places for people to experience. A

Research supervisor: Dr Russell Rodrigo A. Gallery of Stars, ANZAC Memorial Museum B. Liverpool Street entrance, ANZAC Memorial Museum

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B

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Luen Samonte Email luen.samonte@gmail.com Phone 0488 960 888 URL luen-samonte.blogspot.com.au

Educational Benefits of Service Learning in Architecture: Two Australian Community Engagement Projects Experiential learning holds a significant value for architecture. In spite of this, the institutionalisation of architectural education contributed to the reduced exposure to experiential learning overtime. Within recent years, some schools of architecture started offering design studios with a community engagement component. These community engagement studios, often referred to as service learning, provide educational benefits to student learning. Extensive studies in the United States show that these educational benefits vary from improved career competence, increased awareness of civic responsibility to developed critical thinking. Using two Australian case study projects, the aims of this study were to identify the educational benefits, determine strategies employed and discern the value of the benefits for students. The investigation of the two cases show that there are nuances of benefits under improving career competence, increasing awareness of civic responsibility and developing critical thinking. Under improving career competence, the most significant benefits include exposure to interdisciplinary work and increased understanding of design and construction. Whilst under increasing awareness of civic responsibility, the most significant benefits include understanding of civic responsibility and its impact on individuals and communities. Improved critical thinking and problem solving was the most significant benefit under developing critical thinking. In terms of strategies employed, exposure to other disciplines, teamwork and community engagement were common between the two cases. The value of these benefits for students range from the belief that improved communication skills will contribute to career success to developing a set of skills that ensures better negotiation with clients and other professions in the building industry. The students expressed that their ideal career involves the same level of community engagement. Research supervisor: Associate Professor Linda Corkery A. Sipaia Village Ablutions Composting Facility construction B. Canowindra Connections community consultation

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Ana Subotic Email ana.subotic1@gmail.com Phone 0435 087 660

Le Poeme Virtuel: Imagining Le Corbusier’s Basilica of Peace and Forgiveness In 1948 Le Corbusier drew sketch plans for an underground basilica in a small part of southern France named La Sainte Baume. The basilica, however, was never completed. Working under the question - ‘If you were asked to complete the church, how would you?’ - my research attempts to provide an imaginative visualisation of the project through a study of the project itself as well as the three built churches of Le Corbusier.

Research supervisor: Associate Professor Harry Margalit A. My rendition of the entrance to the basilica B. Le Corbusier’s sketch for the basilica, 1948 A

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Cathy Xu Email Cathy.Xu@live.com.au Phone 0466 826 449

Inherent Characteristics of Expressed Timber Structures: Andresen, O’Gorman and Leplastrier This thesis explores the inherent characteristics of expressed timber structures in Brit Andresen’s Mooloomba House and Richard Leplastrier’s Lovett Bay House. By alluding to the inherent spatial and experiential qualities contained in expressed timber structures, it seeks to contest the common preconceptions surrounding timber’s structural properties. Primary research consisted of interviews, site visits, examination of original drawings and critique of literature. Review of literature by Brit Andresen, Haig Beck and Jackie Cooper revealed the sense of an unfortunate loss of architectural opportunity when eucalyptus hardwood was concealed in stud framing systems. Brit Andresen and Kenneth Frampton’s essays on tectonics provided the theoretical framework for undertaking the two case studies. The theoretical framework was structured around key characteristics, namely, dynamism, tectonic quality and hierarchical order and harmony. The expressed timber structure of Mooloomba House serves to fix the house as much as possible as outdoor rooms in order to amplify the qualities of the site, and to continue an expressive capacity of construction through metaphors of landscape. Lovett Bay House is based upon the notion of a small room occupied within a greater room formed by the surrounding landscape. This led to an adjustable structure attuned to the varying conditions of its natural setting. By observing and experiencing the physicality of the expressed structure the basic underlying themes of both houses makes evident the material properties of local hardwood being pushed to its limit physically and metaphorically. Research supervisor: John Gamble A. Mooloomba House, North Stradbroke Island, Queensland B. Lovett Bay House, Lovett Bay, Sydney

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ALUMNI PROFILE

Christopher Tran BArch Studies, 2011 Architectural Student, Cox Richardson Architecture “I chose the BArch studies degree as I liked the well balanced approach to architectural design; it encourages creative freedom and considers technical application. I was also impressed by the workshop environment which is actively promoted amongst by peers and mentors; it’s always a great forum for discussion and progressing your own learning.

building itself, but for the people who occupy it in future. At the same time, studying Architecture at UNSW has also nurtured deep interests in both sustainable design and heritage building that I never knew I had. It was encouraging to know that the Faculty already had the existing framework and courses to promote my interests, whichever direction they grew towards.

Ultimately, the degree gave me an excellent and well-rounded base of knowledge and skills, on which to build upon after graduation. The high standards involved in the studios and classes, have helped develop and shape the drive, motivation and quality required in real-world practice.

A highlight for me was most definitely the Glenn Murcutt Studio in 3rd year- restorative design of Trial Bay Gaol; it was an incredible privilege to learn under the mentorship of Professor Glenn Murcutt. Studios run by practicing architects, which are a core aspect of the course, are one of the most engaging, challenging and fascinating experiences at BE. These kinds of experiences also give you the opportunity to produce your best work. It therefore stands to reason, that I had the honor of receiving the Castle Mountain Prize for my design in the Glen Murcutt studio and later on the Cox Richardson Architecture Award.

Studying at BE has shaped the way I approach design, especially for real-world clients; every design no matter how big or small, needs to be considered and considered well. We don’t design for the sake of the

My advice to anyone considering studying the BArch at BE would be; don’t be afraid to put yourself out there and try new things during your studies. The skills and knowledge you gain as well as the interactions with people in both academic study and university life at UNSW are incredibly worthwhile and rewarding. You just have to be ready to get out what you put in.”

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Faculty of Built Environment The University of New South Wales Online be.unsw.edu.au Phone +61 2 9385 4799 Email fbe@unsw.edu.au


Architectural Studies 2013