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ASPIRE Annual Report 2010 Never Stand Still

Student Equity and Disabilities Unit


CONTENTS 01 2010 Highlights 02 Director’s Report 04 Organisational Structure 05 Overview 07 ASPIRE Partner School Locations 08 Partner Schools 10 ASPIRE Learning Framework 12 2010 – A Sense of Achievement 17 The Year in Review 23 Supplementary Activities

For more information about ASPIRE please contact: Ann Jardine, ASPIRE Project Director Telephone: (02) 9385 4734 Email: a.jardine@unsw.edu.au Web: www.aspire.unsw.edu.au Design: UNSW P3 Design Studio Photography: Moshe Rosenzveig; Members and friends of the ASPIRE team ASPIRE is funded by the Australian Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations and a donation by Citi Foundation. Copyright @ 2011 The University of New South Wales – All rights reserved. The information in this brochure was correct at the time of printing


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annual report 2010

2010 Highlights ƒƒ 1600 students engaged with the ASPIRE program – up from the 60 students engaged during the pilot phase in 2007 ƒƒ 64% increase in the number of students from ASPIRE partner schools receiving offers from universities ƒƒ Regional ASPIRE launched ƒƒ Appointment of dedicated Project Officer to develop regional ASPIRE ƒƒ Stronger links with partner schools formed, with all 13 schools continuing as ASPIRE partners ƒƒ Five new schools on board with ASPIRE ƒƒ First time Kindergarten students participate in ASPIRE ƒƒ Two new initiatives, Step UP and Student Shadowing, launched for Year 11 and 12 students specifically selected by their schools to attend ƒƒ Increased involvement by UNSW faculties with ASPIRE program ƒƒ Increase in the number of university students applying to become ASPIRE Ambassadors ƒƒ Tutoring support offered to school students for first time ƒƒ At the conclusion of ASPIRE activities in 2010: ŠŠ 90% of participating students surveyed had positive attitudes to higher education ŠŠ 8% were undecided ŠŠ only 2% were negative towards higher education.

Growth in number of students who have participated in the ASPIRE program

2000

1500 Total number of students Females Males

1000

500

0

2007

2008

2009

2010


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annual report 2010

Director’s Report 2010 was a busy year for ASPIRE. Now in its fourth year, the ASPIRE program has forged partnerships with 11 high schools and three primary schools in Sydney. We also expanded ASPIRE into regional NSW schools for the first time, partnering with three central schools and one high school. In an exciting new initiative, staff worked with the regional school students from Kindergarten right through to Year 12 with a series of age-appropriate activities. Kindergarten students ‘graduated’ from their ASPIRE workshop, complete with graduation gown, mortarboard, graduation certificate and special gift. Starting conversations about university in the home is one of the key components of reinforcing positive messages about the range of future educational choices open to students. Feedback from parents of Kindergarten students indicated the strategy worked. Parents reported how surprised they were about the conversation and type of questions their new ‘graduates’ were asking about university and studying after coming home from their graduation ceremony. The key to unlocking the academic potential of the students is to make the topic of higher education an ongoing conversation throughout their primary and high school years. Starting early and having frequent interactions with students are the building blocks of success for outreach programs such as ASPIRE. In 2010, there were 2,178 instances of student engagement with ASPIRE. Across the year 40 workshops were held in partner schools. Students in Years 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 came onto the UNSW campus and participated in a total of 13 activities. We were delighted to be able to welcome a group of regional students from Condobolin and Ungarie to the campus. The number of volunteer UNSW students who were trained as student ambassadors continued to grow. In 2010 there were more than 100 ASPIRE Ambassadors assisting with multiple activities throughout the year. The Ambassadors are an invaluable resource and asset to ASPIRE and enable the school students to relate to the university environment on a more personal and engaging level. One of the benefits of building an ongoing relationship with our partner schools is that additional opportunities of engagement between UNSW and the school are opened up. During the year a number of schools were able to include a visit to the UNSW campus as part of an existing school excursion. The ASPIRE team were able to tailor a program for the students, scheduling either a day or a few hours to fit in with the school’s itinerary. Some of these supplementary events are outlined in this report.


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annual report 2010

We were also pleased to be able to assist Canterbury Boys High School with their successful application of $25,000 from the NAB Schools First grant. School and ASPIRE staff worked together on the submission and as a result, a careers education program was established for the boys. All in all, 2010 was a very successful year. The groundwork of the past four years has established ASPIRE and I am confident that 2011 will be even more successful. Our expansion into regional NSW will continue to grow and we will be able to take the program to the next phase of development for all our schools. We will be offering a wider range of support and activities to target specific areas of need. The ASPIRE team is looking forward both to the challenge and reward of giving more Australian students a wider choice of educational options for their future. Ann Jardine Director Student Equity and Disabilities Unit ASPIRE Project Director


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annual report 2010

Organisational structure ASPIRE was developed by the Director and staff of the Student Equity and Disabilities Unit (SEADU). SEADU sits within the portfolio of the Pro Vice-Chancellor (Students) and Registrar. ASPIRE was launched and funded by the University of New South Wales (UNSW) as a pilot scheme in late 2007. At that time, it was staffed by one full-time project officer, had two school partners and an operational budget of $5,000. At the end of 2010, the project had a staffing level of five full-time positions and associated support and direction from within SEADU, as illustrated.

Director SEADU ASPIRE Project Director

ASPIRE Project Manager

ASPIRE Project Officer

ASPIRE Project Officer

ASPIRE Project Support Officer

ASPIRE Project Officer (Regional)

Communications Officer SEADU

Administrative Offficer SEADU


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annual report 2010

Overview ASPIRE is a UNSW initiative that works with school students who come from low socio-economic (SES) backgrounds by supporting their aspirations and helping them to access a university education. The aim of the program is to: ƒƒ build a greater awareness about university amongst students who may not have considered a university education before ƒƒ encourage students to think about their options for the future ƒƒ help students to improve their academic readiness for university, and ƒƒ increase university applications from student cohorts with low transfer rates into higher education. ASPIRE does this by: ƒƒ building self confidence in students who may underestimate their academic abilities ƒƒ reinforcing positive attitudes about higher education ƒƒ helping students to navigate the sometimes complex process of entering higher education. Working with students from Kindergarten to Year 12, ASPIRE helps students discover careers or job prospects they never would have thought themselves capable of pursuing.

The information provided to students on higher education includes: ƒƒ highlighting the variety of courses available ƒƒ enabling students to identify their personal interests and talents and showing how they can lead to further study and interesting jobs ƒƒ demonstrating that Higher School Certificate results are not the only pathway into university. ASPIRE also supports students in the university application process by: ƒƒ providing information on the Universities Admissions Centre (UAC) process, including the Educational Access Scheme ƒƒ assisting with the research and application for scholarships ƒƒ discussing the forms of financial support available. Direct and personal contact with universities is a crucial element in the program. Students attend university campuses and are given an opportunity to interact with current university students and staff. Over time these visits give the school students an insight into university life and the attractions and benefits it offers. More importantly, it makes higher education less intimidating.

Funding In 2010, ASPIRE was funded primarily by the Australian Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations – Diversity and Structural Adjustment Fund Grant. It was also funded by UNSW, the Higher Education Participation and Partnerships Program (HEPPP) and a donation by Citi Foundation.

Evaluation ASPIRE has established an evaluation framework for assessing the impact of the program. The framework includes short term strategies such as feedback and longer term qualitative and quantitative strategies. Feedback received on the activities helps to inform development. Qualitative data is collected on attitudinal shifts of students over time and on the perceptions of school staff and students of the program’s impact. Quantitative data on offers to university and offers to and enrolment in UNSW is also collected.


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Future Directions This annual report covers ASPIRE’s 2010 achievements. Since the close of that year, ASPIRE has made enormous strides in further developing the program and branching into new areas.

ƒƒ an increase in the number of regional students brought onto UNSW campus

Some of the 2011 milestones to date have been:

ƒƒ the development of a community engagement strategy to create stronger links with local communities. This will enable ASPIRE to have a more visible presence in the community by attending local events and by holding specific events for the community

ƒƒ the establishment of a dedicated regional ASPIRE program ƒƒ the addition of new schools in Sydney and regional New South Wales with more prospective partner schools on the horizon

ƒƒ development of a mentoring scheme involving UNSW students and Year 11 students attending the Step Up program

ƒƒ further harnessing of university networks to provide schools with additional support and expertise ƒƒ piloting a work experience program for regional students to be placed in work environments in UNSW faculties and with local employers. The future of ASPIRE is exciting. The program is well positioned in the coming year to reach out to more disadvantaged students in New South Wales, providing them with a solid stepping stone on the path to higher education.


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ASPIRE partner school locations

annual report 2010

Sydney Parramatta

Ryde

Lane Cove

Rosehill

Greystanes

Crows Nest

Mosman

Gladesville

HOLROYD

GRANVILLE

Guildford

North Sydney

Sydney Olympic Park

Drummoyne

Concord

AUBURN

Fairfield

Balmain Vaucluse

Lidcombe

Five Dock

SYDNEY

Strathfield Chester Hill

Cabramatta

Leichhardt Stanmore

BASS HILL

Bondi Beach

Redfern

DULWICH HILL BANKSTOWN

Liverpool

Punchbowl

MARRICKVILLE

CANTERBURY WILEY PARK

ROSEBERY

Tempe

Earlwood

Kensington

UNSW Randwick

Maroubra

Kingsgrove Revesby

Padstow

Holsworthy

Coogee

MASCOT

Rockdale

MATRAVILLE Brighton-Le-Sands

Kogarah Hurstville

Botany Bay

LA PEROUSE

Walgett Lightning Ridge 131km & Queensland

Bourke

Regional New South Wales Coonamble

e

ban

Bris

Coolabah

Tamworth Coonabarabran Cobar

Nyngan Broken Hill

Gilgandra

Warren

Coolah Dunedoo

Trangie

Nymagee Tottenham

Dubbo Gulgong

Gilgunnia Wellington

Tullamore

Mudgee

Approximate distance from Sydney Mount Hope

Lake Cargelligo Ungarie Condobolin Quandialla

Trundle

CONDOBOLIN

Parkes Orange

Forbes

LAKE CARGELLIGO

Bathurst

UNGARIE Adelaide via Mildura

Grenfell

QUANDIALLA

Cowra

Canberra

SYDNEY

600kms 530kms 460kms 430kms


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Partner Schools In 2010, the ASPIRE partner schools were made up of: ƒƒ 15 high schools – 11 in metropolitan Sydney and 41 in regional New South Wales ƒƒ 6 primary schools – ŠŠ 3 in metropolitan Sydney ŠŠ 3 in regional New South Wales

ASPIRE Partner School Criteria To be an ASPIRE partner, every school must meet at least three of the following criteria: The school: ƒƒ is listed as a low SES School Communities National Partnership School ƒƒ is currently, or was previously, a NSW Department of Education and Communities (DEC) Priority Schools Program School ƒƒ has a score below 1000 on the Index of Community SocioEducational Advantage (ICSEA)2 ƒƒ has a low progression rate to higher education ƒƒ is in a geographic area with low progression rates to higher education. It is important to note that while these measures may categorise schools by social or economic disadvantage, they are not a measure of their students’ academic potential. Social and economic disadvantage may prevent students from having: ƒƒ access to information ƒƒ physical exposure to and interaction with tertiary institutions ƒƒ reinforcement and proof that higher education is possible ƒƒ ongoing encouragement and support in their academic ability.

1 Three of the regional schools are Central schools with students from Kindergarten to Year 12. 2 A measure the Federal government uses to determine the levels of educational advantage or disadvantage that students bring to their academic studies.


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ASPIRE Partner Schools 2010 In 2007, ASPIRE was piloted in two schools. Four years later, ASPIRE was in partnership with 18 schools. All 13 established partner schools continued as ASPIRE partners into 2010 with the addition of five new partner schools. The table below lists the ASPIRE partner schools, their location, size, participation in government low SES school partnerships, the school’s ICSEA measure, percentage of students from Indigenous and language backgrounds other than English, and a measure of the socio-economic status of the school population.

Location

Type of school

National Partnership School

NSW Priority Schools Program

Indigenous %

Language background other than English %

Marrickville High

Metro

High

Yes

Yes

938

332

8

80

NA

2007

Dulwich High School of Visual Arts and Design

Metro

High

No

Yes

1059

602

4

38

19

2008

Matraville Sports High

Metro

High

Yes

Yes

866

305

34

27

NA

2008

JJ Cahill Memorial High

Metro

High

No

Yes

959

387

4

64

44

2009

Bass High

Metro

High

Yes

Yes

934

835

2

71

59

2009

Canterbury Boys High

Metro

High

No

Yes

966

495

2

87

44

2009

Bankstown Girls High

Metro

High

No

Yes

948

697

1

96

42

2009

Holroyd High

Metro

High

Yes

Yes

865

516

1

87

NA

2009

Granville Boys High

Metro

High

Yes

Yes

931

486

0

97

60

2009

Auburn Girls High

Metro

High

Yes

Yes

863

782

0

98

NA

2009

Wiley Park Girls High

Metro

High

Yes

Yes

941

591

1

97

51

2009

Gardeners Road Public

Metro

Primary

No ASPIRE local high school feeder

No

1005

234

5

58

27

2009

La Perouse Public

Metro

Primary

Yes

Yes

725

50

80

19

NA

2010

Ungarie Central

Regional

Central

Yes

Yes

980

109

5

0

NA

2010

Quandialla Central

Regional

Central

Yes

Yes

957

38

16

0

NA

2010

Lake Cargelligo Central

Regional

Central

Yes

Yes

868

211

30

1

55

2010

Condobolin High

Regional

High

Yes

Yes

821

250

38

2

55

2010

Matraville Soldiers Settlement Public

Metro

Primary

No ASPIRE local high school feeder

No

948

204

25

38

30

Year joined ASPIRE

School

2007

2

ICESA

Number of students in school

% in bottom quartile of SES


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ASPIRE Learning Framework The building blocks of the ASPIRE program are to raise: ƒƒ awareness ƒƒ aspirations ƒƒ attainment. From this foundation, a learning progression framework has been constructed across the student year groups from Kindergarten to Year 12. Emphasis is placed on raising awareness and aspiration from primary school through Years 7 to10 in high school. The focus on supporting attainment begins from Year 10 through to Year 12 as students start to consolidate what they want to do after school, the choices open to them and how they are going to achieve it.


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Raise awareness ƒƒ short in-school workshops

ƒƒ short in-school workshops

awareness

K–Year 4

ƒƒ Increase understanding of HE ƒƒ Build self-esteem ƒƒ Discover the possibilities outside their environment ƒƒ Increase awareness of skills and interests

ƒƒ o n-campus visits – XPLORE UNSW!

ƒƒ Increase awareness of pathways to jobs

ƒƒ workplace visits

ƒƒ extended in-school workshops ƒƒ o n-campus visits – Uni for a Day ƒƒ workplace visits

Years 7/8

ƒƒ subject-specific days on campus

Raise aspirations

aspirations

Years 5/6

ƒƒ subject-specific days on campus

ƒƒ Increase confidence in ability to enter HE ƒƒ Increase motivation to enter HE ƒƒ Increase knowledge of education and career options

Raise attainment ƒƒ Taster Day ƒƒ mentoring ƒƒ subject-specific days on campus

Years 9/10 ƒƒ Step UP ƒƒ Student Shadowing ƒƒ mentoring ƒƒ tutoring ƒƒ Study Buddies

Years 11/12

ƒƒ subject-specific days on campus ƒƒ teacher follow-up work ƒƒ a ctivities/talks for parents/ carers ƒƒ i ndividual school campus visits ƒƒ community events ƒƒ online materials

Ongoing support for all years

ƒƒ information booklets

attainment

ƒƒ workplace visits

ƒƒ Ability and knowledge to make informed choices relating to HE and career aspirations ƒƒ Increase familiarity with application process and selection requirements ƒƒ Improve awareness and ability to apply skills required to operate successfully in an HE environment


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2010 – A sense of achievement “We’re delighted to welcome the first ASPIRE graduates to UNSW. Key to the program’s success is the understanding that it’s not lack of ability that prevents some students from going to university but low expectations and lack of confidence.” Professor Richard Henry Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic)

Although ASPIRE is a longitudinal program where definitive quantitative results in terms of progression rates to higher education are not likely for several years, there does appear to be an emerging trend that indicates ASPIRE is beginning to produce an increase in the number of university offers to disadvantaged students. The table below shows evidence to date. Measure

2009

2011

% change

Offers to university3

253

414

64%

Offers to university where there is high engagement with ASPIRE4

138

255

85%

Offers to university where there is low engagement with ASPIRE5

61

76

24%

Offers to girls’ schools

97

202

109%

Offers to co-ed schools

109

167

53%

Offers to boys’ schools

46

44

-4%

Offers to prestige faculties (Law and Medicine)

43

62

45%

Offers to UNSW

27

43

63%

The first row shows the number of university places offered to all current partner school leavers in 2009, the number in 2011 and the percentage change between 2009 and 2011. The remaining rows are selfexplanatory. With one exception, the results suggest that the ASPIRE program is achieving its goal of supporting disadvantaged students to access higher education. University offers are up 64% between 2009 and 2011. The increase is even higher where there is high engagement with ASPIRE (85%). It includes offers to prestige faculties (up 45%).

The only unsatisfactory outcome is a slight drop in offers to boys’ schools (-4%). This is a disappointing result, especially when compared with offers to girls’ schools (which have more than doubled) and co-ed schools (which have risen by 53%). It should be noted, however, that the fall in offers of university places to boys is a general trend observed in other parts of Australia and internationally.6 Over the coming year, staff will look at ways in which the ASPIRE program could help increase the number of university places offered to boys.

3 2009 & 2011 figures include all offers made to students of all current partner schools. 2011 figures relate to students who completed schooling in 2010. 4 High engagement with ASPIRE means a school takes up over 90% of activities offered, has more than 60% of students participating in ASPIRE and requests a minimum of one adhoc support activity per year. 5 Low engagement with ASPIRE is where a school takes up less than 50% of student places or activities offered. 6 Broecke S and Hamed J (2008) Gender Gaps in Higher Education Participation Department of Innovation, University and Skills UK.


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Keeping in Contact One of the underlying philosophies of the ASPIRE program is to present students with multiple opportunities to engage with higher education. A student may engage in one ASPIRE activity in a year or multiple activities, depending on the stage they are at in school or the level of engagement their school has with the program. Therefore, not only is the number of students in the program collected, but also the number of interactions the program has with students. Figures 1 and 2 provide different perspectives on the growth of the ASPIRE program. Figure 1 shows the growth in instances of student engagement, number of students at on-campus activities, and the number of students at in-school activities. All three measures show encouraging growth in the four years between 2007 (the commencement of the ASPIRE pilot) and 2010. By 2010, there were more than 4,000 instances of student engagement, more than 2,000 students at on-campus activities and just less than 1,500 students at in-school activities. Not surprisingly, Figure 2 confirms this growth when the measures are on-campus activities, inschool activities and number of schools participating.

Figure 1

Student Engagement

2500

No. of instances of student engagement

2000

No. of students at on-campus activities

1500

No. of students at in-school activities

1000 500 0

2007

2008

2009

2010

Figure 2

Growth of ASPIRE

60

No. of on-campus activities

50

No. of in-school activities

40

No. of schools

30 20 10 0

2007

2008

2009

2010


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“I think ASPIRE is a great program and one that is contributing to the raising of the aspirations of our students.� Sydney high school principal

ASPIRE uses an evidence-based model of numerous and progressive interactions with the students over the long term. The program comprises workshops and events both in school and on campus. These structured activities, quizzes, experiments and teamwork exercises are all linked to the learning progression framework. The strategy is designed to engage the students on multiple occasions through having personal experience of visiting a university campus, interacting with current university students and participating in activities that challenge and explore their capabilities and interests. Over time, students can see how the hopes and dreams they have now about their future could be achieved through higher education.

Number of times the ASPIRE program has interacted with students by year group in 2010

Year K - Year 2

In-School Workshops and Events

On-Campus activities

ASPIRE @ Citi (Activity delivered at Citi Australia Head Office)

82

Years 3 - 4

59

Years 5 - 6

52

111

Totals

Females

Males

82

44

38

59

29

30

163

83

80

Years 7 - 8

337

25

362

160

202

Year 9

269

183

452

239

213

Year 10

282

197

40

519

253

266

Year 11

173

56

91

Year 12

176

45

Total activity 2010

1430

617

Total 2009

1007

Total 2008

264

320

195

125

221

127

94

131

2178

1130

1048

421

91

1519

804

583

208

---

472

N/A

N/A


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annual report 2010

The

Year in

Review


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annual report 2010

ASPIRE Ambassadors All ASPIRE activities draw on the educational experience of current UNSW students to raise student awareness of higher education, support student aspirations and achievement and in later years help them navigate the higher education entry system. The role of Ambassadors is instrumental in the success of the program. All Ambassadors are recruited through a competitive selection process. In 2010, ASPIRE received 187 applications, assessed 117 students in a graduate recruitment group selection activity and trained 67 new Ambassadors. In 2010 there were 119 active ASPIRE Ambassadors who participated in at least one ASPIRE activity, however on average students supported four ASPIRE activities across the year. This meant a total commitment of over 2000 volunteer hours within the year. Ambassadors come from every faculty within the University as the chart illustrates. There was a gender imbalance with males making up only 34% of the group.

“It’s rewarding to help students understand more about what university is all about, debunk myths and empower them to achieve the best they can be.” ASPIRE Ambassador

Science

Medicine Australian School of Business

Law

Arts and Social Sciences Built Environment

College of Fine Arts Engineering


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annual report 2010

Purpose: ƒƒ Experience university teaching ƒƒ Discover the range of support services available on campus

Student Shadowing Target group: Year 11 Number of schools: 10 Number of students attended: 60 When: 16 March, 29 April, 5 May Program

ƒƒ Gain an understanding of the realities of university life by spending one-on-one time with a university student

Sixty students from 10 schools were nominated by their teachers to participate in the ASPIRE Student Shadowing activity. Three separate events were held, with two regional partner schools participating. Twelve Condobolin students and four Ungarie students were able to come to Sydney and visit the campus. Students nominated their area of interest and were matched with trained ASPIRE Ambassadors from within the faculty of the area of interest. The school students were able to experience a range of teaching including clinical skills sessions for Medicine, practical consultation sessions for Exercise Physiology, a broad range of Arts and Law tutorial discussion groups and Science and Business lectures. Students also had approximately two hours ‘free-time’ with Ambassadors.

Purpose:

Step UP

ƒƒ Encourage senior high school students to think critically about their educational choices

Target group: Year 11 Number of schools: 12 Number of students attended: 33 When: 28 and 29 June

ƒƒ Learn about the differences between high school and university study ƒƒ Inspire students to set goals and work to achieve them through their senior years of high school ƒƒ Allows schools to select students they believe would benefit from a more intensive program

Program The two-day program was challenging, wide ranging and allowed students to experience a variety of university teaching methods. The program included a lecture on the philosophical differences between school and university, a session on how to make the most of the university experience, a series of panel discussions and an academic writing tutorial. The program also included a student-directed project, which encouraged students to think critically about the information they were provided within workshops/tours/lectures and to think about what information their student peers (at school) would be most interested in. They then developed a school workshop for their peers based on their experience. School staff attended and participated in a workshop on scholarships and family members were invited to attend the Step UP presentation ceremony. The Deputy Principal of Condobolin High School stated that the change in attitude of one student was remarkable since attending Step UP, and that the student had made lifestyle changes to support her aspiration to attend university and the UNSW Indigenous Winter School in 2011.

“Step up was beneficial to me personally as it really taught me more about uni, student life and the opportunities offered. [The student project] was enjoyable as it was a different exercise than usual and it tested both team management skills and leadership skills.” Student from Granville Boys High School


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annual report 2010

Purpose: ƒƒ Give students an insight into university life ƒƒ Show students the difference between school and university ƒƒ Provide students personal experience of a university campus ƒƒ Meet and talk to current university students

Purpose:

Uni for a Day Target group: Year 9 Number of schools: 12 Number of students attended: 183 When: 30 June and 1 July Program Students were taken on a tour of the campus and given an opportunity to participate in some university activities such as playing a role in a Moot Court in the Faculty of Law. ASPIRE Ambassadors were on hand to answer any questions about student life and to engage students in discussion about the range of available courses, managing uni on a budget and balancing study demands with a social life.

Taster Day

ƒƒ Give students an opportunity to visit a university campus

Target group: Year 10 Number of schools: 10 Number of students attended: 182 When: 18 and 23 November

ƒƒ Meet current university students

Program

ƒƒ Attend lectures to experience university-style teaching

A number of faculties assisted during Taster Day by providing opportunities for the students to “sample” the variety of courses university has to offer. Students attended an acting, writing and directing class with the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, a law lecture, an electrical engineering laboratory, became avatars in virtual architecture with the Faculty of Built Environment and then took notes at a series of science lectures. With the Australian School of Business, students created a marketing campaign to promote university to their peers using their research skills and by developing posters, TV advertisements and advertising jingles.


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annual report 2010

XPLORE UNSW!

Purpose: ƒƒ Increase primary school students’ awareness of university

Target group: Years 5 and 6 Number of schools: 2 Number of students attended: 95 When: 1 December

ƒƒ Encourage the idea that ‘people just like me’ go to university

Program XPLORE UNSW! proved to be a great success for the students involved. They attended a number of sessions co-ordinated across five faculties (Law, Engineering, Science, Arts and Social Sciences, Australian School of Business). Twenty-five ASPIRE Ambassadors assisted on the day.

ƒƒ Experience a university environment ƒƒ Gain an understanding of what people study at university

Students spent a full day on campus taking part in activities that included:

ƒƒ Discover the importance of achievement and significance of university rituals

ƒƒ marketing and business role playing at the Australian School of Business ƒƒ debating and rewriting the Australian Constitution at the Faculty of Law ƒƒ acting and learning how to use performance skills and imagination at the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences ƒƒ watching a liquid nitrogen experiment and making slime and sherbet at the Faculty of Science ƒƒ experiencing their own graduation ceremony and being presented with a certificate by the Pro-Vice Chancellor (Students).

Purpose:

Tutoring

ƒƒ Provide subject-specific academic support to students in school

Target group: Years 7 to 12 Number of schools: 8 Number of students involved: over 100 When: From May across 15 weeks

ƒƒ Provide in-classroom support for teachers ƒƒ Support the raising of academic attainment of high school students ƒƒ Provide students with positive role models for higher education

UNSW’s School of Education gained approval for their students to undertake their Alternative Practicum Experience in ASPIRE partner schools and complete up to 10 days placement in school, across a maximum of 15 weeks. Over 40 UNSW students were trained as ASPIRE Student Tutors and 34 student tutors were placed in schools. The tutors came from a range of subject specialties as detailed in the graph. The role of the tutors was varied and dependent on the needs of the individual schools. Those students who were placed were engaged in a range of contexts:

25 20

ƒƒ Five students were placed in homework clubs where they provided supervised one-on-one support to students

15 10

ƒƒ A number of tutors were engaged as classroom assistants in subject areas within their area of expertise. Students supported students one-on-one helping them to catch up or to advance their knowledge Physics

General Science Biology Chemistry

Mathematics

Economics

Business Studies

Geography

ESL

Drama

0

English History

5

ƒƒ Three students were able to be placed in their old schools ƒƒ One school used the tutors to work one-on-one with students struggling with English and to accompany those students to classes to continue their support in class.


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annual report 2010

Purpose: ƒƒ Increase students’ awareness of the diversity of employment available as a result of university education ƒƒ Expose students to a corporate work environment they might not otherwise get the chance to experience ƒƒ Highlight the relevance of education for later career opportunities

ASPIRE@Citi Target group: Years 10 and 11 Number of schools: 8 Number of students attended: 131 When: 28 April, 27 May, 10 June, 17 August, 1 and 14 September, 26 October Program Citi Australia’s staff warmly welcomed school students to their workplace in the heart of Sydney’s CBD. For some students it is their first visit to a corporate office. The visits enable the students to see firsthand the career possibilities and diversity of jobs, not only in one company, but also in the business community. Students take part in a hands-on career development activity led by Citi’s human resources department. Staff mentors are on hand to talk about the work they do and explain the different careers paths available and how education helped them secure one of a variety of jobs. A tour of the office building gives the students a glimpse of the different aspects of corporate life, including the ‘trading floor’, call centre and an on-site gymnasium. The visit is completed with lunch in the boardroom with Citi staff.

“The program is an excellent one and the welcoming and informative staff at Citi made us feel very special. Our experience at Citi will certainly be something we will remember and one which will help us in some way in the choice of our future careers.” High school Peer Mentor letter on behalf of participating students


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annual report 2010

Supplementary activities NAB Schools First Seed Funding Award

Kool Kids Club visit to UNSW

Canterbury Boys High School approached ASPIRE for assistance in applying for a NAB Schools First Seed Funding Award to develop and implement a Careers Transition program for Year 9 students.

In November, ASPIRE and the UNSW Indigenous programs unit, Nura Gili, ran a workshop for the South Sydney Youth Services Kool Kids Club (also known as La Perouse Supported Activities Program).

Staff from the school and ASPIRE worked together on the application. The school was successful in securing $25,000 to fund the careers education program. ASPIRE Ambassadors will be involved in the program as student mentors. Students will be assisted in developing a written plan of the steps required to achieve their career goal. They will also develop personal career portfolios containing their resumes, career plans, certificates and summaries of their employment related skills which will be used for their mock interviews. Visits to tertiary education providers and workplaces are also proposed in the program.

Sixteen Year 6 students who regularly attend the Kool Kids Club came to UNSW and participated in an interactive ASPIRE workshop. The workshop focused on what university is and why people choose to study at uni. The Kool Kids also visited the Nura Gili Resource Centre and the Eora Student Lounge and UNSW Library.

Canterbury Boys High visit A group of 18 Year 10 students from Canterbury Boys High School who have English as their second language (ESL) visited UNSW campus in November. A small scale ‘Uni for a Day’ program was put together for the students to experience a university and to talk with ASPIRE Ambassadors.

Condobolin Year 8 visit Twenty-five Year 8 students from Condobolin High School in regional NSW included a visit to UNSW in December as part of a visit to a Sydney sports camp. A tailored program was put together for the students, many of whom had never been on a university campus before.

Engineering Information Day In May, the UNSW Faculty of Engineering hosted hundreds of students from a range of schools to showcase the different types of jobs in engineering. ASPIRE schools are invited to attend and ASPIRE sponsors their transport costs to the event.

Alexandra Giameos, Careers Adviser at Canterbury Boys High School (left) and Tamsyn Richards, ASPIRE Project Officer, worked together on a successful application of $25,000 from the NAB Schools First Seed Funding Award


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annual report 2010

ASPIRE is outstanding


Drought-breaking rain brought a canola crop to life and ASPIRE Project Officer Tamsyn Richards (right) and Adam Currey, Head Teacher Secondary Studies, are almost lost in a sea of yellow during a visit by the ASPIRE team to Ungarie Central School, 530 kilometres west of Sydney.

in its ďŹ eld


ASPIRE has been developed by the staff of the Student Equity and Disabilities Unit (SEADU) John Goodsell Building (F20) The University of New South Wales Sydney NSW 2052

Aspire annual report 2010  
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