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DRIVELINE ANGLES Back in the ’90s, large lift kits on solid axle four-wheel drives were as common as bad mullet haircuts and barbed wire armband tattoos. Thanks to modern traction aids and independent suspension, these lifts are no longer necessary, or even really possible to achieve. When you raise a vehicle, driveline angles change. These could range from the CV joints in the front of your truck, as well as driveshafts in the front or rear, as universal joints have a limited range of movement.

Consider fitting a diff drop kit to the front diff of an IFS vehicle if you have raised it, as this will reduce the severity of the angle placed on the moving driveline components. With leaf sprung vehicles, castor wedges can be installed under the spring plate to change the diff’s pinion angle, and adjustable upper or lower control arms are used with coil-sprung applications to bring driveline angles as close as possible to factory. Get it right, and you will notice less vibration, and provide these components a fighting chance at lasting the distance on or off-road.

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Words and picsCLICK by Unsealed 4X4,INTERACTIVE additional picsMAGAZINE by Kirsten Nutting NON-INTERACTIVE VERSION | PLEASE HERE FOR

UNSEALED 4X4 ISSUE 013  
UNSEALED 4X4 ISSUE 013  
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