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FRAMING THE DEBATE  17

Atiti, Unnikrishnan Payyappallimana, Aurea Tanaka, Mario Tabucanon, Sachiko Yasuda and Kazuhiko Takemoto), part of the UNU-IAS programme on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD), explain that Agenda 21, published in 1992, had already warned about the unsustain­ able trends in consumption and production, particularly in more developed countries. In the 20 years since, the situation has become worse. The authors argue that ESD has a critical role in moving society steadily to a more sustainable path regarding production and consumption. This would be achieved by transformative learning processes aligned to increasing awareness and advocacy that could lead to increased resource-use efficiency in different societies. Chapter 6 then examines how the concept of the green economy plays out in the particular context of sociocultural landscapes. The team in the UNU-IAS’s Satoyama Initiative (Kaoru Ichikawa, Robert Blasiak and Aya Takatsuki) analyses the diversity of sustainable production systems involved in the initiative. Those systems promote diverse linkages between humans and nature that can lead to environmental conservation. The concept of the green economy could be a framework for reinforcing the strategies aimed at sustaining ecosystems and the activities of people in such landscapes. In the following chapter, the green economy and governance are examined in a regional perspective for Africa by Timothy Afful-Koomson from UNU-INRA in Ghana. He analyses the governance challenges that African countries face if they want to benefit from the green economy. He looks at the information provided by several national reports submitted to the United Nations by national coordinating institutions for sustain­ able development. He concludes that African nations are in a privileged position to benefit from the follow-up of the discussions in Rio+20 on the green economy, but they need to improve governance institutions in order to introduce more participation and representative voices into the processes. Chapter 8 examines the issue of energy, which is key to moving society onto a more sustainable path. Ingvar B. Fridleifsson from UNU-GTP discusses how geothermal energy can provide a large part of the energy needs for development. One-third of the global population does not have access to modern energy services, which are fundamental to improve their living conditions and raise them out of poverty. Geothermal energy is available in many parts of the world and could provide clean afford­ able energy sources for the poor. However, several technical and institutional challenges need to be overcome to tap the potential of geothermal energy. Chapter 9, by M. S. Suneetha of UNU-IAS and Alexandros Gasparatos of the Biodiversity Institute of the University of Oxford, examines ways

Green Economy and Good Governance for Sustainable Development: Opportunities, Promises and Concerns  

Debates on green growth and environmental governance tend to be general in nature, and are often conceptual or limited to single disciplines...

Green Economy and Good Governance for Sustainable Development: Opportunities, Promises and Concerns  

Debates on green growth and environmental governance tend to be general in nature, and are often conceptual or limited to single disciplines...