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FRAMING THE DEBATE  15

tual or mono-disciplinary (for example, green growth is dominated by economists; IFSD is dominated by political scientists). The book presents the discussions on those themes from the angle of particular topics, where we make links between discussions and practice. This makes the book interesting for various fields of knowledge and practice and attractive to different groups of audience. The United Nations University and the contributors to the book have developed a series of studies on the themes of the green economy and governance, trying to link global environmental changes and local impacts and policies. The UNU Institute of Advanced Studies (UNU-IAS) has a long history of work in the area of ecosystem governance, biodiversity and its relation with human well-being, particularly in the context of the Convention on Biological Diversity. Members of UNU-IAS played an important role in the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA, 2005), because its former Director was co-chair of the MA. The book also brings the expertise of other institutes and programmes that have done research in this area: the UNU World Institute for Development Economics Research (UNU-WIDER), the UNU Institute for Natural Resources in Africa (UNU-INRA), the UNU International Institute for Global Health (UNU-IIGH) and the UNU Geothermal Training Programme (UNUGTP). Recent studies have continued the UNU work related to environmental governance and its links to human well-being. UNU-IAS and other partners have developed an indicator-based integrated assessment of ecosystem change and human well-being and tested it in several case studies in Indonesia, China and Japan (Suneetha et al., 2011). Contributors to the book have also conducted previous studies in global environmental governance, looking at the emergence of international environmental regimes (Kanie and Haas, 2004; Kanie et al., 2010), which will be particularly important for the discussions on IFSD. In addition, UNU-IAS has carried out research trying to link local action to global regimes, such as the work on cities and biodiversity, looking at the governance aspects ­related to the role of cities in the implementation of the Convention on Biological Diversity (Puppim de Oliveira et al., 2011) and the role of subnational governments in the implementation of global agreements (Puppim de Oliveira, 2009). This book brings together several research initiatives in different contexts and presents the research on governance and the green economy at the various levels (local, government and global). The aim is to bring lessons from different angles to move the agenda of the green economy and governance in diverse directions. There is a need to consider how these topics play out in the discussions in different arenas, such as in education, or regionally, such as in Africa, and for particular themes, such as ocean governance, or for certain

Green Economy and Good Governance for Sustainable Development: Opportunities, Promises and Concerns  
Green Economy and Good Governance for Sustainable Development: Opportunities, Promises and Concerns  

Debates on green growth and environmental governance tend to be general in nature, and are often conceptual or limited to single disciplines...