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Catalog 2011-2012


1441 North Cable Road, Lima, OH 45805 (419) 227-3141 Web Page Address: http://www.unoh.edu

Volume 40 2011-2012 CATALOG

Accredited by The Higher Learning Commission of The North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (HLC - NCA) 30 North LaSalle Street Suite 2400 Chicago, IL 60602 (312) 263-0456 www.ncahigherlearningcommission.org

This catalog is for information only and, as such, does not constitute a contract.

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TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S ACADEMIC CALENDARS Colleges of Business, Health Professions, Occupational Professions, & Applied Technologies: 2010-2013

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OVERVIEW Campus Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A Note from the President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Welcome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mission Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vision Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Values Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goals Statements to Achieve the Vision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Assessment Objectives - Institutional Goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Major/Department Goals and Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . General Education Philosophy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Commitment to Diversity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Legal Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Accreditations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Authorization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Approvals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memberships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Northwestern Travel Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Non-Discrimination Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Counseling and Advising Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Academic Skills Lab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

12 14 15 16 16 16 17 17 19 19 19 20 21 21 21 21 21 22 22 23 23

ADMISSIONS Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Admission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Acceptance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Time of Admission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Accredited High School Transcripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Students with a GED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Home Schooling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Evidence of Graduation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Degree-Seeking Students / Undeclared Majors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Non-Degree-Seeking Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transient Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transfer Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . International Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Residency Requirement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Advanced Placement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Credit by Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Credit for Experiential Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . High School Articulation Agreements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech-Prep Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Early Admissions Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Post-Secondary Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dual Enrollment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MBA Admissions Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Army ROTC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Military Via Distance Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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27 27 27 27 27 28 28 28 28 28 29 29 29 30 30 30 31 31 32 32 32 32 32 33 33 34 36


TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S TUITION Tuition Payment Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tuition Reimbursement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Refund Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Complete Withdrawal Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Course Drop Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Medical Withdrawal Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

38 38 38 38 40 40

FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS Grants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Loans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Employment (College Work-Study) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Award Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Veterans’ Educational Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maintaining Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scholarships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Colleges of Business, Health Professions, & Occupational Professions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . College of Applied Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Colleges of Business, Health Professions, Occupational Professions, & Applied Technologies . . . . . . . . UNOH Athletic Scholarships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . UNOH Opportunity Scholarships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Outside Scholarships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

42 43 44 44 44 45 46 47 48 53 54 54 54

STUDENT AFFAIRS New Student Services Department . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Career Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Safety Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . College Counseling Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Academic Advising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Testing Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prometric and Certiport Testing Centers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Student Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Student Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fitness Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Limaland Motorsports Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Student Organizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Marketing Association (AMA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Association of Computing Machinery (ACM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auto-Cross Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Business Professionals of America (BPA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crossroads Bible Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Diesel Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Digital Imaging Graphics in Technology (D.i.G.i.T.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Drag Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kappa Beta Delta Honor Society . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MERA/UNOH Ambassador Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Motorsports Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . National FFA Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . National Truck Equipment Association (NTEA) Intern Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Off-Road Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Politics Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . President’s Student Advisory Council . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Race Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ARCA (American Race Car Association) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Grand Am . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

57 57 57 58 58 58 59 59 59 60 61 61 61 61 62 62 62 62 63 63 63 63 63 64 64 64 64 64 65 65 65 65

3


TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S Over-the-Wall Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SEMA Intern Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Technical Support Team (Limaland Motorsports Park) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . UNOH Collegiate Optimist Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . UNOH Medical Assisting Student Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Student Conduct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Visitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Bookstore - Barnes & Noble at the University of Northwestern Ohio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Racers Cafe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Pit Stop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alumni Association . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

65 65 65 65 66 66 66 66 66 66 67 67 67

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

4

Grades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Incomplete Grade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Record Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Quality Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Grade Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MBA Grades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FERPA Annual Notification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Academic Integrity Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Request for Graduation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Degree Verification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Graduation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Degree Printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Official University Transcripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Second Chance Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Forgiveness Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . President’s List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dean’s List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Grade Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Awards: Academic Achievement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Proficiency Exams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Early/Late Exams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Portfolio Credit (Credit for Experiential Learning) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Definition of a Credit Hour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Advanced Standing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Class Absences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Withdrawal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Drop/Add . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Program Requirement (Catalog Year) Updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Academic Standings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Good Standing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Academic Warning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Academic Probation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Academic Suspension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Academic Dismissal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Class Level Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Academic Outcomes Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Evening Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Degrees for Adults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Distance Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Professional Practice Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Articulation Agreements with Other Colleges and Universities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

69 69 69 69 69 69 70 71 71 72 72 73 73 73 73 74 74 74 74 74 74 75 75 75 75 76 76 76 77 77 77 77 77 77 78 78 78 79 79 79 80


TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S International Experiences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Class Meeting Times . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . College of Applied Technologies Scheduling Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Class Load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dual Majors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inclement Weather . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Academic Adjustments Grievance Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Student Assistance and Grievance Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

80 80 80 81 81 81 81 82

GRADUATE COLLEGE Master of Business Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

85

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS Baccalaureate Degree Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associate Degree Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

87 93

COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS Baccalaureate Degree Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associate Degree Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Diploma Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

97 98 100

COLLEGE OF OCCUPATIONAL PROFESSIONS Baccalaureate Degree Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associate Degree Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Diploma Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Certificate Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

103 105 118 125

COLLEGES OF BUSINESS, HEALTH PROFESSIONS, & OCCUPATIONAL PROFESSIONS Courses of Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

127

COLLEGE OF APPLIED TECHNOLOGIES Associate Degree Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Diploma Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Courses of Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

161 168 177

ADMINISTRATION, FACULTY AND STAFF Board of Trustees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . President’s Cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Administration and Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Admissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Athletic Department . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Faculty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

185 185 185 188 189 190

ADVISORY BOARDS College of Business Advisory Boards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . College of Health Professions Advisory Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . College of Occupational Professions Advisory Boards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Graduate College Advisory Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guidance Counselor Advisory Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . College of Applied Technologies Industry Advisory Boards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

203 203 203 204 205 205

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN OHIO RESERVES THE RIGHT TO MAKE ANY CHANGES IN MATERIAL WITHIN THIS PUBLICATION WITHOUT NOTIFICATION AS DEEMED NECESSARY. 5


6


ACADEMIC CALENDARS UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN OHIO TENTATIVE CALENDAR 2011 - 2014 2011 August 2 8-19 10 11 & 12 22 24 25-26 29 29 September 1 2 5 12 12-16 16 23 29 29 October 3 10 10 28 November 4&5 10 11 14 18 21-23 23 24 & 25 December 1 15 12-16 22 23, 26, & 30

T: Session Ends T: Fall Vacation B: Preregistration Period for Fall Quarter Ends B: Fall Quarter Orientation at 9 a.m. T: Session Begins B: Last day of Summer Quarter Classes B: Summer Quarter Final Exams T: October Session Orientation at 9 a.m. B: Late Registration Period for Fall Quarter Begins B: Placement Testing* B: Late Registration Period for Fall Quarter Ends Labor Day - No School - Offices Closed B: Fall Quarter Begins B: Late Change Period for Fall Quarter B: Last day to add classes B: Preregistration Period for Winter Quarter Begins B: Placement Testing* T: Session Ends T: Session Begins Columbus Day - No School - Offices Closed B: Last day to drop classes w/WP B: Fall Open House and Scholarship Testing T: Fall Open House and Scholarship Testing T: Session Ends Veterans’ Day - No School - Offices Closed T: Session Begins B: Last day of Fall Quarter Classes B: Fall Quarter Final Exams Faculty/Staff Work Day Thanksgiving Holiday - No School - Offices Closed B: Preregistration Period for Winter Quarter Ends B: Placement Testing* B: Late Registration Period for Winter Quarter T: Session Ends Holiday Closings - No School

B: College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions T: College of Applied Technologies *Times to be announced. See the UNOH website or call 419-998-3193 for details. **New students and returning students will be scheduled by the Registrar’s Office at any time after the PreRegistration Period opens until the day before a quarter starts.

7


ACADEMIC CALENDARS 2012 January 2 3 3 10 13 16 31 February 9 13 20 29 March 8 9 12-14 19-23 20 21-27 28 April 2 2-9 6 9 9 13 13 20 & 21 30 May 3 7 15 & 16 28 30 June 8 10 11-13 14 14 18-22 18-22 25

8

Holiday Closing - No School - Offices Closed T: Session Begins B: Winter Quarter Classes Begin B: Last day to add classes B: Preregistration Period for Spring Quarter Begins** Martin Luther King Day - No School - Offices Closed B: Last day to drop classes w/WP T: Session Ends T: Session Begins President’s Day - No School - Offices Closed B: Preregistration Period for Spring Quarter Ends B: Placement Testing* B: Last Day of Winter Quarter Classes B: Winter Quarter Final Exams B: Late Registration Period for Spring Quarter T: Session Ends T: Spring Vacation T: Session Begins B: Spring Quarter Classes Begin B: Late Change Period for Spring Quarter Good Friday - No School - Offices Closed Students Excused / Faculty/Staff Work Day B: Last day to add classes B: Preregistration Period for Summer Quarter Begins** B: Spring Open House T: Spring Open House B: Last day to drop classes w/WP T: Session Ends T: Session Begins T: June Session Orientation at 9 a.m. Memorial Day - No School - Offices Closed B: Preregistration Period for Summer Quarter Ends B: Last day of Spring Quarter Classes Graduation B: Spring Quarter Final Exams B: Placement Testing* T: Session Ends B: Late Registration Period for Summer Quarter T: Summer Vacation T: Session Begins

B: College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions T: College of Applied Technologies *Times to be announced. See the UNOH website or call 419-998-3193 for details. **New students and returning students will be scheduled by the Registrar’s Office at any time after the PreRegistration Period opens until the day before a quarter starts.


ACADEMIC CALENDARS July 2 2-9 4 11, 12, 13 13 25 27 31 August 6-17 9 & 10 12 20 22 23-24 24-30 27 30 September 3 10 10-14 17 21 27 October 1 8 8 26 November 2&3 8 12 13 16 19-21 21 22 & 23 25 December 6 10-14 20 24, 25, 26, 31

B: Summer Quarter Classes Begin B: Late Change Period for Summer Quarter Independence Day Holiday - No School - Offices Closed T: August Session Orientation at 9 a.m. B: Preregistration Period for Fall Quarter Begins** B: Last day to add classes B: Last day to drop classes w/WP T: Session Ends T: Fall Vacation B: Fall Quarter Orientation at 9 a.m. B: Preregistration Period for Fall Quarter Ends T: Session Begins B: Last day of Summer Quarter Classes B: Summer Quarter Final Exams B: Late Registration Period Fall Quarter T: October Session Orientation at 9 a.m. B: Placement Testing* Labor Day - No School - Offices Closed B: Fall Quarter Begins B: Late Change Period for Fall Quarter B: Last day to add classes B: Preregistration Period for Winter Quarter Begins** T: Session Ends T: Session Begins B: Last day to drop classes w/WP Columbus Day - No School - Offices Closed B: Fall Open House and Scholarship Testing T: Fall Open House and Scholarship Testing T: Session Ends Veterans’ Day - No School - Offices Closed T: Session Begins B: Last Day of Fall Quarter Classes B: Fall Quarter Final Exams Faculty/Staff Work Day Thanksgiving Holiday - No School - Offices Closed B: Preregistration Period for Winter Quarter Ends B: Placement Testing* B: Late Registration Period for Winter Quarter T: Session Ends Holiday Closings - No School

B: College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions T: College of Applied Technologies *Times to be announced. See the UNOH website or call 419-998-3193 for details. **New students and returning students will be scheduled by the Registrar’s Office at any time after the PreRegistration Period opens until the day before a quarter starts.

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ACADEMIC CALENDARS 2013 January 1 7 8 8-14 15 21 February 5 14 18 19 March 15 18-20 26 27-April 2 29 April 1 3 8 12 15 19 & 20 May 6 9 13 21 & 22 27 June 9 14 17-19 20 24-28 July 1 8 4 15 16, 17, & 18

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Holiday Closing - No School - Offices Closed T: Session Begins B: Winter Quarter Classes Begin B: Late Change Period for Winter Quarter B: Last day to add classes Martin Luther King Day - No School - Offices Closed B: Last day to drop classes w/WP T: Session Ends President’s Day - No School - Offices Closed T: Session Begins B: Last Day of Winter Quarter Classes B: Winter Quarter Final Exams T: Session Ends T: Spring Vacation Good Friday - No School - Offices Closed Students Excused / Faculty/Staff Work Day T: Session Begins B: Spring Quarter Classes Begin B: Spring Open House B: Last day to add classes T: Spring Open House B: Last day to drop classes w/WP T: Session Ends T: Session Begins T: June Session Orientation at 9 a.m. Memorial Day - No School - Offices Closed Graduation B: Last day of Spring Quarter Classes B: Spring Quarter Final Exams T: Session Ends T: Summer Vacation T: Session Begins B: Summer Quarter Classes Begin Independence Day Holiday - No School - Offices Closed B: Last day to add classes T: August Session Orientation at 9 a.m.

B: College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions T: College of Applied Technologies


ACADEMIC CALENDARS August 2 B: Last day to drop classes w/WP 6 T: Session Ends 12-23 T: Fall Vacation 8&9 B: Fall Quarter Orientation at 9 a.m. 19 T: October Session Orientation at 9 a.m. 26 T: Session Begins 28 B: Last day of Summer Quarter Classes 29-30 B: Summer Quarter Final Exams September 2 Labor Day - No School - Offices Closed 16 B: Fall Quarter Begins 23 B: Last day to add classes October 3 T: Session Ends 7 T: Session Begins 14 B: Last day to drop classes w/WP 14 Columbus Day - No School - Offices Closed 25 B: Fall Open House and Scholarship Testing November 1&2 T: Fall Open House and Scholarship Testing 11 Veterans’ Day - No School - Offices Closed 14 T: Session Ends 18 T: Session Begins 22 B: Last Day of Fall Quarter Classes 25-27 B: Fall Quarter Final Exams 27 Faculty/Staff Work Day 28 & 29 Thanksgiving Holiday - No School - Offices Closed December 19 T: Session Ends 24, 25, 26, 27, & 31 Holiday Closings - No School 2014 January 1 6 6

Holiday Closing - No School - Offices Closed T: Session Begins B: Winter Quarter Classes Begin

B: College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions T: College of Applied Technologies

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OVERVIEW

A NOTE FROM THE PRESIDENT As president of the University, it is my pleasure to introduce you to the University of Northwestern Ohio. Through the years we have prepared people to take responsible positions within business and industry. I take great pride in being a part of an institution that has a goal of educating people to become productively employed in their chosen career path. Our accreditation from The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, coupled with the accreditation of our College of Applied Technologies by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation, ensures that you have made a good choice in investigating the University of Northwestern Ohio. I hope you decide to join our student body. The choice of a university at which to study is a major decision. Your future as a productive professional and a responsible citizen can be greatly enhanced by that decision. Thank you for considering the University of Northwestern Ohio, and I look forward to greeting you personally when you come to our campus.

Dr. Jeffrey A. Jarvis President

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OVERVIEW

WELCOME TO THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN OHIO The University is very proud of its facilities and welcomes visitors. The Admissions office welcomes tours Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Admissions office is also open for tours on Saturdays from 8:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. the first Saturday after Labor Day to the last Saturday before Memorial Day. Tours can be scheduled on the hour by calling 419-998-3120. If you suspect inclement weather, please call 419-998-9689 to verify that the University is open. If the University is delayed or closed, no tours will be given.

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The University of Northwestern Ohio is located at 1441 North Cable Road, Lima, Ohio 45805-1498. 419-998-3120

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OVERVIEW HISTORY Founded in 1920, the University of Northwestern Ohio is a private, not-for-profit institution. The University of Northwestern Ohio is a co-educational institution authorized by the Ohio Board of Regents to grant a Master’s of Business Administration Degree (M.B.A) in the Graduate College, baccalaureate degrees (Bachelor of Science) and associate degrees in applied business (A.A.B.) in the College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions, and associate degrees in applied science (A.A.S.) in the College of Applied Technologies. Diplomas are also granted in the Colleges of Health Professions, Occupational Professions, and Applied Technologies. The University of Northwestern Ohio’s enrollment averages 4,500 with approximately 1,600 students living in oncampus residence halls. A gymnasium, restaurant, student lounges and picnic areas are available for student enjoyment. The University is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. The Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP) accredits the University’s Accounting, Business Administration, Information Technology, Legal Office Management, Marketing, Medical Office Management, Office Management and Word Processing/Administrative Support associate degree programs. The Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) accredits the Medical Assistant Technology program. In addition, the College of Applied Technologies is accredited by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). The HVAC program is accredited by Partnership for Air Conditioning Heating Refrigeration Accreditation - Air-Conditioning Refrigeration Institute (PAHRA ARI). The Ohio Board of Regents provides authorization for the degrees, which are granted by UNOH’s Board of Trustees. The University of Northwestern Ohio is also authorized by the Tennessee Higher Education Commission. This authorization must be renewed each year and is based on an evaluation by minimum standards concerning quality of education, ethical business practices, health and safety, and fiscal responsibility.

MISSION STATEMENT The University of Northwestern Ohio is an entrepreneurial, not-for-profit institution of higher learning, preparing students for careers and productive citizenship that encompass the business, professional, corporate, and technological communities by providing quality education and training in response to the needs and aspirations of our constituents.

VISION STATEMENT 1. 2.

The University will evolve according to its entrepreneurial spirit. The University will pursue quality and excellence by enhancing accreditations and certifications which bring the University national recognition and prestige. 3. The University will assess and measure students’ academic performance and its institutional effectiveness, connecting the results to continuous improvement and the dedication of its resources. 4. The University will offer a diversified curriculum of programs valued by employers that are delivered in formats that meet the needs of students. 5. The University will grow in a manner that encourages and supports a diverse campus population. 6. The University will continually attract, retain, and encourage the development of a talented and qualified University family of employees. 7. The University will enhance its financial security and expand the strength of its resources. 8. The University will aggressively pursue student body growth. 9. The University campus will become the center of community life with improved aesthetics, facilities, and services. 10. The University will share its resources with community and global partners. 11. The University will exceed expectations in the service of students. 12. The University will continue to offer sports programs. 16


OVERVIEW VALUES STATEMENT The Five Guiding Principles of the University of Northwestern Ohio are: 1. Integrity The University of Northwestern Ohio operates with fairness, objectivity, and honesty in its services to all people. The University leads by example and remains steadfast when challenged. 2. Quality The University of Northwestern Ohio commits itself to high standards in all areas including educational activities, experiences, and learning outcomes. The University regularly evaluates and improves the quality of its services. 3. Learning The University of Northwestern Ohio continuously solicits feedback from stakeholders, using the results toward the ongoing pursuit of excellence. 4. Entrepreneurism The University of Northwestern Ohio operates with imagination, initiative, and a readiness to undertake new projects and risks. A strong sense of urgency drives its demanding expectations for sustainable growth. The University is alert to the changing needs of its stakeholders and is committed to making agile responses that create value for its clients. The University is a non-profit institution with an entrepreneurial spirit. 5. Diversity The University of Northwestern Ohio understands the vital role that diversity plays in the pursuit of the University’s mission and in preparing students to succeed in a global society. The University encourages people to make a difference by creating an environment free from barriers, where everyone is encouraged to achieve his/her full potential. The University takes pride in the diversity of its students, faculty, and staff, and it values their contributions.

GOALS STATEMENTS TO ACHIEVE THE VISION 1.

2.

3.

The University will evolve according to its entrepreneurial spirit. • It will research and acquire property and resources in order to expand the size of the campus and structures in correlation with the growing student enrollment. • The University will seek and attain partnerships and enter into commercial ventures. The University will pursue quality and excellence by enhancing accreditations and certifications which bring the University national recognition and prestige. • To serve community and regional organizations as volunteers and, where appropriate, encourage individual employees to serve in similar capacities. • To create and implement a well-conceived strategy to alter the perceptions of the local community to more accurately reflect the breadth and quality of the programs the University offers and the roles in which the University participates. • To review existing programming and pursue, where the opportunity is available, new professional certifications for degrees and diplomas. • To achieve continued OBR authorization. • To continue receiving 10-year HLC/NCA accreditations. • To maintain continued accreditation with ACBSP. • To maintain continued accreditation with AAMA. • To pursue ABA accreditation for Paralegal programs. The University will assess and measure students’ academic performance and its institutional effectiveness, connecting the results to continuous improvement and the dedication of its resources. • To expand the commitment toward the continuous improvement of all existing processes and services by establishing benchmarks for key functions in all departments and measuring performance against those criteria. • To maintain an assessment team, complete with an assessment coordinator and assistants. • To sustain strict self-assessment practices in all academic and non-academic areas. 17


OVERVIEW 4.

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The University will offer a diversified curriculum of programs valued by employers that are delivered in formats that meet the needs of students. • To continue a process for new program development that includes an analysis of key criteria and the input of a diversified team of faculty and senior staff. • To develop and offer new accredited degree programs. • To diversify the fields of study offered by the University. • To respond to the needs of students by offering co-curricular programming. • To expand delivery of credit and non-credit industry and business training and development programs. • To evaluate programs regularly to assure they are of value to students and employers and that they are desired career paths for students. • To continue delivering degree programming at remote locations through Distance Learning. The University will grow in a manner that encourages and supports a diverse campus population. • To develop and implement strategies that will allow the University to be more appealing to minority, foreign, and non-traditional students. • To perpetuate a culture that is accepting of students, faculty, and staff with diverse experiences and backgrounds. • To hire a more diverse staff and faculty. • To develop course offerings and counseling activities to ease the students’ transition to college and campus life and be prepared to handle diversity issues appropriately. • To have a coordinator whose responsibilities will include counseling, designing and implementing events and programs, collection and analysis of demographic information, and recruiting students of diverse backgrounds to the University. • To meet and exceed disability standards by evaluating and modifying the University’s technologies, services, accommodations, and other facilities to better serve learning and physically disabled students. The University will continually attract, retain, and encourage the development of a talented and qualified University family of employees. • To prepare resources and processes that facilitate the orientation and welcome of new employees. • To expand its system to recognize the achievements of employees. • To invest in the personal and professional growth of employees. • To enhance the University’s reputation as well as the rewards offered to employees in order to entice high-quality candidates. • To ensure the activities and responsibilities of all employees are aligned with the goals of the University. • To incorporate team-building activities into the development of all employees. The University will enhance its financial security and expand the strength of its resources. • To form new relationships with business and community organizations that create value for its constituencies and strengthen the financial resources of the University. • To build a successful Development Department. • To generate a change in net assets equal to 5% to 8% of revenues. • To maintain a business resumption plan to guide the continuance and/or re-creation of essential business processes in the event of a catastrophic occurrence. The University will aggressively pursue student body growth. • To create a consistent and sustainable approach to student retention that is successful in reducing student attrition to less than 25% in all programs. • To increase the credit hours delivered to traditional students by 5% per year. • To increase the credit hours delivered to non-traditional students by 15% per year. • To retain 10% of graduating students by attracting them to advanced degrees. • To increase the number of student residents by 5% per year. The University campus will become the center of community life with improved aesthetics, facilities, and services. • To use a committee of senior staff to study and implement a long-term strategy to renovate, expand, and improve the facilities and quality of the University campus. • To employ a consultant to work in conjunction with the committee to create the long-term strategic plan. • To prepare regular reports of committee and consultant activities and present them to the Presidential Cabinet and Board of Trustees.


OVERVIEW 10. The University will share its resources with community and global partners. • To share resources with community organizations in instances where common value can be created. • To expand the quality and quantity of events offered on campus that are open to the general public. • To partner with area businesses and organizations to offer benefits, facilities, and services on campus that students, employees, and the public are invited to attend and utilize. 11. The University will offer intercollegiate sports opportunities to its student body through the NAIA.

ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVES - INSTITUTIONAL GOALS Faculty at the University of Northwestern Ohio have identified six institutional goals for students to develop during their coursework. Graduates should possess the following abilities: • • • • • •

Oral, Written, and Visual Communication Mathematical Data Analysis Arts and Humanities Social and Behavioral Sciences Natural and Physical Sciences Competency in Major

Each course syllabus will cite the specific skills that are being developed in that course and program. Measurement and assessment of the institutional goals will occur in the Portfolio Capstone Course that students will complete before graduating. The University is involved in a four-year study with The Higher Learning Commission Assessment Academy to redefine these goals and general education.

MAJOR/DEPARTMENT GOALS AND OBJECTIVES Academic Outcomes Each department, both academic and non-academic, has identified Major/Department Goals. The academic goals and objectives are developed during the required courses for that major and are measured in embedded course projects and in activities that are administered during the Portfolio Capstone course which all students complete before graduation. Results from the measurement tools are tabulated and disseminated to department members in order to make adjustments to the coursework, lesson plans, textbooks, assignments, etc. to increase the students’ level of understanding for the major goals and objectives. These changes are documented and maintained by all departments. Institutional Effectiveness Goals Non-academic departments have also identified departmental goals and objectives. These goals and objectives outline how the department will fulfill its mission statement. Measurement tools have been identified for nonacademic departments, and the results from the measurement tools are shared among department members and across departments. These results help the non-academic departments consistently improve the services they provide to all potential and current students as well as alumni and members of the communities the University serves.

GENERAL EDUCATION PHILOSOPHY Mission Statement: To provide a positive and diverse learning experience which develops students’ knowledge, skills, and attitudes, enabling success in their fields and personal growth through lifelong learning.

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OVERVIEW Vision: More than ever, in today’s world a meaningful college education goes beyond studying in one’s major field or training for a specific career. General education is a curriculum that supports and complements our institutional goals by providing students the opportunity to achieve a breadth of knowledge, understanding, skills, and values that will help students adapt to change and be informed and productive students, workers, and citizens. To serve these purposes, students will take courses in the following areas: Oral, Written, and Visual Communications • Students should develop interpersonal, written, and oral communication skills as well as recognize non-verbal cues. • Students should develop competencies with writing and reading, to express their own thoughts and to comprehend the writing of others. • Course areas will include composition as well as electives students may choose. Mathematical Data Analysis • Students should engage in abstract and quantitative ways of thinking and problem solving, using mathematical operations and logic. • Specific math courses will be determined by program. Arts and Humanities • Students should recognize the value of human experience and thought as shown through art, philosophy, ethics, history, and popular culture. • Course areas will include literature, philosophy, history, political science, and popular culture. Social and Behavioral Sciences • Students should understand human behavior on the individual and group level and methods of inquiry used within these fields. • Course areas will include communication, economics, politics, psychology, and sociology. Natural and Physical Sciences • Students should develop knowledge of science and its applications to make observations, draw conclusions, and evaluate scientific information. • Course areas will include a science course and a laboratory course. University Studies • Students should develop an awareness, understanding, and respect for a variety of cultures and how they differ from one’s own, to better live and work in an increasingly interconnected world. • Students will be introduced to various learning techniques and methods to enhance their educational experiences and contribute to success in college and beyond. • Courses will include cultural diversity and other areas of enrichment. Students will achieve different levels of Institutional Goals depending on their degree level.

COMMITMENT TO DIVERSITY Diversity at UNOH refers to social differences, the intersections and interactions among identity categories such as background, perspective, values, culture, race, ethnicity, religion or secularism, age, gender identity, sexual orientation, physical and mental abilities, and economic status. Embracing diversity has the positive potential to broaden thinking, enhance experiences, and solve problems in unique ways. Therefore, the University of Northwestern Ohio recognizes, embraces, and seeks to enhance representations of diversity within its student body and family of employees.

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OVERVIEW LEGAL STATUS The University of Northwestern Ohio, Inc. is organized and chartered as a not-for-profit corporation under the laws of the State of Ohio.

ACCREDITATIONS The Higher Learning Commission of The North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (HLC/NCA) The Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs upon the recommendation of the Curriculum Review Board of the American Association of Medical Assistants Endowment (CRB-AAMAE) Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP) National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) Partnership for Air Conditioning Heating Refrigeration Accreditation – Air-Conditioning Refrigeration Institute (PAHRA ARI)

AUTHORIZATION The Ohio Board of Regents

APPROVALS Authorized by the Tennessee Higher Education Commission, Nashville, TN State of Ohio Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (for the training of disabled students) State of Ohio Department of Education (for the training of veterans)

MEMBERSHIPS Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP) - at the Associate Degree Level Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) American Association of Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO) American Association of Higher Education and Accreditation (AAHEA) American Council on Education (ACE) American Institute for Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) American Parts Rebuilders Association (APRA) American Refrigeration Institute (ARI) American Society of Travel Agents (ASTA) American Vocational Association (AVA) American Welding Society (AWS) Association of Diesel Specialists (ADS) Association on Higher Education and Disability (AHEAD) Association on Higher Education and Disability--Ohio Division (AHEAD-OH) Association of Independent Colleges and Schools of Ohio (AICUO) Association of Small Computer Users in Education (ASCUE) Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) Automobile Race Club of America (ARCA) Automotive Aftermarket Industry Association (AAIA) Automotive Engine Rebuilders Association (AERA) Automotive Parts and Accessories Association (APAA) Automotive Service Association (ASA) Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Automotive Service Industry Association (ASIA) Business Professionals of America (BPA) College English Association of Ohio (CEAO) Cooperative Education Association

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OVERVIEW The Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL) EduCause Industry Planning Council (IPC) Kappa Beta Delta Honor Society Microsoft IT Academy Midwest Association for Student Financial Aid Administrators (MASFAA) Midwest Institute for International/Intercultural Education (MIIIE) Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) Modern Language Association (MLA) Motor and Equipment Manufacturers Association (MEMA) National Academic Advising Association (NACADA) National Adobe Photoshop Professional Organization (NAPP) National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC) National Association for Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA) National Association of College Admissions Counselors (NACAC) National Association of College Stores National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) National FFA Organization National Hot Rod Association (NHRA) National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) National Truck Equipment Association (NTEA) North American Council of Automotive Teachers (NACAT) Ohio Association for College Admission Counseling (OACAC) Ohio Association for Counseling and Development Ohio Association for Student Financial Aid Administrators (OASFAA) Ohio Catholic Education Association (OCEA) Ohio College Association (OCA) Ohio Counseling Association (OCA) Partnership for Air Conditioning Heating Refrigeration Accreditation (PAHRA) Professional and Organizational Development Network in Higher Education (POD) Refrigeration Service Engineers Society (RSES) Society for Automotive Engineers (SAE) Specialty Equipment Market Association (SEMA) Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE) United States Auto Club (USAC) Vocational Industrial Clubs of America (VICA)

NORTHWESTERN TRAVEL SERVICE The University of Northwestern Ohio owns a full-service travel agency located right on campus serving corporate, administration and student travel needs.

NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY The University of Northwestern Ohio is committed to a policy of non-discrimination. It admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin, gender identity, age, and sexual orientation to all the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the University. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.

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OVERVIEW COUNSELING AND ADVISING SERVICES The University of Northwestern Ohio provides counseling and advising services for all students. University counselors are available to discuss social or personal adjustment issues and to provide contact information on local doctors and mental health counselors. Students are also encouraged to visit the Counseling Office to seek assistance with coursework, potential grade point average, and personal conflicts, as well as discuss campus issues regarding academic progress, absences, and drug and alcohol policies. Additionally, the Counseling Office promotes several multicultural and wellness programs on campus each year. OutReach: OutReach is a support group for members and allies of the GLBTQ (Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgendered, and Questioning) community. This group meets twice a month to address personal and campus concerns, along with events happening throughout the world and in the media. The purpose of the group is to form friendships and support in a comfortable and safe environment. For more information on the group, when it convenes and location, please contact Danielle McClure at dmyers@unoh.edu or Robyn King at rking@unoh.edu. Domestic Violence Support Group: This support group is for students who have been or are currently involved in a relationship where physical, emotional, verbal, or sexual abuse was present. The group meets one time per week for one hour. The group is available to provide support for the students who have experienced domestic violence and support from others who have been in similar situations. For more information on this support group, please contact Tracey Harris at 419-998-8823 or tharris@unoh.edu. Counselors are available to help students in the College of Applied Technologies and academic advisors are available to help students in the College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions select or change major, set educational goals, and understand the scheduling and planning process of completing their degree/diploma requirements. Students who have questions should contact the Advising Office, Registrar’s Office or members of the Counseling Department. Students enrolled in the College of Business, the College of Health Professions, or the College of Occupational Professions may also meet with the Dean of the Colleges of Business, Health Professions, and Occupational Professions. Students enrolled in the College of Applied Technologies may meet with the Deans and Associate Deans of the College of Applied Technologies.

ACADEMIC SKILLS LAB The Academic Skills Lab assists students with academic difficulties when a student has problems understanding the textbooks, course requirements, tests or exams, has been placed on academic probation, or is having difficulties of any kind. The Lab serves students by helping them improve their study skills, by remediation in basic skills, and by accommodating learning disabilities with adaptive adjustments to ensure equal access and academic success in all of the programs. The Academic Skills Lab is located in the 500 Building. Students who would like additional assistance for written papers or projects can email the assignment to writinghelp@unoh.edu 48 hours prior to the due date. When sending a paper or project, please include the following:

• • • • • • •

Name Due Date Instructor Course Type of Assignment and/or Requirements of Assignments The most important thing(s) I need help with regarding this assignment If you have access to an electronic version of a rubric or directions for the assignment, you can also attach those documents with your work. The more information you provide the better.

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OVERVIEW Mathematics Lab The UNOH Mathematics Lab is open to all undergraduate students and is free of charge. For specific dates and times that the lab is available, please contact James Nastally, Mathematics Lab Coordinator/Academic Skills Assistant, at janastal@unoh.edu or 419-998-3157. The UNOH Mathematics Lab: • Strongly emphasizes students’ desires to learn and understand any and all math material that they are given so they can master the material once leaving the lab. • Is designed to place students more at ease with any anxiety concerning math. • Takes great pride into making any math course more fun, enjoyable, and more self-fulfilling for every student who has a goal in mind of becoming a great business/technical professional. • Understands that students learn at their own pace, hence the staff is supportive and patient in the learning process. What to Expect in the UNOH Mathematics Lab: • All students who use the Mathematics Lab is to sign in on the Mathematics Lab Sign-In Sheet to keep track of traffic flow in the lab to evaluate for future endeavors for the lab. • Come prepared with pencils, paper, books, calculators, etc. Computers will be provided in both the Skills Lab and Room 5207 for courses that require the use of software and online programs. • Have at least tried to work through some of the homework to give the Mathematics Lab staff a better understanding of where students’ struggles are with certain material. What the UNOH Mathematics Lab is NOT: • A replacement for the classroom. For students to fully understand their courses, they must first understand the expectations and directions of their instructor to complete assigned material successfully. Instructors have the option to deviate from their syllabus at will, and it is the students’ responsibility to be aware of the changes to the course that an instructor or professor makes. • A substitute for missed classes. The Mathematics Lab cannot compare with instructors’ direction and expectations, as stated from the previous bullet point. Students are advised to keep in contact with instructors or professors when missing a class period. • A last-minute resort before an exam, midterm, or final examination. The Mathematics Lab cannot replace weeks of material into a few hours of tutoring. It is advised that students are seen in the Mathematics Lab frequently throughout the week to grasp a better understanding of the various material covered in their courses. Tips for Using the UNOH Mathematics Lab: • Stop into the Mathematics Lab the first day of class just to introduce yourself and know whom to meet once problems start to arise throughout the course. • Become acquainted with peers in your math course and form study groups. Having familiar faces to work with while in the Mathematics Lab will help to create better success once leaving the lab. • Do similar problems to your assigned course work with the answers in the back of the book to grasp a better understanding of the material. • Be patient with the Mathematics Lab staff, and they will be patient with you. Students learn on a different platform than the rest of their peers. The learning process is slow when tackling new material; but with time and patience, anything is possible with the right attitude and approach. Students with Disabilities Students who used an IEP (Individualized Education Plan) or 504 plan in high school should bring a copy of their most current plans and accommodations to the Academic Skills Coordinator to be put on file. The University upholds reasonable accommodations for the students who have a plan that is preferably no more than three years old. A student’s IEP or 504 may be brought, mailed, or faxed to the attention of Danielle McClure.

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OVERVIEW Tutors Student tutors are available to students who seek assistance through the Skills Lab. Tutors must have previously taken the class and earned a B or higher in order to be eligible for tutoring. The cost of tutoring is $8 an hour--the student and the University each pays $4. If a student is interested in finding a tutor or becoming a tutor, please stop by the Academic Skills Coordinator’s office to complete an application. Academic Skills Computer Lab The Academic Skills Computer Lab is located on the first floor of the 500 Building. There are 20 computers equipped with numerous software programs for students. Books on tape are also provided for those students who have reading disabilities, through the program WYNN Reader. The computer lab has assistants available throughout the day for any questions that students may have about the programs. Academic Skills Lab Location and Hours The Academic Skills Coordinator’s office is located on the first floor of the 500 Building. Hours: Academic Skills Coordinator Academic Skills Computer Lab -

Monday through Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. *Special arrangements may be made to accommodate students if necessary. Contact Information Danielle McClure, MRC, PC, Director of Counseling & Academic Skills 1441 North Cable Road, Lima, OH 45805 419-998-3157 (office) 419-998-8826 (fax) dmcclure@unoh.edu

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ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES Admission. The Admissions Department will accept applications from high school seniors in an accredited high school after the completion of their junior year. High school juniors can make an application to UNOH at the university’s open houses held each spring. The Admissions’ and Registrar’s offices verify that the high school is a state-recognized and accredited institution. Future students may apply online at www.unoh.edu or be interviewed by an Admissions Representative. During this interview, the Representative will explain the majors in detail, answer questions regarding the University and discuss career opportunities. Applications for enrollment will be completed by the applicants and forwarded to the administrative staff for review. After applicants go through the selection process, they will be notified of acceptance or refusal within four weeks. If accepted, this notification indicates a conditional acceptance contingent upon final transcripts and other appropriate materials after graduation from high school. At the time of application, a $20 application fee must be paid. ACT/SAT scores are recommended but not required. Students who take the ACT/SAT exams may use those scores for placement tests. The University of Northwestern Ohio may deny admission to any applicant for any reason not prohibited by law, including conviction of a crime or the fact that the applicant has been subject to discipline at another academic institution. Students will be asked periodically to complete a disclosure form indicating whether or not they have been arrested for or convicted of a crime. The purpose of the disclosure form is to identify potential threats to the UNOH community. Every disclosure of an arrest or conviction will be evaluated on an individual basis. However, students may be subject to discipline for arrests and convictions up to and including expulsion from UNOH. In addition, failure to disclose an arrest or conviction constitute grounds for discipline up to and including expulsion from UNOH. Questions regarding this policy should be directed to the Director of Safety Services. Acceptance. Students will be accepted at the University on one of two levels. The first is Full Acceptance (upon receipt of the final transcript), which means that no restrictions are placed upon the students. The second is Probational, which means that students are being accepted for one academic quarter/session on the condition that normal scholastic progress is achieved. If a student does not start within a year of completing his/her enrollment application, the new tuition rate and program iteration will apply.

TIME OF ADMISSION Students are admitted at the beginning of each term, according to the dates in the catalog. Students may not begin after the term starts. Only students who are graduates of an accredited high school or its equivalent are eligible to be awarded a diploma or degree by the University. Students should submit proof of graduation before they may begin classes unless they are in an early admissions or post-secondary options program. Students who have been homeschooled must also present proof of graduation and other appropriate documentation.

ACCREDITED HIGH SCHOOL TRANSCRIPTS These transcripts from accredited high schools must be sent directly from your school to the University of Northwestern Ohio. We do not accept hand-delivered or faxed transcripts as official documents. In order for the transcript to be considered official, the following information must be included: • Date of Graduation • Imprint/Raised Seal • Signature of School Official • G.P.A. - Cumulative • Rank of Student 27


ADMISSIONS If your school does not have a raised seal or does not rank students, it must be noted on the transcript by the school official.

STUDENTS WITH A GED Students who have completed a GED from the State of Ohio must request an official copy of test scores be sent directly to the Office of the Registrar. Students with a GED from a state other than Ohio can submit a copy of their test scores for verification.

HOME SCHOOLING Students who have been home-schooled must provide the following documentation as the final transcript:

• • • • •

Transcript outlining all courses taken Course descriptions of courses taken Grades received in those courses Date of completion of all requirements for graduation Documentation outlining a curriculum approved by the state where the student was home-schooled

The transcript must be signed by the person certifying it and be notarized to be considered official.

EVIDENCE OF GRADUATION Students must have evidence that they have been granted a diploma from a state-recognized and accredited high school to be accepted at the University of Northwestern Ohio. Any questions about special circumstances or certificates or a GED should be directed to the Registrar’s Office. College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions students have one quarter and College of Applied Technologies students have two sessions to provide proof of high school graduation. Students without proof of graduation after the deadline may be put on hold and denied further enrollment until proof of graduation is provided. Evidence that students have not graduated will prevent scheduling for any future term.

ORIENTATION Students are encouraged to attend an orientation session prior to starting classes. Orientation is an informative session during which the students and parents will receive information about housing, financial aid, fees, career services and scheduling. The housing move-in activities and procedures will also be explained. The purpose of orientation is to make the transition from high school to the University of Northwestern Ohio an easy one. If students cannot attend orientation, they will be mailed the information and receive a follow-up call from the New Student Coordinator. The Colleges of Business, Health Professions, and Occupational Professions hold orientations before each quarter where placement testing and scheduling are completed. Students who do not complete placement testing before their starting term may be required to take the developmental courses required in their program, EN070 Basic English, MH065 Review Math, and KY080 Keyboarding for Beginners.

DEGREE-SEEKING STUDENTS / UNDECLARED MAJORS Degree-seeking students enroll for the purpose of completing diploma or degree programs. Students may declare a major at the time of enrollment or enter as an undeclared major. Undeclared majors may declare majors at any time. However, because of the sequence of major courses, it will take longer to graduate.

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ADMISSIONS NON-DEGREE-SEEKING STUDENTS Non-degree-seeking students do not intend to complete diploma or degree programs. These students may take a maximum of 12 credit hours and must then declare a major and complete the regular application process. Non-degree seeking students must meet all course prerequisites and will be placed on academic hold which will require the Registrar’s Office to schedule classes. The hold will be removed if a major is declared.

TRANSIENT STUDENTS Students from other colleges who wish to enroll at the University of Northwestern Ohio for a limited time or a specific course can be admitted as transient students. They should contact the Registrar of their current college to determine transferability of UNOH courses. These students may take a maximum of 12 credit hours; after completion, to continue, they must declare a major and complete the regular application process. Transient students must meet all course prerequisites and will be placed on academic hold which will require the Registrar’s Office to schedule classes. The hold will be removed if a major is declared.

TRANSFER STUDENTS Students who transfer from another accredited college must have an official transcript of their college courses sent directly from their original college to the Office of the Registrar at the University of Northwestern Ohio for evaluation of credit. Credit may be granted for comparable course descriptions and credit hours in which students have received a grade of C or better. A maximum of 135 quarter hours for baccalaureate degree programs, 81 quarter hours for associate degree programs and 54 quarter hours for diploma programs may be transferred from other institutions. A maximum of 20 credit hours will be transferred into the general education component of the associate of applied science degree. Diploma students are required to complete their general education course requirements through the University of Northwestern Ohio. Computer and other technical courses will need to be retaken if not taken within a recent time period, usually three years. Students may receive credit for courses in several ways: by completing the courses satisfactorily, by passing proficiency exams, by demonstrating experiential learning through portfolio development or by transferring credits. Students who present evidence of ASE certification (College of Applied Technologies - degree program only) may take a “hands-on” test to gain credit. Proficiency exams may be taken by all students--traditional and Virtual College. Students who have attended an institution that is nationally but not regionally accredited may have their credits transferred conditionally. Upon the successful completion (2.00) of one quarter of full-time work (College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions) or two sessions (College of Applied Technologies), the transfer credits will be recorded on their permanent transcripts; otherwise, the credits will be recorded when a 2.00 is achieved. Students who have earned an appropriate associate degree from an accredited institution can transfer 90 hours into the 2+2 baccalaureate courses with junior status. Students who have not earned an associate degree will have their transcripts evaluated on a course-by-course basis. MBA students may transfer in a maximum of 8 credit hours from a graduate program at another regionally accredited institution. Students in the MBA Program must complete 40 quarter credit hours with the University of Northwestern Ohio. In order to receive credit for transfer courses, the student must have earned an average grade of B or better in graduate courses. Students who wish to transfer to other institutions should contact the Registrar at that college or university for information about transferability of credit.

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ADMISSIONS INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS Students from other countries are offered the opportunity to study at the University of Northwestern Ohio. To be admitted to the University, international students must meet the following admissions requirements:

• •

• • •

Students must submit the University’s Application for Enrollment and an official copy of a secondary level or high school academic record indicating successful completion of the program. (International students completing their last year of secondary level education in the U.S. as exchange students must submit an academic record from the U.S. high school they currently attend as well as the school they last attended in their home country. A letter should also be submitted from a high school official [i.e. guidance counselor] who is familiar with the students’ academic progress, recommending the students for the majors they have selected.) If students have previously attended colleges or universities, official copies of these records must also be submitted. All records should be submitted in English. Students who are from countries where English is not the dominant or common language must also submit one of the following results: IELTS (International English Language Testing System): 5.5 minimum required score TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language): 61 - internet-based test The University defines the requirement of the dominant or common language. The application fee of $50 must be in U.S. currency and accompany the application for enrollment. Financial aid for international students is not offered by the University of Northwestern Ohio. Therefore, students are required to submit documentation of sufficient financial resources to meet university expenses. If students are sponsored by an individual or other source, an official letter of verification from that sponsor must also be submitted. All records need to be translated in English by an acceptable source.

After students submit the above-mentioned items, the University will review the materials and will issue Form I-20, Certificate of Eligibility, if all required items are in order.

RESIDENCY REQUIREMENT Generally, the University of Northwestern Ohio requires students to take a minimum of 45 credit hours from the University for a baccalaureate degree, 27 credit hours for an associate degree and 18 hours for diploma programs. This requirement is modified for Military personnel.

TESTING Placement testing serves two purposes. First, it helps the University determine abilities in English, mathematics, and keyboarding. Second, it places students in the correct course level, either college-level courses or courses that prepare students for college-level courses. To help students succeed, the University provides developmental assistance. For those students who demonstrate a need for help, MH065 Review Math, EN070 Basic English, and KY080 Keyboarding for Beginners are required. These credits are not counted in the accumulative total of credits required for graduation. Students from all colleges are permitted to submit valid ACT or SAT scores for placement into college-level courses. Any student scoring 18 or higher on the ACT English or math test or SAT scores of 450 in writing or math is not required to take tests for placement in college-level courses. College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions Business students are evaluated in English and math. Students scoring below 70% on the tests are required to take EN070 Basic English and/or MH065 Review Math. Students in select majors may have to take the test in keyboarding. Those students scoring below 25 net words per minute and/or scoring more than five errors on the keyboarding timing test are required to take KY080 Keyboarding for Beginners. 30


ADMISSIONS Retesting Policy: The University of Northwestern Ohio follows the COMPASS Retest Policy provided by ACT. Therefore, retesting is only appropriate when there is reason to believe that the examinee’s score does not accurately reflect his or her knowledge or skill. Retesting is appropriate under two circumstances: (1) when performance is influenced by factors other than ability and (2) when there is a significant change in the examinee’s ability. Retesting is considered on an individual basis, and all requests should be submitted in a letter to the Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs. There is a $25 retesting fee. College of Applied Technologies Students will be evaluated in writing and math through a placement test given in UN100 First Year Experience. For students who demonstrate a need for help (scoring below a 70% on the English and/or math placement tests), MH065 Review Math and/or EN070 Basic English are required. If students have taken ACT or SAT tests before matriculating, those scores may be used. Any student scoring 18 or higher on the ACT English or math test or SAT scores of 450 in writing or math is not required to take tests for placement in college-level courses.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT Advanced Placement credit will be granted to students taking college-level courses in high school on the following basis: Advanced Placement Examinations College Entrance Examination Board University of Northwestern Ohio Minimum Credit Hours University of Northwestern Ohio Subject AP Test Score Given Course English Language & Composition 4 5 EN180 Composition I History American History 3 3 HI285 U.S. History–1870 to Present Mathematics Mathematics 3 5 MH169 Business Math Political Science Am. Gov. & Politics 3 3 PS274 American Political Scene Psychology Psychology 5 3 PY177 Introduction to Psychology Advanced Placement test scores in other subject areas may be evaluated for credit in technical, general education, or specialized courses at the 100 or 200 level.

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION Regularly enrolled students in the College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions may request proficiency examinations for advanced standing in some 100-level courses. See the Registrar for applicable classes. Special exams may be given in other classes. Microsoft certifications may serve as credit competencies for DP117, DP150, and WP138. MOS tests must be completed in the current version of Microsoft Office, Office 2010. Students in the College of Applied Technologies must successfully complete both written and hands-on portions of the proficiency exams to receive credit. Proof of ASE certification will suffice as the written portion of the proficiency exam. Proficiency exams may be taken only once and must be taken prior to scheduling for a course. A charge is made for this service.

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ADMISSIONS CREDIT FOR EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING The University of Northwestern Ohio believes that life experiences provide people with measurable opportunities for learning. Students who feel their lifelong learning could be evaluated should set up an interview with the Dean of the Colleges of Business, Health Professions, and Occupational Professions. At that time, the feasibility of the request will be determined; and, in cases where it appears to be a viable option, students should enroll in a one-hour course in Prior Learning Assessment. The assessment of previous learning will be based on the detailed portfolio which will include verification and documentation of experience as well as evidence of college-level learning. A maximum of 40 hours may be earned. A charge is made for evaluation of the portfolio. Credit may be given for PONSI, CLEP, DANTES, and ACE recommendations.

HIGH SCHOOL ARTICULATION AGREEMENTS The University of Northwestern Ohio has a partnership with many area high schools/career centers/vocational schools to grant enrolled students articulation credit if certain course requirements are met through their high school/vocational center. The University of Northwestern Ohio offers articulation credit in the College of Business, College of Health Professions, College of Occupational Professions, and the College of Applied Technologies. Information about schools that currently have articulation agreements with the University of Northwestern Ohio can be gained by contacting the Registrar’s Office. If an agreement has been established with the school, then students should visit their secondary school counselor to have their articulation application completed. All completed applications should be returned to the Registrar’s Office.

TECH-PREP PROGRAMS Through the Tech Prep Consortium, the University of Northwestern Ohio has entered into an arrangement with area career centers/vocational schools to offer articulation credit in automotive technology. Students should contact the counselors at their career centers/vocational schools to have them complete the application form.

EARLY ADMISSIONS PROGRAM With the approval of their high school principals, high school seniors may enroll for business or technological classes at the University of Northwestern Ohio. Interested students should check with their high school principals or guidance counselors.

POST-SECONDARY OPTION The Post-Secondary Option program allows appropriately qualified high school students the opportunity to participate in college-level courses while still attending high school. High school juniors and seniors should have a 3.00 g.p.a. to participate; freshmen and sophomores must have a 3.5 g.p.a. to participate. High school students must meet the University requirements for prerequisite courses and maintain satisfactory progress to continue in the program. Students will be required to take English and math placement tests before enrolling into an English or math course prior to the quarter’s beginning. The Post-Secondary Option program is available fall, winter and spring quarters. Proficiency tests for other courses are available at a cost of $50 each. Grades are available on-line for both traditional and Virtual College students and are sent to the high school counselor each quarter. The Post-Secondary Option is offered through the following delivery methods: Virtual College. Students complete all of the work via the Internet. Each student must have Internet access with a computer and the required software for classes. Weekly contact is made with the instructor. All Virtual College students are required to take UN100 First Year Experience the first quarter. This course prepares the students for the Virtual College experience. 32


ADMISSIONS Traditional Classes. The student will attend regularly scheduled classes and follow the guidelines given by the instructors.

DUAL ENROLLMENT In an effort to strengthen our partnerships with area high schools, the University has instituted a dual enrollment program. This program is designed to enhance the academic rigor of high school curricula and give high school students the opportunity to earn college credit without leaving their home high school. Students must have a 3.00 high school accumulative average or be recommended by their high school guidance counselor. Partnering high schools will teach a duplication of a UNOH course within a regularly scheduled high school class. High school teachers must meet college qualifications standards and are mentored by University administrative staff. The standard application fee will be waived for dual enrollment students. Students must earn a passing grade to receive college credit.

MBA ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Students will be required to submit an application and application fee to the Admissions Department. Application deadlines will be posted with the Admissions Department and online. An MBA student selection date will be also be posted. All applicants will be notified of admittance or waiting list status. Admission into the MBA Program will be granted after review of the application materials by the Admissions Department, the MBA Director, and the Vice President for Academic Affairs/Provost. If applicant numbers are within the allotted number of students being accepted for that quarter, students with a 3.0 or better will be admitted unconditionally; students between a 2.5 – 2.99 will be accepted with conditional acceptance. If enrollment exceeds the sections being offered, potential students will be ranked based on undergraduate g.p.a. Deficiency and prerequisite areas will also be considered. Baccalaureate degrees transferred from an institution with national accreditation will be entered after two quarters of attendance at the University. At that time, the student must be in Good Standing (3.00 g.p.a.). Four areas of prerequisite have been outlined. These areas are: Accounting Marketing Finance Economics Students not meeting these prerequisites at the baccalaureate or graduate level will be required to complete their deficiencies either in a module format for pass/fail credit or be taken as a traditional course for credit. The MBA program is 18 months in length (six quarters) and begins each spring and fall. On-campus MBA students typically schedule two web-enhanced courses per quarter. A web-enhanced course features a combination of traditional and virtual settings. In a typical four-credit hour course students will average two hours on campus and two hours online each week (rather than four hours on campus). Attendance on campus is mandatory, but students are given some flexibility with virtual requirements. Class times consist of lecture, group work, assessments, etc. Virtual requirements include exploration of course material via message board discussion with peers and instructors, article review and summary, assessments, etc. Additionally, lecture information, assignments, course information, and supplemental materials are made available to students on the course website. The MBA on-line degree has no mandatory on-campus time. Academic Requirements. The following procedure was established to monitor student progress.

If a student fails a course the first time, the Registrar’s Office will notify the student in writing that he or she has only one more chance for a retake. Students will be allowed to retake an MBA course only one time; any additional requests will require a written appeal to the MBA committee.

A cumulative g.p.a. of 3.00 must be maintained to be in Good Standing in the MBA program. 33


ADMISSIONS •

Academic standing will be as follows: Acceptance Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3

Conditional (2.5 – 2.99) Probation Dismissed

Full (above 3.0) Warning Probation Dismissed

Action Registrar letter issued

Conditionally accepted students will go on probation the first quarter they are under 3.00 because their conditional acceptance serves as a warning.

These academic requirements do not have to be sequential quarters.

The MBA program will follow the same academic guidelines as other programs.

The MBA program must be completed within five years. Students are encouraged to maintain continuous enrollment in the program, but a student may apply for a temporary leave with the appropriate documentation. Only two leave periods may be taken during enrollment in the program. If a student withdraws for a leave period, he or she will be subject to any iteration changes that may have been made to the program and may, therefore, have additional coursework required in order to complete the program. The tuition at the time of re-admittance will be in effect. Transfer information can be found on Page 29. For information on grading, please see Page 69.

ARMY ROTC Overview Army ROTC is an elective that students take along with their required college classes that teaches them the skills needed for a successful career. Students combine classroom time with hands-on experiences and learn leadership and management skills. It prepares them with the tools, training, and experiences that will help them succeed in any competitive environment. Because it’s an elective, students can try it out for their freshman and sophomore years without incurring any obligation to serve in the military. If they decide they are up to the challenge of leading in the world’s best armed forces, they continue on to the advanced courses of Army ROTC while completing their degree. Students will have a normal college student experience like everyone else on campus, but at graduation they are commissioned as a Second Lieutenant to serve on active duty or with the Army Reserves or National Guard. Take Army ROTC for a semester, 1 year, 2 years, or all 4 years Traditionally, Army ROTC is a four-year program. The first two years are taken in the freshman and sophomore years (Basic Course). Keep in mind, students can take the Basic Course on a trial basis for up to two years (unless, of course, students are on an Army ROTC scholarship or contracted). The ROTC courses must be taken on the Bowling Green State University campus in Bowling Green, Ohio, once a week. The second two years are taken in the junior and senior years (Advanced Course). And, during the summer between the junior and senior years, students will attend Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC), which will give them hands-on training and the confidence they can’t learn in a classroom. It is a four-week summer course to evaluate and train all Army ROTC Cadets. What will you learn? During the Basic Course, studies will include: Basic Leadership Development, Basic Military Skills, Adventure Training, and Life Skills. During the Advanced Course, studies will include: Advanced Leadership and Management Skills, Advanced Tactics, and Army Ethics. Whether students take Army ROTC for a semester, two years, or all four years, they will have the skills, confidence, and experience needed to succeed after they graduate in whatever career they decide to pursue. 34


ADMISSIONS ROTC Courses (Bowling Green Courses) MSL100 Lifetime Leadership Skills (3 quarter hours) Skills needed to be successful in wide range of environments to include academic, corporate, and military. Subjects include, but not limited to, time management, memory comprehension, effective and efficient reading, and effective note taking. Extensive leadership studies of both corporate and military settings focuses on interpersonal skills, professional ethics, and officership. No military obligation or prerequisites. MSL101 ROTC and the National Defense Organization (3 quarter hours) Background, programs, benefits, and objectives of Army ROTC. Organization and functions of national defense establishment, with emphasis on the role of the U.S. Army. Extensive discussion of the role and responsibility of the military officer. Presentation of detailed information concerning career opportunities as an Army officer. MSL201 Leadership/Officership (3 quarter hours) Theoretical and practical leadership instruction. Examination of several aspects of communication and leadership concepts such as written and oral communication, effective listening, assertiveness, personality, adult development, motivation, and organizational culture and change. Emphasis on developing intellectual curiosity and clarifying practical applications. No military obligation. Prerequisite: MSL101 or permission of department. MSL202 Military Tactics (3 quarter hours) Army tactics, principles of engagement and usage of military maps. Simulation exercises and war games will be utilized in class highlighting military tactics. No military obligation. Prerequisite: MSL201 or permission of department. MSL301 Professionalism/Leadership (5 quarter hours) Professionalism and leadership required of the U.S. Army officer; application of leadership principles and styles through case studies and role-playing exercises with emphasis on military situations. Participation in leadership labs, physical training program, and field training exercises required. Prerequisites: Department permission and completion of one of the following: ROTC basic course at BGSU; ROTC Basic Camp at Fort Knox, KY; prior active duty service; Army Reserve or Army National Guard basic training. MSL302 Small Unit Operations (5 quarter hours) Organization and employment of basic military teams. Squad- and platoon-level tactical operations. Progressive leadership development through application of tactical principles. Participation in leadership labs, physical training program, and field training exercises required. Prerequisite: Department permission. MSL401 Unit Management and Officer Development (5 quarter hours) Concepts and fundamentals of Army unit administration, supply and material readiness. Professional officership techniques and military ethics. Management at the small unit level. Organizing, planning, and participating in field training exercises, participation in physical training and leadership labs. Prerequisite: Department permission. MSL402 Military Law and Leadership (5 quarter hours) Organization and concepts of the U.S. Army judicial system including court martial, non-judicial and punitive actions. Fundamentals of the military decision making process. Discussions of various administrative details pertinent to newly commissioned lieutenants. Participation in field training exercises, physical training and leadership labs. Prerequisite: Department permission.

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ADMISSIONS MSL470 Studies in Military Science (3-5 quarter hours) On demand. Detailed study of selected military subjects. Offered on lecture basis in seminar or independent study depending on students’ needs and nature of material. May be repeated to six hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

MILITARY VIA DISTANCE LEARNING The University of Northwestern Ohio was named a 2010 Military Friendly School by G.I. Jobs magazine ranking UNOH in the top 15% of all colleges, universities, and trade schools nationwide. The University is a member of the GoArmyEd portal and the Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges consortium, consisting of more than 1,500 universities and colleges that provide college-level educational opportunities for service members, veterans, and their spouses. Use the power of the Internet and the University of Northwestern Ohio’s Distance Learning to earn an entire associate or baccalaureate degree online, with absolutely no on-campus requirements. Through the College of Distance Learning, students can complete 100% of their education online in specific majors, including all coursework, registration, and purchasing books. Students earn their degrees in the most convenient and efficient way possible, because the University utilizes an asynchronous format that allows students to participate at anytime, anywhere that works best for them. The University also provides a special rate for military personnel, spouses, veterans, and dependents. The College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions rate is $165 per credit hour for traditional and online classes. Students in the College of Applied Technologies, Graduate College, and one-night-aweek programs receive a 10% discount off tuition. Military Withdrawal UNOH offers special circumstance extensions or withdrawals for students who find themselves deployed or sent on military mission assignments after starting a class or classes. Any service member who is eligible for a special extension or withdrawal is required to contact the Registrar’s office, the ESO, the course instructor(s), and the military relations office (Randy Gonzalez) when deployment or other circumstances will make it impossible to complete coursework within the scheduled time frame. Service members who provide documentation of deployment or other acceptable reason to the Military Relations Office at the time of a withdrawal for military purposes may have their catalog year for program requirements maintained for a period of up to one year from the date of withdrawal. If the deployment period exceeds one year, the student must submit documentation of the date of return to the Military Relations Office and re-enroll in the next available term after returning from deployment. Students in the College of Applied Technologies may also have their tuition rate maintained for the same period of time. Documentation must be provided to the military affairs representative, Randy Gonzalez, before withdrawing in order to be eligible for this policy. In the absence of documentation, the withdrawal will be processed according to standard procedure. In case of unexpected deployment, the University may provide for forgiveness of University charges not covered by eligible financial aid or military benefits. Deployment orders must be submitted to the University of Northwestern Ohio Military Relations Office no later than 14 calendar days after the first date of employment.

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TUITION TUITION PAYMENT PROCEDURES Tuition and fee payments are due on or before the first day of each term. Failure to make payment may result in inability to schedule for future terms and/or non-release of transcript. Payments can be made by mail, on-line, or in person at the Cashier’s Office on or before the first day of class. The University accepts cash, bank check, money order and credit cards, including VISA, MasterCard, Discover, and American Express. Cashier’s Office hours are from 7:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m., Monday and Wednesday, and 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Tuesday, Thursday and Friday. Students returning to the University after a term or any portion of a term off must pay all past due fees before scheduling. Upon leave, fee rates increase to the rate in effect when the student returns. For your payment convenience, payment plans are available each term. Students wishing to take advantage of the payment plan option should contact the Cashier’s Office prior to the start of the term. Unpaid balances or late payment plans can result in a “financial hold” being placed on a student’s account. A financial hold may result in any or all of the following: - Student may not be scheduled for subsequent term. - Schedule for next term may be removed. - Transcripts will not be released. - Diploma/degree will not be released.

TUITION REIMBURSEMENT Any student who receives tuition reimbursement may defer payment until the end of each term. Deferment is dependent upon receipt by the University (on or before the first day of class), a signed reimbursement plan form with a satisfactory commitment from the employer to reimburse the University for tuition, fees and other charges. Amount of tuition deferment is based upon the employer’s reimbursement policy. Charges in excess of reimbursement must be paid on or before the first day of class. A new reimbursement plan must be submitted by the first day of each term. Forms are available at the Cashier’s Office or on-line at www.unoh.edu.

REFUND POLICY Students should familiarize themselves with the University’s refund policy. The refund policy determines if any credit is due to students if they withdraw from school or reduce enrollment. The “refund period” is when the University of Northwestern Ohio may not charge 100% of the tuition if the student withdraws. Please refer to the official withdrawal policy as stated on Page 76 to determine date of withdrawal. If students decide not to attend the University, the $20 application fee will be refunded if requested within 30 calendar days after signing the enrollment agreement and making an initial payment or if students are not accepted by the University. All housing deposits are non-refundable.

COMPLETE WITHDRAWAL POLICY Tuition and fees are charged on a quarterly basis in the College of Business, College of Health Professions, College of Occupational Professions, and Graduate College and per six-week session in the College of Applied Technologies. Students who are enrolled in classes and then completely withdraw will be subject to the following policy. • 38

Students who withdraw on or before the second day of the term are credited 100% tuition. Dorm fees are prorated to the day the key is returned to housing/security and an exit sheet is completed.


TUITION •

Students who completely withdraw on or before the eighth (8th) calendar day of the term are entitled to 75% credit of tuition billed for that term.

Students who completely withdraw on or before the fifteenth (15th) calendar day of the term are entitled to 50% credit of tuition billed for that term.

Students who completely withdraw on or before the twenty-second (22nd) calendar day of the term are entitled to 25% credit of tuition billed for that term.

Students who withdraw after the twenty-second (22nd) calendar day of the term will not receive credit of tuition billed for that term.

Withdrawal policy does not apply to dual enrollment students. Dual enrollment students are not eligible for a tuition credit or refund.

The University of Northwestern Ohio adheres to the federal policy for the return of Title IV funding. The Higher Education Amendments of 1998 (HEA98) represent the requirements in the Return of Title IV Federal Financial Aid when a student withdraws from the University. This policy governs all federal grant and loan programs (as listed below), but does not include the Federal Work-Study Program. Federal law requires that a student earn his/her federal financial aid awards in proportion to the number of days in the term prior to the student’s complete withdrawal. The portion of the federal grants and loans to which the student is entitled to receive or has earned is calculated on a percentage basis by comparing the total number of days in the term to the number of days that the student completed before he/she withdrew. For example, if a student completes 40% of the term, he/she earns 40% of the approved federal aid that he/she was originally scheduled to receive for the term. This means that 60% of the student’s scheduled or disbursed federal aid remains unearned and must be returned to the federal program(s). Once the student completes 60% of the term, he/she has earned 100% of his/her financial aid. Thus, no financial aid will be returned. The refund percentage is determined by dividing the number of days the student attended in the quarter/session by the number of days in the quarter/session. This calculation may result in the student’s overpayment in one or more of the Title IV programs. Students in an overpayment situation will be responsible to the school to make restitution for the overpayment. In accordance with the federal policy, unearned aid will be returned in the following order. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Unsubsidized Federal Family Educational Loan Subsidized Federal Family Educational Loan Parent Loan for Undergraduate Student PELL Grant ACG Grant FSEOG Other Title IV Programs (except for Federal Work-Study)

This policy does not affect the student’s charges. The University’s withdrawal policy will be used to determine the reduction, if any, in the student’s tuition and/or room and board charges. The student is responsible for paying any outstanding charges to the University. The University will document the official withdrawal date as the date the University Services or Counseling Department receives either verbal or written notification from the student. For students who do not contact these offices to withdraw, an unofficial withdrawal date will be the date the Registrar or Counseling Department is notified by the instructor that the student is no longer attending classes. Unofficial withdrawals may have a greater adverse effect on financial aid and/or tuition costs than the official withdrawal.

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TUITION Students who withdraw from classes during the refund period are subject to repaying a percentage of their grants and student loans in accordance with Federal Law and the University of Northwestern Ohio’s refund procedures.

COURSE DROP POLICY When a course is dropped, but the student has not completely withdrawn, the following institutional policy is used in determining the adjustment to tuition. •

Students who drop one or more courses on or before the second (2nd) calendar day of the term will be credited 100% tuition for that course/courses.

Students who drop one or more courses on or before the eighth (8th) calendar day of the term will be credited 75% tuition for that course/courses.

Students who drop one or more courses on or before the fifteenth (15th) calendar day of the term will be credited 50% tuition for that course/courses.

Students who drop one or more courses on or before the twenty-second (22nd) calendar day of the term will be credited 25% tuition for that course/courses.

Students who drop one or more courses after the twenty-second (22nd) calendar day of the term will not receive tuition credit for that course/courses.

Students’ financial aid may be adjusted whenever they add or drop classes or completely withdraw. Refunds, both to financial aid and/or the student, will be made within 30 days after the student’s date of withdrawal (the date the student notifies the Registrar’s Office) as determined by the records of the University.

MEDICAL WITHDRAWAL POLICY Students who withdraw due to their own medical condition must present to the Counseling Office medical documentation indicating that they were unable to attend classes during the period of time they were absent and/ or state they cannot continue with classes. This documentation must be received within ten business days after the withdrawal is processed. Students who withdraw with approved medical documentation will be withdrawn from their courses on the date they notify the University of their withdrawal; however, a grade of WP/WS (Withdrawn Passing/Satisfactory) will be entered as the grade for the courses. Students without medical documentation will be assigned a grade of WP/ WS (Withdrawn Passing/Satisfactory) or WF/WU (Withdrawn Failing/Unsatisfactory) according to the established dates for making that determination. Tuition charges in all instances will be based on the date of notification for the withdrawal. Students withdrawing for approved medical reasons with documentation submitted at the time of withdrawal may have their catalog year for program requirements maintained for a period of up to one year from the date of withdrawal. Students in the College of Applied Technologies may also have their tuition rate maintained for the same period of time. In order to be eligible for this action, documentation must be provided in a timely manner at the time of withdrawal or immediately thereafter. In the absence of documentation, the withdrawal will be processed according to standard procedure.

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FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS GENERAL INFORMATION The following information is about the financial aid programs and processes at the University of Northwestern Ohio. Financial aid programs are used to support the remaining costs when the student and/or family have demonstrated the need for these resources to enable the student to attend and graduate from the institution. Actual costs of attendance include tuition and general fees, housing, meals, and an estimate for books and miscellaneous living expenses, such as laundry and transportation to and from home. The University requires the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to determine eligibility for financial assistance programs administered by the Financial Aid Office. These funds are made available to students in the quarters or sessions they are enrolled in. The calendar year that students can receive financial aid when applying for assistance starts in the Summer Quarter (College of Business, College of Health Professions, College of Occupational Professions, and Graduate College) or June Session (College of Applied Technologies) and continues through the Spring Quarter or May Session respectively. To receive assistance for future academic years, students must have reapplied for their financial aid by completing the “Renewal FAFSA” as soon as possible after January 1, but not later than April 1, to meet the quarter or session billing statement due date. Undergraduate students must be registered for a minimum of half-time (6 hours in the College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions and 3 hours in the College of Applied Technologies) to be eligible to receive financial assistance including Federal and private student or parent loans. Students who are registered for less than full-time (full-time is 12 hours in the College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions and 6 hours in the College of Applied Technologies) will have proportional eligibility for Federal and State grants. All graduate students in the Master’s of Business Administration program must be registered for a minimum of halftime or 4 hours in the Graduate College to be eligible to receive financial aid assistance from the Federal Direct Student Loan programs. Full-time is 8 hours. The only funds that MBA students are eligible for are generally the Federal Direct Student Subsidized and Unsubsidized Loans (see loans).

GRANTS Grants are financial aid awards that do not require repayment. They are available to eligible students usually based upon financial need. Federal Pell Grant The Federal Pell Grant can provide financial support to students who have the highest financial need. Students can apply for the Federal Pell Grant by completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid Form (FAFSA). A student must be an undergraduate to receive a Federal Pell Grant. The regulations define an undergraduate as one who is enrolled in an undergraduate course of study and who has not earned a baccalaureate degree. Federal Pell Grants are prorated based on a student’s enrollment status and expected federal contribution. These funds are available for up to 18 quarters of attendance. Students may be eligible for more than nine months (three quarters in the College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions or six sessions in the College of Applied Technologies) of Federal Pell Grant funds within the same academic year if they meet the requirements set by the Department of Education. In order to receive more than nine months of Pell eligibility, students must be enrolled at least half-time, they must have received 100% of their first scheduled award, and they must have completed an academic year, or 36 credit hours, or they must be attempting their 36th credit hour within the second scheduled award period.

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Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) The Federal SEOG is another aid source of grant assistance for students with high need and who are eligible for the Federal Pell Grant. Students can apply for the FSEOG grant by completing the FAFSA. The funds are provided to the University and are then awarded by the Financial Aid Office. There is no separate application for the program.


FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS Ohio College Opportunity Grant The Ohio College Opportunity Grant is a state-funded grant available to eligible Ohio residents who demonstrate financial need with an EFC of 2190 or less. The grant is to be applied to tuition and general fees only. Students must be enrolled in an associate or baccalaureate degree program to receive the Ohio College Opportunity Grant. Students can apply by completing the FAFSA form. The application deadline is the last Friday in September of the award year. These funds are available for up to 15 quarters of attendance.

LOANS Loans are available to eligible students and/or their parents through a variety of need-based and non-need-based programs. Typically, student loans are offered at low interest rates and need not be repaid while the student is enrolled at least halftime. Interest rates and repayment varies according to the terms of the individual programs. Most loans require the student to complete the FAFSA form. All student loan borrowers are required to complete entrance counseling to learn about rights and responsibilities as a borrower before the first Federal Direct Student Loan funds can be disbursed. Exit loan counseling is required if the student graduates, drops to less than half-time, or withdraws. Federal Direct Education Loans The Federal Direct Education Loan Program is a set of Federal student loan programs that includes the Federal Direct Student Loan (subsidized and unsubsidized) and the Federal Direct Parent PLUS loan programs. Federal Subsidized Direct Student Loan (Undergraduate - Dependent and Independent) Under this program students are not charged any interest as long as they meet enrollment requirements (Enrolled on at least a half-time basis). The interest rate is fixed at 3.4% for subsidized loans disbursed beginning July 1, 2011. (The annual grade level amounts are noted below.) Federal Unsubsidized Direct Student Loan (Undergraduate - Dependent and Independent) This program is available to students who were either limited or determined to be ineligible for the Federal Subsidized Direct Student Loan. The amounts per grade level are the same as for the Federal Subsidized Direct Student Loan; however, the student is responsible for the interest charges while in school. In addition, all students are eligible for an additional Unsubsidized Federal Direct Student loan of $2000 per year. The interest rate is fixed at 6.8% for Unsubsidized Federal Direct Student borrowers with loans disbursed beginning July 1, 2011. (The annual grade level amounts are noted below.) Annual Amounts for dependent undergraduate students per grade level are: $5,500 Freshman (0-35 credit hours) $3,500 Subsidized/Unsubsidized + $2,000 Unsubsidized $6,500 Sophomore (36-89 credit hours) $4,500 Subsidized/Unsubsidized + $2,000 Unsubsidized $7,500 Junior, Senior (Baccalaureate Program) $5,500 Subsidized/Unsubsidized + $2,000 Unsubsidized (90 or more credit hours) Annual Amounts for independent undergraduate students per grade level are: $9,500 Freshman (0-35 credit hours) $3,500 Subsidized/Unsubsidized + $6,000 Unsubsidized $10,500 Sophomore (36-89 credit hours) $4,500 Subsidized/Unsubsidized + $6,000 Unsubsidized $12,500 Junior, Senior (Baccalaureate Program) $5,500 Subsidized/Unsubsidized + $7,000 Unsubsidized (90 or more credit hours) Annual Amounts for independent graduate (MBA) students are: $20,500 (Master of Business Administration) $8,500 Subsidized/Unsubsidized + 12,000 Unsubsidized NOTE: Current total borrowing lifetime loan limit for the Federal Direct Student subsidized and unsubsidized loan is $31,000 as an undergraduate dependent student and $57,500 as an undergraduate independent student. The graduate or professional lifetime loan limit is $138,500. 43


FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS Federal Direct Parent PLUS Loans This program is available to parents of dependent students to meet any remaining costs that other financial aid does not cover. Repayment on the PLUS loan usually begins within 30 days after the loan is fully disbursed by the lender; however, delayed repayment and deferment provisions are available. Family income is not a criterion in obtaining parental loans, but a good credit history is required. The interest rate is fixed at 7.9% for loans disbursed after July 1, 2011. Private Loan Programs There are alternative loans available for students needing additional aid. An alternative loan is a loan in which the student may borrow additional money to cover any remaining education expenses. These loans are based on creditworthiness of the borrower, and in many cases a co-borrower, and are, therefore, not guaranteed. In-school deferments of repayment, flexible repayment options, and co-borrower release options are available. For borrowers and co-borrowers with excellent credit, the rate will in most cases be lower. For more information, students should contact the University of Northwestern Ohio’s Office of Financial Aid or visit www.unoh.edu/fastchoice. Charles E. Schell Foundation - Fifth Third Bank, Trustee The Charles E. Schell Foundation Grant Program is an interest-free loan made available through the generosity of the Charles E. Schell Foundation. The individual recipients are asked to repay their interest-free loan to create a revolving loan fund at the University for future students. To be eligible students must: • Be enrolled at the University with an overall g.p.a. of 2.0 or better • Be between the ages of 15 and 25 • Be a resident of Ohio, Kentucky, West Virginia, or adjoining states • Be a citizen of and born in the United States • Have parents who are citizens of and were born in the United States • Have completed at least 36 credit hours To apply students must: • Complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) • Complete the Schell Grant Application • Meet with the Director of Financial Aid and Controller for an Entrance Interview • Sign the UNOH/Schell Grant Promissory Note, when notified of approval

EMPLOYMENT Students may be able to participate in Federal College Work-Study. This program allows students to work and earn money toward meeting expenses. Eligibility for College Work-Study is determined by filing the FAFSA form. College Work-Study is subject to the availability of job positions for which students can meet employment requirements. Students employed under the College Work-Study Program will be paid directly on a bi-weekly basis.

AWARD NOTICES Electronic Award Notices should be electronically reviewed through MyUNOH on the University website. This acknowledgment allows us to reserve these funds for the student when he/she enrolls. Reductions or cancellations of awarded funds should be submitted by email to financialaid@unoh.edu within a (5) five-day time period to ensure proper application of the funds to a student’s account.

VETERANS’ EDUCATIONAL BENEFITS The University of Northwestern Ohio is approved for veterans’ training in associate and baccalaureate degree programs. Numerous diploma programs in the College of Applied Technologies are also approved for benefits. This program provides eligible veterans enrolled in courses with monthly benefits through the Veterans Administration. A full-time veterans’ services officer is available to assist veterans with enrollment and counseling. 44


FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS Military personnel and veterans who are in the College of Applied Technologies and the degrees for adults (including the MBA degree) are entitled to a 10% discount on unpaid tuition only while attending the University of Northwestern Ohio. This discount is contingent upon receipt of a copy of the students’ military ID or DD214. (Other military personnel and veterans who are in the College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions can receive a reduced tuition rate due to their military status but are not eligible for the 10% discount.) Dependents of military veterans are also entitled to a 10% discount on unpaid tuition with the following conditions: – Dependents are classified as born children, step-children, or adopted children, and spouses. – Dependents are claimed by veterans on the most recent IRS income tax returns (exception granted for dependent children of deceased veterans). – Veterans are enrolled in DEERS or are military ID cardholders. – Military veteran dependent children must have matriculated at the University by the age of 21. – Awards will be made available in the current and future terms of enrollment once the documentation has been received. – Dependent and spouse scholarship recipients must also follow the scholarship requirements listed on Page 47. This includes the requirement that these awards are renewable provided students maintain a minimum accumulative g.p.a. of 2.5. One session or quarter of probation will be granted if students fall below an accumulative 2.5 g.p.a.

MAINTAINING FINANCIAL AID (Satisfactory Academic Progress) The University of Northwestern Ohio must publish the standards for satisfactory academic progress that students must meet to be eligible to receive Title IV financial assistance. These programs include the Federal Pell Grant, the Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, the Federal Direct Student Loans, Federal Parent PLUS Loans, and Federal College Work-Study Funds. The following policy for satisfactory academic progress is being provided to students in accordance with federal law. Students are expected to assume the major responsibility for their own progress and to carefully review these guidelines to maintain these standards required for their own individual eligibility and aid continuation. Students who receive Title IV financial aid must maintain satisfactory academic progress while attending the University of Northwestern Ohio in order to continue their financial aid assistance. A student must maintain a cumulative grade point average (g.p.a.) at or above the minimum standard described in the scale below. In addition, students must complete a cumulative minimum of 67% of their attempted coursework for the quarter or session. Total Hours Attempted 1-15 16-30 31-45 46-60 61-75 76 or more

Minimum Cumulative GPA 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 2.0

After each quarter and session, the financial aid staff will also review the students’ progress for those receiving Title IV aid. Depending on the students’ progress, the students’ standing will be determined as follows: Satisfactory Progress—applies to students who successfully complete the required standards for the quarter or session and financial aid is continued. Financial Aid Warning—applies to students who fail to successfully complete the required attempted number of credit hours to meet the 67% completion rate percentage or who do not meet the required accumulative g.p.a. The Financial Aid Office will notify students of this status relative to financial assistance. Students in this category may continue to receive financial aid for the following quarter or session but must satisfactorily complete the required number of attempted credit hours and achieve an overall grade point average equal to the stated standards.

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FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS Financial Aid Probation—applies to students who have failed to successfully complete the required attempted credit hours to meet the 67% completion rate percentage or have failed to achieve a grade point average equal to the stated standard. However, these students have successfully appealed to the Financial Aid Appeals Committee and have been granted approval to receive financial aid for one more session or quarter. Financial Aid Suspension—applies to students who have failed to successfully complete the required attempted credit hours to meet the 67% completion rate percentage or have failed to achieve a grade point average equal to the stated standard. The Financial Aid Office will notify students of immediate termination of their financial aid. Students who receive grades of “incomplete” for one or more courses must make arrangements with their instructors to have this grade finalized. Students must contact their instructors within two weeks of returning to the University for the next quarter in the College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions and within the first week of the College of Applied Technologies (as required). Failure to make arrangements with the instructors or failure to correct the “incomplete” grade will change the grade to an F; the course must then be retaken. Students may repeat a previously passed course only once with the use of financial aid. Students who withdraw from classes during the refund period are subject to repaying a percentage of their grants in accordance with the Federal Law and the University of Northwestern Ohio’s refund procedures. Maximum Time Frame Federal regulations require each institution to establish a percent maximum time frame in which students must complete their programs. The maximum time frame must not exceed 150% of the published length of the program measured in credit hours attempted. Appeal of Financial Aid Suspension Students who are suspended from further financial aid for failure to meet satisfactory academic progress have the right to an appeal. Students who wish to file for an appeal must notify the Director of Financial Aid or Assistant Director in writing within two weeks from the date the student’s financial aid was suspended. Students who file for an appeal must describe in writing first, the circumstances as to why satisfactory academic progress was not made and second, the actions that have been or will be taken to make satisfactory progress in the future. Documentation supporting the explanation of the appeal must be attached. Appeals submitted without documentation may not be considered. The Financial Aid Appeals Committee will review the appeal and determine whether the Financial Aid Suspension is justified. The student will be advised, in writing, of the decision. If appeals are approved, students will be placed on financial aid probation and will receive a quarter or session of financial aid during which they must receive at least a 2.0 accumulative g.p.a. (C average) or meet the minimum standard of the academic scale as well as complete the minimum standard of 67% of their attempted coursework to be removed from financial aid suspension.

SCHOLARSHIPS Scholarship awards are gift awards and may be based on merit or criteria other than financial need as determined from filing the FAFSA. Similar to grants, scholarships also do not have to be repaid. Numerous scholarships are available to students attending the University of Northwestern Ohio through gifts to the University in the names of generous donors who wish to assist students. Students who receive University of Northwestern Ohio-sponsored scholarships in both the College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions and College of Applied Technologies must meet and maintain the requirements and understand their responsibilities as noted on the following page:

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FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS Scholarship Requirements: • Scholarship awards will be divided over the number of sessions or quarters in the academic program. • Scholarship awards are applicable for the original major enrolled. (A Financial Aid Counselor should be consulted if a change in major occurs.) • Scholarship awards must be used for tuition only (excluding lab fees, books, and housing). • Scholarship awards require students to start by January following high school graduation. (For students who elect to join the armed services after high school graduation, scholarship awards require students to start within one year of being honorably discharged.) • Scholarship awards are void if students withdraw for more than one session or quarter over the course of their program. Exceptions: military duty/medical reasons, with verification. • Scholarship awards are renewable provided students maintain a minimum accumulative g.p.a. of 2.5. One session or quarter of probation will be granted if students fall below an accumulative 2.5 g.p.a. Student Responsibilities: • Students will return at the University’s current tuition rate if they withdraw, excluding a withdrawal for an approved exception. • Student violation of any student code of conduct rule that leads to suspension from the University will result in immediate loss of Scholarship awards. The following scholarships are sponsored by the University of Northwestern Ohio and can be applied for by new students only. Students will be notified of their selection with a Scholarship Certificate and Scholarship Agreement. All scholarships awarded by the University of Northwestern Ohio are subject to final review by the University of Northwestern Ohio Scholarship Committee. College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions Allen County Junior Miss Program – To be considered, students must have participated in the Allen County Junior Miss Program. – The winner receives a $10,000 scholarship to be used at the University of Northwestern Ohio. – All other participants receive $500 scholarship to be used at the University of Northwestern Ohio. Bob Snyder Business Scholarship - High School Juniors and Seniors – To be considered for these scholarships, students take tests during spring open house. – Scholarships will be awarded based on the placement in general business test: - 1st place: $3,000 - 6th place: $1,500 - 2nd place: $2,700 - 7th place: $1,250 - 3rd place: $2,500 - 8th place: $1,000 - 4th place: $2,000 - 9th place: $750 - 5th place: $1,750 - 10th place: $500 – Students must submit high school transcripts from a state-recognized and accredited institution, have at least a 2.0 g.p.a., and place above the 50th percentile on the scholarship test. Business Professionals of America – OH, MI, and IN state competition level only (new students only) – To be considered, students must place in: · Financial Services - Fundamental Accounting, Advanced Accounting; · Administrative Support - Keyboarding Production, Fundamental Word Processing, Advanced Word Processing Skills, Integrated Office Applications, Basic Office Systems and Procedures, Advanced Office Systems and Procedures, Legal Office Procedures, Medical Office Procedures, Administrative Support Research Project--Individual, Administrative Support Concepts--Open Event · Information Technology - Computer Security Concepts, Digital Media Production, Information Technology Concepts--Open Event · Management Marketing/Human Resources - Graphic Design Promotion, Presentation Management--Individual, Management/Marketing/Human Resources Concepts--Open Event - 1st place: $3,000 - 2nd place: $2,500 - 3rd place: $2,000 47


FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS Irene Barnett Scholarship – To be considered, students must have attended an Allen County high school – $1,000 – Must have a 3.0 g.p.a. – Must submit letter of intent postmarked by May 1 – Must submit letter of recommendation from the high school – Students will be selected by the University Scholarship committee. Licking – – –

County Junior Miss Program To be considered, students must have participated in the Licking County Junior Miss Program. The winner receives a $2,500 scholarship to be used at the University of Northwestern Ohio. All other participants receive $500 scholarship to be used at the University of Northwestern Ohio.

Miss West Central Ohio Scholarship Program – To be considered, students must have participated in the West Central Ohio Pageant. Counties included are Allen, Auglaize, Darke, Defiance, Hancock, Hardin, Mercer, Paulding, Putnam, Van Wert, or Wood. – The winner receives a $10,000 scholarship to be used at the University of Northwestern Ohio. – All other participants receive $500 scholarship to be used at the University of Northwestern Ohio. Putnam – – –

County Junior Miss Program To be considered, students must have participated in the Putnam County Junior Miss Program. The winner receives a $10,000 scholarship to be used at the University of Northwestern Ohio. All other participants receive $500 scholarship to be used at the University of Northwestern Ohio.

Senior UNOH Business Scholarships – To be considered for these scholarships, students take tests during fall open house. – In the categories of: Accounting, Business Administration, Computer Technology, Medical Technology, and Office Technology. - 1st place: Full tuition for traditional class work only, not to exceed 108 credit hours for Associate Degree or 180 credit hours for Baccalaureate Degree. - 2nd place: $6,000 - 3rd place: $3,500 – The top three students in each testing category must submit a high school transcript. Final selection will be based upon the score on the scholarship test, high school accumulative g.p.a. (on a 4.0 scale), and high school attendance record. College of Applied Technologies ACTE Secondary Level - Award for Excellence – A student from the winning high school selected by ACTE will receive an auto technology scholarship for full tuition, not to exceed $25,000. ARCA Scholarship - Incoming Freshmen Only – To be considered, students must be seeking a primary degree in High Performance Technology. – Have financial need – Must have a 2.5 g.p.a. – Scholarship request submitted to ARCA at www.arcaracing.com and forwarded to UNOH – Students selected by the University Scholarship Committee – Awards will be provided annually for up to $10,000 per year

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Bob Hall Technical Scholarship - High School Juniors and Seniors – To be considered for these scholarships, students take tests during spring open house. – A written, multiple choice test will be given to high school juniors and seniors only. – Winners will be selected by the top test scores in the auto, diesel, agriculture and HVAC/R area. - 1st place: $3,000 - 2nd place: $1,500


FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS Emerson Climate Technologies Scholarship – To be considered, students must be seeking a primary degree with a preference in HVAC – For current UNOH students only – A minority US citizen under current Federal guidelines – Have financial need – Students selected by the University Scholarship Committee – Amounts ranging up to $2500 FFA Agricultural/Electrical Contest Scholarship Competition – These scholarships are provided to State winners who are from Michigan. - 1st place: $3,000 each - 3rd place: $1,500 each - 5th place: $1,000 each - 2nd place: $2,500 each - 4th place: $1,000 each FFA/Tractor Troubleshooting Contest Scholarship Competition – These scholarships are provided to State winners in teams of two who are from: CT, FL, GA, IL, IN, KY, ME, MA, NC, NH, OH, RI, TN, VA, VT, and WI. - 1st place: $10,000 each - 6th place: $3,000 each - 2nd place: $6,000 each - 7th place: $2,000 each - 3rd place: $5,000 each - 8th place: $1,000 each - 4th place: $5,000 each - 9th place: $1,000 each - 5th place: $4,000 each - 10th place: $1,000 each – These scholarships are provided to State winners who are from Michigan. - 1st place: $10,000 each - 6th place: $1,000 each - 2nd place: $8,000 each - 7th place: $1,000 each - 3rd place: $6,000 each - 8th place: $1,000 each - 4th place: $5,000 each - 9th place: $1,000 each - 5th place: $4,000 each - 10th place: $1,000 each – These scholarships are provided to State winners in teams of four who are from: DE, MD, NJ, NY, and PA. - 1st place: $7,000 each - 3rd place: $4,000 each - 5th place: $1,000 each - 2nd place: $5,000 each - 4th place: $2,000 each Ford/AAA National Quality Challenge Scholarship Competition – These scholarships are provided to the State winners in teams of two in auto who are from: CT, DE, FL, GA, IL, IN, KY, MD, ME, MA, MI, NC, NH, NJ, NY, OH, PA, RI, TN, VA, VT, WV, and WI. - 1st place: $10,000 each - 6th place: $3,000 each - 2nd place: $6,000 each - 7th place: $2,000 each - 3rd place: $5,000 each - 8th place: $1,000 each - 4th place: $5,000 each - 9th place: $1,000 each - 5th place: $4,000 each - 10th place: $1,000 each * Note: For all other states: first place winners only receive - $5,000 each – These scholarships are provided to the National winners in teams of two in auto who are from: CT, DE, FL, GA, IL, IN, KY, MD, ME, MA, MI, NC, NH, NJ, NY, OH, PA, RI, TN, VA, VT, WV, and WI. - 1st place: Full tuition, not to exceed $25,000 - 6th place: $8,000 - 2nd place: $10,000 - 7th place: $7,500 - 3rd place: $9,500 - 8th place: $7,000 - 4th place: $9,000 - 9th place: $6,500 - 5th place: $8,500 - 10th place: $6,000 Michigan Industry Technology Education Society (MITES) – These scholarships are provided to students in the Michigan Industry Technology Education Society (MITES). Scholarships are awarded to the following places: - 1st place: $10,000 each - 6th place: $1,000 each - 2nd place: $8,000 each - 7th place: $1,000 each - 3rd place: $7,000 each - 8th place: $1,000 each - 4th place: $6,000 each - 9th place: $1,000 each - 5th place: $5,000 each - 10th place: $1,000 each

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FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS Michigan Industry Technology Education Society (MITES) - Quick Service Competition – These scholarships are provided to students in the Michigan Industry Technology Education Society (MITES) Quick Service Competition. Scholarships are awarded to the following places: - 1st place: $2,500 each - 2nd place: $2,000 each - 3rd place: $1,500 each - 4th place: $1,000 each - 5th place: $1,000 each Niagara Frontier Automotive Technology Competition – These scholarships are provided as a result of the competition sponsored by the Niagara Frontier Automobile Dealers Association, Inc. Scholarships are awarded to the following places: - 1st place: $5,000 - 2nd place: $4,000 - 3rd place: $3,000 Richard – – – – – –

Darrell Fry Scholarship To be considered, students must be seeking a primary degree in Diesel Technology For current UNOH students only Have financial need Must have a 3.0 UNOH g.p.a. Students selected by the University Scholarship Committee Two awards will be provided annually for $1,250 per year

S & S Volvo/GMC Trucks Scholarship – To be considered, students must be seeking a primary degree in Diesel Technology – For current UNOH students only – Have financial need – Must have a 3.0 UNOH g.p.a. – Students selected by the University Scholarship Committee – Two awards will be provided annually for $2,500 per year Senior – – –

Northwestern Technical Scholarship To be considered for these scholarships, students take tests during fall open house. A written, multiple choice test will be given to high school seniors. Winners will be selected by the top test scores in the auto, diesel, agriculture, high performance and HVAC/R area. - 1st place: Full tuition, not to exceed $25,000 - 2nd place: $6,000 - 3rd place: $3,500

Skills USA - Michigan – These scholarships are provided to students who participate in Skills USA - Michigan in the following categories: Auto Technology and Diesel. - 1st place: $10,000 each - 6th place: $3,000 each - 2nd place: $8,000 each - 7th place: $2,000 each - 3rd place: $6,000 each - 8th place: $1,000 each - 4th place: $5,000 each - 9th place: $1,000 each - 5th place: $4,000 each - 10th place: $1,000 each – These scholarships are provided to students who participate in Skills USA - Michigan in HVAC competition. - 1st place: $10,000 each - 2nd place: $7,000 each - 3rd place: $5,000 each

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FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS Skills USA - Scholarship Competition – These scholarships are provided to State winners for automotive, diesel and HVAC hands-on division who are from: CT, DE, FL, GA, IL, IN, KY, MD, ME, MA, MI, NC, NH, NJ, NY, OH, PA, RI, TN, VA, VT, WV, and WI. - 1st place: $10,000 each - 6th place: $3,000 each - 2nd place: $6,000 each - 7th place: $2,000 each - 3rd place: $5,000 each - 8th place: $1,000 each - 4th place: $5,000 each - 9th place: $1,000 each - 5th place: $4,000 each - 10th place: $1,000 each – These scholarships are provided to National Skills USA (includes HVAC/R) winners who are from: CT, DE, FL, GA, IL, IN, KY, MD, ME, MA, MI, NC, NH, NJ, NY, OH, PA, RI, , TN, VA, VT, WV, and WI. - 1st place: Full tuition, not to exceed $25,000 - 6th place: $8,000 - 2nd place: $10,000 - 7th place: $7,500 - 3rd place: $9,500 - 8th place: $7,000 - 4th place: $9,000 - 9th place: $6,500 - 5th place: $8,500 - 10th place: $6,000 Skills USA - Tennessee – These scholarships are provided to students who participate in Skills USA - Tennessee in the following categories: General Auto, Brakes, Electrical, Small Engines, and Heating. - 1st place: $2,500 - 2nd place: $2,000 - 3rd place: $1,500 Snap On Scholarships – To be considered, students must be close to graduation. – For current UNOH students only – Have financial need. – Must have a 2.5 g.p.a. – Students selected by the University Scholarship Committee. – Ten awards will be provided annually for $500 per year. Summit Motorsports Park Scholarship – To be considered for this scholarship, students must be a high school senior with a minimum 2.5 g.p.a. and compete in the High School Nationals held annually in early May at Summit Motorsports Park. Contact phone number is 419-668-5555. - 1st place: $10,000 - 2nd place: $5,000 - Two (2) semifinalists: $2,500 each The Greater Cleveland Automobile Dealers’ Association Technological Competition Scholarship (CADA) – 1st place: Full Automotive Technician scholarship to each team member, not to exceed $14,025. – 2nd place: $4,000 scholarship to each team member to be used for UNOH program of choice. – 3rd place: $2,000 scholarship to each team member to be used for UNOH program of choice. – Competition takes place each year late February or early March at the Cleveland and International Auto Show. – The Education Foundation of the CADA contact phone number is: (440) 746-1500. The Greater New York National Automotive Technology Competition – These scholarships are provided as a result of the competition held at the New York International Automobile Show (NYIAS) which is sponsored by The Greater New York Auto Dealers Association (GNYADA). Scholarships are awarded to the following places: - 1st place: Full tuition not to exceed $25,000 - 6th place: $8,000 - 2nd place: $10,000 - 7th place: $7,500 - 3rd place: $9,500 - 8th place: $7,000 - 4th place: $9,000 - 9th place: $6,500 - 5th place: $8,500 - 10th place: $6,000

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FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS Robert – – – – –

E. Wallis Troubleshooting Contest To be considered, current University of Northwestern Ohio students must take a written test. Finalists will be selected by the top 24 test scores in both the auto and diesel areas. The 48 finalists must participate in a hands-on test. Winners will be selected by the top test scores in the auto and diesel areas. Funds can be used for any educational expense. - 1st place: $1,350 - 2nd place: $600 - 3rd place: $300 – Students in their last session win prizes, not scholarships.

UNOH - Gilmore Car Museum Scholarship – To be considered, entering freshmen, who are currently enrolled students in the Gilmore Garage Works Program, must submit a letter explaining their need and desire to attend UNOH for a post-secondary education. – Students must be seeking a primary degree in Automotive, Diesel, Ag Diesel, or High Performance. – Have financial need – Renewal candidates must maintain a minimum grade point average of 3.0 and perfect attendance in order to re-apply for the scholarship. – Funds can be used for any education expense - 1st place: $2,500 - 2nd place: $1,500 - 3rd place: $1,000 – Submissions for scholarships should be made to The Gilmore Museum, Board of Trustees no later than April 1 of each calendar year. The Gilmore Board of Trustees will select the final six (6) candidates and submit them to UNOH for final selection and approval by the UNOH Scholarship Committee. – Documentation needed with each candidate’s submission request: - Submission Letter - Accredited High School Transcript - Any Letters of Recommendation - Current Photograph of Candidate - Submit all documentation to: Doug Vanderlean, Director of Development, 6865 Hickory Road, Hickory Corners, MI 49060 UNOH - NASCAR Scholarship Program – These scholarships are provided as a result of scholarship submissions made to the NASCAR, Director of Developmental Series, Mr. Bob Duvall. NASCAR will review and forward recommendations to the University Scholarship committee for final selections. – To be considered, students must submit request for scholarship no later than November 1, 2011, in writing to: NASCAR, Director of Developmental Series, One Daytona Boulevard, Daytona Beach, FL 32114 – MUST BE A NASCAR LICENSED MEMBER – Incoming Freshmen can apply – Have financial need – Must maintain a 2.5 g.p.a. – Final selection is made by the University Scholarship Committee. – Three awards will be provided: - 1st place: $10,000 - 2nd place: $ 7,500 - 3rd place: $ 5,000 UNOH Technology Maintenance Council Scholarship – To be considered, students must apply through the TMC website, tmc.truckline.com. – The amount of the scholarship is equal to full tuition, not to exceed $25,000. – Students must be high school graduates with a 2.5 or higher g.p.a. – Students must be members of the Technology Maintenance Council, an employee, or an employee’s family member contracted by a company with at least one current dues paying the TMC membership. – Winners will be selected by the Scholarship Committee.

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FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS Colleges of Business, Health Professions, Occupational Professions, & Applied Technologies CNH/ University of Northwestern Ohio Scholarships – Students who enroll in Agribusiness Management or Agricultural Equipment with a minimum 3.0 high school g.p.a. are considered for these scholarships and are selected by the University Scholarship Committee. – The student must request a letter of recommendation from the high school and submit a letter of intent postmarked by May 1 in their senior year for consideration. – The amount of the scholarship is $1000 and is offered to one student in the College of Business, College of Health Professions, or College of Occupational Professions and one student in the College of Applied Technologies, annually. Ford Partnership for Advanced Studies Scholarship – Students who enroll at the University of Northwestern Ohio and are also recipients of the Ford PAS Scholarship receive matching funds from the University for their first year of attendance. – The amount of the UNOH Matching Scholarship is $500. Honor Scholarships – Students who are High School Valedictorians and Salutatorians are considered for these scholarships and are selected by the University Scholarship Committee. The students’ classification will only be evaluated using their home high school class rank. – Students must have an ACT composite test score of a 26 or an 1170 SAT composite test score to be considered. – The amount of the scholarship is equal to full tuition, not to exceed $30,800 in the College of Applied Technologies or up to 180 credit hours of traditional class work in the other three colleges. – These scholarships are renewable provided students maintain a 3.3 accumulative g.p.a. and have outstanding attendance. – The Scholarship must be accepted and activated within one year of the students’ high school graduation date. Jack Fitzgerald Memorial Scholarship – Students who have graduated from an Allen County High School with a minimum 3.0 high school g.p.a. are considered for these scholarships and are selected by the University Scholarship Committee. – The student must request a letter of recommendation from the high school and submit a letter of intent postmarked by May 1 in their senior year for consideration. – The amount of the scholarship is $750 and is offered to one student in the College of Business, College of Health Professions, or College of Occupational Professions and one student in the College of Applied Technologies, annually. Tech Prep Scholarships – The six area technical schools in the West Central Ohio Tech Prep Consortium, Tri Star Career Compact, Vantage Career Center, Millstream Career Cooperative, Lima Senior High School Vocational Program, Apollo Career Center and Ohio Hi-Point Career Center, will award a scholarship sponsored by the University of Northwestern Ohio. – Each technical school will select a scholarship recipient to receive a $2,000 award to be used at the University of Northwestern Ohio. These students must meet criteria set by the University of Northwestern Ohio. – Interested students may contact the guidance office at their individual school for an application. UNOH AC Delco/General Motors Scholarship Discounted Tuition – All students who are also affiliates of AC Delco TSS Program or active full-time AC Delco/GM employees are entitled to a 10% discount on tuition only while attending the University of Northwestern Ohio. This discount includes on-line studies as well as on-campus classes offered by UNOH (College of Business, College of Health Professions, College of Occupational Professions, and College of Applied Technologies). This does not include the MBA on-line or on-campus programs. This discount is contingent upon receipt of a pre-approved waiver form and must be submitted to UNOH by AC Delco/GM verifying employment.

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FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS UNOH American Legion KIA/MIA Scholarship – To be considered for this scholarship, students must be a child or grandchild of a member of the U.S. Armed Forces who died as a result of “hostile” action or was officially listed as missing in action during one of the following periods of war: Vietnam War - from 2/28/1961 to 5/7/1975 Lebanon/Grenada - from 8/24/1982 to 7/31/1984 Panama - from 12/20/1989 to 1/31/1990 Persian Gulf War (includes Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom) - from 8/2/1990 until the cessation of hostilities as determined by the U.S. government – Scholarship amounts are as follows: $10,000, $4,000, $3,000, $2,000, and $1,000 and will be placed in the UNOH Scholarship Fund prior to the award of that year’s scholarship award winners. – Submit all documentation to: Steve Farmer, VP of Corporate Development, UNOH, 1441 North Cable Road, Lima, OH 45805. UNOH Athletic Scholarships The University offers co-ed athletic scholarships in NAIA and institutional athletic sports: baseball, basketball, bowling, golf, motorsports, tennis, volleyball, soccer, cheerleading, and managers/trainers. Please contact the Athletic Department for information on how to apply. UNOH Opportunity Scholarships The University of Northwestern Ohio offers three need-based scholarships covering tuition only for incoming firsttime college students. Two UNOH Opportunity Scholarships are available in the College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions for residents of Allen County, Ohio. Students may take up to 108 credit hours towards an associate degree. (Scholarships will cover traditional class work only.) In the College of Applied Technologies, one scholarship is designated for a resident of Allen County, Ohio. The UNOH Opportunity Scholarship for the College of Applied Technologies is full tuition not to exceed 148 credit hours. Students must apply for all other grants and scholarships for which they are eligible. Other grants and scholarships the students receive which only cover tuition will be applied to the tuition charges first. This may cause the UNOH Opportunity Scholarship to be adjusted, but in all cases would enable the students to have their full traditional tuition covered. Preference will be given to students whose household income is less than $50,000. The award must follow all other University Scholarship guidelines, including being applied to the traditional college rate, concurrent enrollment (only one session or quarter off), used for traditional tuition charges only, available for the original major, 2.5 g.p.a., with one session or quarter of probation if students fall below the 2.5 g.p.a. The UNOH Opportunity Scholarship may continue after the students have completed an associate degree. A scholarship board consisting of representatives of the University will choose the recipients of these scholarships. Applications are available by contacting the Financial Aid Department. Outside Scholarships Students who choose to apply and receive scholarships from outside sources are required to adhere to the requirements of that scholarship. The amount of the outside scholarship must be reported to the Financial Aid Office by Federal Law. A re-evaluation of the student’s financial aid package will occur to ensure the student award is correctly provided. A revised award will be sent if necessary to reflect the additional resources. Datatel Scholars Foundation

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The Datatel Scholars Foundation (DSF), an independent tax-exempt foundation, awards scholarships to undergraduate and graduate students attending eligible Datatel client institutions. The scholarship awards range in value from $1,000 - $2,000 per year. Scholarships are awarded in the following categories:


FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS –

Datatel Scholars Foundation Scholarship: For outstanding students currently attending an eligible Datatel client college or university.

Angelfire Scholarship: Honoring soldiers who have served during combat, the Angelfire scholarship is for outstanding students currently attending an eligible Datatel client institution, who served in the Vietnam War, their spouses and children, or refugees. Scholarships are also available for soldiers who served in Operation Desert Storm, Operation Enduring Freedom, and/or Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Returning Student Scholarship: For outstanding students currently attending an eligible Datatel client institution who have returned to school after a five-year absence or more.

Nancy Goodhue Scholarship: For outstanding undergraduate students currently attending an eligible Datatel client institution, who are majoring in an Information Technology-related curriculum program. The applicants will need to indicate their majors on their applications.

Global Automotive Aftermarket Symposium (GAAS) Scholarship These $1,000 scholarships are awarded to high school graduates who are enrolling in a college, university or vocational-technical school. The program is funded from the net proceeds of the Global Automotive Aftermarket Symposium. For more information and an application for the program, go to www.automotivescholarships.com or call (919) 549-4800. SEMA Memorial Scholarship Program These $1,000 scholarships are awarded to U.S. citizens enrolled in an accredited university or college who have a minimum 2.5 g.p.a. They must be pursuing studies leading to a career in the automotive aftermarket or related field. For more information and an application for the program, go to www.sema.org or call (909) 396-0289, Ext. 137. UNOH/Lima Access--Last Dollar Scholarship Students graduating from Allen County high schools who enroll at the University of Northwestern Ohio are eligible to apply for the UNOH/Lima Access--Last Dollar Scholarship for their first year of attendance. The amount of the scholarship is $500. Applications are available from the Allen County Access program.

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STUDENT AFFAIRS NEW STUDENT SERVICES DEPARTMENT The New Student Services Department is responsible for assisting with the transition from high school to college. There are many questions and concerns associated with moving away to a new learning environment. This is where New Student Services can help. Questions dealing with a wide variety of subjects, such as housing, financial aid, scheduling, and job placement, are fielded through this department. New students will receive phone calls to check their progress and assist in preparing for college. This department can help ease the worries that come with preparing for college. Checklist for Preparing for College: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Apply to the University of Northwestern Ohio early in your senior year. Tour the campus. Start looking for scholarships early in your senior year. Apply for a PIN to fill out your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), www.fafsa.ed.gov. Fill out the FAFSA as soon as possible after January 1. Fill out Stafford Student Loans and PLUS Parent Loans as soon as your financial aid is finalized. Attend your orientation. This is a great time to ask questions and meet everyone at the University.

Feel free to call Deb Badertscher or Amy Miller in the New Student Services Department at 419-998-3120.

CAREER SERVICES The University of Northwestern Ohio students interested in part-time employment while in attendance should contact the Career Services Department, a service exclusively for the University’s students and graduates. Close contact is maintained with the business community through mailings, phone calls and personal contacts to insure that jobs are channeled to this office. Career Services has established relationships with employers on a local, regional, and national level. Applicants are selected and scheduled for interviews by the employers, saving them and students countless hours in the selection process. Career Services offers additional services such as Career Success Seminars and Career Fairs to benefit the students. The Seminars cover topics in Resume Design, Interviewing Success, Career Planning/Networking, and Business/ Table Etiquette. Career Fairs are offered for both colleges which take place in the new Event Center and offered online as a Virtual Career Fair; this is a great way to network with employers and to submit resumes. Graduating students in the College of Business, College of Health Professions, College of Occupational Professions, and College of Applied Technologies will take a Portfolio Capstone class which will assist them in developing resumes, job search techniques, setting goals, and interviewing successfully. These personal skills and technical tools are necessary to obtain the career of choice after graduation. Career Services offers to current students and alumni an opportunity to explore opportunities in their career fields by offering the online system, Career Magnet. This online system is designed to enhance the job search and has the ability to connect with employers who are seeking students’ talents and education. This is to the students’ advantage since it is being offered only to UNOH current students and alumni. It is also an integral part of the Lifetime Assistance that the University offers through Career Services. Students now have the advantage of applying for jobs and sending resumes as well as other important documents to the employer who is hiring right away! Please contact Career Services for more information regarding Career Magnet.

HOUSING The University of Northwestern Ohio has on-campus housing available to students up to the age of 25. Students are not required to live in campus housing, but new students are advised to reside in university housing for at least six weeks for proper adjustment to campus life. Married students must reside off campus and can obtain a list of apartment complexes in the area at the Housing Office. 57


STUDENT AFFAIRS UNOH has four residence areas located on the 300-acre campus. College Park, Northwestern Park, and Sherwood Park contain 181 apartment-style dorms, which include kitchen facilities, dining table and chairs, and standardsize bunk beds. Racers Village contains 24 apartment-style suites, which include full kitchen facilities, dining tables and chairs, washer and dryer, and extra-long twin beds. In Racers Village, each bedroom also has a private bathroom. Students and their parents should attend orientation during the month preceding the beginning of classes to secure proper housing accommodations.

SAFETY SERVICES The University of Northwestern Ohio provides a Safety Services Department for the protection and welfare of all students. Safety Services Officers patrol the residence halls, parking lots and all real property owned and operated by the University of Northwestern Ohio. Safety Services’ employees are school officials with a legitimate educational interest in student records. Safety Services has the right to call local law enforcement agencies for investigation and accident reports. Safety Services also has the right to ask students for their I.D. cards for infractions of student rules and regulations governed by the University. All Safety Services officers carry identification and are identified by a Safety Services uniform indicating that they are University of Northwestern Ohio Safety Services officers.

COLLEGE COUNSELING SERVICES The University of Northwestern Ohio provides counseling services for all students. Students are encouraged to seek help from the University counselors as well as from their instructors. In order that a student’s withdrawal from the University of Northwestern Ohio is processed in a proper fashion, a student contemplating withdrawal should meet with a member of the counseling staff. Students in the College of Applied Technologies should also see Counseling if they choose to change their major. Business faculty meetings are held monthly, and faculty members are apprised of problems and encouraged to assist students in academic areas.

ACADEMIC ADVISING Students are encouraged to contact the Registrar’s Office or Advising Office to answer questions related to selecting classes for quarter schedules, deciding to change a schedule and understanding the consequences of changing a schedule, planning future schedules, changing majors, and using the features in MyUNOH. Contact can be made by visiting the offices in the Student Services Building or e-mailing advisor@unoh.edu. In addition to the Registrar’s Office and Advising Office, students in the College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions may contact Rick Bowersock, Bob Elsass, or Tracey Harris in the Counseling Department; and Dean Hobler, Dean of the Colleges of Business, Health Professions, and Occupational Professions, for advising assistance. Students in the College of Applied Technologies may contact the Registrar’s Office and Advising Office; Tom Grothous and Andy O’Neal, Deans of the College of Applied Technologies; and Bob Marshal and Kevin Meager, Associate Deans of the College of Applied Technologies, or the Counseling Department, for advising assistance. MBA students should contact Michael Callahan, Director of the MBA program. Current students in the College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions will use their MyUNOH accounts to create a class schedule each quarter. Advising services are available to answer questions related to the processes of selecting courses and entering the schedule; however, it is the students’ responsibility to learn how to use the MyUNOH account to accomplish this task. 58


STUDENT AFFAIRS TESTING CENTER The University of Northwestern Ohio provides an on-campus testing center to proctor tests for classes taken at or through the University. In order to assist students in the time management of their personal, professional, and academic schedules, the Testing Center is open various hours during the week. It is the only approved site for UNOH Distance Learning students who live in Allen County or within a 50-mile radius of the University. All University students whose circumstances require a proctored test in the Testing Center should arrive prepared to take their test. Reservations are recommended for any test requiring the use of a computer. A reservation is not needed for paper-based tests. Students may check testing hours or reserve a computer online at myUNOH or by calling 419-998-8879. A photo ID is required to take a test. The Testing Center is located in the former Welcome Center at the corner of North Cable Road and College Park West. It provides a comfortable and secure testing environment for students of the University of Northwestern Ohio.

PROMETRIC AND CERTIPORT TESTING CENTERS Prometric Testing Center The University is also authorized to serve as an IT Prometric Testing Center and as a Certiport Testing Center for current students, graduates and the general public. Testing Center Administrators are Jodi Stopher, Laura Taylor, and Joan Wilhelm. Contact Joan Wilhelm for registration and scheduling questions by calling 419-998-3105 or visit www.prometric.com. The staff follows all policies and procedures set by Prometric and Certiport. Each testing session is recorded using video cameras. Testing candidates will receive a list of the policies and procedures after they register for each test. Tests can be taken for other test sponsors at the Prometric Testing Center. Vouchers for these tests can be purchased at the following website: www.prometric.com. These tests will be scheduled during the regular hours that are available in the online scheduling process. Special Testing Center hours can be created for UNOH students to fit their class schedules. It is a good idea to set up a time before purchasing vouchers if you are a student. Contact Joan Wilhelm to do so. Testing Center hours for the general public are subject to the administrator’s availability. Certiport Testing Center Students and the general public who are interested in taking Adobe or Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) or Microsoft Certified Application Professional (MCAP) tests for Word, Access, Excel, or PowerPoint can take their tests at the UNOH Certiport Testing Center. The tests are an excellent way to earn a credential to show mastery of software applications courses. They can be included on a resume, and Microsoft issues a frameable certificate for each test passed. Interested candidates must call 419-998-8879 to schedule a time to take a test. Information about purchasing test vouchers can be obtained by going to the Certiport website: www.certiport.com.

STUDENT ATHLETICS Mission Statement The University of Northwestern Ohio provides the opportunity for student athletes to compete in intercollegiate sports and to earn a college education. To fulfill this mission, the Athletic Department has the following objectives: • To facilitate the maturation of the student athletes in leadership skills • To develop character • To emphasize academic achievement • To instill pride in all they do. 59


STUDENT AFFAIRS The University of Northwestern Ohio is a member of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics. Both male and female students have the opportunity to play intercollegiate baseball, basketball, bowling, golf, tennis, and girls’ volleyball. Freshman Eligibility Requirements (Article V, Section C, Items 1 and 2 of the NAIA Bylaws) 1.

An entering freshman student must be a graduate of an accredited high school or be accepted as a regular student in good standing as defined by the enrolling institution.

2.

An entering freshman student must meet two of the three entry level requirements: a.

A minimum score of 18 on the Enhanced ACT or 860 on the SAT (for tests taken on or after April 1, 1995).

NOTE: In order to meet the requirement of Article V, Section C, item 2, paragraph above, an entering freshman taking the SAT as of March 1, 2005, must achieve a score of 860 or higher on the Critical Reading and Math sections. b.

An overall high school grade point average of 2.000 or higher on a 4.000 scale.

c.

Graduate in the upper half of the student’s high school graduating class.

Transfer and international students may also enroll if they meet eligibility requirements. Athletic scholarship information may be found in Financial Aid Programs on Page 54. Interested students may contact Chris Adams, Director of Athletics. Student Athlete Study Tables Student athletes are required to attend study tables in the Academic Skills Lab each week, based on their accumulative GPA. While at study tables, the student athletes can work on projects, conduct research, meet with tutors, or complete other homework. The time spent at study tables is based on the student’s accumulative GPA and is broken down in the chart below: 3.0 and higher – study tables at the athlete’s discretion 2.99 – 2.51 – 3 hours per week 2.5 – 2.01 – 4 hours per week 2.0 and below – 10 hours per week, or 2 hours per day Coaches and the Director of Counseling & Academic Skills have the right to change hours based on individual needs.

STUDENT ACTIVITIES The University of Northwestern Ohio realizes that student activities are an important part of the University experience. To provide the activities required by ever-expanding enrollments, the University has a gymnasium, a fitness center, and an Event Center that houses the University’s own night club, Club UNOH.

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The gymnasium is available for sporting events, intramural sports, entertainment groups, visiting lecturers, and other special programs.


STUDENT AFFAIRS Club UNOH provides a relaxed atmosphere that students can enjoy anytime. Students can do homework, shoot pool, watch TV, or just hang out with friends. Club UNOH has free wireless internet and laptop computers for students to use while visiting the Club. The Fitness Center offers a variety of cardio equipment, weight lifting machines, and free weights. These facilities provide excellent opportunities for activities that develop skills in leadership and responsibility, as well as activities that are necessary for success in today’s business world. They provide the necessary cultural and social environments to prepare students for the productive future they desire. All hours of operation are posted in their respective areas. The University also offers a wide variety of special events throughout the year. Some of the more popular events include fall and winter bowling nights, student truck pulls, and involvement in various clubs. The University of Northwestern Ohio schedules a variety of dances throughout the year; the most popular is the annual Halloween dance and costume contest. The University also plans events and activities to help new students become better acquainted upon arrival to campus. In addition, the Multicultural Perspectives class coordinates International Day which presents customs, foods, displays and entertainment of various cultures. The University encourages all students to become involved with organizations and activities. Student involvement is essential to the growth of any activities program and is also a great way to make lifelong friends. Lima’s recreational needs are served by eleven city parks, boating and fishing in six reservoirs, five public and two private golf courses, two state parks, two movie theaters and three bowling alleys.

FITNESS CENTER The Fitness Center is located on the first floor of the 500 Building. A friendly staff member is always available to set up students on a resistance weight training plan. The Fitness Center has five treadmills, six bikes, and five elliptical machines for a cardiovascular workout. A large selection of free weights and a state-of-the-art Nautilus training circuit are also available.

LIMALAND MOTORSPORTS PARK Limaland Motorsports Park is a 1/4-mile high-banked clay oval operated by the University of Northwestern Ohio. Students may get involved in many different ways at Limaland. The first option is to participate on the Technical Support Team which assists race teams on Friday nights throughout the season. Current University of Northwestern Ohio students are granted admission into the spectator side grandstand area FREE of charge for specified race events. Students must show their valid student identification for free admission. If the student is in the High Performance Motorsports Program, some of his/her classes will take place at Limaland. Many of the student activities are also held at Limaland, one of the favorites being Truck Pulls.

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS American Marketing Association The American Marketing Association (AMA) is the largest marketing association in North America and is a professional association for individuals and organizations involved in the practice, teaching, and study of marketing worldwide. Marketers turn to the AMA every day for information/resources, education/training, and professional networking. AMA members are connected to a network of more than 30,000 experienced marketers and include leading marketing academics, researchers, and practitioners from every industry. AMA professional and collegiate chapters and special interest groups keep members in touch with the best people and the best practices.

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STUDENT AFFAIRS Association of Computing Machinery The University of Northwestern Ohio has a forum for Information Technology students to interact and share knowledge. The Student Chapter of the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM) is a nationally recognized charter. The ACM gives students access to high-quality computing and IT information, career and professional development opportunities as well as extensive professional connections within the community. Founded in 1947, the ACM is a major force in advancing the skills of information technology professionals and students worldwide. ACM established student chapters to provide an opportunity for students to play a more active role in the association and its professional activities. Today, more than 700 colleges and universities throughout the world participate in the ACM Student Chapter Program, whose aims are to enhance learning through exchange of ideas among students and between established professionals and students. The ACM Distinguished Lectureship Program is one activity designed specifically to promote contact between students and computing professionals. The ACM Student Chapter events focus on community service, educational goals, career development and general fund raising. Auto-Cross Club The Auto-X Club provides students with a motorsport activity (called auto-cross) that is exciting, inexpensive, and safe. Using a parking lot here on campus, the Auto-X Club members create a race course that is marked out using small pylons (called “cones”) and chalk. Competitors in the event then use their own cars to drive through this course as quickly as possible without hitting any cones. This event is very similar to the slalom-type competition used by skiers. Cars are divided into classes based on the number of modifications that have been made to it, and the timing of the event is done electronically by a state-of-the-art timing system. This competition gives the members of the Auto-X Club an opportunity to use the knowledge they gain in their fields of study to improve their cars’ performance, and it teaches them how to drive a car quickly and safely. Learning these skills makes them more competitive on the track and makes them better drivers on the street. The Auto-X Club meetings are held every Tuesday at 12:30 and 6:00 p.m. in the 600 Building Lounge. Business Professionals of America (BPA) BPA was founded in 1966, and now has over 51,000 members in its 23-state association. BPA is dedicated to increasing membership as well as the development of “Today’s students. Tomorrow’s business professionals.” BPA is the leading Career Technical Student Organization for students pursuing careers in business management, office administration, information technology, and other related career fields. UNOH’s BPA chapter is built upon the four critical elements of Education, Leadership, Competition, and Community Service, tying directly into the national mission of BPA, which is to contribute to the preparation of a world-class workforce through the advancement of leadership, academic, citizenship, and technological skills. Through co-curricular programs and services, BPA’s Workplace Skills Assessment Program prepares students to succeed and assesses real-world business skills and problem-solving abilities in finance, management, IT, and computer applications. The University of Northwestern Ohio’s BPA chapter is highly successful in this annual BPA showcase program at both the state and national levels; students’ trophies, medals, and plaques are proudly and permanently displayed in the 100 Building. Crossroads Bible Group The Crossroads Bible Group is a non-denominational group that was begun at the University of Northwestern Ohio to provide support and encouragement for those who practice the Christian faith and to give opportunity for nonChristians to come with questions and discussion in a non-threatening environment. The group enjoys Bible study and prayer at each meeting. The group also enjoys other activities like Christian concerts, movies, bowling, and outreach activities. Crossroads meets every Sunday the University is in session from 8:00 to 9:15 p.m. in the 400 Building Museum, Room 407.

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STUDENT AFFAIRS Diesel Club The Diesel Club provides students with a diesel performance outlet. The students are currently building a pulling truck and assisting with the performance modifications in order to participate in local events. The club members have attended and worked several truck and tractor pulls by assisting the event promoters with track duties, competition line-up, and safety inspections of pulling vehicles. The Diesel Club is open to all University students and meets every Monday at 12:30 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. Digital Imaging Graphics in Technology (D.i.G.i.T.) The D.i.G.i.T. group is designed to allow students the opportunity to learn and utilize skills learned in the Digital Multi-Media associates degree but students do not need to be in this program. This group also teaches other students basic skills in digital design, such as Adobe Photoshop. The purpose of the organization is to promote digital technology as an art form on campus. In the DiGiT group, time is spent on learning, designing, and receiving hands-on experience in the media industry. Students who enjoy spending extra time working on cool projects will find that DiGiT is the student organization for them. The group does anything from websites, 3D animation, and Flash animation to posters and video productions. Various projects have been completed for use within the University and for local businesses in the surrounding communities. There are plenty of opportunities for real-world experience outside of the classroom. Drag Club The Drag Club gives students who are interested in drag racing a place to meet and network with other students who share the same interest. Upcoming events, future project vehicles, and fund raising activities are just a sample of the information that is put out at these meetings. Faculty advisors are there to help students with their own drag racing vehicles, as well as to recruit students to help maintain and crew the University’s three drag cars at selected events in the tri-state area. The Drag Club also sponsors “grudge� races for students and faculty at Marion County International Raceway in LaRue, Ohio. In addition, involvement in the Drag Club provides an inside track in finding work on professional and semi-professional teams while still in school, where students gain invaluable experience if a career in professional drag racing is their aspiration. Several former members are currently working on professional teams that compete in the NHRA and other sanctioning bodies. Drag Club meetings are held every Wednesday in Room 602 in the 600 Building. Kappa Beta Delta Honor Society Kappa Beta Delta Honor Society is a national honor society, which was instituted on the University of Northwestern Ohio campus in the Spring of 2002. This honor society is to recognize students in accredited associate degreegranting institutions for their high academic achievement. Students are eligible to be invited to lifetime membership based upon the following criteria: 1) Rank in the upper 20% of students pursuing associate business degrees at the time of invitation to membership. 2) Completion of a minimum of 22 1/2 quarter hours of credit, of which a minimum of six quarter hours are in business courses toward the degree program. 3) A minimum of 3.0 g.p.a. on a 4.0 scale. Transfer students who meet the qualifications for membership may be inducted after they have completed a minimum of one term of work in the College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions in which the chapter is located, provided their overall record, in the judgment of the collegiate chapter, is of Kappa Beta Delta calibre. MERA / UNOH Ambassador Program The MERA / UNOH Ambassador Program has been established to enhance the experience of learning about the various career opportunities in the very diverse automotive field. MERA (Mobile Enhanced Retailers Association) offers our students opportunities in various career areas in the retail trade. The ambassadors are evaluated and interviewed for g.p.a. and attendance, as well as their communication skills, and desire to excel in the automotive arena. The ambassadors are the guests of MERA at their annual Knowledge Fest Convention and Trade Exhibit held at various locations in the Midwest. The ambassadors are representing themselves, the next generation of business professionals, and MERA in this experience.

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STUDENT AFFAIRS Motorsports Team The UNOH Motorsports Team is a one-of-a-kind opportunity for students who have a passion for dirt track racing. It has been developed to give students the ability to participate as team members, at a professional level, in an actual racing environment. Students design and build the vehicles and engines used on the Motorsports team. Students can be selected as drivers based on a driving skills test that will be conducted prior to the racing season. Students work/practice during the week from 1 to 5 p.m., maintaining and preparing the cars for races. Students who are new to the team will become members on the stock car teams. Students, who are multiple year members or have distinguished themselves as exceptional team members, will work on the modified teams. Team members should have a minimum g.p.a. of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale; drivers should have a minimum g.p.a. of 3.2 on a 4.0 scale. The Motorsports Team competes on Friday nights at the University-owned Limaland Motorsports Park and during the season will travel to other venues to compete, such as Eldora Speedway, I-55 Speedway, Waynesfield Motorsports Park, and Speedweek at Volusia Motorsports Park in Florida. National FFA Organization The National FFA Organization makes a positive difference in the lives of students by developing their potential for leadership, personal growth, and career success through agricultural education. Through relationships developed by the National FFA Foundation, college students can be directly connected with the best agriculturally related industries and organizations in the country. The UNOH Collegiate FFA chapter is a great opportunity for students to meet new people and practice social skills through community service, fundraising, and professional growth opportunities. Meetings are held during the first, third, and fifth weeks of the session at 12:35 p.m. and 6:05 p.m. in the 400 museum area. The UNOH FFA chapter is a chartered local unit of the Ohio Association of FFA, which is chartered by the National Organization of FFA. National Truck Equipment Association (NTEA) Intern Program UNOH has partnered with the NTEA to give students the opportunity to show their skills and knowledge by being interns. This program is offered to Alternative Fuels and Diesel students. Students must be recommended by a faculty member. Attendance and g.p.a. is also a determining factor in the selection process. Students are interviewed, and six students are selected to become interns for this conference/trade show. All expenses are paid for students to attend, and the students work in conjunction with the NTEA staff. Their primary responsibility is to manage the Hybrid Medium and Heavy Duty Truck Ride and Drive. The purpose is for students to learn of the opportunities available to them upon graduation and to find out the newest technology in the industry. This is also valuable information to have on their resume. Off-Road Club The Off-Road Club exposes students to the growing field of off-road motorsports. Club members participate in two types of activities. First, students may choose to attend and even compete in events such as tough truck racing, mud drags, and rock crawling. At the events, students work with each other as well as attending teams to repair and/or correctly modify vehicles for competition. In addition to competitions, students regularly attend trail rides, often camping out for the weekend. The Club teaches and enforces the “tread lightly� motto, teaching members to respect nature while enjoying their motorsport of choice. Politics Club The Politics Club provides politically active students the opportunity to socialize, discuss political topics, and promotes political awareness to those who are interested in learning more about bureaucratic matters. The club meets on campus twice quarterly and meetings normally involve discussion and debate relevant to a particular political theme. The club has coordinated a variety of activities including watching election results, brown bag lunches, and round-table discussions. 64


STUDENT AFFAIRS President’s Student Advisory Council The President’s Student Advisory Council is the voice and perspective of selective UNOH students who are recommended by their professors and who have attended UNOH for one year. These students will also serve as a focused group on specified issues. The Council meets monthly with senior University officials thinking critically about issues and challenges facing UNOH students. Race Club The Race Club at UNOH was started more than a decade ago to help students in the High Performance Motorsports program get more involved within the industry. Students can participate in a variety of organizations with the Race Club, such as ARCA, Grand Am, and Over-the-Wall. ARCA (American Race Car Association) – A partnership was formed with Ron Drager, the President of the ARCA Re/Max Series, where race club members are now traveling around the country to work with various ARCA race teams. Students in the ARCA Club have a distinct understanding of how the racing industry works and what rules and regulations need to be followed. Students will be able to intern on ARCA race teams and perform all duties as assigned by the crew chief. Grand Am – Another facet of the race team is the Grand Am Team members. Students involved in the Grand Am section of the Race Club are uniquely interested in sports car racing that takes place on road courses over the traditional oval track. Students understand the different sanctioning bodies of these types of races and are able to crew the vehicle to the race team’s satisfaction. Over-the-Wall Club – The Over-the-Wall Club helps students improve pit crew skills such as jacking, tire changing, and tire carrying. The Club concentrates on agility, mental, and nutritional aspects of the sport. Practice is on a weekly basis and includes students who are interested in participating with ARCA, NASCAR, or Grand Am style racing. SEMA Intern Program This is a very prestigious event for students. To qualify, students must be in their sophomore year of studies in an automotive/high performance or automotive/diesel area of concentration, must have applied for and been awarded a scholarship from SEMA (Specialty Equipment Manufacturers’ Association), and must have at least a 3.0 g.p.a. with minimal absences in their respective concentration. SEMA interns are interviewed by a committee for their professional insight and desire for excellence in their respective field of expertise, not to mention a desire to go to Las Vegas, Nevada, to the largest convention and trade exhibit in the automotive field. Experiencing and learning alongside some of the best manufacturers this industry has to offer, students have a very rewarding learning experience. Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE) SIFE teams are on more than 1,800 college and university campuses in more than 40 countries. Its mission is to change the world through free enterprise. Students gain experience in applying their classroom education by teaching the principles of free enterprise to their communities. This organization maintains a lifelong, free virtual career fair site for alumni. SIFE membership is free to students and is sponsored by contributions from large corporations. The University of Northwestern Ohio Students in Free Enterprise Team has been the recipient of the “Regional Winner,” “First Runner Up,” “Rookie of the Year” awards, and project grants. Technical Support Team (Limaland Motorsports Park) The Technical Support Team was formed to educate students through hands-on experience. On Friday nights at Limaland Motorsports Park, instructors/coordinators find race teams that need extra help. The students are put on these teams to gain experience in racing. Some students stay with the same team all year and even go to other tracks with their team. To join, come to the pit booth on Friday nights and talk to the Technical Support Team Coordinators to be placed on a team.

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STUDENT AFFAIRS UNOH Collegiate Optimist Club The purpose of the UNOH Collegiate Optimist Club is to develop optimism as a philosophy of life. The club promotes an active interest in good government and civic affairs, inspires respect for law, and promotes patriotism and work for international accord and friendship among all people. It also aids and encourages the development of youth in the belief that the giving of one’s self in the service of others will advance the well being of all students and communities. UNOH Medical Assisting Student Group Current students in the Medical Assisting Program can participate in the student group and develop knowledge that goes beyond the classroom. The purpose of this group is to provide opportunities to the students to exchange information with members of the medical community, explore various career opportunities, develop leadership skills, render community service, and interact with Certified Medical Assistants.

STUDENT CONDUCT All students are required to abide by all rules and regulations as stated in the Student Handbook.

VISITORS Persons who want to visit the University are welcome. Persons wanting to visit the campus dorms must register at the Safety Services Office located in the Administration Building. The University does not permit children of enrolled students to be unaccompanied on campus or to visit in the classrooms or the Library.

THE BOOKSTORE - BARNES & NOBLE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN OHIO The bookstore and the Racer’s Cafe are open Monday and Wednesday, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., and is closed Sunday. The bookstore accepts cash, checks, all major credit cards, Barnes & Noble gift cards, and Student Financial Aid (if excess is available). The Cafe accepts cash, checks, all major credit cards and Barnes and Noble gift cards; excess financial aid cannot be used at the Cafe. Textbooks can be returned for a refund within the first five days of class each term with a receipt and in original condition. Receipt is required for refund. Shipping and handling charges are non-refundable. See the bookstore website for a full refund policy. The bookstore buys back resalable used textbooks daily. The best time to sell back textbooks is during the week prior to and the week of finals. See the bookstore for the full buy back policy. Student ID is required. For students’ protection, the bookstore requires a photo ID (preferably student ID) with all transactions other than cash sales. For Financial Aid purchases, a Student ID is required. Books are included in tuition fees for students who are scheduled for Associate or Baccalaureate Degree accelerated classes and for MBA classes. The Racer’s Café at Starbucks, located inside the Bookstore, is a full-service cafe proudly serving Starbucks coffee products, as well as soups, sandwiches, and snacks. The Cafe cannot accept Starbucks gift cards or the meal cards.

THE RACERS CAFÉ The Racers Café, located in the Student Union Building, is open 7:00 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and 7:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Friday. The Racers Café serves breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Many items are offered including pizza, subs, salads, baskets, comfort meals, sandwiches, and a variety of sides. All of these items are offered daily. Carry-out orders are available by phone at 419-998-3129.

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STUDENT AFFAIRS THE PIT STOP The Pit Stop, located in the student lounge of the 300 Building, is open 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., Monday through Thursday. The Pit Stop serves breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

THE LIBRARY The University Library is located at the corner of College Park West and Cable Road, facing Cable Road. Regular insession hours are Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Saturday, 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Students are encouraged to become familiar with the University library and what it offers. Students will find a collection of materials which support the curriculum and research needs of the University. Books, magazines, annual reports, and study guides are readily available to help students complete classroom assignments. The collection also includes general reference materials and on-line resources. The library catalog may be accessed by going to <library.unoh.edu> or through <my.unoh.edu>. The University Library is a member of OhioLINK, a consortium of Ohio college and university libraries, and the State Library of Ohio. OhioLINK offers access to more than 46 million library items statewide, encompassing a spectrum of library materials. OhioLINK may be accessed through the UNOH online card catalog or at <www.ohiolink.edu>. Online resources include ProQuest, IBISWorld, and OhioLink databases. ProQuest makes thousands of magazine and newspaper resources available to students. IBISWorld provides instant access to over 700 U.S. industries providing hundreds of economic and demographic profiles. OhioLINK offers many electronic research databases including a variety of full-text resources in many academic areas at varying levels of detail. ProQuest, IBISWorld, and the OhioLINK databases may all be accessed through the Library website or MySirius <my.unoh.edu>. Computers are available in the Library for student use. A copy machine is available for student use at a minimal cost. When using the Library, students are asked to observe the following regulations so all students may fully utilize the library facilities. • • • • •

No food or drink. No smoking. No children. No talking on cell phones. Quiet environment. Library privileges may be suspended due to continuous talking or disruptive behavior in the library.

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION It is the University’s conviction there is no greater asset a university can possess than loyal and informed alumni. The Alumni Association exists as your connection to your alma mater. Alumni support important programs and scholarships while having the opportunity to enjoy a number of special benefits and discounts. Whether you are across the street or across the country, there are many ways to remain involved. Students are encouraged to network with the Alumni Association so we all benefit the University of Northwestern Ohio. To become involved with the University of Northwestern Ohio Alumni Association, contact the Coordinator of Alumni Affairs at 419-998-3265.

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ACADEMIC AFFAIRS GRADES A, B, C, D, F, and WF (withdraw/failing) are computed in the accumulative average. WP (withdraw/passing), I (incomplete), S (satisfactory), U (unsatisfactory), WS (withdrawn satisfactory), WU (withdrawn unsatisfactory), and NR (not reported) are not computed in the accumulative average. An S is considered a C or better. A U is comparable to a D or F. Transfer and proficiency credits are not computed in the accumulative average. Incomplete Grade Failure to correct an “Incomplete” grade in the specified amount of time will result in the grade being changed to an “F.” The course must then be retaken in its entirety. Making up this deficiency is the student’s responsibility. College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions: A grade of “Incomplete” for one or more courses for a quarter is a deficiency which must be corrected within two weeks for the next quarter. College of Applied Technologies: Students who receive an incomplete grade in a technical course must complete course work before the following session ends. Students receiving an incomplete for a general education course must complete course work by the second week of the following session. Record Changes Grades or attendance records will not be changed after six months have elapsed from the end of the term in which the grade or absence was received. Quality Points To figure the grade point average (accumulative), multiply the number of credits by the quality points. Then divide the total quality points by the number of credit hours. A

=

A- =

4.00 94-100

B+ =

3.33 87-89

C+ =

2.33 77-79

D+ =

1.33 67-69

3.67 90-93

B

=

3.00 82-86

C

=

2.00 72-76

D

=

1.00 62-66

B- =

2.67 80-81

C- =

1.67 70-71

D- =

.67 60-61

F

=

.00 59 and below

Grade Review A student may petition for an academic review of a grade by the following procedure: 1. 2.

The student initially requests of the instructor a verbal explanation of a grade or evaluation. If the student is not satisfied with the instructor’s explanation, he or she may appeal to the Dean of the Colleges of Business, Health Professions, and Occupational Professions or the College of Applied Technologies, who will confer with the Vice President for Academic Affairs/Provost, who makes the final decision.

MBA Grades Students will be issued a letter grade based on criteria outlined in each course syllabus. All courses receiving below a C must be retaken. Students must maintain a cumulative 3.0 g.p.a. for graduation. If a student’s g.p.a. falls below a 3.0, an academic warning or probation letter will be issued and the student won’t be eligible for graduation. Students will be counseled by the MBA Director on maintaining a 3.0 g.p.a. 69


ACADEMIC AFFAIRS FERPA ANNUAL NOTIFICATION The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. These rights are: 1.

The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days of the day the University receives a request for access. Students should submit to the Office of the Registrar written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The Registrar will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the Office of the Registrar does not maintain the records, the Registrar shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request shall be addressed.

2.

The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes is inaccurate or misleading. Students may ask the University to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write the University official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If the University decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the University will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.

3.

The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent.* One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is defined as a person employed by the University as an administrative, supervisory, academic, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit); a person or company with whom the University has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a person assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks, including student workers. A school official has a legitimate education interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility.

4.

The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the University to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SE, Washington, DC 20202-4605

*The student can request a Waiver for Release of Information, granting specific individuals access to financial information. This does not include educational information, i.e. grades. FERPA designates certain information related to students as “Directory Information” and gives the University the right to disclose such information to anyone inquiring without having to ask students for permission unless the student specifically requests in writing that ALL such information not be made public without their written consent. The University shall release “Directory Information” unless students specifically request in writing that it be withheld. Please consider very carefully the consequences of any decisions by you to withhold “Directory Information.” Should you decide NOT to release “Directory Information,” any future requests for such information from noninstitutional persons or organizations will be refused. Some of the effects of your decision to withhold “Directory Information” will be friends or relatives trying to reach you and prospective employers inquiring about you, etc., requests for information will be refused.

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ACADEMIC AFFAIRS The University will honor your request to withhold “Directory Information,” but cannot assume responsibility to contact you for permission to release requested information. Regardless of the effect upon you, the institution assumes no liability for honoring your instructions that information be withheld. The request to withhold Directory Information must be made while the student is actively enrolled. The restriction can be revoked in writing (signature required) at any time by the student. DIRECTORY INFORMATION – The following information is specified as “Directory Information”: Name Address (local and home) Telephone Number (local and home) Email address Participation in officially recognized activities

College of Enrollment Enrollment Status Dates of enrollment Class schedule Expected Date of Graduation

Major Degrees Earned Grade Level (Jr./Sr.) Honors and Awards Received

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY POLICY Academic integrity or honesty is the foundation for all the coursework at the University of Northwestern Ohio. Cheating and plagiarism are considered dishonest. Cheating includes, but is not limited to, copying another person’s answers on homework, quizzes, or tests, whether in paper or electronic format. Plagiarism includes using another’s work as one’s own, either paraphrasing or directly quoting without proper citation. An incident of cheating or plagiarism will be considered an offense; subsequent offenses will be met with increasingly severe penalties. Therefore, the following revised policy has been adopted: 1st Offense:

The instructor has the discretion to fail the student for the assignment and/or require another assignment or to fail the student for the course depending upon the weight of plagiarized assignment. The instructor may recommend failure after consulting with the Dean. A notice of the offense will be filed in the Dean’s office.

2nd Offense: If the student has a second offense in any class, the student will be immediately dismissed from the current class and receive a failing grade or an F for that course depending upon the weight of plagiarized assignment. The instructor may recommend failure after consulting with the Dean. If the student is found to have two offenses in two courses during the same quarter, the student will receive Fs for both courses. A notice of the offense will be filed in the Dean’s Office. 3rd Offense:

If a student is found to have committed a third offense in any class, the student will be immediately expelled from the University and receive failing grades or Fs for all courses for that quarter. If you are dismissed from the University of Northwestern Ohio for cheating or plagiarism, you may not return to the University. A notice of the offense will be filed in the Dean’s Office.

Any of the above steps may be skipped depending upon the severity of the offense. Students who have been accused of cheating or plagiarism may appeal the decision in writing to the Dean of the Colleges of Business, Health Professions, and Occupational Professions or the Dean of the College of Applied Technologies. The Vice President for Academic Affairs/Provost will be consulted. The Dean’s and the Vice President for Academic Affairs/Provost’s decision will be final.

REQUEST FOR GRADUATION Students in the College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions must file a Request to Graduate with the Advising Office. The forms are available online at the MyUNOH Portal in Campus Offices>>Registration & Advising web page and in the quarterly scheduling packet. Digital versions can be completed and sent as an email attachment to advisor@unoh.edu. Printed versions can be mailed to or dropped off at the Student Services Building. An email message or other reminder notice will be sent to all students once each quarter. 71


ACADEMIC AFFAIRS Term After Which Student Will Graduate Fall Quarter Winter Quarter Spring Quarter Summer Quarter

Term Form Needs to Be Completed - Three Qtrs. Before Final Qtr. Week 2 of Winter Quarter After Scheduling for Spring Quarter Week 2 of Spring Quarter After Scheduling for Summer Quarter Week 2 of Summer Quarter After Scheduling for Fall Quarter Week 2 of Fall Quarter After Scheduling for Winter Quarter

The Request for Graduation gives the Advising Office an opportunity to review the student’s academic program evaluation to update the anticipated graduation date and course numbers as needed and to confirm that all program requirements will be fulfilled before the anticipated graduation date. It is an essential activity that requires that the students notify the Registrar’s Office and the Advising Office of the courses they plan to take in their last three quarters. A letter will be sent to each student confirming the accuracy of the plan or with details about corrective action that is needed, including delaying graduation if all the requirements cannot be met by the anticipated graduation date. The Advising Office will send a reminder each quarter by UNOH email or other methods of communication through the MyUNOH Portal to announce due dates to file Request for Graduation forms. Request forms are included in each quarter’s scheduling packet and are also located in the Documents & Forms links in the MyUNOH Portal. Students with multiple programs can file one request form if all the programs are graduating simultaneously. If the student desires one program to graduate earlier than another, a request form must be completed at the appropriate time for each program. The Request for Graduation form is required in the Portfolio Capstone course. Students who fail to complete this process might cause their own delay in graduation or may not be processed by the Registrar’s Office even though all requirements are completed.

DEGREE VERIFICATION The Degree Verification process is designed to be the second step in the graduation process completed by the Registrar’s Office. Graduating students will complete the Verification of Degree Program form when they take the Portfolio Capstone course for their program. This form confirms the degree level and program from which the student is graduating as well as the intended term of graduation. The form also allows the student to provide a preferred name for the commencement ceremony. Students who do not receive this form can access it online or contact the Registrar’s Office. Completed forms may be returned to the Registrar’s Office.

GRADUATION To qualify for graduation, students must meet the course and credit requirements specified for their curricula. They must also have a 2.0 accumulative grade point average to graduate. Students should apply for graduation through their appropriate college. Students in the College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions should update their anticipated graduation date by emailing the new date to advisor@unoh.edu. Anticipated graduation dates are affected by scheduling decisions, terms not attended, and other plans made by the student. Each student’s current anticipated graduation date is located on the program evaluation and is posted as a link at the MyUNOH Portal. Students with multiple programs need to check each program’s anticipated graduation date. Anticipated graduation dates are not automatically updated. It is the student’s responsibility to monitor it and request it to be updated. Inaccurate anticipated graduation dates can affect financial aid eligibility.

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Students in the College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions are advised to submit a Request for Graduation three quarters before a program is completed. In addition to requesting a program to be graduated by the Registrar’s Office, the Request for Graduation process requires the student to submit a formal scheduling plan three quarters before graduation and provides a well-defined graduation date. The scheduling plan allows the Advising Office to advise students to adjust their plan, if needed, to achieve graduation. Failing to file the Request for Graduation form may delay graduation if requirements are not complete or if the anticipated graduation date is not correct.


ACADEMIC AFFAIRS In June, the University holds a formal graduation ceremony for all graduates from the past year. Questions concerning graduation requirements should be referred to the Registrar’s Office.

DEGREE PRINTING To request a reprint of a degree certificate, please submit a written request and include the following information: • Full Name (Maiden, if applicable) • Current Address and Phone Number • Social Security Number • Dates Attended • Date of Birth • Major • Signature Degree certificate reprints should include a processing fee of $15 made payable to the University. Academic records cannot be released without the written consent of the student.

OFFICIAL UNIVERSITY TRANSCRIPTS If you would like to request an academic transcript, please use the Transcript Request Form online at www.unoh.edu or submit a written request to the Registrar’s Office and include the following information: • Full Name (Maiden, if applicable) • Major • Current Address and Phone Number • Address of Receiver • Social Security Number • Your Official Signature • Dates Attended • Date of Birth Transcript requests are processed every Friday. There is no charge for transcripts. If a transcript needs to be sent immediately, a rush fee of $30 must be paid to the Cashier’s Office. Transcripts cannot be processed if the students have a Business Office hold on an account.

SECOND CHANCE PROGRAM Students who have been dismissed from the University of Northwestern Ohio and who have been out for at least seven years may apply for reinstatement (with the exception of students who are dismissed for Academic Dishonesty). They must write a letter to the Academic Committee explaining why they had not been successful and identifying the reasons they should be given a fresh start in their academic careers. Following our current guidelines for retaking failing grades and substituting courses for new major courses, the students must have 2.0 quarterly grade point average. If they are not successful, they will be dismissed with no provision for returning.

FORGIVENESS POLICY Students may repeat a class (once) in which they have received a D, F, WF, U, or WU. (Note: May take a third time dependent upon circumstances and formal request.) A student will be academically dismissed after a course has been failed a third time. When a class is repeated, only the higher grade will be calculated in the grade point average. The course and grade earned previously will remain on students’ records. Students are expected to pay for the course each time it is taken. Students who are scheduled for First Year Experience/Portfolio Capstone are required to attend. Those failing to attend will be charged for the course and will receive a failing grade. The failing grade will remain on the student’s final transcript permanently.

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ACADEMIC AFFAIRS If students have declared a change of major, students may petition through the Registrar’s Office to take other classes to substitute for courses where an F was received. These courses may be used only as specialized electives in the new major. General Education courses do not apply.

PRESIDENT’S LIST A student in the College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions who earns a 4.00 grade point average (6 credits or more) for the quarter will be named to the President’s List. Students must be in Good Standing to qualify for the President’s or Dean’s Lists.

DEAN’S LIST Students in both colleges who earn a 3.5 or better grade point average (6 credits or more) for the term will be named to the Dean’s List. Students must be in Good Standing to qualify for the President’s or Dean’s Lists.

GRADE REPORTS Final grades are posted on the University’s student access web-site at the end of each term. All students are assigned a user name and password and need to utilize this information to view their grade reports on-line. If a student needs a paper grade sheet, it may be requested from the Registrar’s Office. No grade reports are mailed.

AWARDS Academic Achievement Awards At graduation, degrees are conferred with the following distinctions: summa cum laude 3.9 - 4.00 magna cum laude 3.75 - 3.89 cum laude 3.5 - 3.74 These designations are for undergraduate degree programs only.

PROFICIENCY EXAMS Students wishing to take a proficiency exam should contact the Registrar’s Office so that eligibility can be determined. Once the Registrar verifies eligibility to take the exam, students should contact the Cashier’s Office prior to taking the exam to pay the $50 proficiency fee. Students must present their receipt from the Cashier to the Registrar’s Office. Tests will then be sent to the Testing Center. Students should schedule a time to test with the Testing Center. For technical classes in the College of Applied Technologies, after the Registrar is notified that students have passed the written portion of an exam, the students must again see the Cashier to make payment for the comprehensive portion prior to taking the exam. Again, students must present their receipt from the Cashier to the person administering the exam.

EARLY / LATE EXAMS All students should request an early or late exam time only when absolutely necessary. Students wishing to take an early exam must first contact the instructor/professor of the course. Upon approval by the instructor/professor, a signed, written permission form will be given to the student. The student must take the permission form to the Cashier’s office for payment prior to taking the exam. A $25 fee will be charged per exam. The Cashier will give the student a receipt and sign the permission form verifying payment. The student must then return the form to the instructor/professor of the course. 74


ACADEMIC AFFAIRS PORTFOLIO CREDIT (CREDIT FOR EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING) Students whose non-traditional learning may qualify for college-level credit should contact the Dean’s office for eligibility. Once the Dean has determined the students are eligible, they should enroll for the UN154 Prior Learning Assessment or UN354 Orientation and Experiential Learning for Accelerated Programs. All students should submit a portfolio for review for each course they would like evaluated for potential credit. The portfolio would need to be submitted to the Dean so that he may assign the appropriate faculty member to review it. After submitting a portfolio, students should contact the Cashier’s office to pay the fee. All fees need to be paid before the portfolio will be reviewed. The Registrar’s office will notify students of the results of the review.

DEFINITION OF A CREDIT HOUR The College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions operates on a quarterly system. Traditionally, one quarter hour of credit is one class period per week. For example, all five-hour classes will meet five days per week for 45 minutes per day. The College of Applied Technologies operates on six-week sessions. Technical classes meet for 20 hours Monday through Thursday. Distance Learning does not follow the traditional Carnegie unit. The accelerated and the MBA on-campus classes meet from 6-10 p.m. one night weekly.

ADVANCED STANDING Credit may be granted to students who have had comparable courses at a regionally accredited college or university. Students who have earned credits at a nationally accredited institution may transfer credits conditionally. Only those grades of C or better in similar courses will be transferred after receipt of an official transcript from the institution. Students who have earned associate degrees at other regionally accredited colleges and universities will have 90 hours transferred into baccalaureate programs.

CLASS ABSENCES College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions Traditional Students: Students could be withdrawn from a class during the first seven weeks of the quarter if the following applies: 4 consecutive days absent from a daily class 3 consecutive days absent from an odd or even day class 2 consecutive days absent from an evening class Distance Learning Students: Students will automatically be withdrawn from a class after the first week if the course has not been accessed. If students do not maintain weekly contact or complete assignments, they may be withdrawn from the class. If a student decides to drop a class, the student needs to contact the Registrar to withdraw from the class. The student will be taken out of the class as of the date the Registrar is notified. The University reserves the right to withdraw students who fail to attend classes regularly or to prepare assignments. College of Applied Technologies Excused Absences: The University excuses the following absences: • Three days for death in the immediate family • Subpoena to court to testify

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ACADEMIC AFFAIRS • • • • • •

Birth of Child (of whom you are the parent) Military Service Jury Duty School-supported function Inclement weather (documentation required) Emergency medical treatment/hospitalization (documentation required;excludes office visits)

This means these days are excused for grade point penalty, final and the absence. However, due to the nature of the College of Applied Technologies courses, all missed assignments must be made up. If the student misses more than one week of training, it is recommended that he/she should withdraw and retake the class over in its entirety. Verifiable documentation is required (dates and contact information). Technology students may be withdrawn from courses if they are absent for five days throughout the session. Documentation must be provided to the instructor in a timely manner to verify an excused absence to remain in courses for the session.

WITHDRAWAL OR HIATUS To insure that a student’s withdrawal from the University of Northwestern Ohio is processed in a proper fashion, a student contemplating withdrawal should meet with a Counselor in the Student Services Building prior to leaving campus. Documentation is requested when withdrawal is associated with medical or military reasons. Students residing in the dorms must also sign an exit sheet at the Housing Office, and students who have loans must also meet with the Financial Aid Office. To receive a refund of all or part of the instructional fees paid for a term, students must follow the above withdrawal procedure. The date used in calculating the amount of fees to be charged will be the date on which the completed official withdrawal request is approved. Withdrawals completed prior to the midpoint of the quarter/session will result in grades of WPs (Withdrawal Passing) or WSs (Withdrawal Satisfactory). Withdrawals completed after the midpoint of the quarter/session will result in WFs (Withdrawal Failing) or WUs (Withdrawal Unsatisfactory). Students who do not maintain continuous enrollment at the University will be updated to the program requirements found in the catalog in effect at the time of their return. This may delay graduation if new courses are required in the current requirements. For military withdrawal, please see page 36.

DROP/ADD Students who wish to withdraw from a course after the quarter starts or change their academic program must contact the Office of the Registrar. Current students in the College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions can change their schedule in MyUNOH during the pre-registration and late registration periods. Students must withdraw within the first half of the quarter/session to avoid failing grades. Courses may be added during the late change period during the first five days of the term by visiting the Registrar’s Office or by emailing advisor@unoh.edu and only if the student is already scheduled for the related term.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENT (CATALOG YEAR) UPDATES The catalog year for program requirements will be updated to the current catalog in the following situations: 1. 2. 76

When changing an existing program to a new program When changing degree levels between diploma, associate degree, or baccalaureate degree programs (Adding the Alternate Fuels or CDL options in the College of Applied Technologies are exceptions.)


ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 3.

4.

When adding a program in the College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions to existing programs, the program being added will be updated to the current catalog requirements. When returning to classes after one or more term of non-attendance

ACADEMIC STANDINGS Students’ academic records are reviewed by the Academic Qualifications Committee at the end of each term. At that time, those students whose g.p.a. for the term or for the accumulative g.p.a. is below the required g.p.a. may be placed on warning, probation, suspension, or dismissal. During the time students are at the University, they must meet the following grade standards or be subject to academic action: Minimum Completed Credit Hours Class Level GPA Standard Diploma/Certificate Associate/Baccalaureate Freshman 1.75 1-29 hours 1-44 hours Freshman 2.00 30+ hours 45+ hours Sophomore 2.00 30+ hours 45+ hours Junior 2.00 30+ hours 45+ hours Senior 2.00 30+ hours 45+ hours Only credit hours completed at UNOH are computed into the grade point average. Other kinds of credit, such as transfer, exams, prior learning experiences, etc. do not count in g.p.a. Based on their term g.p.a. or accumulative g.p.a., students will receive the following academic notifications: Good Standing Students with the designated accumulative g.p.a.s or better are in good academic standing. Academic Warning Students earning less than the required g.p.a. for a term, but whose accumulative g.p.a. is above the minimum required, will be placed on academic warning. Academic Probation Students whose accumulative g.p.a. falls below the minimum required will be placed on Academic Probation. They will then have one term for the College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions and two terms for the College of Applied Technologies to raise their accumulative average to the minimum required or they may be considered for suspension. Academic Suspension Students who are on probation and do not raise their accumulative average to the designated g.p.a. may be academically suspended for a minimum of one session or quarter. Any dorm student who is academically suspended must sign an exit sheet at the Housing Office. Suspended students must make a written appeal for re-admission. Students’ letters should explain the reason for the low g.p.a. and the steps they plan to take to raise their g.p.a. to a level of “good standing.” The letters should be submitted to the Director of Advising. Students must also meet with Danielle McClure in the Academic Skills Lab to prepare an academic success plan. This appeal must be approved by the Academic Qualifications Committee and/ or the Vice President for Academic Affairs/Provost. Academic Dismissal After re-admission into the University, students who do not meet the requirements may be permanently dismissed. Students who fail the same course three times may be permanently dismissed. 77


ACADEMIC AFFAIRS Students who fail to make academic progress toward graduation for three consecutive sessions or two quarters may also be subject to dismissal. The Academic Qualifications Committee and/or the Vice President for Academic Affairs/Provost may accelerate a student’s dismissal for lack of academic progress. After a seven-year hiatus, students who were dismissed from the University may apply for re-admission under the Second Chance provision. They must provide documentation that would support their claim that they could successfully complete an academic program. For graduation, students must have an accumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher. In addition, they must successfully complete all courses in their programs.

CLASS LEVEL DEFINITION Highest Degree Level: Diploma or Certificate Class Level Institutional Credit Hours Freshman Enrolled or completed at least 1 credit hour Highest Degree Level: Associate Degree Program Class Level Institutional Credit Hours Freshman Enrolled or completed at least 1 credit hour Sophomore Completed at least 45 credit hours and enrolled in or completed a 200 level course Highest Degree Level: Bachelor’s Degree Program Class Level Institutional Credit Hours Freshman Enrolled in or completed at least 1 credit hour Sophomore Completed at least 45 credit hours and enrolled in or completed a 200 level course Junior Completed at least 90 credit hours and enrolled in or completed a 300 or 400 level course Senior Completed at least 135 credit hours and enrolled in or completed a 400 level course *Completed= Successfully completed credit hours

ACADEMIC OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT The University of Northwestern Ohio has instituted an Academic Outcomes Assessment program to measure students’ academic achievement. Course syllabi indicate the goals and objectives which enable students to meet the desired University outcomes. During their programs formative students’ achievements are evaluated. At the end of their programs, summative assessments are conducted in a one-hour course Portfolio Capstone (UN292 for associate degree; UN490 for baccalaureate degree). The University is committed to helping students achieve their academic goals.

EVENING PROGRAM In the College of Business, programs offered in the evening are designed to serve the needs of the students interested in furthering their education in Accounting and Business Administration. Traditional classes for the degree programs meet Monday through Thursday evening beginning at 5:45 p.m. As part of the evening program, various continuing education courses are offered each quarter. These courses are designed to meet the educational needs of adults within the Lima community.

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ACADEMIC AFFAIRS ONE-NIGHT-A-WEEK DEGREES FOR ADULTS On-campus one-night-a-week programs are available--the Associate of Applied Business Degree in Business Administration, the Bachelor of Science Degree in Business Administration, and the Bachelor of Science Degree in Specialized Studies. These programs meet one evening each week from 6-10 p.m. The students in the Associate Degree in Business Administration program must be professionally employed and be 22 years of age. The program, if taken as designed, can be completed in 24 months. The Bachelor of Science Degrees may be completed in 18 months if the student meets the following requirements: 1.

2. 3. 4.

Has an associate degree from an accredited college or university (or 90 quarter hours) in a businessrelated major for the Business Administration program; otherwise, the student will be enrolled in the Specialized Studies program. Proof of the degree must be submitted before the end of the first quarter at UNOH, or the student will not be allowed to schedule. Students who fail to submit the transcript will be dismissed. Is currently employed in a professional position. Maintains enrollment in all designated classes. Meets all the Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s requirements for graduation.

These students must attend orientation each quarter and will be scheduled according to the rotation of courses. Deviation from the rotation sheets may require the students to leave the cohort, take courses to make up the deficiency, or wait until the next cohort begins. Textbooks are included in tuition charges, and books for dropped courses must be returned by the 10th day of the quarter to avoid charges. More information is available by contacting the Admissions Office and talking to a representative. The Bachelor of Science Degree in Health Care Administration is also available through the Virtual College. Students can complete a baccalaureate degree in 18 months if they meet all the above criteria. A completed associate degree that meets the programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s entry requirements must be documented prior to enrollment.

DISTANCE LEARNING Majors in the College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions are offered through the Virtual College (VC) program. Working adults may apply for admission to this unique program, which provides the opportunity for non-traditional students to study independently. Those prospective students must be self-motivated since the program is rigorous and self-directed. Faculty are available for personal consultation through a variety of media, including e-mail. All course work must be completed within each quarter. Faculty may be reached by chat, e-mail, fax and phone. Baccalaureate-degree-completion programs are available through Distance Learning. Students who have earned an associate degree in a health-related field may complete a Bachelor of Science Degree in Health Care Administration. Students with associate degrees also have the opportunity to earn a Bachelor of Science in Specialized Studies or Business Administration in as little as 18 months if all requirements (see above) are met satisfactorily.

PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE OPTION Students in degree programs in the College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions are eligible to participate in a Professional Practice Option. Professional Practice (CO101, CO102 or CO103) can be used as a specialized elective in most degree programs. Students who are interested in this option must apply one quarter prior to their participation with the Dean. 79


ACADEMIC AFFAIRS ARTICULATION AGREEMENTS WITH OTHER COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES As a baccalaureate-degree-granting institution, the University of Northwestern Ohio accepts students who have completed associate degrees from other regionally accredited colleges and universities toward four-year programs in accounting, health care administration, and business administration (with additional concentrations in agribusiness management, automotive management, and marketing). Formal articulation agreements have been signed with James A. Rhodes State College, Owens College, Ivy Technical College, and Edison State Community College. Graduates from their two-year programs in the specific discipline articulate into the University’s 2+2 programs as juniors. Credits from the associate degree at the University of Northwestern Ohio transfer into the University’s baccalaureate programs. The University of Northwestern Ohio associate degree graduates in other major programs have articulation opportunities at many other colleges and universities. Students who wish to transfer to another college or university for a baccalaureate degree should check with the Admissions Office at that particular institution for transferability of credits.

INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCES UNOH students have the opportunity to experience other countries and cultures and to act as Student Ambassadors for Understanding. Two annual study trips are available. For the International Travel course, the students fly to London or another major city in Europe and visit many diverse sights. The destination varies annually and includes other European countries. Students may earn 3 hours of elective college credit. Students must be in good academic and social standing at the University to participate. The International Travel course may be taken only twice for credit. In the spring, students in the Travel and Hotel Management major take a cruise to the Caribbean and/or Mexico to learn that segment of the travel industry.

CLASS MEETING TIMES Day and evening classes in the College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions are held 12 months a year. Daytime classes begin at 8 a.m., Monday through Friday. Evening classes begin at 5:45 p.m., Monday through Thursday. The accelerated classes are scheduled one night a week from 6-10 p.m. In the College of Applied Technologies morning classes begin at 7:30 a.m., afternoon classes start at 1:00 p.m., and evening classes start at 6:30 p.m. Morning, afternoon, and evening classes are held Monday through Thursday. Early morning classes are offered from midnight to 6:30 a.m. Monday through Wednesday on a limited basis.

COLLEGE OF APPLIED TECHNOLOGIES’ SCHEDULING INFORMATION Students’ schedules are designed for them by the Registrar each six-week session. Schedules are posted online during the third week of each term. If a schedule change is necessary, see the Registrar’s Office immediately after the schedule is posted. An attempt will be made to accommodate the request but it cannot be guaranteed. It is the students’ responsibility to check their schedules on MyUNOH and request any necessary changes. It is also the students’ responsibility to check that their time preference is correct. Contact the Registrar’s Office to update your time preference. All students are scheduled according to their seniority in the College of Applied Technologies. The order of priority scheduling is categorized as follows: current, new, and then returning students. In each of these groups, scheduling is based on courses needed, time preference, and graduation date. If there is a schedule conflict or you have not been scheduled, please contact the Registrar for the College of Applied Technologies. 80


ACADEMIC AFFAIRS CLASS LOAD Students in the Graduate College carry a load of 8 credits to be full time and 4 credits to be part time. Students carrying a minimum of 12 quarter hours in the College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions are considered to be full-time students. The average class load is 16 to 18 quarter hours. Students in the College of Applied Technologies carrying one class of 6 credit hours are considered full-time students.

DUAL MAJORS Students may add an additional major in the College of Business, College of Health Professions, and College of Occupational Professions or College of Applied Technologies, which will necessitate additional credit hours. For example, a student may elect a dual major in Business Administration and Marketing which will require a total of 128 credit hours for an associate degree. In the College of Applied Technologies, a student may elect a dual major in Diesel Technology and High Performance/Motorsports Technology which will require a total of 184 credit hours. Dual majors are also available in the baccalaureate degree programs. Dual majors must be declared with the Registrar’s Office and will always require additional hours. Associate degree programs require courses at the 100 and 200 level, while baccalaureate degree programs require courses at the 300 and 400 level. Students must schedule courses at the appropriate level for each degree. Dual majors with a combination of an associate degree and a baccalaureate degree cannot use one course to satisfy required or elective credits in both the associate and baccalaureate degree.

INCLEMENT WEATHER The University of Northwestern Ohio rarely cancels classes due to weather conditions. However, if closing the University becomes necessary, an announcement will be made over the local and area TV and radio stations by 7 p.m. for early morning classes (College of Applied Technologies), by 6 a.m. for day classes and 4 p.m. for evening classes. Students may also call the voice mailbox at 419-998-9689 after 7 p.m. and after 6 a.m. to check on cancellations. When a delay is necessary, for example, the 8 a.m. class will begin at 10 a.m. Students can also sign up for Racers Alerts to be delivered by text or email. Sign up at the MyUNOH Portal.

ACADEMIC ADJUSTMENTS GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE The University of Northwestern Ohio has adopted an internal grievance procedure providing prompt and equitable resolution of complaints alleging any action prohibited by the U.S. Department of Justice regulations implementing Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Title II states, in part, that “no otherwise qualified disabled individual shall, solely by reason of such disability, be excluded from the participation in, be denied the benefits of or be subjected to discrimination in programs or activities sponsored by a public entity.” Complaints should be addressed to 504 Officer, University of Northwestern Ohio, 419-998-3157, who has been designated to coordinate ADA compliance efforts. 1.

A complaint should be filed in writing or verbally, contain the name and address of the person filing it and briefly describe the alleged violation of the regulations.

2.

A complaint should be filed within 10 days after the complainant becomes aware of the alleged violation. (Processing of allegations of discrimination, which occurred before this grievance procedure was in place, will be considered on a case-by-case basis.)

3.

An investigation, as may be appropriate, shall follow a filing of complaint. The investigation shall be conducted by Cheryl Mueller, Ph.D., Vice President for Academic Affairs/Provost. These rules contemplate informal, but

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ACADEMIC AFFAIRS thorough, investigations, affording all interested persons and their representatives, if any, an opportunity to submit evidence relevant to a complaint. 4.

A written determination as to the validity of the complaint and a description of the resolution, if any, shall be issued by Cheryl Mueller, Ph.D., Vice President for Academic Affairs/Provost, and a copy forwarded to the complainant no later than 30 days after its filing.

5.

The ADA Coordinator shall maintain the files and records of the University of Northwestern Ohio relating to the complaints filed.

6.

Complainants can request a reconsideration of the case in instances where they are dissatisfied with the resolution. The request for reconsideration should be made within 10 days to President Jeffrey Jarvis.

7.

The right of a person to a prompt and equitable resolution of the complaint filed hereunder shall not be impaired by the personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pursuit of other remedies such as the filing of an ADA complaint with the responsible federal department of agency. Use of this grievance procedure is not a prerequisite to the pursuit of other remedies.

8.

These rules shall be construed to protect the substantive rights of interested persons to meet appropriate due process standards and to assure that the University of Northwestern Ohio complies with the ADA and implementing regulations.

STUDENT ASSISTANCE AND GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE The staff at the University of Northwestern Ohio is committed to helping students adjust to the challenges of university life. This adjustment is sometimes difficult and, therefore, problems arise. The following procedures should be followed when help is needed. Academic Students are always advised to talk with their instructors if they are having problems in class or with a grade. If the problem is with the instructor, students should contact the Dean in the Colleges of Business, Health Professions, and Occupational Professions or the Dean in the College of Applied Technologies. Students may appeal (in writing) the Deansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; decisions to the Vice President for Academic Affairs/Provost. Student Services All problems dealing with Student Services should be directed to the department heads. If special assistance is needed, a Counselor is available. State of Tennessee Students Complaints should be directed toward: University of Northwestern Ohio Dr. Cheryl Mueller, Vice President for Academic Affairs/Provost 1441 North Cable Road Lima, OH 45805 419-227-3141 If a complaint is not settled at the institutional level, the student may contact the Tennessee Higher Education Commission, Nashville, TN 37243-0830. Telephone Number: 615-741-5293

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BACCALAUREATE DEGREE

UNOH students studying abroad in Italy.

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BACCALAUREATE DEGREE

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN OHIO DISTANCE LEARNING The College of Distance Learning of the University of Northwestern Ohio offers the Bachelor of Science Degrees, Associate Degrees in Applied Business, and Diplomas. The programs are designed for students who cannot regularly attend traditional classes. Requirements: (Applies to Distance Learning students) · Must obtain a proctor for testing purposes. · Due to the challenging nature of the learning environment, an accumulative g.p.a. of 3.0 is recommended for students interested in taking Distance Learning courses. The Academic Affairs section of the catalog has more information about the rigorous nature of Distance Learning. To determine if Distance Learning is right for you, visit the Online Readiness Questionnaire at http://www.unoh.edu/ academics/collegedl/online_readiness_questionnaire.php. UNOH is not authorized to deliver Virtual College courses to students living in Rhode Island. Hardware and Software Requirements: The hardware required to use the Virtual College is typically included with computers manufactured after 2002. Microsoft Office is the product required by all students enrolled in the Virtual College; having Microsoft Office 2010 or later will ensure complete compatibility between students and faculty. It is required that all students complete their assignments, papers, and tests with Microsoft Office, unless otherwise specified by the student’s instructor. Minimum Specifications PC - 1 GHz or higher MAC - G4 1.25 GHz or higher Memory 1 GB RAM Drives CD-ROM or DVD Drive Display 1025 X 768 Graphics Card Supports the above display Operating System Windows XP Home with Service Pack 3 or higher MAC - OS X (10.4) or higher Software Macintosh: MS Office 2008 or higher PC: MS Office 2007 or higher Anti-Virus Software Audio Audio Output with Speakers Internet Connection 56KB Modem Browser Version IE 7/Firefox 3.5 or higher Plugins Mac: QuickTime 7 PC: Windows Media Player 12 Pop-Up Blocking Disabled Javascript 6.0 or higher Adobe Acrobat Reader 10 Flash Player 10 Java 1.6.0+ Processor

Suggested Specifications PC - 2 GHz or higher MAC - Intel 2 GHz or higher 2 GB RAM or higher CD-ROM or DVD Drive 1280 X 1024 Supports the above display Windows 7 Home or higher MAC - OS X (10.6) or higher Macintosh: MS Office 2008 PC: MS Office 2010 or higher Anti-Virus Software Audio Output with Speakers Broadband (Cable or DSL) IE 8/Firefox 3.6 or higher Mac: Quicktime 7 PC: Windows Media Player 12 Pop-Up Blocking Disabled Javascript 6.0 or higher Adobe Acrobat Reader 10 Flash Player 10 Java 1.6.0+

The Virtual College at the University of Northwestern Ohio offers Distance Learning students the opportunity to earn their degrees by taking courses via the World Wide Web. Students who have a personal computer with Internet access can send and receive course materials and communicate with instructors as well as other students. Interested, qualified students should contact the University at info@unoh.edu.

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The one-night-a-week degree programs for adults described on Page 79 are available for the baccalaureate degrees in Health Care Administration and Business Administration. All courses for the MBA are offered through the Virtual College.


BACCALAUREATE DEGREE

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN OHIO GRADUATE COLLEGE The Graduate College of the University of Northwestern Ohio offers the Master of Business Administration on campus and fully online.

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION This curriculum prepares individuals holding baccalaureate degrees to contribute to the success of their organizations through the enhancement of their management skills. MISSION STATEMENT: In a personalized setting, using multiple delivery methods, the University prepares diverse students to acquire business skills, knowledge, and abilities for successful application in a global marketplace. MBA Prerequisites: There are four areas of prerequisite for entry into the MBA program: Accounting, Finance, Marketing, and Economics. The courses can either be taken traditionally for credit, through the College of Distance Learning for credit, or in module format for pass/fail credit. All courses are offered online. The hours completed on prerequisite courses are not part of the 48 credit hours required for graduation from the MBA program. For a complete listing of MBA Admissions Requirements, see pages 33 and 34. Course Requirements: 40 Credit Hours MBA501 Introduction to Graduate Writing/2 MBA502 Introduction to Graduate Studies/2 MBA600 Marketing Management/4 MBA610 Human Resources Management/4 MBA620 Accounting for Managers/4 MBA630 Production and Operations Management/4 MBA640 Quantitative Analysis for Management/4 MBA650 Leadership/4 MBA660 Management Information Systems/4 MBA670 Finance for Managers/4 MBA690 Management Capstone/4 Program Electives: 8 Credit Hours Students will select two of the below elective courses to complete. MBA540 Learning Organizations/4 MBA560 Legal and Ethical Environment of Business/4 MBA580 Global Business Issues and Strategies/4 MBA625 Accounting Theory/4 MBA680 Managerial Economics/4

Program offered on line.

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BACCALAUREATE DEGREE

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN OHIO COLLEGE OF BUSINESS The College of Business of the University of Northwestern Ohio includes majors in Accounting, Business Administration, and Marketing. Some programs have major course sequences beginning summer and/or fall quarters. Students may enter any quarter to take general education courses but must take required major courses when offered. Subsequently, more time may be needed to complete the programs. EVENING Evening students may pursue the bachelor’s degrees or the associate degree programs in accounting, business administration or marketing. The one-night-a-week programs--both for the associate degree and baccalaureate degree in Business Administration--are available in the evening. BACCALAUREATE DEGREES Accounting Accounting - CPA - 5-year track Forensic Accounting Business Administration Business Administration –Agribusiness Management Option –Automotive Management/Automotive Aftermarket Option –Marketing Option Marketing ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED BUSINESS DEGREES Accounting Business Administration Marketing

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Programs are offered on line.


RA ET AE T E DDEEG GR RE EE E B AB C ACCACLAALUARU E

ACCOUNTING This curriculum provides education to students in the areas of preparation of financial reports, statements, cost procedures, audit and finance for business firms. The sequence of major offerings starts summer and fall quarters. MISSION STATEMENT: The Accounting Program provides an intensive study of the accounting/finance field in flexible student-friendly formats for lifelong learning opportunities. Curriculum for Four-Year Degree: 180 Credit Hours Technical and Basic Requirements: 105 Credit Hours AC114 Accounting I/5* AC115 Accounting II/5* AC116 Accounting III/5* AC117 Personal Taxes/5* AC131 Introduction to Accounting Software/5* AC202 Managerial Accounting/5* AC218 Intermediate Accounting I/5* AC219 Intermediate Accounting II/5* AC301 Cost Accounting I/5 AC302 Cost Accounting II/5 AC310 Business Taxes/5 AC375 Accounting Professional Ethics/3 AC405 Accounting Information Systems/5 AC411 A Survey of Auditing/3 AC412 Auditing for Fraud/3 AC435 Advanced Accounting I/5 AC436 Advanced Accounting II/5 BU315 Business Law I/3 BU316 Business Law II/3 DP150 Spreadsheet Applications/3* FI210 Principles of Finance/5* FI400 Corporate Finance/4 FI410 Investments/3 MA121 Principles of Management/5* General Education Requirements: 64 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3* CO445 Group Dynamics/3 EN Any 300/400 level EN course/3 EN180 Composition I/5* EN200 Composition II/5* MH190 Algebra/5* MH310 Finite Mathematics/3 OR MH315 Calculus/3 MH350 Statistics/5 MH420 Quantitative Methods/3 PH310 Ethics/3 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3* OR SO186 Sociology/3* SC200 Principles of Ecology/3* SC320 Biology/3 OR SC330 Physics/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1*

UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3* UN490 Portfolio Capstone/1 Any 100/200 level AR, EN, HI, RE, or SP course/3* Any 300/400 level PY or SO course/3 Any 300/400 level AR, CO, HI, PO, or WS courses/6 General Education Electives: 9 Credit Hours 3 Credit Hours* Choose 100- or 200-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Political Science (PS), Psychology (PY), Religion (RE), Sociology (SO), Spanish (SP), or University Survey (UN). 6 Credit Hours Choose 300- or 400-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), Communication (CO), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Popular Culture (PO), Psychology (PY), Science (SC), Sociology (SO), University Survey (UN), or Women’s Studies (WS). Specialized Electives: 2 Credit Hours Choose courses at the 300 or 400 level that are not required in your program.

Note: Elective courses can apply to only one degree level. The same course cannot be re-used to satisfy the elective requirements at the Associate’s Degree level and again at the Bachelor’s Degree level. *Denotes first and second year courses

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BAC TT E ED EDGERGER EE E B C CCAALLAAUURRE EA A

ACCOUNTING CPA Track (5-year program) This curriculum provides education to students in the areas of preparation of financial reports, statements, cost procedures, audit and finance for business firms. The sequence of major offerings starts summer and fall quarters. MISSION STATEMENT: The Accounting Program provides an intensive study of the accounting field in flexible student-friendly formats for lifelong learning opportunities. The CPA Track Program provides students with the preparation needed to sit for the CPA Exam. Curriculum for Five-Year Degree: 225 Credit Hours Technical and Basic Requirements: 149 Credit Hours AC114 Accounting I/5* AC115 Accounting II/5* AC116 Accounting III/5* AC117 Personal Taxes/5* AC122 Payroll Accounting/3* AC131 Introduction to Accounting Software/5* AC202 Managerial Accounting/5* AC218 Intermediate Accounting I/5* AC219 Intermediate Accounting II/5* AC301 Cost Accounting I/5 AC302 Cost Accounting II/5 AC310 Business Taxes/5 AC321 Corporate Governance/3 AC375 Accounting Professional Ethics/3 AC382 Special Topics/3 AC405 Accounting Information Systems/5 AC411 A Survey of Auditing/3 AC412 Auditing for Fraud/3 AC413 Auditing for Compliance/5 AC435 Advanced Accounting I/5 AC436 Advanced Accounting II/5 AC440 Financial Statement Analysis/5 AC442 Governmental and Non-Profit Accounting/5 AC443 Accounting Theory/5 AC452 CPA Review - Financial Accounting & Reporting/3 AC453 CPA Review - Business Environment & Concepts/3 AC454 CPA Review - Regulation/3 AC455 CPA Review - Auditing & Attestation/3 BU315 Business Law I/3 BU316 Business Law II/3 DP150 Spreadsheet Applications/3* DP210 Advanced Spreadsheet Applications/3* FI210 Principles of Finance/5* FI400 Corporate Finance/4 FI410 Investments/3 MA121 Principles of Management/5*

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General Education Requirements: 64 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3* CO445 Group Dynamics/3 EN Any 300/400 level EN course/3 EN180 Composition I/5*

EN200 Composition II/5* MH190 Algebra/5* MH310 Finite Mathematics/3 OR MH315 Calculus/3 MH350 Statistics/5 MH420 Quantitative Methods/3 PH310 Ethics/3 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3* OR SO186 Sociology/3* SC200 Principles of Ecology/3* SC320 Biology/3 OR SC330 Physics/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1* UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3* UN490 Portfolio Capstone/1 Any 100/200 level AR, EN, HI, RE, or SP course/3* Any 300/400 level PY or SO course/3 Any 300/400 level AR, CO, HI, PO, or WS courses/6 General Education Electives: 9 Credit Hours 3 Credit Hours* Choose 100- or 200-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Political Science (PS), Psychology (PY), Religion (RE), Sociology (SO), Spanish (SP), or University Survey (UN). 6 Credit Hours Choose 300- or 400-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), Communication (CO), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Popular Culture (PO), Psychology (PY), Science (SC), Sociology (SO), University Survey (UN), or Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Studies (WS). Specialized Electives: 3 Credit Hours Choose courses at the 300 or 400 level that are not required in your program. FI425 Money and Banking and MA445 Global Management Issues are recommendations.

*Denotes first and second year courses


BA T E DDEEGGR RE EE E BAC C CACLAALUARUERAE TA E

ACCOUNTING Forensic Accounting This curriculum provides education to students in the areas of white collar crime, obtaining documents for examination, federal regulation relating to fraud examinations, and the review of the provision of Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 relating to the corporate governance and testing of internal controls related to corporate assets. The sequence of major offerings starts summer and fall quarters. MISSION STATEMENT: The Forensic Accounting Program provides an intensive study of the element of fraud including prevention and detection in order to prepare students for the Certified Fraud Examiner (CFE) examination. Curriculum for Four-Year Degree: 180 Credit Hours Technical and Basic Requirements: 105 Credit Hours AC114 Accounting I/5* AC115 Accounting II/5* AC116 Accounting III/5* AC117 Personal Taxes/5* AC131 Introduction to Accounting Software/5* AC202 Managerial Accounting/5* AC218 Intermediate Accounting I/5* AC219 Intermediate Accounting II/5* AC301 Cost Accounting I/5 AC302 Cost Accounting II/5 AC321 Corporate Governance/3 AC375 Accounting Professional Ethics/3 AC405 Accounting Information Systems/5 AC411 A Survey of Auditing/3 AC412 Auditing for Fraud/3 AC443 Accounting Theory/5 BU315 Business Law I/3 BU316 Business Law II/3 DP150 Spreadsheet Applications/3* FA380 White Collar Crime/3 FA415 Forensic Accounting/5 FI210 Principles of Finance/5* FI410 Investments/3 PL100 Introduction to the Legal System/5* PL202 Criminal Law/3* General Education Requirements: 64 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3* CO445 Group Dynamics/3 EN Any 300/400 level EN course/3 EN180 Composition I/5* EN200 Composition II/5* MH190 Algebra/5* MH310 Finite Mathematics/3 OR MH315 Calculus/3 MH350 Statistics/5 MH420 Quantitative Methods/3 PH310 Ethics/3 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3* OR SO186 Sociology/3* SC200 Principles of Ecology/3*

SC320

Biology/3 OR SC330 Physics/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1* UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3* UN490 Portfolio Capstone/1 Any 100/200 level AR, EN, HI, RE, or SP course/3* Any 300/400 level PY or SO course/3 Any 300/400 level AR, CO, HI, PO, or WS courses/6 General Education Electives: 9 Credit Hours 3 Credit Hours* Choose 100- or 200-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Political Science (PS), Psychology (PY), Religion (RE), Sociology (SO), Spanish (SP), or University Survey (UN). 6 Credit Hours Choose 300- or 400-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), Communication (CO), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Popular Culture (PO), Psychology (PY), Science (SC), Sociology (SO), University Survey (UN), or Women’s Studies (WS). Specialized Electives: 2 Credit Hours Choose courses at the 300 or 400 level that are not required in your program.

Note: Elective courses can apply to only one degree level. The same course cannot be re-used to satisfy the elective requirements at the Associate’s Degree level and again at the Bachelor’s Degree level.

*Denotes first and second year courses

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BAC TT E ED EDGERGER EE E B C CCAALLAAUURRE EA A

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION This curriculum offers excellent instruction for a wide range of positions in the service, banking and manufacturing industries, as well as in small businesses. MISSION STATEMENT: In a personalized setting, using multiple delivery methods, we prepare diverse students to acquire business skills, knowledge, and abilities for successful application in a global marketplace. Curriculum for Four-Year Degree: 180 Credit Hours Technical and Basic Requirements: 95 Credit Hours AC114 Accounting I/5* AC115 Accounting II/5* BU100 Survey of Business Leaders--Past & Present/3* BU240 International Business I/5* BU315 Business Law I/3 DP144 Developing Business Presentations/3* DP150 Spreadsheet Applications/3* EC190 Survey of Economics/3* EC215 Macroeconomics/3 EC310 Microeconomics/3 FI210 Principles of Finance/5* FI400 Corporate Finance/4 FI410 Investments/3 MA121 Principles of Management/5* MA122 Small Business and the Entrepreneur/3* MA225 Retail Management/5* MA226 Human Resources Management I/3* MA322 Organizational Behavior/5 MA324 Organizational Behavior II/3 MA326 Human Resources Management II/3 MA327 Leadership/3 MA406 Information Management/3 MA430 Entrepreneurship/3 MA445 Global Management Issues/3 MA465 Strategic Management and Business Policy/3 MT220 Marketing I/5* Practicum Options: 6 Credit Hours Two 3-hr Approved Specialized Electives UN415 1-hr Practicum Prior Learning Assessment UN416 5-hr Practicum Experiential Learning Portfolio or BU410 Seminar in Business/1 and one of the following: BU411 5-hr Work Option Practicum BU412 2-hr Work Option Practicum & 3-hr Approved Specialized Elective BU414 2-hr Business Research Project & 3-hr Approved Specialized Elective

90

General Education Requirements: 69 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3* CO445 Group Dynamics/3 EN Any 300/400 level EN course/3 EN180 Composition I/5* EN200 Composition II/5* MH169 Business Math/5*

MH190 Algebra/5* MH310 Finite Mathematics/3 OR MH315 Calculus/3 MH350 Statistics/5 MH420 Quantitative Methods/3 PH310 Ethics/3 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3* OR SO186 Sociology/3* SC200 Principles of Ecology/3* SC320 Biology/3 OR SC330 Physics/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1* UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3* UN490 Portfolio Capstone/1 Any 100/200 level AR, EN, HI, RE, or SP course/3* Any 300/400 level PY or SO course/3 Any 300/400 level AR, CO, HI, PO, or WS courses/6 General Education Electives: 9 Credit Hours 3 Credit Hours* Choose 100- or 200-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Political Science (PS), Psychology (PY), Religion (RE), Sociology (SO), Spanish (SP), or University Survey (UN). 6 Credit Hours Choose 300- or 400-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), Communication (CO), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Popular Culture (PO), Psychology (PY), Science (SC), Sociology (SO), University Survey (UN), or Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Studies (WS). Specialized Elective: 1 Credit Hour Choose courses at the 300 or 400 level that are not required in your program.

*Denotes first and second year courses


BA BAC C CACL AALUARUERAE TA ET E DDEEGGRR EE EE

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION CONCENTRATIONS Students in a bachelor’s degree of Business Administration or Specialized Studies program can add a concentration to their program. The three choices are: Agribusiness Management; Automotive Management/Automotive Aftermarket; or Marketing. Students who graduate with an associate degree in Agribusiness Marketing/Management; Automotive Management/Automotive Management; or Marketing might consider continuing at the baccalaureate level in either the bachelors degree in Business Administration or Specialized Studies program with or without a concentration. If the Business Administration program is chosen, all lower level course requirements not completed in the associate degree must be satisfied. Contact the Registrar’s Office to change your program or to add one of these concentrations and to learn more about the options and requirements related to them.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION WITH AGRIBUSINESS MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION AG300 AG310 AG315 AG400 AG405 AG406

Agribusiness Strategies and Management/5 Agribusiness Entrepreneurship, Finance and Marketing/5 Professional Agribusiness Selling/5 Agricultural Policy/5 Agricultural Price Analysis/3 Special Problems in Agribusiness/3

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION WITH AUTOMOTIVE MANAGEMENT/AUTOMOTIVE AFTERMARKET CONCENTRATION AM310 AM311 AM312 AM412 AM413 AM420

Automotive Dealerships/3 Automotive Aftermarket and Manufacturing/3 Automotive Aftermarket and Retailing/3 Parts and Service Merchandising/3 Automotive Jobber/Wholesaler Aftermarkets/3 Automotive Entrepreneurship/5

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION WITH MARKETING CONCENTRATION MT321 MT342 MT353 MT401 MT424 MT426

International Marketing/3 Marketing Research I/3 Services Marketing/3 Special Topics in Marketing/3 Marketing Management/5 Marketing Strategies/3

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B AA TE EEE BA A CCCCAALLAAUURRE E T ED EDGERGE R

MARKETING The purpose of the marketing program is to expose students to a wide range of marketing expertise encompassing strategic marketing, product management, promotion, pricing, distribution, sales, and other essential marketing areas that prepare students for multiple career options in marketing, promotion, and sales management. With the understanding of marketing principles, students are given the chance to apply marketing knowledge to organizational situations in order to fulfill customer needs in a changing, global environment. The focus of the marketing program is to provide students with an in-depth practical approach to analyzing, planning, and implementing marketing strategies. MISSION STATEMENT: In a personalized setting, using multiple delivery methods, we prepare diverse students to acquire business skills, knowledge, and abilities for successful application in a global marketplace. Curriculum for Four-Year Degree: 180 Credit Hours Technical and Basic Requirements: 101 Credit Hours AC114 Accounting I/5* BU240 International Business I/5* BU315 Business Law I/3 DP144 Developing Business Presentations/3* EC190 Survey of Economics/3* EC215 Macroeconomics/3 EC310 Microeconomics/3 FI210 Principles of Finance/5* FI400 Corporate Finance/4 FI410 Investments/3 MA121 Principles of Management/5* MA226 Human Resources Management I/3* MA322 Organizational Behavior/5 MA401 Moral Issues in Business/3 MT111 Professional Selling/3* MT120 Advertising/3* MT210 Public Relations/3* MT220 Marketing I/5* MT230 Marketing II/5* MT321 International Marketing/3 MT342 Marketing Research I/3 MT343 Marketing Research II/3 MT352 Internet Marketing/3 MT353 Services Marketing/3 MT401 Special Topics in Marketing/3 MT423 Brand Management/3 MT424 Marketing Management/5 MT450 Marketing Capstone/3

92

General Education Requirements: 69 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3* CO445 Group Dynamics/3 EN Any 300/400 level EN course/3 EN180 Composition I/5* EN200 Composition II/5* MH169 Business Math/5* MH190 Algebra/5* MH310 Finite Mathematics/3 OR MH315 Calculus/3 MH350 Statistics/5

MH420 Quantitative Methods/3 PH310 Ethics/3 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3* OR SO186 Sociology/3* SC200 Principles of Ecology/3* SC320 Biology/3 OR SC330 Physics/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1* UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3* UN490 Portfolio Capstone/1 Any 100/200 level AR, EN, HI, RE, or SP course/3* Any 300/400 level PY or SO course/3 Any 300/400 level AR, CO, HI, PO, or WS courses/6 General Education Electives: 9 Credit Hours 3 Credit Hours* Choose 100- or 200-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Political Science (PS), Psychology (PY), Religion (RE), Sociology (SO), Spanish (SP), or University Survey (UN). 6 Credit Hours Choose 300- or 400-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), Communication (CO), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Popular Culture (PO), Psychology (PY), Science (SC), Sociology (SO), University Survey (UN), or Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Studies (WS). Specialized Electives: 1 Credit Hour Choose courses at the 300 or 400 level that are not required in your program.

*Denotes first and second year courses


RE EE A S S O C I A T E O F A P P LBI AECDC A B LUASUI RNEEASTSE DDEEGG R

ACCOUNTING This curriculum prepares students in the areas of preparation of financial reports, statements, cost procedures, audit and finance for business firms. The sequence of major offerings starts summer and fall quarters. MISSION STATEMENT: The Accounting Program provides an intensive study of the accounting field in flexible student-friendly formats for lifelong learning opportunities. Curriculum: 108 Credit Hours Length: 6 quarters Technical and Basic Requirements: 64 Credit Hours AC114 Accounting I/5 AC115 Accounting II/5 AC116 Accounting III/5 AC117 Personal Taxes/5 AC122 Payroll Accounting/3 AC131 Introduction to Accounting Software/5 AC202 Managerial Accounting/5 AC218 Intermediate Accounting I/5 AC219 Intermediate Accounting II/5 BU115 Contract Law/5 DP150 Spreadsheet Applications/3 DP210 Advanced Spreadsheet Applications/3 FI210 Principles of Finance/5 MA121 Principles of Management/5 General Education Requirements: 32 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3 EN180 Composition I/5 EN200 Composition II/5 MH190 Algebra/5 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3 OR SO186 Sociology/3 SC200 Principles of Ecology/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3 UN292 Portfolio Capstone/1 Any 100- or 200-level AR, EN, HI, RE, or SP course/3

General Education Electives: 3 Credit Hours Choose 100- or 200-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Political Science (PS), Psychology (PY), Religion (RE), Sociology (SO), Spanish (SP), or University Survey (UN). Specialized Electives: 9 Credit Hours Choose courses at the 100 or 200 level that are not required in your program. AC225 Governmental and Not-for-Profit Accounting is recommended. Choose courses from the following disciplines: Business, Marketing, or Data Processing.

Note: Elective courses can apply to only one degree level. The same course cannot be re-used to satisfy the elective requirements at the Associateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree level and again at the Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree level.

*18 hours of the associate degree curriculum are not required for students who go directly into the baccalaureate program. Students should see the Academic Advisor.

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B A AS CSCOACL IAAUTREE AOTFE ADPEPGLRI E E D BUSINESS DEGREE

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION The associate degree in Business Administration offers an excellent education for a wide range of entry-level positions in the service, banking and manufacturing industries, as well as in small businesses. MISSION STATEMENT: In a personalized setting, using multiple delivery methods, we prepare diverse students to acquire business skills, knowledge, and abilities for successful application in a global marketplace. Curriculum: 108 Credit Hours Length: 6 quarters Technical and Basic Requirements: 67 Credit Hours AC114 Accounting I/5 AC115 Accounting II/5 BU100 Survey of Business Leaders--Past & Present/3 BU115 Contract Law/5 BU240 International Business I/5 DP117 Database Applications/3 DP144 Developing Business Presentations/3 DP150 Spreadsheet Applications/3 EC190 Survey of Economics/3 EC215 Macroeconomics/3 FI210 Principles of Finance/5 MA121 Principles of Management/5 MA122 Small Business and the Entrepreneur/3 MA225 Retail Management/5 MA226 Human Resources Management I/3 MT220 Marketing I/5 WP138 Introduction to Word Processing Applications/3 General Education Requirements: 32 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3 EN180 Composition I/5 EN200 Composition II/5 MH169 Business Math/5 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3 OR SO186 Sociology/3 SC200 Principles of Ecology/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3 UN292 Portfolio Capstone/1 Any 100- or 200-level AR, EN, HI, RE, or SP course/3

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General Education Electives: 3 Credit Hours Choose 100- or 200-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Political Science (PS), Psychology (PY), Religion (RE), Sociology (SO), Spanish (SP), or University Survey (UN). Specialized Electives: 6 Credit Hours Choose courses at the 100 or 200 level that are not required in your program. Note: Elective courses can apply to only one degree level. The same course cannot be re-used to satisfy the elective requirements at the Associateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree level and again at the Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree level.

*18 hours of the associate degree curriculum are not required for students who go directly into the baccalaureate program. Students should see the Academic Advisor.


RE EE A S S O C I A T E O F A P P LBI AECDC A B LUASUI RNEEASTSE DDEEGG R

MARKETING This curriculum prepares students to enter marketing positions in retail, wholesale or manufacturing organizations. MISSION STATEMENT: In a personalized setting, using multiple delivery methods, we prepare diverse students to acquire business skills, knowledge, and abilities for successful application in a global marketplace. Curriculum: 108 Credit Hours Length: 6 Quarters Technical and Basic Requirements: 65 Credit Hours AC114 Accounting I/5 BU109 Customer Service/3 BU115 Contract Law/5 BU120 Introduction to Business/3 BU240 International Business I/5 DP144 Developing Business Presentations/3 DP150 Spreadsheet Applications/3 EC190 Survey of Economics/3 EC215 Macroeconomics/3 FI210 Principles of Finance/5 MA121 Principles of Management/5 MA226 Human Resources Management I/3 MT111 Professional Selling/3 MT120 Advertising/3 MT210 Public Relations/3 MT220 Marketing I/5 MT230 Marketing II/5

General Education Electives: 3 Credit Hours Choose 100- or 200-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Political Science (PS), Psychology (PY), Religion (RE), Sociology (SO), Spanish (SP), or University Survey (UN). Specialized Electives: 3 Credit Hours Choose courses at the 100 or 200 level that are not required in your program.

Note: Elective courses can apply to only one degree level. The same course cannot be re-used to satisfy the elective requirements at the Associateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree level and again at the Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree level.

General Education Requirements: 37 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3 EN180 Composition I/5 EN200 Composition II/5 MH169 Business Math/5 MH190 Algebra/5 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3 OR SO186 Sociology/3 SC200 Principles of Ecology/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3 UN292 Portfolio Capstone/1 Any 100- or 200-level AR, EN, HI, RE, or SP course/3

95


BACCALAUREATE DEGREE

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN OHIO COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS The College of Health Professions of the University of Northwestern Ohio includes the following majors: Health Care Administration, Medical Assistant Technology, Medical Office Management, Medical Coding, and Medical Transcription. Major course sequences begin fall quarter. Students may enter any quarter to take general education courses but must take required major courses when offered. Subsequently, more time may be needed to complete the programs. BACCALAUREATE DEGREE Health Care Administration ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED BUSINESS DEGREES Medical Assistant Technology Medical Office Management DIPLOMAS Medical Coding Medical Transcriptionist

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BA T E DDEEGGR RE EE E BAC C CACLAALUARUERAE TA E

HEALTH CARE ADMINISTRATION This is a 2+2 degree. University of Northwestern Ohio students in the Medical Assisting or Medical Office Management associate degree will transfer into the degree completion program and complete their junior and senior years. The sequence of major offerings starts fall quarter. In addition, students from other regionally accredited institutions may transfer associate degrees in health-related areas into the 2+2 program. Students who transfer into the baccalaureate degree may have differing requirements to complete, based upon the general education and related courses the student has already taken. MISSION STATEMENT: Through traditional and nontraditional delivery methods, students prepare to work across the health care continuum by acquiring the management knowledge and skills needed in this dynamic industry. Junior- and Senior-Level Courses 90 Credit Hours (Total) Major Requirements: 43 Credit Hours BU301 Management Essentials for Specialized Studies/3 BU302 Economics, Accounting, and Finance for Specialized Studies/3 HC300 Health Care Management/3 HC310 Health Care Law/3 HC315 Quality in Health Care Management/3 HC467 Health Care Finance/5 HC470 Health Care Economics/3 MA322 Organizational Behavior/5 MA324 Organizational Behavior II/3 MA326 Human Resources Management II/3 MA327 Leadership/3 MA406 Information Management/3 MA465 Strategic Management and Business Policy/3

General Education Electives: 6 Credit Hours Choose 300- or 400-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), Communication (CO), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Popular Culture (PO), Psychology (PY), Science (SC), Sociology (SO), University Survey (UN), or Women’s Studies (WS).

General Education Requirements: 33 Credit Hours CO445 Group Dynamics/3 EN Any 300/400 level EN course/3 MH310 Finite Mathematics/3 OR MH315 Calculus/3 MH350 Statistics/5 MH420 Quantitative Methods/3 PH310 Ethics/3 SC320 Biology/3 OR SC330 Physics/3 SO380 Death & Dying/3 UN490 Portfolio Capstone/1 Any 300/400 level AR, CO, HI, PO, or WS courses/6

Note: Elective courses can apply to only one degree level. The same course cannot be re-used to satisfy the elective requirements at the Associate’s Degree level and again at the Bachelor’s Degree level.

Specialized Electives: 8 Credit Hours Choose courses at the 300 or 400 level that are not required in your program.

97


BS AC A TFEA D E BUSINESS DEGREE A SC OACLI AAUT REE O P EP GL RI EE D

MEDICAL ASSISTANT TECHNOLOGY Medical office personnel with business backgrounds have many opportunities. Entering students must have proof of immunizations on file with the University Registrar. The sequence of major offerings begins fall quarter only. MISSION STATEMENT: To be an excellent institution to attract, excite, and nurture Medical Assistant students and to prepare them with exceptional skills in the health care field. Curriculum: 108 Credit Hours Length: 6 Quarters Technical and Basic Requirements: 73 Credit Hours BU120 Introduction to Business/3 KY146 Keyboarding I/5 MA121 Principles of Management/5 MO130 Medical Law and Ethics/3 MO135 Clinical I/2 MO136 Clinical II/2 MO140 Human Anatomy, Pathophysiology, and Terminology I/3 MO142 Human Anatomy, Pathophysiology, and Terminology II/3 MO144 Pharmacology for Medical Assisting I/3 MO145 Human Anatomy, Pathophysiology, and Terminology III/3 MO146 Pharmacology for Medical Assisting II/3 MO159 Clinical III/2 MO246 Pharmacology for Medical Assisting III/3 MO250 Human Anatomy, Pathophysiology, and Terminology IV/3 MO259 Clinical IV/2 MO272 Coding I/3 MO273 Coding II/3 MO278 Understanding Health Insurance/2 MO282 Administrative Skills for the Medical Assistant/3 MO285 Medical Assisting Externship I/1 MO286 Medical Assisting Externship II/1 MO287 Medical Assisting Externship III/1 OP130 Medical Accounting Software/2 OP149 Records Management/3 OP252 Machine Transcription/3 OP255 Medical Machine Transcription/3 WP138 Introduction to Word Processing Applications/3

98

General Education Requirements: 32 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3 EN180 Composition I/5 EN200 Composition II/5 MH169 Business Math/5 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3 OR SO186 Sociology/3 SC200 Principles of Ecology/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3 UN292 Portfolio Capstone/1 Any 100- or 200-level AR, EN, HI, RE, or SP course/3 General Education Electives: 3 Credit Hours Choose 100- or 200-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Political Science (PS), Psychology (PY), Religion (RE), Sociology (SO), Spanish (SP), or University Survey (UN).

Note: Elective courses can apply to only one degree level. The same course cannot be re-used to satisfy the elective requirements at the Associateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree level and again at the Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree level.


A S S O C I A T E O F A P P LBI AE CDC A B LUASUI R N EEASTSE DDEEGGRR EE E MEDICAL OFFICE MANAGEMENT Medical office managers are needed in business today. This program provides instruction in many aspects of the medical field, including the use of microcomputers with document processing and medical office software and an introduction to billing and coding. Additional general education courses provide a broad background for the graduate. The sequence of major offerings starts summer and fall quarters. MISSION STATEMENT: The Office Technologies Department provides quality instruction to students by preparing them to be successful and productive community and business leaders while emphasizing employability skills and personal attributes. Curriculum: 108 Credit Hours Length: 6 Quarters Technical and Basic Requirements: 72 Credit Hours BU120 Introduction to Business/3 DP117 Database Applications/3 DP144 Developing Business Presentations/3 DP150 Spreadsheet Applications/3 KY146 Keyboarding I/5 KY147 Keyboarding II/5 MA121 Principles of Management/5 MO130 Medical Law & Ethics/3 MO163 Medical Terminology I/3 MO264 Medical Terminology II/3 MO272 Medical Coding I/3 MO273 Medical Coding II/3 MO278 Understanding Health Insurance/2 MO279 Medical Terminology III/3 OP130 Medical Accounting Software/2 OP149 Records Management/3 OP252 Machine Transcription/3 OP255 Medical Machine Transcription/3 OP275 Integrated Software Applications/3 OP276 Office Procedures/5 WP138 Introduction to Word Processing Applications/3 WP267 Advanced Word Processing Applications/3 General Education Requirements: 32 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3 EN180 Composition I/5 EN200 Composition II/5 MH169 Business Math/5 OR MH190 Algebra/5 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3 OR SO186 Sociology/3 SC200 Principles of Ecology/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3 UN292 Portfolio Capstone/1 Any 100- or 200-level AR, EN, HI, RE, or SP course/3

General Education Electives: 3 Credit Hours Choose 100- or 200-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Political Science (PS), Psychology (PY), Religion (RE), Sociology (SO), Spanish (SP), or University Survey (UN). Specialized Electives: 1 Credit Hour Choose courses at the 100 or 200 level that are not required in your program.

Note: Elective courses can apply to only one degree level. The same course cannot be re-used to satisfy the elective requirements at the Associateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree level and again at the Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree level.

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BA AL D I PC LC O MAAU R E A T E D E G R E E

MEDICAL CODING Students completing the medical coding curriculum will be prepared for entry-level positions in a wide-range of healthcare settings, i.e., physician offices, hospitals, insurance companies, and other health-oriented industries. The sequence of major offerings begins fall quarter only. Curriculum: 72 Credit Hours Length: 5 quarters Technical and Basic Requirements: 48 Credit Hours KY146 Keyboarding I/5 KY147 Keyboarding II/5 MO130 Medical Law and Ethics/3 MO144 Pharmacology for Medical Assisting I/3 MO146 Pharmacology for Medical Assisting II/3 MO163 Medical Terminology I/3 MO264 Medical Terminology II/3 MO272 Medical Coding I/3 MO273 Medical Coding II/3 MO274 Medical Coding III/4 MO278 Understanding Health Insurance/2 MO279 Medical Terminology III/3 OP130 Medical Accounting Software/2 OP149 Records Management/3 WP138 Introduction to Word Processing Applications/3 General Education Requirements: 21 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3 EN180 Composition I/5 EN200 Composition II/5 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3 UN292 Portfolio Capstone/1 Specialized Electives: 3 Credit Hours Choose courses at the 100 or 200 level that are not required in your program.

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B A C C A L A U R E A T ED IDPELGORM EA E

MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTIONIST Medical transcriptionists are in demand for hospitals, clinics and doctorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; offices. This program provides training in the skills necessary for this increasingly important health professional. The sequence of major offerings begins fall quarter only. Curriculum: 72 Credit Hours Length: 1 year Technical and Basic Requirements: 48 Credit Hours DP150 Spreadsheet Applications/3 KY146 Keyboarding I/5 KY147 Keyboarding II/5 MO163 Medical Terminology I/3 MO264 Medical Terminology II/3 MO272 Medical Coding I/3 MO273 Medical Coding II/3 MO278 Understanding Health Insurance/2 MO279 Medical Terminology III/3 OP252 Machine Transcription/3 OP255 Medical Machine Transcription/3 OP256 Word Language Specialist/3 OP259 Medical Word Specialist/3 WP138 Introduction to Word Processing Applications/3 WP267 Advanced Word Processing Applications/3 General Education Requirements: 21 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3 EN180 Composition I/5 EN200 Composition II/5 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3 UN292 Portfolio Capstone/1 Specialized Electives: 3 Credit Hours Choose courses at the 100 or 200 level that are not required in your program.

101


BACCALAUREATE DEGREE

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN OHIO COLLEGE OF OCCUPATIONAL PROFESSIONS The College of Occupational Professions includes the following majors: Agribusiness, Automotive Management, Information Technology, Legal, Office Management, Specialized Studies, Sport Marketing and Management, Travel, and Word Processing. Some programs have major course sequences beginning summer and/or fall quarters. Students may enter any quarter to take general education courses but must take required major courses when offered. Subsequently, more time may be needed to complete the programs. Students who select the specialized studies major should meet with the Registrar or the Academic Advisor to declare the program majors. BACCALAUREATE DEGREE Specialized Studies ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED BUSINESS DEGREES Agribusiness Marketing/Management Technology Automotive Management/Automotive Aftermarket IT -Computer Forensics IT -Digital Multimedia Design IT -Microsoft Networking Technology IT -Network Security Legal Assisting Legal Office Management Office Management Specialized Studies Sport Marketing and Management Travel and Hotel Management Word Processing/Administrative Support DIPLOMAS Agribusiness Management Executive Assistant IT - Graphic Designer IT - Microsoft Networking Technology Paralegal Travel and Hospitality Word Processing Specialist CERTIFICATES Information Technology Microsoft Administrator Microsoft Networking

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Programs are offered on line.


AE T E DDEEG GR RE EE E BAB C ACCACLAALUARU ER AE T

SPECIALIZED STUDIES A freshman must have an active associate degree program in addition to the Specialized Studies baccalaureate program. The associate degree will satisfy the lower level requirements for the Specialized Studies program. When the associate degree program is completed or nearly completed, courses at the upper level can be started. It is required that students who declare this program a) complete the associate degree program and b) also have the intent to complete the baccalaureate degree program. A student transferring into the program with a completed associate degree from the University of Northwestern Ohio or another regionally accredited college or university will use that concentration for the lower level requirements and will be admitted to Option 1 which has requirements majoring in Business Administration. By submitting documentation to the Registrarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office and with the approval of the Vice President for Academic Affairs, students with extensive health care related work experience may be admitted to Option 2 which has requirements majoring in Health Care Administration. Students will complete 90 credit hours at the upper level to meet the requirements for this program. Students with a completed associate degree in Business Administration should declare the baccalaureate degree in Business Administration. Students with a completed associate degree in an allied health area that meets the requirements for the baccalaureate degree in Health Care Administration should declare that program. Associate degrees in other majors from accredited institutions make students eligible for the baccalaureate degree in Specialized Studies. MISSION STATEMENT: To meet the individual needs of students, the University has developed a degree program that allows them to design majors that cross disciplines. Junior- and Senior-Level Courses: 90 Credit Hours Students will choose one of the upper level options to complete the degree. OPTION 1 Technical and Basic Requirements: 48 Credit Hours BU301 Management Essentials for Specialized Studies/3 BU302 Economics, Accounting, and Finance for Specialized Studies/3 BU315 Business Law I/3 EC310 Microeconomics/3 FI400 Corporate Finance/4 FI410 Investments/3 MA322 Organizational Behavior/5 MA324 Organizational Behavior II/3 MA326 Human Resources Management II/3 MA327 Leadership/3 MA406 Information Management/3 MA430 Entrepreneurship/3 MA445 Global Management Issues/3 MA465 Strategic Management & Business Policy/3 Any 300/400 level PY or SO course/3 Specialized Electives: 6 Credit Hours Choose courses at the 300- or 400-level that are not required in your program.

OPTION 2 Technical and Basic Requirements: 46 Credit Hours BU301 Management Essentials for Specialized Studies/3 BU302 Economics, Accounting, and Finance for Specialized Studies/3 HC300 Health Care Management/3 HC310 Health Care Law/3 HC315 Quality in Health Care Management/3 HC467 Health Care Finance/5 HC470 Health Care Economics/3 MA322 Organizational Behavior/5 MA324 Organizational Behavior II/3 MA326 Human Resources Management II/3 MA327 Leadership/3 MA406 Information Management/3 MA465 Strategic Management & Business Policy/3 SO380 Death & Dying/3 Specialized Electives: 8 Credit Hours Choose courses at the 300- or 400-level that are not required in your program.

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BAC E ED EDGERGERE E E B CC C AALLAAUURREEA AT T FOR BOTH OPTIONS General Education Requirements: 30 Credit Hours CO445 Group Dynamics/3 EN Any 300/400 level EN course/3 MH310 Finite Mathematics/3 OR MH315 Calculus/3 MH350 Statistics/5 MH420 Quantitative Methods/3 PH310 Ethics/3 SC320 Biology/3 OR SC330 Physics/3 UN490 Portfolio Capstone/1 Any 300/400 level AR, CO, HI, PO, or WS courses/6 General Education Electives: 6 Credit Hours Choose 300- or 400-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), Communication (CO), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Popular Culture (PO), Psychology (PY), Science (SC), Sociology (SO), University Survey (UN), or Women’s Studies (WS).

Note: Elective courses can apply to only one degree level. The same course cannot be re-used to satisfy the elective requirements at the Associate’s Degree level and again at the Bachelor’s Degree level.

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AL A S S O C I A T E O F A P P LBI A E CD C B UASUI R N EE ASTSE DDEEGGRREE EE

AGRIBUSINESS MARKETING/MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY Students entering positions in the agribusiness marketing/management environment—wholesale, retail or production—will have the background to operate a family farm, manage a retail agribusiness supply firm, sell agricultural equipment and products and fill other agricultural-related positions. The sequence of major offerings starts fall quarter. MISSION STATEMENT: The Agribusiness Department fosters a foundation of agricultural learning, developing the individual and facilitates the transition from secondary to postsecondary education through to the work force. The student will explore the relationship and the possibilities of the community of agriculture. Curriculum: 108 Credit Hours Length: 6 Quarters Technical and Basic Requirements: 72 Credit Hours AC114 Accounting I/5 AG106 Agribusiness Fundamentals/3 AG125 Agriculture Law/5 AG145 Agricultural Sales/5 AG208 Agricultural Economics/5 AG209 Agricultural Marketing/5 AG210 Agronomy/5 AG211 Animal Science/5 AG230 Agronomy II/5 DP144 Developing Business Presentations/3 DP150 Spreadsheet Applications/3 EC190 Survey of Economics/3 FI210 Principles of Finance/5 MA121 Principles of Management/5 MT220 Marketing I/5 MT230 Marketing II/5

General Education Electives: 3 Credit Hours Choose 100- or 200-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Political Science (PS), Psychology (PY), Religion (RE), Sociology (SO), Spanish (SP), or University Survey (UN). Specialized Elective: 1 Credit Hour Choose courses at the 100 or 200 level that are not required in your program. Note: Elective courses can apply to only one degree level. The same course cannot be re-used to satisfy the elective requirements at the Associate’s Degree level and again at the Bachelor’s Degree level.

General Education Requirements: 32 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3 EN180 Composition I/5 EN200 Composition II/5 MH169 Business Math/5 OR MH190 Algebra/5 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3 OR SO186 Sociology/3 SC200 Principles of Ecology/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3 UN292 Portfolio Capstone/1 Any 100- or 200-level AR, EN, HI, RE, or SP course/3

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BS AC A TFEA D E BUSINESS DEGREE A SC OACLI AAUT REE O P EP GL RI EE D

AUTOMOTIVE MANAGEMENT/AUTOMOTIVE AFTERMARKET MANAGEMENT This curriculum prepares students for positions in automotive aftermarket environments. Emphasis is on management. MISSION STATEMENT: The Automotive Management/Automotive Aftermarket Department’s mission is to provide a quality education from its diverse courses, developing students into a knowledgeable and productive work force prepared to enter the automotive aftermarket as an entrance-level management position. Curriculum: 108 Credit Hours Length: 6 Quarters Technical and Basic Requirements: 49 Credit Hours AM128 Customer Relations Automated Management/3 AM130 Introduction to the Automotive Industry/5 AM210 Parts & Service Management/3 AM215 Automotive Aftermarket Management/5 BU240 International Business I/5 DP117 Database Applications/3 DP150 Spreadsheet Applications/3 MA121 Principles of Management/5 MA226 Human Resources Management I/3 MT111 Professional Selling/3 MT120 Advertising/3 MT220 Marketing I/5 WP138 Introduction to Word Processing Applications/3 General Education Requirements: 32 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3 EN180 Composition I/5 EN200 Composition II/5 MH169 Business Math/5 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3 OR SO186 Sociology/3 SC200 Principles of Ecology/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3 UN292 Portfolio Capstone/1 Any 100- or 200-level AR, EN, HI, RE, or SP course/3

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General Education Electives: 3 Credit Hours Choose 100- or 200-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Political Science (PS), Psychology (PY), Religion (RE), Sociology (SO), Spanish (SP), or University Survey (UN). Specialized Automotive Electives: 24 Credit Hours* *Students who have passed the ASE tests and have documented experience in the automotive area (civilian or military) may qualify for course credit.

Note: Elective courses can apply to only one degree level. The same course cannot be re-used to satisfy the elective requirements at the Associate’s Degree level and again at the Bachelor’s Degree level.


A LUASUI R E A S S O C I A T E O F A P P LBI AE CDC B N EEASTSE DDEEGGRR EE E

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Computer Forensics This curriculum is a study of computer forensics using current information technologies that are the driving force of today’s business and legal world. Digital forensics, as it applies to digital evidence recovery, forensic laboratory analysis, and legal and ethical issues regarding seizure of computer evidence will be explored in-depth. Computer network security, protocols, and intrusions detection will also provide the students with skills required to protect against threats and vulnerabilities. A hands-on approach will be used to reinforce the concepts discussed in this curriculum. Please review the catalog course descriptions for prerequisites. The sequence of the courses starts in the fall quarter only and cannot be taken in the Virtual College. MISSION STATEMENT: The Information Technology Department delivers to the students an educational experience that leads to lifelong learning skills through field-experienced professionals using contemporary technology. Curriculum: 108 Credit Hours Length: 6 Quarters Technical & Basic Requirements: 61 Credit Hours AC114 Accounting I/5 CF101 Introduction to Computer Forensics/4 CF130 Analysis of Digital Media/5 CF140 White-Collar Crime/3 CF201 Advanced Computer Forensics/3 CF202 Intrusion Detection and Prevention/3 CF210 Cybercrime/5 CF230 Search & Seizure - Legal, Ethical & Privacy Issues/3 CF240 Computer Forensics and Incident Response/3 CF280 Advanced Topics in Computer Forensics/4 CF295 Safety and Security of Critical Infrastructure/3 IT110 Modern Computing Concepts/3 IT184 Ethics in Information Technology/4 MA121 Principles of Management/5 PL100 Introduction to the Legal System/5 PL202 Criminal Law/3

General Education Electives: 3 Credit Hours Choose 100- or 200-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Political Science (PS), Psychology (PY), Religion (RE), Sociology (SO), Spanish (SP), or University Survey (UN). Specialized Electives: 9 Credit Hours Choose courses at the 100 or 200 level that are not required in your program. Note: Elective courses can apply to only one degree level. The same course cannot be re-used to satisfy the elective requirements at the Associate’s Degree level and again at the Bachelor’s Degree level.

General Education Requirements: 35 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3 EN180 Composition I/5 EN200 Composition II/5 MH169 Business Math/5 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3 OR SO186 Sociology/3 PY270 Social Psychology/3 SC200 Principles of Ecology/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3 UN292 Portfolio Capstone/1 Any 100- or 200-level AR, EN, HI, RE, or SP course/3 107


BA E BUSINESS DEGREE A SC S COACLI AAUTREE A O TFEA DP EPGL RI EE D

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Digital Multimedia Design This curriculum is a study of digital multimedia design using current information technologies that are utilized in this high growth field. The curriculum will give the student the skills to create dynamic and interactive multimedia productions for both the web and optical media. A hands-on approach will be used to reinforce the concepts discussed in this curriculum. Please review the catalog course descriptions for prerequisites. The sequence of the courses starts in the fall quarter only and cannot be taken in the Virtual College. MISSION STATEMENT: The Information Technology Department delivers to the students an educational experience that leads to lifelong learning skills through field-experienced professionals using contemporary technology. Curriculum: 108 Credit Hours Length: 6 Quarters Technical & Basic Requirements: 71 Credit Hours AC114 Accounting I/5 DM118 Digital Design Fundamentals/3 DM121 Web Page Design Concepts/3 DM125 Graphic Imaging/3 DM180 Applied Digital Drawing/3 DM190 Interactive Graphic Animation/3 DM200 Digital Multimedia/5 DM220 Applied Digital Video Editing/5 DM221 Advanced Digital Video Editing/3 DM230 Advanced Graphic Imaging/3 DM240 Applied 3-D Modeling Concepts/5 DM250 Applied 3-D Animation Concepts/3 DM263 Advanced Digital Multimedia/3 IT110 Modern Computing Concepts/3 IT114 Business Applications/3 IT235 Electronic Commerce/5 MA121 Principles of Management/5 MT120 Advertising/3 MT220 Marketing I/5 General Education Requirements: 32 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3 EN180 Composition I/5 EN200 Composition II/5 MH190 Algebra/5 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3 OR SO186 Sociology/3 SC200 Principles of Ecology/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3 UN292 Portfolio Capstone/1 Any 100- or 200-level AR, EN, HI, RE, or SP course/3 108

General Education Electives: 3 Credit Hours Choose 100- or 200-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Political Science (PS), Psychology (PY), Religion (RE), Sociology (SO), Spanish (SP), or University Survey (UN). Specialized Electives: 2 Credit Hours Choose courses at the 100 or 200 level that are not required in your program. Note: Elective courses can apply to only one degree level. The same course cannot be re-used to satisfy the elective requirements at the Associateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree level and again at the Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree level.


E A S S O C I A T E O F A P P LBI AE CDC A B LUASUI R N EEASTSE DDEEGGRR EE E

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Microsoft Networking Technology The University of Northwestern Ohio is a Microsoft IT Academy and this curriculum was developed as a study of several Microsoft® Windows 2003 products as they apply to a networking professional. It explores and applies these products in order to prepare the student for the Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator (MCSA) and Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE) exams in pursuit of these Microsoft certifications. A hands-on approach will be used to reinforce the concepts discussed in this curriculum. The sequence of the courses starts in the fall quarter only and cannot be taken in the Virtual College. The student is required to successfully complete the coursework in order to receive the degree. MCSA and MCSE testing and certifications are completely up to the individual student. The University is an Authorized Prometric Testing Center. Students enrolled in this program are able to complete certification exams on campus for a reduced fee. Receipt of the University degree is separate and apart from the actual MCSA and MCSE certifications. MISSION STATEMENT: The Information Technology Department delivers to the students an educational experience that leads to lifelong learning skills through field-experienced professionals using contemporary technology. Curriculum:

108 Credit Hours Length: 6 Quarters

Technical & Basic Requirements: 64 Credit Hours AC114 Accounting I/5 BU115 Contract Law/5 IT110 Modern Computing Concepts/3 IT184 Ethics in Information Technology/4 IT235 Electronic Commerce/5 MA121 Principles of Management/5 MN270 Administering a Client Operating System^/3 MN290 Administering a Server Environment^/4 MN291 Maintaining a Network Infrastructure^/4 MN293 Planning a Network Infrastructure^/4 MN294 Configuring & Maintaining a Directory Service^/3 MN297 Designing a Network Directory Service Architecture^/3 MN298 Designing Network Security^/4 MN299 Developing Security in a Network Architecture^/4 MT210 Public Relations/3 NS183 Network Security Fundamentals^/5 General Education Requirements: 37 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3 EN180 Composition I/5 EN200 Composition II/5 MH169 Business Math/5 MH190 Algebra/5 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3 OR SO186 Sociology/3 SC200 Principles of Ecology/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3 UN292 Portfolio Capstone/1 Any 100- or 200-level AR, EN, HI, RE, or SP course/3

General Education Electives: 3 Credit Hours Choose 100- or 200-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Political Science (PS), Psychology (PY), Religion (RE), Sociology (SO), Spanish (SP), or University Survey (UN). Specialized Electives: 4 Credit Hours Choose courses at the 100 or 200 level that are not required in your program. Note: Elective courses can apply to only one degree level. The same course cannot be re-used to satisfy the elective requirements at the Associate’s Degree level and again at the Bachelor’s Degree level.

^ Preparation for test to gain credit towards Microsoft® Certified System Administrator (MCSA) and/or Engineer (MCSE) certification.

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BA E BUSINESS DEGREE A SC S COACLI AAUTREE A O TFEA DP EPGL RI EE D

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Network Security This curriculum is a study of network security using current information technologies that are the driving force of today’s business world. Networking security, as it applies to the Internet and intranets, will be explored in depth. A hands-on approach will be used to reinforce the concepts discussed in this curriculum. Please review the catalog course descriptions for prerequisites. The sequence of the courses starts in the fall quarter only and cannot be taken in the Virtual College. MISSION STATEMENT: The Information Technology Department delivers to the students an educational experience that leads to lifelong learning skills through field-experienced professionals using contemporary technology. Curriculum:

108 Credit Hours Length: 6 Quarters

Technical & Basic Requirements: 64 Credit Hours AC114 Accounting I/5 CF101 Introduction to Computer Forensics/4 IT110 Modern Computing Concepts/3 IT184 Ethics in Information Technology/4 IT235 Electronic Commerce/5 MA121 Principles of Management/5 NS147 Windows Client/Server Operating Systems/3 NS148 Linux Operating System Fundamentals/3 NS183 Network Security Fundamentals/5 NS190 Local and Wide Area Networks/3 NS195 Network Defense and Countermeasures/4 NS200 Internet Security/3 NS203 Network Disaster Recovery/3 NS259 Implementing Internet/Intranet Firewalls/3 NS278 Operating Systems Security/3 NS288 Security Policy and Procedures/3 PL100 Introduction to the Legal System/5 General Education Requirements: 37 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3 EN180 Composition I/5 EN200 Composition II/5 MH169 Business Math/5 MH190 Algebra/5 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3 OR SO186 Sociology/3 SC200 Principles of Ecology/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3 UN292 Portfolio Capstone/1 Any 100- or 200-level AR, EN, HI, RE, or SP course/3

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General Education Electives: 3 Credit Hours Choose 100- or 200-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Political Science (PS), Psychology (PY), Religion (RE), Sociology (SO), Spanish (SP), or University Survey (UN). Specialized Electives: 4 Credit Hours Choose courses at the 100 or 200 level that are not required in your program. Note: Elective courses can apply to only one degree level. The same course cannot be re-used to satisfy the elective requirements at the Associate’s Degree level and again at the Bachelor’s Degree level.


A S S O C I A T E O F A P P LBI AE CDC A B LUASUI R N EEASTSE DDEEGGRR EE E LEGAL ASSISTING The legal community has recognized the need for paralegals to aid the profession in certain areas of the law. Additional business courses provide a general background for the legal assisting graduate. The sequence of major courses begins fall quarter only. MISSION STATEMENT: The Legal Assisting Program provides students an educational experience of an integrated set of core courses of the highest quality and assists students in obtaining positions in which they will have the opportunity to exercise the skills they have acquired. A successful graduate will possess not only a common core of legal knowledge but will also acquire vital critical thinking, organizational, research, writing, oral communication and interpersonal skills, which will be adaptable to various fields and professions. Curriculum: 108 Credit Hours Length: 6 Quarters Technical and Basic Requirements: 70 Credit Hours AC114 Accounting I/5 AC122 Payroll Accounting/3 BU115 Contract Law/5 BU120 Introduction to Business/3 DP150 Spreadsheet Applications/3 KY146 Keyboarding I/5 MA121 Principles of Management/5 PL100 Introduction to the Legal System/5 PL101 Litigation/5 PL102 Probate Administration/5 PL106 Domestic Relations/4 PL107 Real Estate/4 PL108 Juvenile Law/5 PL201 Legal Research & Writing/5 PL202 Criminal Law/3 PL203 Automated Research/2 WP138 Introduction to Word Processing Applications/3

General Education Electives: 3 Credit Hours Choose 100- or 200-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Political Science (PS), Psychology (PY), Religion (RE), Sociology (SO), Spanish (SP), or University Survey (UN). Specialized Electives: 3 Credit Hours Choose courses at the 100 or 200 level that are not required in your program. Note: Elective courses can apply to only one degree level. The same course cannot be re-used to satisfy the elective requirements at the Associateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree level and again at the Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree level.

General Education Requirements: 32 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3 EN180 Composition I/5 EN200 Composition II/5 MH169 Business Math/5 OR MH190 Algebra/5 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3 OR SO186 Sociology/3 SC200 Principles of Ecology/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3 UN292 Portfolio Capstone/1 Any 100- or 200-level AR, EN, HI, RE, or SP course/3 111


B ED E BUSINESS DEGREE AA S CS COACLIAAUTREE A OTFE ADPEPGLRI E

LEGAL OFFICE MANAGEMENT The field of law offers many opportunities for the skilled legal office manager. With specialized instruction in this field, an attractive career is open to those who qualify. Additional general education courses provide a broad background for the graduate. The sequence of major offerings starts summer and fall quarters. MISSION STATEMENT: The Office Technologies Department provides quality instruction to students by preparing them to be successful and productive community and business leaders while emphasizing employability skills and personal attributes. Curriculum: 108 Credit Hours Length: 6 Quarters Technical and Basic Requirements: 73 Credit Hours AC114 Accounting I/5 BU120 Introduction to Business/3 DP117 Database Applications/3 DP144 Developing Business Presentations/3 DP150 Spreadsheet Applications/3 KY146 Keyboarding I/5 KY147 Keyboarding II/5 MA121 Principles of Management/5 OP149 Records Management/3 OP252 Machine Transcription/3 OP256 Word Language Specialist/3 OP260 Workplace Technologies/3 OP275 Integrated Software Applications/3 OP276 Office Procedures/5 PL100 Introduction to the Legal System/5 PL201 Legal Research and Writing/5 WP138 Introduction to Word Processing Applications/3 WP267 Advanced Word Processing Applications/3 WP273 Advanced Document Processing Concepts/5 General Education Requirements: 32 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3 EN180 Composition I/5 EN200 Composition II/5 MH169 Business Math/5 OR MH190 Algebra/5 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3 OR SO186 Sociology/3 SC200 Principles of Ecology/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3 UN292 Portfolio Capstone/1 Any 100- or 200-level AR, EN, HI, RE, or SP course/3

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General Education Electives: 3 Credit Hours Choose 100- or 200-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Political Science (PS), Psychology (PY), Religion (RE), Sociology (SO), Spanish (SP), or University Survey (UN).

Note: Elective courses can apply to only one degree level. The same course cannot be re-used to satisfy the elective requirements at the Associateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree level and again at the Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree level.


GRE A S S O C I A T E O F A P P LB IAECDC ABLUASU IRNEEAST SE DD EE G E EE

OFFICE MANAGEMENT The demand for competent, qualified office personnel continues to grow. The associate degree program in Office Management provides instruction in all phases of the office career. Instruction is provided on document processing equipment. Additional general education courses provide a broad background for graduates. The sequence of major offerings starts summer and fall quarters. MISSION STATEMENT: The Office Technologies Department provides quality instruction to students by preparing them to be successful and productive community and business leaders while emphasizing employability skills and personal attributes. Curriculum: 108 Credit Hours Length: 6 Quarters Technical and Basic Requirements: 73 Credit Hours AC114 Accounting I/5 BU115 Contract Law/5 BU120 Introduction to Business/3 DP117 Database Applications/3 DP144 Developing Business Presentations/3 DP150 Spreadsheet Applications/3 KY146 Keyboarding I/5 KY147 Keyboarding II/5 KY250 Keyboarding III/5 MA121 Principles of Management/5 OP149 Records Management/3 OP252 Machine Transcription/3 OP256 Word Language Specialist/3 OP260 Workplace Technologies/3 OP275 Integrated Software Applications/3 OP276 Office Procedures/5 WP138 Introduction to Word Processing Applications/3 WP267 Advanced Word Processing Applications/3 WP273 Advanced Document Processing Concepts/5

General Education Electives: 3 Credit Hours Choose 100- or 200-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Political Science (PS), Psychology (PY), Religion (RE), Sociology (SO), Spanish (SP), or University Survey (UN). Note: Elective courses can apply to only one degree level. The same course cannot be re-used to satisfy the elective requirements at the Associateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree level and again at the Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree level.

General Education Requirements: 32 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3 EN180 Composition I/5 EN200 Composition II/5 MH169 Business Math/5 OR MH190 Algebra/5 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3 OR SO186 Sociology/3 SC200 Principles of Ecology/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3 UN292 Portfolio Capstone/1 Any 100- or 200-level AR, EN, HI, RE, or SP course/3 113


B A AS CSCOACL IAAUTREE AOTFE ADPEPGLRI E E D BUSINESS DEGREE

SPECIALIZED STUDIES This degree will be designed by the student, with assistance from the Dean or Academic Advisors, to meet the requirements of the University. MISSION STATEMENT: The Specialized Studies Program allows students more flexibility in designing a specific curriculum that meets their career needs. Curriculum: 108 Credit Hours Length: 6 Quarters Technical and Basic Requirements: 60 Credit Hours Student will choose two majors consisting of at least 30 hours each. General Education Requirements: 32 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3 EN180 Composition I/5 EN200 Composition II/5 MH169 Business Math/5 OR MH190 Algebra/5 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3 OR SO186 Sociology/3 SC200 Principles of Ecology/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3 UN292 Portfolio Capstone/1 Any 100- or 200-level AR, EN, HI, RE, or SP course/3 General Education Electives: 3 Credit Hours Choose 100- or 200-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Political Science (PS), Psychology (PY), Religion (RE), Sociology (SO), Spanish (SP), or University Survey (UN). Specialized Electives: 13 Credit Hours Choose courses at the 100 or 200 level that are not required in your program. Note: Elective courses can apply to only one degree level. The same course cannot be re-used to satisfy the elective requirements at the Associate’s Degree level and again at the Bachelor’s Degree level.

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E A S S O C I A T E O F A P P LBI AE CDC A B LUASUI R N EEASTSE DDEEGGRR EE E

SPORT MARKETING AND MANAGEMENT The Sport Marketing and Management program is designed to prepare students to work in the sports industry. This program emphasizes the management, business, and leadership skills necessary to launch or enhance the sports business career. Reflected in the curriculum are the present issues in today’s global sports industry and how integrating what is learned in the classroom can be immediately applicable to the workplace. The sports industry is competitive; and, for students to succeed, it is necessary to network and build relationships in the industry while pursuing undergraduate education. This program seeks to maximize student contact with industry professionals and enhance understanding of the business of sport through academic preparation. MISSION STATEMENT: The Sport Marketing and Management program provides students an opportunity to combine marketing and management fundamentals with the sport and recreation industry, while preparing students to become well-trained business professionals. Curriculum: 108 Credit Hours Length: 6 Quarters Technical and Basic Requirements: 62 Credit Hours AC114 Accounting I/5 BU240 International Business/5 DP150 Spreadsheet Applications/3 FI210 Principles of Finance/5 MA121 Principles of Management/5 MT120 Advertising/3 SM130 Principles of Sport Management/5 SM150 Sport in Society/3 SM170 Managing Fitness Concepts/3 SM190 Sport Marketing I/5 SM200 Sport Marketing II/5 SM230 Facility and Event Management/3 SM240 History of Sport in the United States/3 SM250 Sport Law/5 SM289 Sport Internship I/1 SM290 Sport Internship II/3

General Education Electives: 3 Credit Hours Choose 100- or 200-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Political Science (PS), Psychology (PY), Religion (RE), Sociology (SO), Spanish (SP), or University Survey (UN). Specialized Electives: 6 Credit Hours Choose courses at the 100 or 200 level that are not required in your program.

Note: Elective courses can apply to only one degree level. The same course cannot be re-used to satisfy the elective requirements at the Associate’s Degree level and again at the Bachelor’s Degree level.

General Education Requirements: 37 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3 EN180 Composition I/5 EN200 Composition II/5 MH169 Business Math/5 MH190 Algebra/5 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3 OR SO186 Sociology/3 SC200 Principles of Ecology/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3 UN292 Portfolio Capstone/1 Any 100- or 200-level AR, EN, HI, RE, or SP course/3 115


B ED E BUSINESS DEGREE AA S CS COACLIAAUTREE A OTFE ADPEPGLRI E

TRAVEL AND HOTEL MANAGEMENT This program prepares graduates for careers in the travel and hotel industry. Hands-on computer instruction and observation experiences at the University travel agency and the University Event Center, combined with business and management courses, provide a well-rounded program. A Caribbean cruise is an integral part of this curriculum. The sequence of major courses begins fall quarter. MISSION STATEMENT: The Travel and Hotel Management Department provides quality education in preparing committed students for a career in a continually changing global hospitality, travel and tourism market. Curriculum: 108 Credit Hours Length: 6 Quarters Technical and Basic Requirements: 70 Credit Hours BU109 Customer Service/3 DP150 Spreadsheet Applications/3 KY146 Keyboarding I/5 MA121 Principles of Management/5 MA226 Human Resources Management I/3 MT111 Professional Selling/3 TR122 Introduction to the Travel Industry/3 TR124 Cruises & Tours/3 TR125 Computerized Reservations/3 TR130 Travel Destinations I/5 TR131 Travel Destinations II/5 TR211 Hotel & Motel Operations/3 TR216 Hospitality Supervision/5 TR217 Event Planning/5 TR218 Hospitality & Travel Marketing/5 TR219 Hospitality & Travel Sales/3 TR220 Restaurant Management/5 WP138 Introduction to Word Processing Applications/3 General Education Requirements: 32 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3 EN180 Composition I/5 EN200 Composition II/5 MH169 Business Math/5 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3 OR SO186 Sociology/3 SC200 Principles of Ecology/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3 UN292 Portfolio Capstone/1 Any 100- or 200-level AR, EN, HI, RE, or SP course/3

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General Education Electives: 3 Credit Hours Choose 100- or 200-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Political Science (PS), Psychology (PY), Religion (RE), Sociology (SO), Spanish (SP), or University Survey (UN). Specialized Electives: 3 Credit Hours Choose courses at the 100 or 200 level that are not required in your program.

Note: Elective courses can apply to only one degree level. The same course cannot be re-used to satisfy the elective requirements at the Associateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree level and again at the Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree level.


GR REE A S S O C I A T E O F A P P LBIAECDC ABLUASUIRNEEASTSE DDEE G E

WORD PROCESSING/ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT This program prepares students for responsible positions as administrative assistants for document processing. Document processing concepts and management theory are studied. Extensive instruction on the microcomputer prepares students for specific Microsoft Application Certification Testing. Emphasis is on developing grammar, communications and human relations skills. The sequence of major offerings starts summer and fall quarter. A general education core provides a well-rounded experience. MISSION STATEMENT: The Office Technologies Department provides quality instruction to students by preparing them to be successful and productive community and business leaders while emphasizing employability skills and personal attributes. Curriculum: 108 Credit Hours Length: 6 Quarters Technical and Basic Requirements: 65 Credit Hours BU115 Contract Law/5 BU120 Introduction to Business/3 DP117 Database Applications/3 DP144 Developing Business Presentations/3 DP150 Spreadsheet Applications/3 KY146 Keyboarding I/5 KY147 Keyboarding II/5 KY250 Keyboarding III/5 MA121 Principles of Management/5 OP149 Records Management/3 OP252 Machine Transcription/3 OP256 Word Language Specialist/3 OP260 Workplace Technologies/3 OP270 Office Systems and Procedures/5 WP138 Introduction to Word Processing Applications/3 WP267 Advanced Word Processing Applications/3 WP273 Advanced Document Processing Concepts/5

General Education Electives: 3 Credit Hours Choose 100- or 200-level courses from the general education subject categories, which may include Art (AR), English (EN), History (HI), Math (MH), Political Science (PS), Psychology (PY), Religion (RE), Sociology (SO), Spanish (SP), or University Survey (UN). Specialized Electives: 8 Credit Hours Choose courses at the 100 or 200 level that are not required in your program.

Note: Elective courses can apply to only one degree level. The same course cannot be re-used to satisfy the elective requirements at the Associateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree level and again at the Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree level.

General Education Requirements: 32 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3 EN180 Composition I/5 EN200 Composition II/5 MH169 Business Math/5 OR MH190 Algebra/5 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3 OR SO186 Sociology/3 SC200 Principles of Ecology/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3 UN292 Portfolio Capstone/1 Any 100- or 200-level AR, EN, HI, RE, or SP course/3

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AGRIBUSINESS MANAGEMENT Students completing this one-year program will be prepared for entry-level positions in the agribusiness management communityâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;wholesale, retail or production. The sequence of major course offerings begins fall quarter. Curriculum: 72 Credit Hours Length: 1 year Technical and Basic Requirements: 49 Credit Hours AG106 Agribusiness Fundamentals/3 AG208 Agricultural Economics/5 AG209 Agricultural Marketing/5 AG210 Agronomy/5 AG211 Animal Science/5 AG230 Agronomy II/5 DP150 Spreadsheet Applications/3 MA121 Principles of Management/5 MH169 Business Math/5 MT220 Marketing I/5 WP138 Introduction to Word Processing Applications/3 General Education Requirements: 21 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3 EN180 Composition I/5 EN200 Composition II/5 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3 UN292 Portfolio Capstone/1 Specialized Electives: 2 Credit Hours Choose courses at the 100 or 200 level that are not required in your program.

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B A C C A L A U R E A T ED IDPELGORM EA E

EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT This program prepares graduates for a variety of employment opportunities in business and industry. Superior office skills are stressed. The sequence of major offerings starts summer and fall quarters only. Curriculum: 72 Credit Hours Length: 1 Year Technical and Basic Requirements: 42 Credit Hours DP117 Database Applications/3 DP144 Developing Business Presentations/3 DP150 Spreadsheet Applications/3 KY146 Keyboarding I/5 KY147 Keyboarding II/5 OP149 Records Management/3 OP252 Machine Transcription/3 OP256 Word Language Specialist/3 OP260 Workplace Technologies/3 OP270 Office System and Procedures/5 WP138 Introduction to Word Processing Applications/3 WP267 Advanced Word Processing Applications/3 General Education Requirements: 21 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3 EN180 Composition I/5 EN200 Composition II/5 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3 UN292 Portfolio Capstone/1 Specialized Electives: 9 Credit Hours Choose courses at the 100 or 200 level that are not required in your program.

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B CL CO A LMAAU R E A T E D E G R E E D AI P

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Graphic Designer This curriculum is a study of digital multimedia design using current information technologies that are utilized in high growth field. The curriculum will give the student the skills to create page layouts and graphic elements for both the web and printed media. A hands-on approach will be used to reinforce the concepts discussed in this curriculum. Please review the catalog course descriptions for prerequisites. The sequence of the courses starts in the fall quarter only and cannot be taken in the Virtual College. Curriculum: 72 Credit Hours Length: 1 Year Technical & Basic Requirements: 47 Credit Hours DM118 Digital Design Fundamentals/3 DM121 Web Page Design Concepts/3 DM125 Graphic Imaging/3 DM180 Applied Digital Drawing/3 DM190 Interactive Graphic Animation/3 DM220 Applied Digital Video Editing/5 DM221 Advanced Digital Video Editing/3 DM230 Advanced Graphic Imaging/3 DM240 Applied 3-D Modeling Concepts/5 IT110 Modern Computing Concepts/3 IT114 Business Applications/3 MA121 Principles of Management/5 MH169 Business Math/5 General Education Requirements: 21 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3 EN180 Composition I/5 EN200 Composition II/5 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3 UN292 Portfolio Capstone/1 Specialized Electives: 4 Credit Hours Choose courses at the 100 or 200 level that are not required in your program.

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B A C C A L A U R E A T ED IDPELGORM EA E

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Microsoft Networking Technology This curriculum is a study of several Microsoft速 Windows 2003 products as they apply to a networking professional. It explores and applies these products in order to prepare the student for the Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE) exams necessary in the pursuit of the MCSE certification. The sequence of the courses starts in the fall quarter only and cannot be taken in the Virtual College. Students are required to take the courses in the order presented as many of them have the previous courses as prerequisites. Please review the catalog course descriptions for prerequisites. The student is required to successfully complete the coursework in order to receive the diploma. MCSE testing and certification is completely up to the individual student. The University is an Authorized Prometric Testing Center. Students enrolled in this program are able to complete certification exams on campus for a reduced fee. Receipt of the University diploma is separate and apart from the actual MCSE certification. Curriculum: 72 Credit Hours Length: 1 Year Technical Requirements: 48 Credit Hours IT110 Modern Computing Concepts/3 IT184 Ethics in Information Technology/4 IT235 Electronic Commerce/5 MA121 Principles of Management/5 MH169 Business Math/5 MN270 Administering a Client Operating System^/3 MN290 Administering a Server Environment^/4 MN291 Maintaining a Network Infrastructure^/4 MN293 Planning a Network Infrastructure^/4 MN294 Configuring and Maintaining a Directory Service^/3 MN297 Designing a Network Directory Service Architecture^/3 NS183 Network Security Fundamentals/5 General Education Requirements: 21 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3 EN180 Composition I/5 EN200 Composition II/5 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3 UN292 Portfolio Capstone/1 Specialized Electives: 3 Credit Hours Choose courses at the 100 or 200 level that are not required in your program.

^ Preparation for test to gain credit towards Microsoft速 Certified System Administrator (MCSA) and/or Engineer (MCSE) certification.

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BA AL D I PC LC O MAAU R E A T E D E G R E E

PARALEGAL The legal community has recognized the need for paralegals to aid the profession in certain areas of the law. This program will prepare students in those areas, as well as provide clerical skills. The sequence of major offerings starts fall quarter only. Curriculum: 72 Credit Hours Length: 1 year Technical and Basic Requirements: 51 Credit Hours BU115 Contract Law/5 KY146 Keyboarding I/5 KY147 Keyboarding II/5 PL100 Introduction to the Legal System/5 PL101 Litigation/5 PL102 Probate Administration/5 PL106 Domestic Relations/4 PL107 Real Estate/4 PL201 Legal Research & Writing/5 PL202 Criminal Law/3 PL203 Automated Research/2 WP138 Introduction to Word Processing Applications/3 General Education Requirements: 21 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3 EN180 Composition I/5 EN200 Composition II/5 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3 UN292 Portfolio Capstone/1

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BACCALAUREATE E D IDPELGORME A

TRAVEL AND HOSPITALITY Graduates of this program will be prepared for positions in the travel and hotel industry. Relocation is normally necessary for acquiring certain positions in the travel and hotel industry. A minimum of 30 contact hours of handson computer instruction will be included. A Caribbean cruise is an integral part of this curriculum. The sequence of major offerings starts fall quarter only. Curriculum: 72 Credit Hours Length: 1 Year Technical and Basic Requirements: 51 Credit Hours BU109 Customer Service/3 KY146 Keyboarding I/5 MH169 Business Math/5 TR122 Introduction to the Travel Industry/3 TR124 Cruises & Tours/3 TR125 Computerized Reservations/3 TR130 Travel Destinations I/5 TR131 Travel Destinations II/5 TR211 Hotel & Motel Operations/3 TR218 Hospitality & Travel Marketing/5 TR219 Hospitality & Travel Sales/3 TR220 Restaurant Management/5 WP138 Introduction to Word Processing Applications/3 General Education Requirements: 21 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3 EN180 Composition I/5 EN200 Composition II/5 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3 UN292 Portfolio Capstone/1

123


BDAI C UREATE DEGREE PC L AOLMA A

WORD PROCESSING SPECIALIST This program is designed to prepare students for the modern office which demands excellent communication and technical skills. The use of various types of equipment will be emphasized in this program. The sequence of major offerings begins summer and fall quarters. Curriculum: 72 Credit Hours Length: 1 year Technical and Basic Requirements: 46 Credit Hours DP117 Database Applications/3 DP150 Spreadsheet Applications/3 KY146 Keyboarding I/5 KY147 Keyboarding II/5 KY250 Keyboarding III/5 MH169 Business Math/5 OP149 Records Management/3 OP252 Machine Transcription/3 OP260 Workplace Technologies/3 OP270 Office Systems and Procedures/5 WP138 Introduction to Word Processing Applications/3 WP267 Advanced Word Processing Applications/3 General Education Requirements: 21 Credit Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication/3 EN180 Composition I/5 EN200 Composition II/5 PY177 Introduction to Psychology/3 UN100 First Year Experience/1 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues/3 UN292 Portfolio Capstone/1 Specialized Elective: 5 Credit Hours Choose courses at the 100 or 200 level that are not required in your program.

124


B A C C A L A U RCEEA R TT E ID RT EE E FE I CG A

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Microsoft Administrator This curriculum is a study of several Microsoft速 Windows 2003 products as they apply to a networking professional. It explores and applies these products in order to prepare the student for the Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator (MCSA) exams necessary in the pursuit of the MCSA certification. The sequence of the courses starts in the fall quarter only. Students are required to take the courses in the order presented as many of them have the previous courses as prerequisites. Please review the catalog course descriptions for prerequisites. The student is required to successfully complete the coursework in order to receive the certificate. MCSA testing and certification is completely up to the individual student. Receipt of the University certificate is separate and apart from the actual MCSA certification. Curriculum: Technical Requirements: 19 Credit Hours IT110 Modern Computing Concepts/3 MN270 Administering a Client Operating System^/3 MN290 Administering a Server Environment^/4 MN291 Maintaining a Network Infrastructure^/4 NS183 Network Security Fundamentals/5

^Preparation for test to gain credit towards Microsoft速 Certified System Administrator (MCSA) and/or Engineer (MCSE) Certification.

125


BA LA RT EE ATE DEGREE C E CR CTAI F I CU A

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Microsoft Networking This curriculum is a study of several Microsoft速 Windows 2003 products as they apply to a networking professional. It explores and applies these products in order to prepare the student for the Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE) exams necessary in the pursuit of the MCSE certification. The sequence of the courses starts in the fall quarter only. Students are required to take the courses in the order presented as many of them have the previous courses as prerequisites. Please review the catalog course descriptions for prerequisites. The student is required to successfully complete the coursework in order to receive the certificate. MCSE testing and certification is completely up to the individual student. Receipt of the University certificate is separate and apart from the actual MCSE certification. Curriculum: Technical Requirements: 33 Credit Hours IT110 Modern Computing Concepts/3 IT184 Ethics in Information Technology/4 MN270 Administering a Client Operating System^/3 MN290 Administering a Server Environment^/4 MN291 Maintaining a Network Infrastructure^/4 MN293 Planning a Network Infrastructure^/4 MN294 Configuring and Maintaining a Directory Service^/3 MN297 Designing a Network Directory Service Architecture^/3 NS183 Network Security Fundamentals/5 ^Preparation for test to gain credit towards Microsoft速 Certified System Administrator (MCSA) and/or Engineer (MCSE) Certification.

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COURSES The following pages contain descriptions of the courses offered. The courses are arranged under the various university academic disciplines. The number of credit hours granted for each course is in parentheses. The University reserves the right to withdraw a course from its schedule if the enrollment is not sufficient. CO101, CO102, CO103 Professional Practice Option These courses are designed to allow the associate degree candidate to receive on-the-job experience. Each quarter is graded S/U based on satisfactory completion of course assignments and a successful work experience.

ACCOUNTING AC114 Accounting I (5) Students receive a basic knowledge in double-entry accounting theory. Instruction will be given in journalizing and posting accounts, periodic adjustments, closing entries, statement preparation, special journals, and cash controls. No Prerequisite. AC115 Accounting II (5) The study of accounting principles continues with more specific processes explained. Students will be exposed to receivables, inventory, depreciation methods, asset disposition, current liabilities, partnership and corporation formation. Prerequisite: AC114. AC116 Accounting III (5) This course is an extension of AC115 with emphasis on corporation activities. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) accounting for income taxes, bonds issued for financing and acquired for investment, cash flow statements, and financial statement analysis. Prerequisite: AC115. AC117 Personal Taxes (5) Students are introduced to income tax laws and regulations to prepare federal income tax returns and sole proprietorships. No Prerequisite. AC122 Payroll Accounting (3) Students are acquainted with various laws relating to the payment of wages and salaries. Payroll accounting systems and procedures commonly followed in the development of personnel and payroll records are described. Practice in payroll operations is included. Prerequisite: AC114.

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AC131 Introduction to Accounting Software (5) Students will be introduced to QuickBooks and another accounting software package to create and customize forms, reports, and journals for a simulated business applying learned accounting skills and principles. Prerequisite: AC114. AC202 Managerial Accounting (5) A study of accounting data: how it can be interpreted and used by management in planning and controlling business activities. Business problems are discussed from the point of view of internal management to show how accounting can aid in the solving of problems confronting management. The use of accounting data by investors and potential investors is also addressed whenever applicable. Prerequisite: AC116. AC218 Intermediate Accounting I (5) This course covers the income statement and related topics. Applicable FASB standards, interpretations, and staff positions are examined focusing on their impact on the income statement. Prerequisite: AC116. AC219 Intermediate Accounting II (5) This course covers the balance sheet and related topics. Applicable FASB standards, interpretations, and staff positions are examined focusing on their impact on the balance sheet. Prerequisite: AC218. AC225 Governmental & Not-for-Profit Accounting (3) This course will provide an overview of the characteristics of accounting for governmental and not-for-profit organizations. Study of the various governmental funds, the budgetary process, reporting standards, and preparation of financial statements for both governmental and not-for-profit organizations will also be included. Prerequisite: AC219. AC301 Cost Accounting I (5) This specialized course focuses on the methods of accounting for costs and expenditures in a manufacturing, retail or service business. Definitions, behavior and application of costs will be studied leading the students into one of three fields of cost accounting. Prerequisite: AC219. AC302 Cost Accounting II (5) This course involves a continuation of practical work in each of the specialized fields of cost: job order, process and standard accounting. Prerequisite: AC301. 127


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AC310 Business Taxes (5) An in-depth study of business tax law and its applications. Partnership and corporation tax returns are also examined. Prerequisites: AC117 and AC219. AC321 Corporate Governance (3) Corporate governance is a multi-faceted subject. It focuses on the set of processes, customs, policies, laws, and institutions affecting the way corporations are managed and controlled. The principal constituents are the shareholders, management, and the Board of Directors. This course specifically addresses the causes of high profile corporate failures, detailing the breakdowns by all principal stakeholders. Prerequisite: AC219. AC375 Accounting Professional Ethics (3) A study of the impacts and risks associated with professional decisions and behaviors on the public environment. This course will investigate how professional and accounting ethics become a factor for success, improved decision-making, and defensible actions in the public forum. The ethical environment, accountability, special issues concerning accountants and managing ethics, risks and opportunities will be discussed. Prerequisite: AC219. AC382 Special Topics (3) This course provides the students with the opportunity to study specific topics of interest in the field of accounting. Prerequisite: AC375. AC405 Accounting Information Systems (5) Students are introduced to Accounting Information Systems. These systems are a collection of resources created to transform financial and other pertinent data into information to be communicated to many different decision makers. Prerequisite: AC219. AC411 A Survey of Auditing (3) Students are introduced to attestation and auditing terminology, standards and reports. In-depth study of Generally Accepted Auditing Standards, types of acceptable reports, internal control investigation and working papers will be addressed. Prerequisite: AC219.

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AC412 Auditing for Fraud (3) Fraud examination (sometimes referred to as forensic accounting) will study such topics as fraud prevention, detection and investigation. Emphasis is placed on various accounting/auditing skills including technology updates, interviewing, documents and record examination. Prerequisite: AC411. AC413 Auditing for Compliance (5) This is a more in-depth study of the auditing process to include risk management, evaluating internal control of financial reports, understanding the integrated audit process and an overview and analysis of the gathering of final evidence in the preparation of reports and financial statements. Prerequisites: AC412. AC435 Advanced Accounting I (5) Students are introduced to advanced accounting concepts including business combinations, stock investments, consolidations, consolidated working papers and related financial statements. Prerequisite: AC219. AC436 Advanced Accounting II (5) Students are introduced to additional advanced accounting concepts including foreign currency transactions, branch operations, partnerships and corporation liquidations and reorganizations. Consolidation income taxation and consolidated basic and diluted earnings per share are included in course material. Prerequisite: AC435. AC440 Financial Statement Analysis (5) Students are introduced to steps involved to effectively and completely analyze financial statements. These steps will involve industry economics, business strategy, generally accepted accounting principles and quality of accounting information, assessment of profitability and risk, forecasts of future profitability and risk and valuation of firms. Prerequisite: AC219. AC442 Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting (5) Students are acquainted with the accounting differences between government and not-for-profit organizations compared with for-profit businesses. Exposure will be provided to the various government funds, capital projects and debt service. Students will be introduced to accounting for the various contributions to a notfor-profit organization. Prerequisite: AC435.


COURSES AC443 Accounting Theory (5) Students are acquainted with the formulation of accounting theory and standard setting from the early 1900s to the present. Students will study various accounting issues within the conceptual framework to include such topics as financial reporting, disclosure, mark to market accounting and the nature of liabilities. Prerequisite: AC219. AC452 CPA Review - Financial Accounting and Reporting (3) This CPA review study centers on the section of the CPA exam that focuses on the financial accounting and reporting elements. It includes the study of financial statement concepts and standards, cash and investments, receivables, inventories, intangible and other assets, employee benefits, long-term liabilities, leases, governmental fund accounting and reporting, and not-for-profit accounting and reporting. Prerequisite: AC443. AC453 CPA Review - Business Environment and Concepts (3) This CPA review study centers on the section of the CPA exam that focuses on the business environment and concepts. It includes the study of business structures such as proprietorships, general partnerships, non-corporate limited liability entities, formation of corporations, microeconomics, macroeconomics, working capital policy and management, long-term capital financing, information technology, planning and budgeting, and standard costs and variance analysis. Prerequisite: AC443. AC454 CPA Review - Regulation (3) This CPA review study centers on the section of the CPA exam that focuses on regulation. It includes the study of AICPA ethics, CPAs and the law, agency, contracts, government regulation of business, tax computations and tax procedures, property transactions, corporate taxable income, corporate tax computations, S corporations, partnerships and estates and trusts. Prerequisite: AC443. AC455 CPA Review - Auditing and Attestation (3) This CPA review study centers on the section of the CPA exam that focuses on the auditing and attestation elements. It includes engagement responsibilities, risk assessment, internal control concepts, tests and controls, key considerations in gathering evidence, the sampling of evidence, reports to include the review and compilation of special reports, and governmental audits. Prerequisite: AC413 and AC443.

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AGRIBUSINESS MARKETING/MANAGEMENT AG106 Agribusiness Fundamentals (3) Students are introduced to the methods and procedures used by agribusiness in decision making. No Prerequisite. AG125 Agriculture Law (5) Study of the law as it applies to agriculture and ag business. Study of the application of grain, futures, livestock marketing, equipment, and land contracts, along with other major areas of concern in ag business today. Prerequisite: AG106. AG145 Agricultural Sales (5) Students will examine the fundamentals of selling as it relates to agriculture. The selling process of agriculture products are explored in detail. Prerequisite: AG106. AG208 Agricultural Economics (5) Basic macro- and microeconomic principles relative to agribusiness are discussed in this course. Prerequisite: AG106. AG209 Agricultural Marketing (5) The application of basic marketing principles to the field of agribusiness with emphasis on products/services. Prerequisites: AG106 and MT220. AG210 Agronomy (5) Basic characteristics of soils and its fertility, management alternatives, environmental concerns and profitable plant production practices are discussed. Prerequisite: AG106. AG211 Animal Science (5) Students should learn about the livestock industry and the appropriate management practices of selecting, breeding, feeding, housing, waste management, health and marketing for the purpose of maintaining a profitable operation. Prerequisite: AG106. AG230 Agronomy II (5) Characteristics of plant anatomy including an understanding of nutrient and health needs of plants are discussed. The influence of management alternatives and environmental applications using profitable plant production in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agriculture are also covered. Prerequisite: AG210. 129


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AG300 Agribusiness Strategies and Management (5) Expands the application of the four functions of management: planning, organizing, directing, and controlling plus viable business strategies relative to agribusiness. Prerequisite: Junior Standing. AG310 Agribusiness Entrepreneurship, Finance and Marketing (5) Study of entrepreneurship, finance, and marketing including (1) establishing a relationship with financial institutions, (2) marketing challenges, and (3) solutions relative to agribusiness. Prerequisite: Junior Standing. AG315 Professional Agribusiness Selling (5) Expands the concepts and applications of the total selling process relative to agribusiness and the clientele involved. Prerequisite: Junior Standing. AG400 Agricultural Policy (5) Study of U.S. food and agricultural policy and how it affects the agribusiness sector and the domestic and international populations. Prerequisite: Senior Standing. AG405 Agricultural Price Analysis (3) This course examines the forces that influence agricultural prices including the final product and analytical techniques in predicting price changes and the consequences of those price changes. Prerequisite: Senior Standing. AG406 Special Problems in Agribusiness (3) Case studies of agribusiness firms and enterprises are studied. Prerequisite: Senior Standing.

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AR105 Beginning Drawing (3) This course introduces students to classical and contemporary drawing techniques and concepts, with emphasis on the understanding of their formal language and the fundamentals of artistic expression. Previous drawing experience is not a prerequisite for this course. Linear perspective, pictorial composition, figure/ ground relationships, shading techniques, tonal value, visual perception, spatial concepts, and critical thinking skills are all emphasized extensively. The class will study and research major drawing styles and movements in historical context. The hope is that students will use this global approach to develop a “critical eye” in the evaluation of contemporary drawing. Demonstrations, slide lectures, group and individual critiques

will be given throughout the course. Various dry drawing media, such as graphite and charcoal, are the primary tools for this class. No Prerequisite. AR305 Composing Your Life: Exploration of Self through Visual Arts & Writing (3) Students explore a variety of visual and written tools for self exploration and self expression. Through discussion, written assignments, and directed exercises, students practice utilizing a variety of media to explore and express who they are. Students will need access to a camera. Prerequisite: EN200.

AUTOMOTIVE MANAGEMENT AM128 Customer Relations Automated Mgt. (3) Students will acquire basic knowledge of the automotive management field, encompassing the use of the microcomputer in parts ordering and handling, inventory control and system pricing. Instruction will include service management, covering such areas as manager, writer and advisor. Students will be exposed to customer relations, evaluation of technicians, including time study proficiency as well as the use of the microcomputer in assisting with management operations. No Prerequisite. AM130 Introduction to the Automotive Industry (5) This course is designed to provide an overview of the automotive/vehicle industry, including the history, terminology and trends. No Prerequisite. AM210 Parts and Service Management (3) The activities involved in managing parts and service departments in an automotive/vehicle business—organization, equipment and operations—are discussed. No Prerequisite. AM215 Automotive Aftermarket Management (5) This course discusses procedures and relationships involving all aspects of the automotive/vehicle aftermarket—from manufacturer to consumer. Those areas covered are marketing, sales, advertising, budgeting and professional activities. No Prerequisite. AM310 Automotive Dealerships (3) All aspects of the automotive dealerships will be introduced. Also included will be such topics as location and design of facilities, financing requirements and management. Prerequisite: Junior Standing.


COURSES AM311 Automotive Aftermarket & Manufacturing (3) The various functions in the relationship between the automotive aftermarket and manufacturing activities are studied. Students will be introduced to planning, marketing, sales, budgeting, and research. Prerequisite: AM310. AM312 Automotive Aftermarket and Retailing (3) Managing an aftermarket business is emphasized. Parts management and marketing, especially with techniques of Electronic Data Imaging, will be studied. Prerequisite: AM311. AM412 Parts & Service Merchandising (3) Students are introduced to practical approaches and techniques for effectively organizing practical applications of a mechanical service department for optimum customer retention and satsifaction. They learn how to incorporate modern personnel and inventory management techniques for improved productivity and achieve practical parts and accessories in wholesale and retail. Prerequisite: AM312. AM413 Automotive Jobber/Wholesaler Aftermarket (3) The cataloguing and layout of various product lines, inventory cost and personnel pertaining to the wholesale segment of the automotive aftermarket are analyzed and evaluated. Organization and capitalization are explored in detail. Prerequisite: AM312. AM420 Automotive Entrepreneurship (5) Current entrepreneurial practices will be introduced. Case studies will provide additional visionaries for analyzing entrepreneurial and management techniques in specific automotive aftermarket companies. Prerequisite: Senior Standing.

BUSINESS BU100 Survey of Business Leaders--Past & Present (3) This course will address the historical background of the foundations of business management and how industrialists and entrepreneurs have influenced how America and the world have grown to do business. The works of Andrew Carnegie, Henry Ford III, James Cash Penney, William Henry Gates, etc. will be studied to understand their influence on modern business management practices. No Prerequisite.

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BU109 Customer Service (3) Provides the student with an understanding of customer service. The course will cover customer needs and wants, values, trends, customer psychology, customer behavior, customer satisfaction, service performance, quality improvement, and use of information to improve business decisions. No Prerequisite. BU115 Contract Law (5) Students will be introduced to the basic concepts of law and how it operates. Emphasis will be on contract law and the Uniform Commercial Code and its impact on business. No Prerequisite. BU120 Introduction to Business (3) Students should develop an understanding of the broad areas of activity known as business. A vocabulary of terms, the varied careers available in the business world and an understanding of the methods and procedures used by business in decision making will be discussed. No Prerequisite. (Should be taken prior to the fourth quarter of enrollment.) BU240 International Business I (5) This course is designed to provide students with knowledge of worldwide aspects of different business functions. Emphasis will be on the nature of international business, international government and foreign environment. Prerequisites: MA121 and [MT220 or SM190]. BU250 International Business II (3) More detailed information about the operations of international business is provided. Students will apply learned information and research different aspects of international business such as various international forces, marketing, exporting and importing procedures. Prerequisite: BU240. BU301 Management Essentials for Specialized Studies (3) This course is designed to provide the foundational management concepts for Specialized Studies students prior to taking upper-level courses. Material covered will concentrate on the four functions of management, decision making, ethical standards, and contract law. Students enrolled in the Specialized Studies baccalaureate program are required to successfully complete this course. Prerequisite: Junior Standing. Specialized Studies Major Only. 131


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BU302 Economics, Accounting, and Finance for Specialized Studies (3) This course is designed to provide the foundation for more advanced finance coursework. The concepts from the fields of economics, accounting, and finance as used in upper level business courses are covered. Material covered will include terminology, conceptual application, and mathematical computations. Students enrolling in the Specialized Studies baccalaureate program are required to successfully complete this course. Prerequisite: Junior Standing. Specialized Studies Major Only. BU315 Business Law I (3) This course offers a comprehensive study of the legal aspects of personal property and bailments. Further concentration is placed on studying sales and leases of personal property, which includes such legal subjects as, risk of loss, obligations of performance, product warranties, remedies for breach of sales contract, and consumer protection. Prerequisite: Junior Standing. BU316 Business Law II (3) This course offers a comprehensive study of negotiable instruments, covering such legal topics as the kinds of negotiable instruments, transfer of negotiable instruments, rights of holders and defenses, as checks and funds transfers. Further concentration is placed on studying secured transactions, bankruptcy, and insurance. Prerequisite: BU315.

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COMMUNICATION CO179 Introduction to Human Communication (3) Students are introduced to theory and skill building in the basic areas of human communication: interpersonal communication, nonverbal communication, small group dynamics, and public communication. No Prerequisite. CO312 Media and Pop Culture (3) This course is designed to give students an introduction to media literacy through the analysis of the media and pop culture. The course will directly address the definitions, purposes, principles, and theoretical models of media literacy. This course will include active discussion of gender stereotyping in both print and television ads, AdBusters and anti-ad techniques, television news segments, propaganda in both print and television media, branding, the World Wide Web, and the values and ideologies conveyed in selected television and music media. Prerequisite: EN200. CO445 Group Dynamics (3) A more in-depth study of the factors which affect the behavior of individuals who make up diverse groups in society. Prerequisite: CO179.

COMPUTER FORENSICS

BU410 Seminar in Business (1) Students will complete this one-hour course prior to beginning their practicum. They will discuss the expectations of the University as well as the supervising facility or organization. Prerequisite: Senior Standing.

CF101: Introduction to Computer Forensics (4) This course examines the use of computers in the commission of crimes and civil wrongs, the elements of computer crimes and civil wrongs, and the detection, collection, analysis and production of digital evidence. Students will use computer resources to explore basic computer forensic investigation techniques. Corequisite: IT110.

BU411, BU412, BU414 Practicum in Business (Credit hours will vary.) Field experience is designed to allow the degree candidate to receive on-site training under the supervision of a practitioner. Students must be in good academic standing and have senior status to apply for this experience. Application should be made one quarter prior to the anticipated participation and approval must be granted by the supervising instructor. Students are required to work a minimum of 50 hours per credit granted. This course should be taken in the senior year. Prerequisite: BU410.

CF130 Analysis of Digital Media (5) Information relating to all five human senses canâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or soon willâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;be represented in digital form. This course will examine digital media and digital information in detail, to include different types of media, different file systems, and different data types, leading to an understanding of how information is saved to, organized on, and retrieved from digital media. The culmination of this subject will be to examine how information can be altered, deleted, and hidden on various digital media. Prerequisite: CF101.


COURSES CF140 White-Collar Crime (3) This course will provide students with a thorough presentation of the various types of white-collar crime identified by the law enforcement community. Students will gain insight into the motives behind white-collar crime and methods used by white-collar criminals to pursue their criminal endeavors. Students will also be presented with enforcement strategies and techniques. Prerequisite: CF101 and PL100. CF201 Advanced Computer Forensics (3) In this course students examine the techniques used to gather evidence from digital media in a court-acceptable manner and then analyze that evidence using advanced tools and techniques. Students will use computer resources to conduct analyses on actual digital media and attempt to recover evidence that can be used in a classroom “investigation” exercise. Prerequisite: CF101 and PL100. CF202 Intrusion Detection & Prevention (3) In this course, students learn the complexities, technical details, and skills involved in investigating instances in which network and computer defenses have been compromised due to intrusions. Because of the sheer scope of a network, this course will require students to expand their technical and analytical skills. They will examine the planning of intrusions, methods employed in the surveillance of networks, and techniques intruders employ to penetrate and damage them. These concepts will be put into the context of investigating crimes that occur where computer networks are the “victim.” Prerequisite: CF201. CF210 Cybercrime (5) This course will focus on economic and other crimes perpetrated over the Internet or other telecommunications networks. This course will discuss crimes ranging from auction fraud and social engineering to e-mail scams and phishing. Network forensics and investigative techniques will also be presented. Prerequisite: CF101. Corequisite: PL202. CF230 Search and Seizure – Legal, Ethical, and Privacy Issues (3) This course will introduce students to the processes involved in seizing computer equipment and data and searching them for evidence. Legal aspects of search and seizure will be covered as well as ethical issues relating to data recovery for investigative purposes. Topics will also include guidelines for preparing legal documentation and proper handling of digital evidence. Prerequisites: CF210 and PL202.

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CF240 Computer Forensics & Incident Response (3) This course will introduce the students to the processes in planning for incident response. The students will learn how to communicate with site personnel, how to implement an organizational policy, and how to minimize the impact on the organization if an incident occurs. Topics also include the methodology in performing incident analysis, restoring systems, and capturing volatile information relating to the incident. Prerequisite: CF201. CF280 Advanced Topics in Computer Forensics and Investigations (4) The purpose of this advanced topics course is to provide an in-depth study of the fundamental issues related to computer security and forensic analysis, by building upon the knowledge from the previous Computer Forensics courses. The state-of-the-art technology, both in software and hardware, will be addressed. Commercial tools for setting up firewalls, intrusion detection, event monitoring and logging, forensic analysis, will be used in the teaching labs to provide the hands-on experience. Further, applicable computer crime laws and statues will be discussed using documented trial cases for demonstration. We will also use expert speakers from the relevant domains including security system administrators, law enforcement officers, attorneys and lawyers in cyber laws, to provide guest lectures. Prerequisite: CF210. CF295 Safety & Security of Critical Infrastructure (3) A critical infrastructure can be defined as any facility, system, or function which provides the foundation for national security, governance, economic vitality, reputation, and way of life. The continuity of critical infrastructure is also essential to avoid panic and hysteria during the impact of a disaster. Every day each person’s life is shaped or affected in some way by one or more critical infrastructure. This course will focus on the basic goals of infrastructure protection, continuity of government, continuity of private sector, and continuity of public services. The students will learn about the mission of protecting critical infrastructure and how it does not depend upon any unique intelligence collection nor does it require any unique intelligence integration functions. In addition, students will learn the importance of secrecy in protecting critical infrastructures. Topics regarding intelligence about threats to the infrastructure, analysis of where the weaknesses are, and then the recommendations on how to protect against those weaknesses have to be communicated or alerted to a wide range of people, all without “leaks” to the very parties who are involved in putting our citizens or the organization at risk. Prerequisites: CF240.

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DATA PROCESSING DP117 Database Applications (3) The concepts of relational databases and their manipulation will be presented. Microsoft Access is used to illustrate relational database concepts. The application of relational databases to typical business problems, especially on microcomputers in small businesses, is extensively discussed. (This course provides preparation for Microsoft速 Application Certification Testing.) Students taking this course via Virtual College must have access to a computer with appropriate software installed. No Prerequisite. DP144 Developing Business Presentations (3) In this course students develop audio-visual business presentations using Microsoft PowerPoint. The course begins with introductory software instruction, continues with the completion of practice presentations and finishes with the development of a comprehensive presentation utilizing the full range of features available in the software. (This course provides preparation for Microsoft速 Application Certification Testing.) Students taking this course via Virtual College must have access to a computer with appropriate software installed. No Prerequisite. DP150 Spreadsheet Applications (3) This introductory course exposes students to a wide variety of fundamental electronic spreadsheet operations and functions through business-related applications. (This course provides preparation for Microsoft速 Application Certification Testing.) Students taking this course via Virtual College must have access to a computer with appropriate software installed. No Prerequisite. DP210 Advanced Spreadsheet Applications (3) This hands-on course will implement advanced features of the electronic spreadsheets software in business-related applications. Topics include table creation, database operations and advanced macro operations. (This course provides preparation for Microsoft速 Application Certification Testing.) Students taking this course via Virtual College must have access to a computer with appropriate software installed. Prerequisite: IT114 or DP150.

DIGITAL MULTIMEDIA

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DM118 Digital Design Fundamentals (3) In this course the students will learn the basic fundamentals of digital design using new media. The students will learn the elements of design by exploring visual components, various colors, lines, shapes, tex-

tures and combine the elements to determine proper balance, composition and layout, abstraction, style, perspective and emphasis. The student will learn how these principles apply to new media technologies and will build on this knowledge with the remaining digital multimedia software courses. Corequisite: IT110. DM121 Web Page Design Concepts (3) HTML documents are a major component of the WWW on the Internet as well as Electronic Commerce web sites. Students will learn how to develop web pages for use on the Internet or on an Intranet for organizations that are using HTML. Students will use various HTML text editors to enhance and create dynamic HTML web pages. Prerequisite: IT110. DM125 Graphic Imaging (3) This course will give the students the skills necessary to select and manipulate image selections using all of the selection tools, navigate images efficiently at different magnifications, create and manipulate layers, work with layer opacity and mode, combine images, create text and apply layer effects, adjust image color, use the painting tools, use gradients, create painting effects, adjust color saturation and work with mask and channels. Prerequisite: IT110. DM180 Applied Digital Drawing (3) The student will explore the fundamentals of digital art design, creation, and manipulation. Students will create artwork for various media in a digital format using drawing design skills and software of the digital drawing trade. Prerequisite: IT110. DM190 Interactive Graphic Animation (3) This course covers the basics of creating interactive and animated elements utilizing graphics, sound and video. The techniques learned will be used to create multimedia elements that will be incorporated into web pages. Corequisite: DM125. DM200 Digital Multimedia (5) This course continues the experience of creating a multimedia production. The authoring tool will be used to integrate graphics, animations, sound, video and web pages together into a fully interactive multimedia presentation. Prerequisite: DM121.


COURSES DM220 Applied Digital Video Editing (5) This is an introductory course in capturing and editing digital video in the creation of interactive motion graphics. The student will learn to create, edit, add transitions, capture and store video files, and add effects to video files. Students will also gain hands-on experience with equipment such as lighting, green screens, and digital camcorders. Prerequisite: DM125 and DM190. DM221 Advanced Digital Video Editing (3) This course continues the study of digital video editing. Students will learn advanced techniques such as chroma key, organic animation, and integration with other multimedia software packages. Students will also learn to incorporate various forms of animation in video editing. Prerequisite: DM220. DM230 Advanced Graphic Imaging (3) A continuation of Graphic Imaging, this course further explores the nuances of manipulating graphic images. The student will become skilled in the tools used for these manipulations to gain professionalism in this art. Many common techniques will be studied in depth through projects. Prerequisite: DM125. DM240 Applied 3-D Modeling Concepts (5) The student will explore the fundamentals of digital art design, 3-D modeling, and incorporating animation into a digital multimedia presentation. Students will create various 3-D models as this course is geared towards creating 3-D logos and models that are used in digital multimedia presentations, all while using a 3-D animation software of the digital trade. Prerequisite: DM125 and DM190. DM250Applied 3-D Animation Concepts (3) The work environment and tool sets will be further explored in this continuation of 3-D Modeling Concepts. The student will further their skills and techniques in perspective, patterns, advanced layouts, layering, color management, lighting, and animation concepts. Prerequisite: DM240. DM263 Advanced Digital Multimedia (3) This course concludes the experience of creating a multimedia production by introducing advanced techniques that includes programming concepts. The student will put all this learning into practice by learning the techniques to deploy these productions for use on the web and on optical media. Prerequisite: DM200.

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ECONOMICS EC190 Survey of Economics (3) This course provides a basic introduction to the economic principles that affect our economy, public policy, and standard of living. Topics include supply and demand, production possibilities frontier, unemployment, inflation, opportunity costs, comparable analysis, as well as an introduction to macroeconomics and microeconomics. Emphasis is placed on students applying the concepts to daily life. Prerequisite: MH169 or MH190. EC215 Macroeconomics (3) Macroeconomics is the level of economic analysis that deals with the activity of the whole economy and with the interaction between the major sectors of the economy, such as all households, all businesses or all governments. Prerequisite: EC190. EC310 Microeconomics (3) Microeconomics is the level of economic analysis that deals with the choices made by households, firms, and government and how those choices affect the market. Emphasis will be on the firm and industry. This course will enhance the studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; understanding of the relationships among variables and issues that concern business. Students examine levels of competition, elasticity, marginal cost and revenue. These tools will enable the student to make more informed business decisions and ultimately become a more informed citizen. Prerequisite: BU302 or EC190.

ENGLISH EN070 Basic English (3) Students are provided with a thorough review of English grammar usage as well as an introduction to writing. Students with one of the following qualifications do not have to take EN070: 1) have at least 18 ACT or 450 SAT English/writing score, 2) passed the UNOH English placement test, or 3) transferred in credit for a higher-level English course. Class meets daily. (Credit is not counted towards graduation.) No Prerequisite. EN180 Composition I (5) The aim of this course is to help students learn to write competently at the university level. Emphasis is placed on organization and development of ideas. Essays are typed and revised on the microcomputer. Outside lab time is required. Prerequisite: EN070 or Proficiency Credit. 135


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EN200 Composition II (5) This advanced course includes the writing processes common to a variety of academic disciplines, such as investigating and evaluating topics and responding to literature. It emphasizes critical reading and thinking skills and their use in writing essays. Students must write a well-documented research paper. Prerequisite: EN180. EN250 Introduction to Literature (3) This course introduces students to the study of fiction, poetry, and drama by various writers and from various periods. Elements of literature such as plot, character, and setting, as well as techniques for writing about literature, will be presented. Prerequisite: EN180. EN278 Short Stories (3) This course has two objectives: to introduce students to the short story genre and its techniques and to provide the opportunity to become careful, aware readers. The study begins briefly with the earliest types of stories—legends, fables and allegories—and extends through modern-day writings. Prerequisite: EN180. EN279 Creative Writing (3) This course is designed to introduce students to the craft of writing creatively. Students will explore the various forms of writing from fiction to non-fiction as well as poetry. Through writing, reading, and analysis, students will develop their own technique of writing creatively. Prerequisite: EN180. EN280 Film and Literature (3) This course presents the relationships between film and literature. Attention will be given to problems involved in adapting literature to another art form. Prerequisite: EN180. EN290 Women Writers (3) The objectives of the course are to read several novels, stories and poems by women authors, with women as main characters, and explore themes dealing with women’s issues, including the search for independence and the question of roles in society. Prerequisite: EN180.

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EN310 Journalism (3) This course is designed to enhance students’ understanding and abilities in the areas of journalism and print media including news writing, feature writing, editorial writing, interviewing, editing, publishing, and layout design. Students enrolled in this course will assume responsibilities as active reporters and editors resulting in UNOH news publications. Prerequisite: EN200. EN315 Special Topics in Literature (3) Selected topics in literature will be available some quarters. A specific course description will be posted when offered. Prerequisite: EN200. EN316 Mystery Fiction (3) This class will explore the mystery genre, ranging from Sherlock Holmes stories to contemporary fiction. Prerequisite: EN200. EN317 Classics of the 20th Century (3) Several short classic novels from the 20th century will be read and discussed, examining them both as literature and as expressions of important social themes in their historical and cultural settings. Prerequisite: EN200. EN318 Gothic Literature (3) This course explores imaginative literature of the subconscious and dreams, including the work of Mary Shelley, Edgar Allen Poe, William Faulkner, and Joyce Carol Oates. Elements of suspense, horror, and psychological intrigue will be examined in relation to the dramatic events and settings of these works. Prerequisite: EN200. EN325 Sherlock Holmes (3) Selected stories of the “great detective” will involve both literary analysis and specific applications of deductive reasoning and critical thinking. The course includes a review of the socioeconomic and political climate of Victorian England which coincided with the popularity of the detective story in the 1880s (the Jack the Ripper murders) and led to the development of crime fiction as a genre. Prerequisite: EN200. EN326 Shakespeare (3) A survey of William Shakespeare’s major works will focus on an analysis of human motivations and classic themes and conflicts. The course will include theatrical background on the English Renaissance period and emphasize the role of theatre as a form of popular entertainment. Films and film excerpts will be used with the viewing of a live performance when possible. Prerequisite: EN200.


COURSES EN420 Myth and Fairy Tales (3) This course presents a history of myth and fairy tales. Students will examine traditional and popular versions of these stories, as well as exploring their cultural and social influences. Prerequisite: EN200.

FINANCIAL FI210 Principles of Finance (5) Students are introduced to financial theories, institutions, investments and management. The course will provide an overview in the field of finance for associate degree students and provide the foundation for students taking the upper level courses in finance. Prerequisites: AC114. FI310 Personal Finance (3) An overview of personal and family financial planning with an emphasis on financial record keeping, consumer spending decisions, tax planning, consumer credit, insurance protection, selecting investments and retirement and estate planning. Prerequisite: Junior Standing.

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FA415 Forensic Accounting (5) This class provides students with knowledge about corporate fraud and the types of schemes that are used as well as the detection and prevention of these schemes. With the use of case studies, students will be looking at how to detect and prevent such schemes as cash larceny, bill schemes, skimming, and check tampering. Prerequisite: AC302.

HEALTH CARE HC300 Health Care Management (3) This course views health care from a management perspective. Included are such topics as the roles health care institutions play, the terminology of the industry and the relationships of the various segments of health care. Prerequisite: Junior Standing. HC310 Health Care Law (3) This course will introduce the student to important medical and legal issues that apply to the health care field. Prerequisite: Junior Standing.

FI400 Corporate Finance (4) This course surveys current finance theory and practice including such topics as financial statement analysis, cash budgeting, working capital management and capital budgeting. Prerequisites: FI210 and MH350 or BU302 and MH350.

HC315 Quality in Health Care Management (3) This course will examine total quality assurance used in health care as both strategy and control device. Additionally, the course will emphasize identification, modifications, and implementation of problem solving and process improvement. Prerequisite: MH350.

FI410 Investments (3) This is a course for the student interested in learning the fundamentals of investments. Topics include investment philosophy, the time value of money, the language of investing, stocks and bonds, mutual funds, and basic portfolio management. Prerequisite: FI210 or BU302.

HC320 Managing Wellness Across the Continuum (3) Wellness, or preventative health care, is a growing field following the development of managed care. This course is designed to provide students an opportunity to develop a better understanding of the wellness products and how to manage these products. Prerequisite: Junior Standing.

FI425 Money and Banking (3) This course covers three major components and their impact on the economy. Money and credit are defined. Financial institutions as well as the forces that shape them are studied. The Federal Reserve System with its impact through monetary policy are evaluated. Prerequisite: EC190.

HC410 Health Care Management Seminar (1) Students will complete this one-hour course prior to beginning their practicum. They will discuss the expectations of the University as well as the supervising facility or organization. Prerequisites: Senior Standing and Three Quarters from Graduation.

FORENSIC ACCOUNTING

HC411, HC412, HC414 Health Care Management Practicum (Credit hours will vary.) Field experience is designed to allow the degree candidate to receive on-the-site training under the supervision of a practitioner and a faculty member. Students must be in good academic standing and be of senior status to apply for this experience. Application should

FA380 White Collar Crime (3) This class provides students with information about white collar crime and its effects and an understanding of theories and law pertaining to the policies and regulations of white collar crime as well as the prosecution and defense of white collar criminals. Prerequisite: PL202.

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be made during HC410 Healthcare Seminar and approval must be granted by the supervising instructor. Prerequisite: HC410. HC450 Special Topics in Health Care (3) This course offers students an opportunity to explore special topics in health care. The topics may vary each quarter and will be determined by the instructor. Prerequisite: HC300. HC467 Health Care Finance (5) This course is an introduction to health care financial management and accounting. The student will gain competencies in creating financial information, using financial information in decision making and application of financial information in a managed care environment. Prerequisite: Junior Standing. HC470 Health Care Economics (3) This course examines supply, demand, resource utilization, allocation, provider concerns, and managing financial risk in health care. Prerequisite: HC300. HC475 Contemporary Issues in Health Care (3) Students will research current topics relevant to their specific interests in health care administration. Research papers and a final research project will be assigned. Prerequisites: HC300 and Senior Standing.

HISTORY HI225 A Brief History: Women in Modern America: 1890 to Present (3) This course is designed to give the student an introduction to American women’s history from the dates 1890 to present. It will examine the historical situations of female reformers, working class women, immigrant and ethnic women, farm women, women of color, and lesbians. This course will consider the ways in which these women have affected various social and economic issues, which include industrialization and the move to the cities, changing attitudes and behaviors in sexual expression and marriage, the growing power of the mass media and consumer culture, the expansion of the economy and of certain occupations within it that were identified with women, technological advancements that offered women more leisure time, and discrimination toward racial, ethnic, and sexual minorities. No Prerequisite. (3)

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HI260 Special Topics in History (3) Selected topics in history will be available some quarters. Course descriptions will be posted when offered. Prerequisite: EN180. HI280 United States Formative History (3) This class is a survey of the United States from the beginnings of European colonization in the Western hemisphere through the American Civil War and early Reconstruction. The course includes an examination of the Exploration Age, Jamestown, the Massachusetts Bay Colony, the French and Indian War, the American Revolution, the Constitutional Convention, westward migration, and the sectional conflict over slavery. The course also takes an in-depth look at the American Civil War. Particular attention is paid to the political and social characteristics and developments of the period. Prerequisite: EN180. HI285 United States History—1870 to Present (3) A survey of the history of the United States from 1870 to the present with a view toward the rise to world prominence of the U.S., the course will include an examination of both World War I and II, plus the “roaring” twenties, “depressionary” thirties, and “crises” of the sixties, seventies and eighties, focusing upon the social and political effects of each era. Prerequisite: EN180. HI310 The American Civil War & Reconstruction (3) This class is a thorough examination of the causes, events and effects of the American Civil War. The course examines the nature of sectional conflict, the debate over slavery, the major political and military events of the war and its social ramifications in terms of gender and race. The class also discusses Abraham Lincoln’s assassination, the struggles of the Radical Republicans and Southern Democrats and the “unfinished business” of Reconstruction. Prerequisite: EN200. HI312 The American Experience in World War II (3) This course is both an overview of the entire conflict known as World War II and also an exploration into the unique experience of the United States in the war. The class examines the specific causes of the war, American hesitance to get involved, and its level of commitment once war had been declared. The class investigates Pearl harbor, rationing and production, Japanese internment, Allied strategy, important battles, the Manhattan Project, and Axis war crimes. The course also examines war as an instrument of social change. Prerequisite: EN200.


COURSES HI315 American Frontier & the Old West (3) This course examines the major events relating to westward expansion in the United States beginning with the first white settlements in Kentucky and ending with the boom/bust settlements in the Southwest. The class studies the Lewis and Clark Expedition, the Mormon settlement in Utah, the California gold rush, the Oregon Trail, the transcontinental railroad and the Texas cattle drives. The course also discusses the peculiar Western society that was created by fur trappers, miners, explorers, gamblers and outlaws. The class delves into Native American culture; the influx and influence of Asians, Latinos and Africans; and the role of the frontier in changing gender identity in the United States. Prerequisite: EN200. HI318 Special Topics in History (3) Selected topics in history will be available some quarters. Course descriptions will be posted when offered. Prerequisite: EN200.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IT109 Welcome to Web 2.0 and New Media (2) This course is designed to help students understand and effectively use a variety of Web 2.0 technologies including blogs, RSS, wikis, social bookmarking tools, photo sharing tools, screencasts, audio and video podcasts, social networking sites, virtual worlds (Second Life), and video sharing (You Tube). No Prerequisite. IT110 Modern Computing Concepts (3) This introductory course will discuss many of todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newer computer hardware and software technologies. This class also gives the student a general overview of the computer industry and the responsibilities expected of a computer professional. No Prerequisite. IT113 Introduction to Computer Programming (3) This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of object-oriented programming. Basic concepts and principles of programming using a visually-oriented instructional program to teach otherwise abstract concepts are also taught. Prerequisite: IT110. IT114 Business Applications (3) This introductory course will expose students to the fundamentals of electronic spreadsheet operations using Microsoft Excel, word processing using Microsoft Word, and audio-visual business presentations using Microsoft PowerPoint. (This course provides preparation for MicrosoftÂŽ Application Certification Testing.) No prerequisite.

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IT184 Ethics In Information Technology (4) The student will learn concepts covering ethics for IT professionals and IT users as it applies to information technology. Students will examine the different ethical situations that arise in the realm of information technology and, where appropriate, gain practical advice for addressing these issues. The student will also learn concepts regarding ethics related to computer and internet crime, privacy, freedom of expression, intellectual property, and software development. Prerequisite: IT110. IT235 Electronic Commerce (5) Most businesses find they are required to architect change that incorporates e-business in some form or another to stay competitive. This course will study the organizational, technological and business implications of incorporating e-commerce into an organization by covering topics such as retailing, advertising, internet services, consumer behavior, corporate strategies and even public policy. No Prerequisite.

KEYBOARDING KY080 Keyboarding for Beginners (2) Students are provided with a knowledge of the keyboard. Emphasis is placed on accuracy, speed and proofreading. A speed of 25 NWPM (net words per minute) must be attained. This course is required of students who key less than 25 NWPM on the placement test. (Credit is not counted toward graduation.) No Prerequisite. Graded S/U. KY146 Keyboarding I (5) Students are given a review of the keyboard and are introduced to vertical and horizontal centering, tables, placement and style of letters, reports and memoranda. Prerequisite: KY080 or Proficiency Credit. KY147 Keyboarding II (5) Students take an in-depth look at personal and business correspondence, advanced tables and preparing interoffice communications while applying the rules from KY146. Prerequisite: KY146. KY250 Keyboarding III (5) Students work on office simulation projects which focus on special reports, letters, tables and manuscripts. Prerequisite: KY147.

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MANAGEMENT MA121 Principles of Management (5) This course combines the analysis of the familiar management principles and the newer systems concept of management. The planning, organization, leadership and control functions of management are analyzed in detail. No Prerequisite. MA122 Small Business and the Entrepreneur (3) As the dominant type of business in the United States, small business is attractive to many people as a way of life. This introductory course provides examination of a broad range of concepts, including typical personality characteristics, understanding the given industry, analyzing competition and customers, establishing groundwork for the business, legal and operational foundations, and the option of franchising. Prerequisite: MA121. MA150 Applied Business Principles I: SIFE (1) This course provides students the opportunity to apply their classroom education to real world experience. Students design and implement educational outreach projects that teach others about the free enterprise system, globalization, business ethics, and personal fiscal responsibility. They will practice leadership, teamwork, and communication skills to become better future business leaders. Students taking this class are required to join the University of Northwestern Ohio Students in Free Enterprise Team (SIFE). Prerequisite: EN180. MA225 Retail Management (5) All phases of the retailing trade are thoroughly covered in this course, which include such topics as selling, buying, pricing, display, stock control, store organization, advertising and government regulations. Prerequisite: MA121. MA226 Human Resources Management I (3) This course is designed to aid human resource managers in the methods used to implement human resource programs in business. Emphasis is placed in the areas of planning, staffing, performance appraisal, training and development, and equal employment opportunity laws. Prerequisite: MA121.

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MA322 Organizational Behavior (5) This course will study the interrelationships among the various constituencies in organizations. Particular emphasis will be given to the dynamics of the workings of individuals and the organizational variables that include job satisfaction, productivity, absenteeism, and turnover. Prerequisite: Junior Standing. MA324 Organizational Behavior II (3) This course will discuss the dynamics of the individual, groups and the organization in more detail. The course is designed to build on the foundation of knowledge discussed in MA322 Organizational Behavior. Prerequisite: MA322. MA325 Training in Organizations (3) This course provides information to help students learn the necessary steps for training within organizations. A systematic approach to needs assessment, development and evaluation will be taught. Prerequisite: MA322. MA326 Human Resources Management II (3) This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of human resources management. Special emphasis will be placed on employee relations, establishing pay plans, pay-for-performance and financial incentives, benefits and services, labor relations and collective bargaining, guaranteed fair treatment, and employee safety and health. Prerequisite: MA226 or BU301. MA327 Leadership (3) This course will focus on the historical origins of leadership, major theoretical approaches to leadership and current applications of leadership theory. Prerequisite: MA322. MA350 Applied Business Principles II: SIFE (1) Students taking this class are required to join the Students in Free Enterprise Team (SIFE). This course provides students the opportunity to apply their classroom education to real world experience. Students are to create, manage and implement outreach projects that teach others about the free enterprise system, globalization, business ethics, and personal fiscal responsibility. They will develop leadership, teamwork, and communication skills to become better future business leaders themselves and to help develop others through the outreach programs. Prerequisite: MA150.


COURSES MA380 Human Relations in Organizations (3) This course examines the concepts of self-management, self-motivation, goal setting, problem-solving, personal wellness and dealing with others within the organization so that sutdents can learn to develop healthy habits and relationships while still being efficient and effective within the workplace. Prerequisite: Junior Standing. MA395 Managing Change in Organizations (3) Examines topics related to organization development and change, including diagnosing the need for change, overcoming resistance to change, implementing and evaluating interventions, and confronting the ethical dilemmas of change. Prerequisite: Junior Standing. MA401 Moral Issues In Business (3) This course will discuss the procedures in business ethics that business professionals face every day. The focus will be on the nature of morality, ethical theory, and economic justice in general business. Prerequisite: Junior Standing. MA406 Information Management (3) This course is a survey of information systems and the management issues associated with such systems. Management of personnel, equipment and information are discussed. Students will also become familiar with the terminology associated with the data processing industry. Prerequisite: Senior Standing.

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MA440 Project Management (3) This course is designed to provide practical and applied approaches to making managers better at controlling a complex process. The course will concentrate on the ideas and strategies presented by practicing project managers from a variety of industries. The student will develop specific skills such as conflict resolution and group problem-solving in various areas of project management. Prerequisite: Senior Standing. MA445 Global Management Issues (3) Contemporary challenges in management are analyzed through research and application of management concepts. Linking the management framework to global considerations enhances student perspective of competitive developments worldwide. Prerequisite: BU240 or BU301. MA465 Strategic Management and Business Policy (3) Long-run managerial decision-making is the essence of this case-study course. As the capstone for business and health care majors, students apply their knowledge of the functional areas of management to simulate strategic management decisions experienced in actual cases. Coursework includes integration of internal organizational analysis, external environmental examination, strategy formulation and strategy implementation and control. Prerequisites: FI400 for Business Majors; HC467 for Health Care Majors.

MARKETING MA426 Introduction to Production and Operations Management (3) This course provides an overview of the fundamentals of management of operations of firms, design of production systems, operation, coordination and control of production activity, and major analytical tools for management. Prerequisite: An elective to be taken in conjunction with BU412 or BU414. MA430 Entrepreneurship (3) In this course students will discuss and analyze the theories and concepts relating to entrepreneurship. Part of the learning process will focus on application of textbook ideas to real life entrepreneurial opportunities. Students will gain an understanding and appreciation of the process and steps that must be used in researching, creating, building, and maintaining their own business ideas. Prerequisite: Senior Standing.

MT111 Professional Selling (3) Numerous aspects of the sales profession are explored. The concepts and applications of adaptive selling and the selling process as a series of interrelated activities will be included. No Prerequisite. MT120 Advertising (3) Students will study advertising concepts and the proper use of advertising in business, designing advertisements and the advertising media. No Prerequisite. MT210 Public Relations (3) This course will focus on public relations problems, policies, and practices applied to business and nonprofit organizations, along with media methods of communications. No Prerequisite.

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MT220 Marketing I (5) The philosophy of marketing is introduced. The marketing environment, consumer and business markets, demographics and marketing research are covered. Special attention is given to the product: development, product-mix strategies, brands, packaging and other product features. No Prerequisite.

MT353 Services Marketing (3) This services marketing course delves into the conceptual and analytical framework for applying marketing principles to the service section of the economy. The focus will be on developing and understanding the impact of unique service characteristics on the development of marketing strategies. Prerequisite: MT220 or SM190.

MT230 Marketing II (5) Topics covered relate to the marketing mix: price, distribution, product and promotion. Emphasis will be on pricing strategies, channels of distribution and promotional programs. Wholesaling, retailing, personal selling, advertising and public relations are studied. Prerequisite: MT220.

MT401 Special Topics in Marketing (3) Current topics in the marketing field will be studied. Special attention will be given to development, planning, and needs analysis research. Prerequisite: MT220.

MT321 International Marketing (3) This course combines the components of international business and marketing. Emphasis will be placed on the significance of sociocultural, economic and geopolitical environments in global marketing. Prerequisites: BU240 and MT220. MT342 Marketing Research I (3) This course emphasizes the problem-oriented nature of marketing research and investigates how marketing research activities are implemented. Students will study sampling theory, questionnaire design and an overview of acquiring data. This course, in conjunction with MT343 Marketing Research II, prepares students for collecting research related to marketing objectives. Prerequisites: MH350. MT343 Marketing Research II (3) This course emphasizes the problem-oriented nature of marketing research and investigates how marketing research activities are implemented. Students will study sampling theory, questionnaire design and an overview of acquiring data. This course, in conjunction with MT342 Marketing Research I, prepares students for collecting research related to marketing objectives. Prerequisites: MT342. MT352 Internet Marketing (3) This course explores how marketing and networked economy knowledge can be utilized for the business world. Students will learn how to design a marketing program for the online environment of todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s organizations. Using technology to create a competitive advantage for a company will be an important theme of the course. Prerequisite: MT230.

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MT421 Logistics and Distribution (5) Students examine marketing channels and integrate principles of channel elements and structural functions. The complementary subjects of inventory and routing as components of the total marketing relationship are studied. Prerequisite: MT220. MT423 Brand Management (3) Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of brand management including key branding terms, definitions, and language. Students will learn the importance of a brandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s value, the responsibilities a brand manager should fulfill, various methods and strategies used to meet those responsibilities, and the signals of a troubled brand strategy. Prerequisite: Senior Standing. MT424 Marketing Management (5) Decision-making in marketing is discussed. Each case studied is designed to bring an important and difficult marketing concept to life. Students will observe the marketplace and reflect on their own past experiences as consumers to make decisions. Prerequisite: MT342. MT426 Marketing Strategies (3) Specific methods for pricing, policy making, planning, budgeting, and distribution will be included. Prerequisite: MT220. MT450 Marketing Capstone (3) This course will provide students with a practical approach to analyzing, planning, and implementing marketing strategies. The students will use a creative process of applying the knowledge and concepts of marketing to the development and implementation of marketing strategy by means of case studies. The course will allow students to understand the essence of how marketing decisions fit together to create a coherent strategy. Prerequisite: Senior Standing.


COURSES MBA MBA501 Introduction to Graduate Writing (2) This course is designed to provide students with graduate skills they will need in many of the other MBA courses. This course will focus on critical writing issues for graduate-level students. Emphasis will be placed on addressing writing techniques and the APA writing style. Co-requisite: MBA502. Must be taken first quarter. MBA502 Introduction to Graduate Studies (2) This course is designed to provide students with graduate skills they will need in many of the other MBA courses. This course will focus on critical issues for graduate-level students. Emphasis will be placed on orienting students to UNOH and addressing informational technology resources, critical analytical thinking, and case analysis methodology. Co-requisite: MBA501. Must be taken first quarter. MBA540 Learning Organizations (4) In this course students acquire knowledge of how organizational learning occurs at the individual, team, and system levels. Systems thinking is analyzed and applied to a variety of organizational processes and situations. The class includes brief lectures, assigned readings with prepared class discussions, exercises, and discussion of the results of the simulation to demonstrate systems thinking competency. Prequisite: MBA Program Acceptance. MBA560 Legal & Ethical Environment of Business (4) This course examines the legal and ethical environments that organizations and managers face and how these environments impact business. Course topics include privacy and technology, government regulation in the workplace, valuing diversity, environmental protection, marketing legalities, product liability, and intellectual property. Prequisite: MBA Program Acceptance. MBA580 Global Business Issues and Strategies (4) This course will investigate the major themes in international business today. The main emphasis will be on the four major subject areas of global business issues and strategies which include management, economics, political science and strategy. This course will provide a truly global perspective by exposing the student to cultural diversity for both the practitioner and the scholar. Prequisite: MBA Program Acceptance.

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MBA600 Marketing Management (4) This course examines the role of the marketing function for both consumer and business markets. Relevant theory and practice are discussed in relation to principles, analysis, and planning for developing and implementing marketing strategies. Prequisite: MBA Program Acceptance. MBA610 Human Resources Management (4) This course examines the policies and regulations affecting human resources issues. Emphasis will be on analysis of the management of human resources from legal, organizational and practical viewpoints. Prequisite: MBA Program Acceptance. MBA620 Accounting for Managers (4) Students are introduced to methods of utilizing accounting and financial information for decisionmaking processes. Alternative financial structures, cost accounting, working capital and cash flows, and short-term/long-term budgeting concepts are discussed in the context of internal management needs. Prequisite: MBA Program Acceptance. MBA625 Accounting Theory (4) Presentation of standard setting and accounting theory formulation and how these translate toward providing financial information about economic entities to investors and creditors who do not control these business entities, but do have a financial interest in their operations. Prequisite: MBA Program Acceptance. MBA630 Production & Operations Management (4) This course presents design, planning, and control for effective supply chain and process control. Learners apply the techniques and principles to effectively manage market leadership, organizational growth, and innovation. Prequisite: MBA Program Acceptance. MBA640 Quantitative Analysis for Management (4) Probability, decision theory, and forecasting are studied to make objective business decisions in the face of uncertainty. Business models are developed and linear programming is studied to make the most effective use of a business organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s resources. Inventory control, project management, and queuing theory are studied to improve the operating efficiency of most business organizations. Microsoft EXCEL software is used throughout the course. Prequisite: MBA Program Acceptance. MBA650 Leadership (4) In this course students acquire knowledge of and apply effective leadership practices as they work to

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understand their own personal leadership style. Students will also compare and contrast other common leadership styles. Students will analyze their own leadership strengths and areas for improvement. Additionally, students will be assessing their organization’s framework for leadership. Prequisite: MBA Program Acceptance. MBA660 Management Information Systems (4) In this course students are introduced to the processes necessary to align the organization’s information systems to create a competitive strategy. Students will examine the processes and factors involved in the successful application of information technology to support the organization’s strategy. Prequisite: MBA Program Acceptance. MBA670 Finance for Managers (4) This course focuses on the application of financial information to a wide range of management decisions, including: assessing the financial health and performance measurement, project analysis using discounted cash flows, organizational budgeting, and product pricing. Students will apply basic financial management theories and techniques to real-world case studies. Prequisite: MBA Program Acceptance. MBA680 Managerial Economics (4) This course applies economic theory and methods to business and administrative decision-making and tells managers how decisions should be analyzed to achieve organizational objectives efficiently, also helps managers recognize how macroeconomic forces affect organizations and describes the economic consequences of managerial behavior. Special attention is paid to the operation of the firm in a global economy. Prequisite: MBA Program Acceptance. MBA690 Management Capstone (4) This course is designed to be a capstone course for the MBA program. Students will have the chance to analyze, synthesize and evaluate theories, terms and concepts discussed in other MBA courses through the use of cases and real-life situations. This course is designed to be an information application course. Prequisite: MBA Program Acceptance.

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MH065 Review Math (3) Basic mathematical operations are studied with emphasis on concepts, facts and properties to prepare the student for college-level mathematics. Use of calculators is limited. Students with one of the following

qualifications do not have to take MH065: 1) have at least 18 ACT or 450 SAT math score, 2) passed the UNOH math placement test, or 3) transferred in credit for a higher-level math course. Credit does not apply to graduation requirements. No Prerequisite. Graded S/U. MH169 Business Math (5) Business math applications are studied and include banking, business statistics, trade and cash discounts, markup and markdown, payroll, simple and compound interest, consumer credit, annuities and sinking funds, mortgages, depreciation and inventory valuation. A business or scientific calculator is required. Prerequisite: MH065. MH190 Algebra (5) This course is a study of complex numbers, variables, linear functions, the rectangular coordinate system, exponents, radicals, polynomials, equations and inequalities, linear and quadratic functions, and exponential and logarithmic functions. Additional topics include range and domain of a function, intercepts, inverse of a function, composition of functions, modeling with functions, and solving systems of equations and inequalities. Any model of TI-83 or TI-84 calculator is required. Prerequisite: MH065. MH310 Finite Mathematics (3) This course includes a pre-calculus review and studies functions and linear models, systems of linear equations and matrices, linear programming, applications to finance, sets and counting, and probability. Any model of TI-83 or TI-84 calculator is required. Prerequisite: MH169 or MH190. MH315 Calculus (3) This course studies functions, linear models, and nonlinear models; the derivative, differentiation techniques, and derivative applications; the integral, advanced integration techniques, and multivariable functions, and partial derivatives. Any model of TI-83 or TI-84 calculator is required. Prerequisite: MH190. MH350 Statistics (5) This course studies data collection, presenting data, descriptive measures, probability, discrete probability distributions, the normal distribution, sampling and sampling distributions, confidence interval estimation, hypothesis testing, two sample tests, analysis of variance, and linear and multiple regression. Microsoft Excel software with an add-in is used. Any model of TI83 or TI-84 calculator is recommended. Prerequisite: MH310 or MH315.


COURSES MH420 Quantitative Methods (3) This course provides an introduction to quantitative methods for decision making. Topics include linear programming with graphical solutions, computer solutions, sensitivity analysis, and interpretation of solutions; project scheduling with PERT/CPM; decision analysis; and forecasting. Microsoft Excel software with an add-in is used. Any model of TI-83 or TI-84 calculator is recommended. Prerequisite: MH350.

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY MO130 Medical Law and Ethics (3) An introductory course providing an overview and discussion of legal, ethical, and bioethical issues pertaining to the health care field, particularly in an ambulatory care setting, this course encourages active student participation in the learning process through regular class discussion of these various issues. A variety of topics are discussed including the legal system, physician-client relationships, professional liability, public duties of the physician, the medical record, medical malpractice, confidentiality issues, importance of patient/family education and documentation and specific responsibilities of the allied health professional. No Prerequisite. MO135 Clinical I (2) This course is an introduction to the profession and practices of a Medical Assistant. Legal, moral, and ethical issues related to the medical field, as well as patient education, are discussed. Emphasis on universal precautions and aseptic procedures are included. Clinical competencies are practiced and evaluated in the clinical lab. Relevant patient/family education and documentation are emphasized. No Prerequisite. MO136 Clinical II (2) This course is a continuation of MO135. Emphasis is placed on clinical procedures performed in the office environment. Theory includes HIV, hepatitis, and other blood-borne pathogens. Practice and evaluation in the clinical lab includes obtaining a patient history, taking vital signs, and preparing a patient for an exam in a general office setting. Prerequisite: MO135. MO140 Human Anatomy, Pathophysiology, and Terminology I (3) Students are introduced to the medical language. The course begins with a strong emphasis on the division of words into prefixes, root words, suffixes and building medical words from these components as well as learning the definitions. This course encourages active

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student participation in the learning process through regular class discussion and written textbook assignments. Introduction to human anatomy begins at the cellular level through tissues, organs and systems. The digestive system, including structure and function, related disease processes, clinical procedures and tests, and medical terminology are discussed. No Prerequisite. MO142 Human Anatomy, Pathophysiology, and Terminology II (3) This course is a continuation of MO140. Students will learn the structure and function of individual body systems, various pathological conditions, clinical procedures and tests specific to that system. Medical terminology relevant to each system is integrated and reviewed. This course encourages active student participation in the learning process through regular class discussion and written textbook assignments. Students are introduced to the importance of relevant patient/family education and documentation. Prerequisites: MO135 and MO140. MO144 Pharmacology for Medical Assisting I (3) A review of basic mathematics, dosage calculations, drug sources, schedules, forms, medication order and medication administration. Prerequisites: MO135 and MO140. Prerequisites: MO163 for Medical Coding Majors Only. MO145 Human Anatomy, Pathophysiology, and Terminology III (3) This course is a continuation of MO142. Various body systems, including structure, function, pathology, tests and procedures for each system are discussed as well as related medical terminology. This course encourages active student participation in the learning process through regular class discussion and written textbook assignments. Relevant patient/family education and documentation are emphasized. Prerequisites: MO136, MO142, and MO144. MO146 Pharmacology for Medical Assisting II (3) This is a study of allergic reactions, antifungals, antivirals, immunizing agents, antineoplastic agents, vitamins, minerals, psychotropics, substance abuse and medications for musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary, endocrine, nerves and reproductive systems. Prerequisites: MO136, MO142, and MO144. Prerequisites: MO264 for Medical Coding Majors Only. MO159 Clinical III (2) This course is a continuation of MO136. Theory and practice include assisting with cold and heat therapy and ambulation techniques, emergency preparedness

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including cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and complementary and alternative medicines. An introduction to microbiology is completed with the emphasis on urine collection, catheterization, processing and testing of urine specimens, along with quality control standards. Laboratory safety and equipment will also be discussed, including disposing of biohazardous waste material. Finally an emphasis on patient education is completed, including using specialized techniques for special needs and educating patients/family on specialized therapies. Prerequisite: MO136. MO163 Medical Terminology I (3) A vocabulary course for students enrolled in the medical field. It is designed to aid in the spelling, definition and pronunciation of the terminology related to human anatomy/pathophysiology. No Prerequisite. MO246 Pharmacology for Medical Assisting III (3) This course is a continuation of Pharmacology for Medical Assisting II. This is a study of medications related to various body systems. Prerequisite: MO145, MO146, and MO159. MO250 Human Anatomy, Pathophysiology, and Terminology IV (3) This course is a continuation of MO145. It is a detailed discussion of body systems, including structure; function; disease processes; and relevant tests, procedures and medical terminology. Additional topics of oncology, radiology, nuclear medicine, radiation therapy and psychiatry are included. This course encourages active student participation in the learning process through regular class discussion and written textbook assignments. A strong emphasis on patient/ family education and documentation are included. Prerequisites: MO145 and MO159. MO259 Clinical IV (2) This course is a continuation of MO159. Theory and practice introduce students to more advanced skills, such as collection and processing of blood specimens, completing EKGs, pulmonary function testing, and drug administration. The concepts of x-rays will be discussed as well. An emphasis will be on nutrition and special diets and how the diets relate to patient care and health. Prerequisite: MO159.

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MO264 Medical Terminology II (3) Students continue the study of medical terms, their spelling and usage. Emphasis is on terminology related to specific human body systems/pathophysiology. Prerequisite: MO163.

MO272 Medical Coding I (3) This course will introduce the student to the fundamentals of the CPT coding system required for reimbursement of medical visits, procedures and tests. Prerequisite: MO142. Prerequisite: MO264 for Medical Coding, Medical Office Management, and Medical Transcriptionist Majors Only. MO273 Medical Coding II (3) A continuation of Medical Coding I with the addition of the fundamentals of the ICD-9-CM coding system for statistical and reimbursement purposes. Prerequisite: MO145. Prerequisite: MO264 for Medical Coding, Medical Office Management, and Medical Transcriptionist Majors Only. MO274 Medical Coding III (4) This course is designed to work with various coding systems. The student will code both diagnoses and procedures and work with complex coding situations. Computerized coding applications will be presented as well as guidelines for outpatient and inpatient reimbursement. Prerequisites: MO272 and MO273. MO278 Understanding Health Insurance (2) A course designed to introduce students to major nationwide medical insurance programs, including relevant patient/family education. Prerequisite: MO140. Prerequisite: MO264 for Medical Office Management. Corequisite: MO264 for Medical Coding and Medical Transcriptionist Majors. MO279 Medical Terminology III (3) Students continue the study of medical terms, their spelling, and usage. Emphasis is on terminology related to specific human body systems/pathophysiology. Prerequisite: MO264. MO282 Administrative Skills for the Medical Assistant (3) This course is designed to prepare the medical assistant for duties that are performed on the administrative side of the medical office setting. Concepts covered include the facility environment, computers, patient scheduling, written communications, accounting practices, office management and employment strategies. Additional topics and concepts will be introduced in order to prepare the student for the CMA exam. Prerequisite: WP138. MO285 Medical Assisting Externship I (1) A supervised practicum that allows the student to observe and begin to utilize administrative and clinical


COURSES skills in an ambulatory care setting. Exposure to the various responsibilities of the medical assistant including legal/moral/ethical obligations, professional behavior, and effective communication skills is given. Mandatory weekly conferences allow the student to review and discuss the externship experience. Prerequisites: MO130, MO145 and MO272. MO286 Medical Assisting Externship II (1) This course is a continuation of MO285. Students continue to develop the necessary administrative and clinical skills through experience in an ambulatory care setting including focus on legal/moral/ethical issues, professional behavior, and effective communication. The practicum remains supervised but allows the student to participate in a more independent role. Mandatory weekly conferences allow the student to review and discuss the externship experience. (The student will also have the opportunity to prepare for the CMA exam.) Prerequisite: MO285. MO287 Medical Assisting Externship III (1) This course is a continuation of MO286. Students continue to develop the necessary administrative and clinical skills through experience in an ambulatory care setting including focus on legal/moral/ethical issues, professional behavior, and effective communication. The practicum remains supervised but allows the student to participate in a more independent role. Mandatory weekly conferences allow the student to review and discuss the externship experience. (The student will also have the opportunity to prepare for the CMA exam.) Prerequisite: MO286.

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MN291 Maintaining a Network Infrastructure (4) This course will give students the skills necessary to install, manage, monitor, configure and troubleshoot the many facets of networking Windows® Server 2003 including DNS, DHCP, Remote Access, Network IP Routing and WINS. This course prepares students for the Microsoft® Certified System Engineer (MCSE)/ Microsoft® Certified Professional (MCP) core exam 70291 with the same title. Prerequisites: MN270 and MN290. MN293 Planning a Network Infrastructure (4) This course will introduce students to the skills necessary to configure, manage, secure, administer and troubleshoot Windows 2003 Servers and client computers. It also consists of the study of network infrastructure in the Windows 2003 environment including DHCP, DNS, remote access, network IP routing and WINS. This course prepares the students for the Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer exam 70-293 with the same title. Prerequisite: MN270 and MN290. MN294 Configuring and Maintaining a Directory Service (3) This course will introduce students to the skills necessary to install, configure and troubleshoot Windows® Server 2003 Active Directory components, DNS for Active Directory and Active Directory security solutions. The student will also learn how to manage, monitor and optimize the desktop environment by using Group Policy. This course prepares students for the Microsoft® Certified System Engineer (MCSE)/ Microsoft® Certified Professional (MCP) core exam 70294 with the same title. Prerequisite: MN291.

MICROSOFT NETWORKING MN270 Administering a Client Operating System (3) This course will give students the skills necessary to install, customize, integrate, network and troubleshoot Windows® Vista. This course prepares students for the Microsoft® Certified System Engineer (MCSE)/ Microsoft® Certified Technology Specialist (MCTS) 70620: TS: Configuring Microsoft Windows Vista Client. Prerequisite: IT110. MN290 Administering a Server Environment (4) This course will give students the skills necessary to install, customize, integrate, network and troubleshoot Windows® 2003 Server. This course prepares students for the Microsoft® Certified System Engineer (MCSE)/ Microsoft® Certified Professional (MCP) core exam 70290 with the same title. Prerequisite: IT110.

MN297 Designing a Network Directory Service Architecture (3) This course will give students the skills necessary to analyze the business requirements and design a directory service architecture that includes directory services such as Active Directory and Windows® NT domains, connectivity and data replication. This course prepares students for the Microsoft® Certified System Engineer (MCSE)/Microsoft® Certified Professional (MCP) core exam 70-297 with the same title. Prerequisite: MN291. MN298 Designing Network Security (4) This course will give students the skills necessary to analyze the business requirements for security and design a security solution that meets business requirements. These skills include controlling access to resources, auditing access to resources, authentication and encryption. This course prepares students for the

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Microsoft® Certified System Engineer (MCSE)/Microsoft® Certified Professional (MCP) core elective exam 70-298 with the same title. Prerequisite: MN294. MN299 Developing Security in a Network Architecture (4) This course will introduce students to the skills necessary to analyze the business requirements for a network infrastructure and design a network infrastructure that meets business requirements. The network infrastructure topics include network topology, routing, IP addressing, WINS, DNS,VPN, remote access and telephony. This course prepares students for the Microsoft® Certified System Engineer (MCSE)/Microsoft® Certified Professional (MCP) core elective exam 70-299 with the same title. Prerequisite: MN291.

NETWORKING SECURITY NS147 Windows Client/Server Operating Systems (3) This course provides students with the fundamental knowledge and skills necessary to install and configure Microsoft Windows 7 on client computers that are part of a network domain. In addition, this course provides the skills and knowledge necessary to install and configure Windows 2008 Server while ensuring server security for users, groups, file and print services and group policy objects. This course is supplemented with many hands-on exercises that reinforce the lectures. Prerequisite: IT110. NS148 Linux Operating System Fundamentals (3) This course introduces the Linux and UNIX operating systems to students with a basic knowledge of computers. The course covers the UNIX/Linux file system, communication with other users, editors, file manipulation and processing, graphical environments within Linux, terminal interfaces and bash, data manipulation commands, software tools, networking tools, and system administration tools. This course is supplemented with many hands-on exercises that reinforce the lectures. Prerequisite: IT110.

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NS183 Network Security Fundamentals (5) This course will give students the skills necessary to maintain a secure network environment and is designed to prepare the student for CompTIA’s Security + Certification Exam. Students will learn how to implement authentication, prevent network attacks against malicious code, secure a remote access point, e-mail and web security, encryption with wireless technologies, and how to develop security baselines for implementing a secure network topology. The

student will learn how to manipulate intrusion detection systems, firewalls, routers and mobile devices to ensure information integrity by completing hands-on lab exercises. Prerequisite: IT110. NS190 Local and Wide Area Networks (3) Computer networks are classified according to their reach and complexity within an infrastructure. This class will cover in-depth, the LAN/WAN environment, interconnectivity, physical transmission options, transmission equipment and the various protocols that can be used accordingly. The student will learn the various media types as well as the equipment involved in creating a networked environment such as a router, switch, bridge and others. The student will learn the fundamentals in laying out a network topology and review key features in creating a secure Local Area and Wide Area network. Prerequisite: NS183. NS195 Network Defense and Countermeasures (4) The practice of intrusion detection encompasses virtually all aspects of network security, and provides a good entry point to the fundamental concepts associated with protecting computers and networks in the 21st century. These concepts include: deterring attacks; detecting intrusion attempts; responding to

break-ins and intrusion attempts; assessing the damage of hack attacks; anticipating future attacks; and the steps involved in locating and prosecuting intruders. This course provides the student with a solid foundation in network security fundamentals; while the primary emphasis is on intrusion detection, the student will also learn essential practices in developing a security policy and implementing the policy. The student will perform Network Address Translation, packet filtering, and install proxy servers, firewalls, and Virtual Private Networks. Co-requisite: NS183. NS200 Internet Security (3) This course expands basic security concepts, strategies, and tools and focuses these specifically to the Internet. It provides a detailed discussion of basic security concepts including identifying security resources as well as a variety of organizational issues related to securing networks and data. The student will learn to distinguish threats to information technology assets, devices, strategies for defense, intrusion detection, and operating system security (both Windows and UNIX). The course reviews security standards and compliance issues and discusses strategies for testing security of an organization. Prerequisites: NS147 and NS148.


COURSES NS203 Network Disaster Recovery (3) When a business or organization is interrupted by disasters, accidents, or natural events, a loss in money, data, or productivity occurs. The extent to which the loss affects the health of the organization is often determined by how prepared the organization is for dealing with these interruptions. This course provides the student with a foundation in disaster recovery principles including preparation of a disaster recovery plan, assessment of the risks in the enterprise, development of the policies and procedures, understanding the roles and relationships of the various members of the organization, implementation of the plan, testing and rehearsing the plan, and actually recovering from a disaster. Prerequisite: NS200. NS259 Implementing Internet/Intranet Firewalls (3) Firewalls have become a fundamental security tool. This course provides the student with an in-depth look at firewall technologies and how these technologies are incorporated into the information security policy of an organization. It introduces the student to different varieties of firewall configurations and describes popular firewall tools by Check Point, Cisco, and other vendors. It takes the student through the steps involved in installation, configuration, and administration of firewalls on a network system. The course culminates with a project in which the student constructs a sophisticated firewall. Prerequisite: NS190. NS278 Operating Systems Security (3) This course expands the network student’s basic network and operating system skills to include planning, implementation, and auditing of the system’s security. The student will participate in many handson projects using a variety of operating systems including a Windows client operating system, Windows server operating systems, Linux, NetWare, and Mac OS. Through these hands-on projects and case studies, the student can practice setting up and managing these network operating systems in a secure environment. Prerequisite: NS147 and NS148. NS288 Security Policy and Procedures (3) This course is designed to prepare the student for a career in network security. It focuses on some of the important business issues related to network security including the various threats, legal issues, and risk management. The student will learn to create strategies used in planning for continuity and maintaining security including security topologies, physical security alternatives, and policies and procedures related to an organization’s personnel. Prerequisite: IT184.

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OFFICE PROCEDURES OP130 Medical Accounting Software (2) This course will focus on the critical role of medical accounting software in a medical office and will equip students with the general concepts and procedures behind medical billing and database software. The course will be a hands-on experience with tutorial and simulation activities related to adding patients to the system; entering charges, payments, and adjustments; creating accounting reports; and preparing claims. The students will learn to follow complicated procedures in an office’s accounting, billing, and insurance reimbursement systems using specialized software. Prerequisites: KY146 or WP138. OP149 Records Management (3) Students will study the principles and procedures of records storage, retrieval and disposition. The filing methods introduced include: alphabetic, numeric, and, subject. Manual simulation projects will be completed. No Prerequisite. OP252 Machine Transcription (3) Students become acquainted with the use of the machine transcriber through the transcription of pre-dictated audio files. This course emphasizes proficiency in grammar, spelling, and written communications skills. Speed and accuracy are developed. Students taking this course via Virtual College must have access to a computer with appropriate software installed and must buy the foot pedal required for this course. Prerequisites: EN070 or proficiency exam credit and KY146. OP255 Medical Machine Transcription (3) Students type pre-dictated documents and forms used in the different kinds of medical offices. Good grammar, spelling, and written communication skills are essential. Students taking this course via Virtual College must have access to a computer with appropriate software installed and must buy the foot pedal required for this course. Prerequisites: OP252 and MO145. Prerequisites: OP252 and MO163 for Medical Office Management & Medical Transcriptionist Majors Only. OP256 Word Language Specialist (3) This course emphasizes proficiency in the necessary skills to correct the formatting and grammar errors in voice recognition documents. Grammar, spelling, and written communication skills are also emphasized. Students taking this course via Virtual College must have access to a computer with appropriate software installed and must buy the foot pedal required for this course. Prerequisite: OP252.

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OP259 Medical Word Specialist (3) This course emphasizes proficiency in the necessary skills to correct the formatting and grammar errors in voice recognition medical documents. Students will correct medical reports from pre-typed documents that contain a variety of medical fields and topics and will face more challenging sources of syntax errors primarily from a hospital in-patient environment. Students taking this course via Virtual College must have access to a computer with appropriate software installed and must buy the foot pedal required for this course. Prerequisites: MO264 and OP255. OP260 Workplace Technologies (3) In this course students develop an understanding of new and current office technologies used in the office environment. Students are provided an article overview and/or hands-on applications that serves to introduce the technology topic, providing key background information, which will provide the social, historical, or antecedent events necessary to understand the topics. Prerequisites: EN180 and WP138. OP270 Office Systems and Procedures (5) In this capstone course, students begin to set priorities and work independently in an office simulation. Excellent keyboarding, research and communication skills are required, as well as a strong knowledge of document processing, spreadsheets and database software. Prerequisites: DP117, DP150, KY147 and WP138. OP275 Integrated Software Applications (3) This course is a project-based experience that integrates the use of the core level skills of Microsoft Word, Excel, Powerpoint, and Access, as well as the use of the Internet, to improve the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s level of efficiency and effectiveness in completing office tasks and projects. Students will set priorities, practice time management, and work independently or in groups within the confines of the projectsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; criteria. Excellent keyboarding and written/oral communication skills are required as well as a strong knowledge base for document processing, creating and using spreadsheets and database software. Prerequisites: DP117, DP144, DP150, EN180 and WP138.

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OP276 Office Procedures (5) This course will expose future administrative professionals to the changing global market place, continual advances in technology and an increasingly diverse labor force. This course will prepare students to perform in a professional office environment. Students will complete activities such as preparing presentations, learning about office professionalism and office

confidentiality, composing documents, and developing telephone techniques. Students will learn to be a productive member of an office team, behave ethically, process information, and communicate effectively - both orally and in writing. Prerequisites: EN180, KY146, and WP138.

PARALEGAL PL100 Introduction to the Legal System (5) A general overview of the legal system and its terminology is provided. Special emphasis is placed on the duties of the paralegal. Legal research is introduced. No Prerequisite. PL101 Litigation (5) An introduction to the process of civil and criminal litigation, this course defines and explains basic principles of discovery and pretrial procedures, as well as many other legal aspects. Preparation of summary judgments is included. Prerequisite: PL100. PL102 Probate Administration (5) The basic legal concepts of wills, trusts and intestacy will be studied. The organization and jurisdiction of the Probate Court will be included, as well as applicable writing assignments. Prerequisite: PL100. PL106 Domestic Relations (4) Students will study many laws relating to family law including marriage, divorce, annulment, adoption, guardianship and custody and support. Applicable writing assignments will be included. Prerequisite: PL100. PL107 Real Estate (4) The basic concepts of real estate property laws will be studied. Completion of applicable documents will be included. Prerequisite: PL100. PL108 Juvenile Law (5) The basic legal concepts of juvenile law, including paternity, abuse/neglect/dependency of children and delinquency will be studied. Prerequisite: PL100. PL201 Legal Research and Writing (5) The students should learn the basics of legal research projects, including use of library resources. Corequisite: PL100.


COURSES PL202 Criminal Law (3) Students will study the basics of criminal law from both a prosecution and defense viewpoint. The course will follow the steps of criminal litigation from arraignment to post-conviction relief. Emphasis will be placed on the paralegalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s role in motion drafting and pre-trial investigation. Prerequisite: PL100. PL203 Automated Research (2) Students will receive training in computerized database research. Prerequisites: PL100 and PL201.

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PSYCHOLOGY PY177 Introduction to Psychology (3) Introduction to Pyschology is designed to introduce the concepts required for the study of social perceptions, conditioning, learning, intelligence, motivations, emotions, and personality. The primary focus of the course will be an examination of human behaviors that are effectively valuable for work and professional environments and contribute positively to personal well being. Students will also examine the history, methods, and theories of psychology as a behavioral science and the interaction of heredity and environment. No Prerequisite.

PHILOSOPHY PH310 Ethics (3) This course is designed to introduce students to the study of ethics and moral philosophy. The course will explore the moral impact of acts not only on the individual but also on the community as a whole. Emphasis will be placed on developing individual critical thought. Prerequisite: EN200.

POLITICAL SCIENCE PS274 The American Political Scene (3) This course is designed to inform students about government and politics in America: how the system works, its history and its strengths and weaknesses. It attempts to integrate the traditional with the modern approach so that students can understand the interconnection between political thought/the formal structure of politics on one hand and the policymaking process/ political behavior on the other. Prerequisite: EN070.

POPULAR CULTURE PO300 Women Who Rock (3) A survey of women in rock music from the 1960s to the 21st century will focus on their musical prowess and styles in relation to their artistic philosophies as well as the contributions they have made to the rock music genre. Prerequisite: EN200. PO320 The Beatles (3) This course will examine the story of the Beatles, including their lives, music, and times in which they produced their music, the 1960s. We will explore their most famous songs and albums, learning the stories behind the songs and the influences the Beatles had on music and society. Prerequisite: EN200.

PY270 Social Psychology (3) The study of how individuals think, feel, and behave in regard to other people. Topics may include the social self, perceiving others, stereotypes and prejudice, attitudes, conformity, group processes, attraction, helping others, aggression, law, business, and health. Prerequisite: PY177 or SO186. PY276 Life Span Development (3) This course will study normal patterns of cognitive, physical, emotional, and psycho-social growth and development from infancy through end of life. Prerequisites: EN070 and PY177 or SO186. PY375 Abnormal Psychology (3) This course provides a broad overview of the world of abnormal behavior. Students will discover the history, causes, and types of abnormal behavior. A variety of treatment options will also be discussed. Prerequisite: EN200. PY376 Child and Adolescent Psychology (3) This course will give the students a broad introduction into the cognitive, psychosocial, and physical development of children. Students will be exposed to the various widely recognized stages of child development, including infancy, early childhood, middle childhood and adolescence. Prerequisite: EN200.

RELIGION RE270 Religions of the World (3) This course is a survey of the major world religions, examining their beliefs and values. Current issues in religion will also be discussed. Prerequisite: EN180.

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SPANISH

SC200 Principles of Ecology (3) This course serves as an introduction to the biological and ecological aspects of environmental science. Students will evaluate processes that affect natural environments and will examine the structure and dynamics of populations, communities, and ecosystems while maintaining a focus on sustainability. No Prerequisite.

SP259 Conversational Spanish (3) Language emphasis will be on learning practical and functional Spanish that can be used in everyday situations. This course is designed for students who have no, or very little, understanding of the Spanish language. No Prerequisite.

SC301 Planet Earth: A Survey of Zoology, Taxonomy, and Community Ecology (3) Students will be introduced to the diversity of life on our planet. Analysis of the past, present, and future conditions of the environment will be performed. Underlying themes include community ecology, conservation genetics, and environmental sustainability. Prerequisite: EN200. SC320 Biology (3) This course will introduce students to basic principles of molecular and cell biology, genetics, and evolution and discuss current biological and environmental issues. Prerequisite: Junior Standing. SC330 Introduction to Physics (3) Basic principles of Newtonian mechanics will be studied. Topics include Newtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Laws, friction, conservation laws, and linear and rotational motion. Laboratory experiments will be used to bolster understanding. Prerequisite: MH190 or MH310.

SOCIOLOGY SO186 Sociology (3) An introductory approach to the field of sociology, topics include a study of the individualâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s behavior in diverse social groups, ranging from family to bureaucracies, social stratification, group personality and social change. No Prerequisite. SO380 Death and Dying (3) This course will introduce the student to the phenomenon of death and dying. The student will be exposed to theories of death and dying as well as the needs of the terminally ill. The many cultural views of death and dying will also be explored. Prerequisite: EN200.

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SPORT MARKETING & MANAGEMENT SM130 Principles of Sport Management (5) This course presents a study of the sport arena: budget and finance development, application, and adherence; facility operations, building codes and requirements for both indoor and outdoor sport pursuits; and review of the personnel hiring process, staffing requirements, staff development procedures and legal aspects of human resource management. This course also offers a study of media relations, customer service programming and the use of technology in the sport industry. No Prerequisite. SM150 Sport in Society (3) This course examines some of the major issues and controversies of sport in society. From psychological, sociological and philosophical perspectives, the factors that often influence the behavior of sport participants will be studied. Developing an appreciation of the ways sport in society contributes to analyzing and understanding human behavior in sports contexts forms the foundation for the course. Course material also details some current problems in sports and how these problems may affect those involved in sports. Prerequisite: SM130. SM170 Managing Fitness Concepts (3) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the concept of fitness. In addition to fitness, the roles that physical activity, body composition, nutrition, and stress play in personal wellness development are examined. Prerequisite: SM130. SM190 Sport Marketing I (5) This course focuses on applying the basic foundations, theories and concepts of marketing to the sport industry. Topics will include marketing management in sport, consumer behavior, research, market segmentation, and sport product. Prerequisite: SM130.


COURSES SM200 Sport Marketing II (5) This course is the second course in the sport marketing course requirement. In this course, the marketing mix will be more fully explored. Topics include pricing strategies, promotion, licensing, distribution, public relations and marketing mix coordination in the sport industry. Prerequisite: SM190.

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TRAVEL & HOTEL MANAGEMENT TR122 Introduction to the Travel Industry (3) An overview of the travel and tourism industry will be given. Included in the course will be discussion of hotels, cars, motorcoach and rail travel, as well as domestic and international air. Opportunities for employment in travel and related fields will also be discussed. No Prerequisite.

SM230 Facility and Event Management (3) This course is designed to give students a comprehensive overview of designing, planning and managing sport venues. Students will be asked to show competency in directing and planning, both sport facilities and events. This course will also address issues pertaining to customer service, marketing, ticket sales, risk management and crowd control. Prerequisite: SM130.

TR124 Cruises & Tours (3) This course examines the cruise line and tour industry. A wide variety of topics are covered including how the cruise line and tour industry operated, domestic and international experiences, presenting packages to clients and what the clients can expect on their trip. Prerequisite: TR122.

SM240 History of Sport in the United States (3) This course is designed to look at the development and modernization of sport, recreation and athletics in the United States. Focus will revolve around the economic, political and social impact that sport has had on the development of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s framework. Prerequisite: SM130 and EN200.

TR125 Computerized Reservations (3) This course is an introduction to computerized reservation systems, using both GDS and Internet options. Hands-on demonstrations with GDS software and Internet-based web sites allow students to learn how to make airline, hotel, cruise, tour, and car rental reservations. Students are trained in search techniques to find the lowest fares for specific travel requirements. No Prerequisite.

SM250 Sport Law (5) Sport Law is designed to give students an overview of the legal system related to the sport industry including topics such as tort law, risk management, contract, agency, employment, and constitutional law, gender equity, and intellectual property. A variety of sportrelated cases and examples will be explored. Prerequisite: SM130.

TR130 Travel Destinations I (5) This course covers destination geography and tourism for North and South America. Included are cities, major tourist attractions, and physical characteristics of landmarks that would attract travelers to those areas. No Prerequisite.

SM289 Sport Internship I (1) Students will complete this one-hour course prior to beginning their sport internship in SM290. In this course, students will: 1) complete the work necessary to locate an internship site, 2) learn the expectations of the University as well as the supervising facility or organization, and 3) complete the paperwork required for the internship. Prerequisite: SM130. SM290 Sport Internship II (3) This course is designed to allow students to gain professional experience through an internship in sport industry. Positions in professional sports, intercollegiate sports, health and fitness clubs, arenas and stadia, sport marketing and management firms, and other sport entities can be used to fulfill this requirement. The internship is directed and evaluated by a faculty member with supervision of an on-site professional. Prerequisite: SM289.

TR131 Travel Destinations II (5) This course covers destination geography and tourism for Europe, Asia, North Africa, and Australia. Included are cities, major tourist attractions, and physical characteristics of landmarks that would attract travelers to those areas. No Prerequisite. TR211 Hotel & Motel Operations (3) Students are provided with a basic understanding of hotel and motel operations. Topics studied will be trends and techniques in the industry, front office operations, guest relations, rooming procedures, handling of cash and auditing procedures. Students will also examine the variety of careers available in the hotel and hospitality industry. Hotel, motel, and resort operations are covered. (A hotel â&#x20AC;&#x153;site inspectionâ&#x20AC;? is required.) Prerequisite: TR122. 153


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TR216 Hospitality Supervision (5) This is a practical course designed to teach students how to be supervisors in a hospitality setting. Skills for handling the transition from worker to a management level are covered, such as how to counsel subordinates, delegate the workload, build a productive team, and document work performance. Handling problem employees and termination procedures are two of the more difficult areas for new supervisors. The course gives students who will be new supervisors those skills necessary for success in their first management role. No Prerequisite. TR217 Event Planning (5) This course allows students to explore the careers of planning meetings and events, with employment opportunities in conference centers, hotels, convention centers, larger corporations, and meeting planning companies. Fundraisers, corporate events, expositions (trade shows), conventions, parties, incentive trips, sporting events, catering, and conferences will be examined. Students will learn how to work with destination management companies, service contractors, convention and visitors bureaus, and caterers to provide quality meetings and events. A field trip to Veteransâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Memorial Civic & Convention Center and the University Event Center are required. No Prerequisite. TR218 Hospitality & Travel Marketing (5) An introduction to marketing and sales in the hospitality and tourism industries. Students will learn how to develop a marketing plan, covering market research, selecting target markets, positioning the product, and creating and implementing marketing strategies. Sales will be introduced as a vital process in marketing hospitality, with distribution channels, advertising, sales promotion, and public relations as integral components. No Prerequisite. TR219 Hospitality & Travel Sales (3) Students explore the hotel and travel agency as a workplace and learn sales techniques, such as qualifying, features/benefits, answering objections, closing, and follow up. Sales promotion, public relations, and customer service are also addressed. (Required observation at a hotel.) Prerequisite: TR218.

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TR220 Restaurant Management (5) This course is designed to give current and future restaurant managers the tools needed to successfully run the business side of restaurant operations. Although many issues in culinary arts are addressed, the main emphasis is operational effectiveness for the restaurant management team. No Prerequisite.

UNIVERSITY SURVEY COURSES UN100 First Year Experience (1) Students receive information on the grading system, note taking, study habits, methods of reading textbooks, methods of test taking and other related areas of college learning. This course is required for all students. No Prerequisite. UN101 Chess (1) An introduction to the game of chess. Students will learn the rules, strategies, and tactics of the game, while also improving critical thinking skills. No prior chess experience is necessary. No Prerequisite. UN102 Introduction to Hatha Yoga (1) The Introduction to Hatha Yoga class is specifically designed for those with little or no yoga experience. Students will learn the basic principles and techniques of Yoga, a 4,000 year old ancient art and science of creating a healthy mind and body. During this tenweek session, the fundamentals, the Yoga Asanas (the physical postures), Pranayama (breathing practices), Yoga Nidra (Yogic Sleep), and basic meditation are also introduced. Learn how to use yoga practice to enhance the quality of life, reduce stress, and improve focus and concentration while increasing physical strength and flexibility. Create a harmonious unity in the body, mind, and spirit with yoga. No Prerequisite. UN105 Orientation for the College of Business (1) Students participating in orientation will receive information and training in the use of the online scheduling system, applying for financial aid, housing/safety services, career services, and academic resources. No Prerequisite. UN150 21st Century Thinking (3) This course will focus on the fundamental concepts related to critical thinking and reasoning in order to prepare students to think critically in future classes, within their jobs and within their daily lives. Learning the fundamental skills will help students better evaluate any topic and will present a solid foundation for becoming better thinkers. No Prerequisite. UN154 Prior Learning Assessment (1) In this class, documentation will be prepared for a complete and thorough portfolio that will be presented for credit for experiential learning. Prerequisites: Students must have completed at least six credit hours of college-level work to apply for this course.


COURSES UN202 Intermediate Yoga (1) Intermediate Yoga is designed for those that have completed the Introduction to Yoga class. The basic principles and techniques of yoga taught in the introduction class will be expanded upon. The pace of the vinyasa flow of the asanas (postures) will move faster and more advanced poses will be introduced, along with continued teachings of pranayama (breathing practices), yoga nidre (the yogic sleep) and meditation. The chakras (energy centers) will be studied, with a three-page research paper on the chakras being due on the final class. Learn how yoga vinyasa flow will increase your physical strength and flexibility, plus tone your body while reducing stress, improving focus and concentration, and creating a feeling of peace and well being. Prerequisite: UN102. UN205 U.S. Travel (2) Through course lectures, secondary research, and travel experience, students are introduced to cultures, landmarks, entertainment, and geographic features of an urban environment. Possible travel destinations include Washington D.C., New York City, and Chicago. (**Please note: Other destinations must be approved by administration.) Prerequisite: EN180 and Good Academic Standing. (2.0 or better) UN210 International Travel (3) Students will be able to study the culture(s) of other countries through a short trip between the fall or spring breaks. Prerequisite: EN180 and Good Academic Standing. (2.0 or better) UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues (3) Students will explore topics related to diversity in the United States today, such as race, class, religion, sex, and gender, to learn how to better relate to a diverse society. No Prerequisite. UN292 Portfolio Capstone (1) This course is designed for students who are in the final quarter of their associate degree program. It will provide students with the opportunity to prepare a comprehensive portfolio. In this course students will gather documentation and participate in activities to show their ability to demonstrate the University of Northwestern Ohio Goals for Institutional Effectiveness and Student Success. Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing.

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UN305 U.S. Travel (2) Through course lectures, secondary research, and travel experience, students are introduced to cultures, landmarks, entertainment, and geographic features of an urban environment. Possible travel destinations include Washington D.C., New York City, and Chicago. Additional coursework is required beyond UN205. (**Please note: Other destinations must be approved by administration.) Prerequisite: EN180 and Good Academic Standing. (2.0 or better) UN310 International Travel (3) Students will be able to study the culture(s) of other countries through a short trip between the fall or spring breaks. Additional coursework is required beyond UN210. Prerequisite: EN180 and Good Academic Standing. (2.0 or better) UN320 Multicultural Perspectives (3) In this course students experience customs, food, history and literature of several cultures. The subject matter will vary. The course is often team taught. Prerequisite: EN200. UN354 Orientation and Experiential Learning for Accelerated Programs (1) This course provides students with an orientation to their accelerated program and presents the structural methods, concepts, and information to create a portfolio that documents their experiential learning. Only students who have had a minimum of two years of professional experience related to their major are eligible to take this course. This course can be taken only in the first quarter of an accelerated program. Students who start the accelerated program after this course is offered will be required to take UN490 Portfolio Capstone (1 credit hour) at the end of their program or a general education elective course (3 credit hours) at some point during their program in an online format. It must be assumed the replacement course will not be available in an accelerated format. No Prerequisite. UN415 Practicum (Prior Learning Assessment) (1) This course provides students with structural methods, concepts and information to create a portfolio that documents their experiential learning. Only students who have had a minimum of two years of professional experience related to their major are eligible to take this course. (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory) Prerequisite: Advanced Standing.

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UN416 Practicum (Experiential Learning Portfolio) (5) This course allows students to gain university credit for major-related work experience and learning. During this course students will create a portfolio that documents job/work experience that they have had relating to their major. Documentation will center around one topic or a variety of major-related topics. Only students who have had a minimum of two years of professional experience related to their major are eligible to take this course. Prerequisite: UN415. UN490 Portfolio Capstone (1) This course is designed for students who are in the final quarter of the baccalaureate degree program. It will provide students with the opportunity to prepare a comprehensive portfolio. In this course students will gather documentation and participate in activities to show their ability to demonstrate the University of Northwestern Ohio Goals for Institutional Effectiveness and Student Success. Prerequisite: Senior Standing.

WOMEN’S STUDIES WS310 Women and Psychology (3) This course is designed to provide students with an overview of women’s psychology, social issues affecting women, and an opportunity to consider the historical roots of persisting United States social issues, particularly sexism, racism, homophobia, and classism. Special attention will be given to how these social issues play out in the work place and to the changing role of business leaders. Prerequisites: EN200. WS315 Women and Technology (3) This course is designed to provide students with an overview of women’s issues regarding technologies, including reproductive and computer technologies. This course will also introduce students to the concept of gendered technologies and provide an opportunity to consider the historical roots of persisting United States social issues, particularly sexism, sex role expectations, divisions of labor, racism, homophobia, and classism. Special attention will be given to how social expectations about technology play out in the work place, to the changing organizational characteristics of businesses, and to the changing role of business leaders. Prerequisites: EN200.

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WORD PROCESSING WP138 Introduction to Word Processing Applications (3) This is an introductory course in the use of Microsoft Word. Students will also be introduced to file management concepts. The functions will include creating, editing and formatting documents, tables, and labels. (This course provides preparation for Microsoft Application Certification Testing.) Students taking this course via Virtual College must have access to a computer with appropriate software installed. No Prerequisite. WP267 Advanced Word Processing Applications (3) This course examines the application of automated formatting and layout functions available on word processing software systems. A wide variety of documents will be generated and formatted according to business reports, correspondence and routine publications. (This course provides preparation for Microsoft Application Certification Testing.) Students taking this course via Virtual College must have access to a computer with appropriate software installed. Prerequisites: WP138. WP273 Advanced Document Processing Concepts (5) This course utilizes a lab environment in which a collection of short-, medium- and long-range projects will be completed. A variety of software will be applied to complete the projects, including word processing software and its desktop publishing features, graphic presentations software and Internet browser software. Students taking this course via Virtual College must have access to a computer with appropriate software installed. Prerequisite: WP267.


ASSOCIATE DEGREE IN APPLIED SCIENCE

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ASSOCIATE DEGREE IN APPLIED SCIENCE

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN OHIO COLLEGE OF APPLIED TECHNOLOGIES Mission Statement Engaging dedication and commitment, the College of Applied Technologies focuses on serving the needs of people in high technologically advanced fields by assuring quality education. ASSOCIATE DEGREES IN APPLIED SCIENCE

DIPLOMAS

Automotive Technology Automotive/High Performance Technology Diesel Technology Automotive/Diesel Technology High Performance Technology Agricultural Equipment Technology Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology

Automotive Technician Automotive/High Performance Technician Diesel Technician Automotive/Diesel Technician High Performance Technician Agricultural Equipment Technician Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Technician Alternate Fuels Technician - Automotive Alternate Fuels Technician - Diesel

For information on the Baccalaureate Degree in Business Administration/Automotive Management, please see the College of Business section. For information on the Baccalaureate Degree in Specialized Studies, please see the College of Occupational Professions section. The College of Applied Technologies offers associate degrees and diploma programs in the Automotive; Diesel; Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration; High Performance; Alternate Fuels; and Agricultural Equipment fields. These programs take from 54 weeks to 2 years to complete. Classes are held Monday through Thursday in the morning, afternoon and evening. Under special circumstances, early-morning classes are offered from 12:00 a.m. to 6:30 a.m. Enrollment in the technical courses of the College of Applied Technologies is limited to 20 students. Graduates of the College of Applied Technologies programs are trained to perform entry-level skills in their field(s) of endeavor as well as to enter management programs because of the associate degree courses in general education. The National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) has evaluated the instruction, course of study, instructor credentials, facilities and equipment of the University of Northwestern Ohioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Automotive and Medium/Heavy-Duty Truck programs and determined that they meet or exceed the high standards set by the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence. Both of these programs are Master Accredited by ASE/NATEF. Additionally, NATEF has accredited the College of Applied Technologiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Alternate Fuels programs and the academic courses which meet or exceed these same standards. Since most employers view the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certification program as a standard requirement of employment, University of Northwestern Ohio students enrolled in the Automotive and Diesel Truck programs are required to take two ASE examinations before graduating. The University also recognizes the Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration (HVAC/R) programs industry guidelines for the requirements to take two of the three ICE (Industry Competency Exams) exams for the ARI-PAHRA accrediting body. The University is one of the six founding members of the National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC). Alternate fuels is becoming a large component in the transportation industry; therefore, the University not only offers the alternate fuels program but students can also get NAFTC certified in propane, natural gas, and cylinder inspection. This will allow students to be more marketable when looking for employment. 158


ASSOCIATE DEGREE IN APPLIED SCIENCE

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN OHIO COLLEGE OF APPLIED TECHNOLOGIES In addition, since the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) also requires technicians under Sections 608 and 609 of the Clean Air Act to be certified to perform any air conditioning service or repair, the University offers students the opportunity to certify through the Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS), voluntary testing through Video General Inc. (V.G.I.) and RSES, “Refrigeration Service Engineers Society.” The University of Northwestern Ohio also provides optional testing for students to become certified under Federal requirement 49CFR 396.25 (D)(3)(1), qualifying them to perform “in service” adjustments on air-operated cam brakes on commercial vehicles for students in the Diesel program. The growth of the College of Applied Technologies over the years has resulted in the expansion into eight modern buildings which contain more than 200,000 square feet of classroom and shop space, along with student and faculty lounges to accommodate the increasing enrollments in the programs.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES The University of Northwestern Ohio graduates will enter into a growing job market. According to industry sources, the job market for graduates of both the degree or diploma programs is expected to increase steadily to the year 2018 and beyond (see chart below*).

Occupational Field Automotive Agricultural Equipment Diesel Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning & Refrigeration

Job Openings Due to Growth & Replacement by Year 2018

Currently in Field

Growth Potential Percentage

949,000 190,000 263,000

4% 8% 6%

229,000 51,000 75,000

308,000

28%

136,000

*The statistics are based upon U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics 2008-2018 Employment Projections. In addition, the high performance industry offers an extensive variety of career opportunities. This multi-billion dollar industry offers careers in performance engine building and testing, chassis building and modification, vinyl graphic design and application, and the production and installation of aftermarket accessories. Opportunities also exist for graduates to work with the teams and organizations involved in competing in professional motorsports under the following sanctioning bodies: Automobile Race Club of America (ARCA), United States Auto Club (USAC), INDYCAR, National Hot Rod Association (NHRA), International Hot Rod Association (IHRA), and National Association of Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR). The University of Northwestern Ohio offers state-of-the-art programs to educate students to handle advanced professional technology within the industry. Experienced instructors develop and teach a curriculum designed to prepare students for success. Knowledge-based and performance-based courses are carefully integrated to provide a well-balanced education.

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UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN OHIO COLLEGE OF APPLIED TECHNOLOGIES NATIONAL ALTERNATIVE FUELS TRAINING CONSORTIUM The University of Northwestern Ohio is an Executive National Training Center (ENTC) for the National Alternate Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC). The NAFTC is a national organization that is devoted to training post-secondary students, fleet managers, transit managers, and academic institution trainers. Also, NAFTC performs public outreach regarding the alternate fuels industry and technology. The University of Northwestern Ohio is one of 21 ENTCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in the country and the only ENTC in the state of Ohio. In cooperation with NAFTC, the University has trained hundreds of students in alternate fuels to date. NAFTC is recognized by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) and has trained organizations such as the US Postal Service, NASA, UPS, GSA Services, National Park Service, Ford Motor Company, General Motors Company, Honda Motor Company, and many others. The NAFTC is the leading alternate fuels vehicle (AFV) training organization in the United States. The University has seen a direct need for alternate fuels training, and our commitment is reflected by our accomplishments in alternate fuels. The University is National Automotive Technician Education Foundation (NATEF) accredited in Alternate Fuels and Master NATEF accredited in Automotive and Medium Heavy Duty Trucks. Our Alternate Fuels instructors are ASE certified in Automotive and F1 certified in Alternate Fuels. Alternate fuels training at the University covers electric technology, hybrid electric, compressed natural gas (LPG), bio-diesel, ethanol, methanol, propane, and hydrogen fuel cell technology. Technology changes in alternate fuels daily. The country must rely less on foreign oil, so the government is supportive of this theory and is taking proactive steps to pass legislation with regard to alternate forms of clean energy. We are very serious about our alternate fuels training and invite you to come and train with the best at the University of Northwestern Ohio.

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E A I NP A E DS S CE A S S O CA ISAS TO EC I A D TEEG DREEGER E IN P PLPI LEI D C CI IEENN C The Associate Degree programs are designed for students who have the desire and ability to obtain both the technical and management education needed to become an entry-level technician or manager. This training will provide graduates with the necessary education to move into such positions as service manager, parts manager or business owner.

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY

Length: 84 Weeks

Students in this program will prepare for entry-level positions in the automotive industry by acquiring both the technical and management education currently applicable to the industry. They will also take a core of general education courses to augment their technical education. MISSION STATEMENT: The Automotive Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission is to provide our students with technical training according to the standards set by N.A.T.E.F. to enable our students to be a viable commodity in the automotive field. Technical Requirements Instructional Hours AU116 Manual Drive Trains & Axles 120 AU117 Automatic Transmissions/Transaxle 120 AU118 Transportation Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning 120 AU122 Automotive Engine Diagnosis & Repair 120 AU123 Electrical & Electronics I 120 AU126 Suspension & Steering 120 AU127 Hydraulic Brake Systems 120 AU128 Electrical & Electronics II 120 AU130 Automotive Engine Performance 120 AU132 Computerized Engine Control Systems 120 Total Technical Hours 1200

Credit Hours 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 60

Related Requirements AM128 Customer Relations Automated Management DP152 Applications of Word and Excel Total Related Hours

Instructional Hours 48 36 84

Credit Hours 3 3 6

General Education Requirements CO179 Introduction to Human Communication PS274 The American Political Scene EN180 Composition I SC112 Physical Science EN200 Composition II MH170 Technical Math PY177 Psychology UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues UN100 First Year Experience UN292 Portfolio Capstone Total General Hours TOTAL HOURS FOR GRADUATION

Instructional Hours 24 24 48 48 48 48 24 24 12 12 312 1596

Credit Hours 3 3 5 5 5 5 3 3 1 1 34 100

*EN070 Basic English 48 3 *MH065 Review Math 48 3 *If the placement test is passed with a score of 70% or higher, course will not be required to graduate. Recommended Optional Courses CDL101 Commercial Driver License I CDL102 Commercial Driver License II HP130 High Performance Engine Machining

Instructional Hours 120 120 120

Credit Hours 6 6 6 161


AS TE E ER E I NE AI PNP A L IPE PD LSI CE I D E NSCCEI E N C E A S SS OOCCI AI A T ED EDG ER G

DIESEL TECHNOLOGY

Length: 90 Weeks

Students in this program will prepare for entry-level positions in the diesel industry by acquiring both the technical and management education currently applicable to the industry. They will also take a core of general education courses to augment their technical education. MISSION STATEMENT: The Diesel Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission is to provide a quality education from its diverse courses, developing students into a knowledgeable and productive work force. Technical Requirements Instructional Hours AU118 Transportation Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning 120 AU123 Electrical & Electronics I 120 AU126 Suspension & Steering 120 AU127 Hydraulic Brake Systems 120 DT119 Theory & Techniques in Welding 120 DT124 Diesel Engine Diagnosis & Repair 120 DT126 Diesel Performance & Diagnosis 120 DT128 Heavy Equipment & Vehicle Integrated Electronics 120 DT130 Truck Air Systems, Brakes & Preventive Maintenance 120 DT131 Truck Drive Trains 120 120 DT135 Diesel Engine Electronic Controls Total Technical Hours 1320

Credit Hours 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 66

Related Requirements AM128 Customer Relations Automated Management DP152 Applications of Word and Excel Total Related Hours

Instructional Hours 48 36 84

Credit Hours 3 3 6

General Education Requirements CO179 Introduction to Human Communication PS274 The American Political Scene EN180 Composition I SC112 Physical Science EN200 Composition II MH170 Technical Math PY177 Psychology UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues UN100 First Year Experience UN292 Portfolio Capstone Total General Hours TOTAL HOURS FOR GRADUATION

Instructional Hours 24 24 48 48 48 48 24 24 12 12 312 1716

Credit Hours 3 3 5 5 5 5 3 3 1 1 34 106

*EN070 Basic English 48 3 *MH065 Review Math 48 3 *If the placement test is passed with a score of 70% or higher, course will not be required to graduate. Recommended Optional Courses CDL101 Commercial Driver License I CDL102 Commercial Driver License II HP130 High Performance Engine Machining

162

Instructional Hours 120 120 120

Credit Hours 6 6 6


E IANP APPLPI LEI D E DS SCCI IEENN C CE A S S O CA ISAS TO EC I A D TEEGDREEGER EI N

AUTOMOTIVE/DIESEL TECHNOLOGY

Length: 120 Weeks

Students in this program will prepare for entry-level positions in the automotive/diesel industry by acquiring both the technical and management skills currently applicable to the industry. They will also take a core of general education courses to augment their technical education. MISSION STATEMENT: The Automotive Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission is to provide our students with technical training according to the standards set by N.A.T.E.F. to enable our students to be a viable commodity in the automotive field. The Diesel Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission is to provide a quality education from its diverse courses, developing students into a knowledgeable and productive work force. Technical Requirements Instructional Hours AU116 Manual Drive Trains & Axles 120 AU117 Automatic Transmissions/Transaxle 120 AU118 Transportation Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning 120 AU122 Automotive Engine Diagnosis & Repair 120 AU123 Electrical & Electronics I 120 AU126 Suspension & Steering 120 AU127 Hydraulic Brake Systems 120 AU128 Electrical & Electronics II 120 or DT128 Heavy Equipment & Vehicle Integrated Electronics 120 AU130 Automotive Engine Performance 120 AU132 Computerized Engine Control Systems 120 DT119 Theory & Techniques in Welding 120 DT124 Diesel Engine Diagnosis & Repair 120 DT126 Diesel Performance & Diagnosis 120 DT130 Truck Air Systems, Brakes & Preventive Maintenance 120 DT131 Truck Drive Trains 120 DT135 Diesel Engine Electronic Controls 120 Total Technical Hours 1920 Related Requirements Instructional Hours AM128 Customer Relations Automated Management 48 DP152 Applications of Word and Excel 36 Total Related Hours 84 General Education Requirements Instructional Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication 24 PS274 The American Political Scene 24 EN180 Composition I 48 SC112 Physical Science 48 EN200 Composition II 48 MH170 Technical Math 48 PY177 Psychology 24 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues 24 UN100 First Year Experience 12 UN292 Portfolio Capstone 12 Total General Hours 312 TOTAL HOURS FOR GRADUATION 2316

Credit Hours 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 96 Credit Hours 3 3 6 Credit Hours 3 3 5 5 5 5 3 3 1 1 34 136

*EN070 Basic English 48 3 *MH065 Review Math 48 3 *If the placement test is passed with a score of 70% or higher, course will not be required to graduate. Recommended Optional Courses Instructional Hours Credit Hours CDL101 Commercial Driver License I 120 6 CDL102 Commercial Driver License II 120 6 HP130 High Performance Engine Machining 120 6

163


A T ET E D ED GE RE D LSI CEI D E NSCCE I E N C E A SS SSOOCCI AI A G ER IENE A IPNP LA I PE P

AUTOMOTIVE / HIGH PERFORMANCE TECHNOLOGY

Length: 132 Weeks

Students in this program will prepare for entry-level positions in the high performance industry by acquiring both the technical and management skills currently applicable to the industry. They will also take a core of general education courses to augment their technical education. MISSION STATEMENT: The Automotive Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mission is to provide our students with technical training according to the standards set by N.A.T.E.F. to enable our students to be a viable commodity in the automotive field. The High Performance Divisionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission is to provide our students with the competitive edge necessary to ensure their success by educating them in the most current technology and procedures being utilized in the high performance industry. Technical Requirements Instructional Hours AU116 Manual Drive Trains & Axles 120 AU117 Automatic Transmissions/Transaxle 120 AU118 Transportation Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning 120 AU122 Automotive Engine Diagnosis & Repair 120 AU123 Electrical & Electronics I 120 AU126 Suspension & Steering 120 AU127 Hydraulic Brake Systems 120 AU128 Electrical & Electronics II 120 AU130 Automotive Engine Performance 120 AU132 Computerized Engine Control Systems 120 HP101 High Performance Suspension & Steering 120 HP102 High Performance Drive Lines 120 HP105 High Performance Accessory Trends 120 HP130 High Performance Engine Machining 120 HP200 High Performance Fuel/Electronics/Ignition Systems 120 HP201 High Performance Custom Engine Building 120 HP210 High Performance Welding 120 HP215 High Performance Fabrication 120 Total Technical Hours 2160 Related Requirements Instructional Hours AM128 Customer Relations Automated Management 48 DP152 Applications of Word and Excel 36 Total Related Hours 84 General Education Requirements Instructional Hours CO179 Introduction to Human Communication 24 PS274 The American Political Scene 24 EN180 Composition I 48 SC112 Physical Science 48 EN200 Composition II 48 MH170 Technical Math 48 PY177 Psychology 24 UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues 24 UN100 First Year Experience 12 UN292 Portfolio Capstone 12 Total General Hours 312 TOTAL HOURS FOR GRADUATION 2556

Credit Hours 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 108 Credit Hours 3 3 6 Credit Hours 3 3 5 5 5 5 3 3 1 1 34 148

*EN070 Basic English 48 3 *MH065 Review Math 48 3 *If the placement test is passed with a score of 70% or higher, course will not be required to graduate.

164

Recommended Optional Courses CDL101 Commercial Driver License I CDL102 Commercial Driver License II

Instructional Hours 120 120

Credit Hours 6 6


E A I NP A E DS S CE A S S O CA ISAS TO EC I A D TEEG DREEGER E IN P PLPI LEI D C CI IEENN C

HIGH PERFORMANCE TECHNOLOGY

Length: 120 Weeks

Students in this program will prepare for entry-level positions in the high performance industry by acquiring both the technical and management skills currently applicable to the industry. They will also take a core of general education courses to augment their technical education. MISSION STATEMENT: The High Performance Divisionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission is to provide our students with the competitive edge necessary to ensure their success by educating them in the most current technology and procedures being utilized in the high performance industry. Technical Requirements Instructional Hours AU116 Manual Drive Trains & Axles 120 AU117 Automatic Transmissions/Transaxle 120 AU122 Automotive Engine Diagnosis & Repair 120 AU123 Electrical & Electronics I 120 AU126 Suspension & Steering 120 AU127 Hydraulic Brake Systems 120 AU128 Electrical & Electronics II 120 AU130 Automotive Engine Performance 120 HP101 High Performance Suspension & Steering 120 HP102 High Performance Drive Lines 120 HP105 High Performance Accessory Trends 120 HP130 High Performance Engine Machining 120 HP200 High Performance Fuel/Electronics/Ignition Systems 120 HP201 High Performance Custom Engine Building 120 HP210 High Performance Welding 120 HP215 High Performance Fabrication 120 Total Technical Hours 1920

Credit Hours 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 96

Related Requirements AM128 Customer Relations Automated Management DP152 Applications of Word and Excel Total Related Hours

Instructional Hours 48 36 84

Credit Hours 3 3 6

General Education Requirements CO179 Introduction to Human Communication PS274 The American Political Scene EN180 Composition I SC112 Physical Science EN200 Composition II MH170 Technical Math PY177 Psychology UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues UN100 First Year Experience UN292 Portfolio Capstone Total General Hours TOTAL HOURS FOR GRADUATION

Instructional Hours 24 24 48 48 48 48 24 24 12 12 312 2316

Credit Hours 3 3 5 5 5 5 3 3 1 1 34 136

*EN070 Basic English 48 3 *MH065 Review Math 48 3 *If the placement test is passed with a score of 70% or higher, course will not be required to graduate. Recommended Optional Courses AU118 Transportation Air Conditioning & Refrigeration AU132 Computerized Engine Control Systems CDL101 Commercial Driver License I CDL102 Commercial Driver License II

Instructional Hours 120 120 120

Credit Hours 6 6 6

120

6

165


A I AI T D ED GE RE D LS ICEI D E NSCCE I E N C E A SSSSOOC C A ET E GER IEN EA IPNP LAI PE P

AGRICULTURAL EQUIPMENT TECHNOLOGY

Length: 90 Weeks

Students in this program will prepare for entry-level positions in the agricultural equipment industry by acquiring both the technical and management skills currently applicable to the industry. They will also take a core of general education courses to augment their technical education. MISSION STATEMENT: The Agricultural Equipment Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission is to provide quality education on various equipment to serve our students in developing skills for a productive work force as an entry-level agriculture technician. Technical Requirements Instructional Hours AG227 Combines 120 AG228 Tractors 120 AU118 Transportation Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning 120 AU123 Electrical & Electronics I 120 AU128 Electrical & Electronics II 120 or DT128 Heavy Equipment & Vehicle Integrated Electronics 120 DT119 Theory & Techniques in Welding 120 DT124 Diesel Engine Diagnosis & Repair 120 DT126 Diesel Performance & Diagnosis 120 DT131 Truck Drive Trains 120 DT135 Diesel Engine Electronic Controls 120 HY130 Hydraulics 120 Total Technical Hours 1320

Credit Hours 6 6 6 6 6

Related Requirements AM128 Customer Relations Automated Management DP152 Applications of Word and Excel Total Related Hours

Instructional Hours 48 36 84

Credit Hours 3 3 6

General Education Requirements CO179 Introduction to Human Communication PS274 The American Political Scene EN180 Composition I SC112 Physical Science EN200 Composition II MH170 Technical Math PY177 Psychology UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues UN100 First Year Experience UN292 Portfolio Capstone Total General Hours TOTAL HOURS FOR GRADUATION

Instructional Hours 24 24 48 48 48 48 24 24 12 12 312 1716

Credit Hours 3 3 5 5 5 5 3 3 1 1 34 106

6 6 6 6 6 6 6 66

*EN070 Basic English 48 3 *MH065 Review Math 48 3 *If the placement test is passed with a score of 70% or higher, course will not be required to graduate. Recommended Optional Courses CDL101 Commercial Driver License I CDL102 Commercial Driver License II HP130 High Performance Engine Machining

166

Instructional Hours 120 120 120

Credit Hours 6 6 6


E IANP APPLPI LEI D E DS SCCI IEENN C CE A S S O CA ISAS TO EC I A D TEEGDREEGER EI N

HEATING, VENTILATION, AIR CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION TECHNOLOGY

Length: 72 Weeks

Students in this program will prepare for entry-level positions in the heating, ventilation, air conditioning and refrigeration industry by acquiring both the technical and management skills currently applicable to the industry. They will also take a core of general education courses to augment their technical education. MISSION STATEMENT: The HVAC/R Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission is to present the student with the knowledge, technical, and personal skills needed to obtain productive employment in the HVAC/R field, as the first stepping stone of a successful career. Technical Requirements HV101 Service & Procedures I HV102 Service & Procedures II HV103 Refrigeration Systems & Controls HV104 Electrical & Electronics HV201 Air Conditioning Systems and Controls HV202 Heating Systems & Controls HV203 Heating Systems II & Heat Pumps HV204 Special Topics & Applications of Refrigeration and Temperature Controls Total Technical Hours

Instructional Hours 120 120 120 120 120 120 120

Credit Hours 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

120 960

6 48

Related Requirements AM128 Customer Relations Automated Management DP152 Applications of Word and Excel Total Related Hours

Instructional Hours 48 36 84

Credit Hours 3 3 6

General Education Requirements CO179 Introduction to Human Communication PS274 The American Political Scene EN180 Composition I SC112 Physical Science EN200 Composition II MH170 Technical Math PY177 Psychology UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues UN100 First Year Experience UN292 Portfolio Capstone Total General Hours TOTAL HOURS FOR GRADUATION

Instructional Hours 24 24 48 48 48 48 24 24 12 12 312 1356

Credit Hours 3 3 5 5 5 5 3 3 1 1 34 88

*EN070 Basic English 48 3 *MH065 Review Math 48 3 *If the placement test is passed with a score of 70% or higher, course will not be required to graduate. Recommended Optional Courses CDL101 Commercial Driver License I CDL102 Commercial Driver License II

Instructional Hours 120 120

Credit Hours 6 6

167


A SO A TAE D E G R E E I N A P P L I E D S C I E N C E D SI P L COI M The diploma programs are designed to prepare graduates with entry-level skills to gain employment in their career field. Students must maintain a 2.0 accumulative grade point average to graduate.

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN

Length: 66 Weeks

Students in this program will prepare for entry-level positions in the automotive industry by acquiring the technical skills currently applicable to the industry. Technical Requirements Instructional Hours AU116 Manual Drive Trains & Axles 120 AU117 Automatic Transmissions/Transaxle 120 AU118 Transportation Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning 120 AU122 Automotive Engine Diagnosis & Repair 120 AU123 Electrical & Electronics I 120 AU126 Suspension & Steering 120 AU127 Hydraulic Brake Systems 120 AU128 Electrical & Electronics II 120 AU130 Automotive Engine Performance 120 AU132 Computerized Engine Control Systems 120 Total Technical Hours 1200

Credit Hours 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 60

Related Requirements DP152 Applications of Word and Excel

Instructional Hours 36

Credit Hours 3

General Education Requirements CO179 Introduction to Human Communication MH170 Technical Math UN100 First Year Experience UN292 Portfolio Capstone Total General Hours TOTAL HOURS FOR GRADUATION

Instructional Hours 24 48 12 12 96 1332

Credit Hours 3 5 1 1 10 73

*MH065 Review Math 48 3 *If the placement test is passed with a score of 70% or higher, course will not be required to graduate. Recommended Optional Courses CDL101 Commercial Driver License I CDL102 Commercial Driver License II HP130 High Performance Engine Machining

168

Instructional Hours 120 120 120

Credit Hours 6 6 6


ASSOCIATE DEGREE IN APPLIED E D ISPC LI EONMC A

DIESEL TECHNICIAN

Length: 72 Weeks

Students in this program will prepare for entry-level positions in the diesel industry by acquiring the technical skills currently applicable to the industry. Technical Requirements Instructional Hours AU118 Transportation Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning 120 AU123 Electrical & Electronics I 120 AU126 Suspension & Steering 120 AU127 Hydraulic Brake Systems 120 DT119 Theory & Techniques in Welding 120 DT124 Diesel Engine Diagnosis & Repair 120 DT126 Diesel Performance & Diagnosis 120 DT128 Heavy Equipment & Vehicle Integrated Electronics 120 DT130 Truck Air Systems, Brakes & Preventive Maintenance 120 DT131 Truck Drive Trains 120 DT135 Diesel Engine Electronic Controls 120 Total Technical Hours 1320

Credit Hours 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 66

Related Requirements DP152 Applications of Word and Excel

Instructional Hours 36

Credit Hours 3

General Education & Related Requirements CO179 Introduction to Human Communication MH170 Technical Math UN100 First Year Experience UN292 Portfolio Capstone Total General Hours TOTAL HOURS FOR GRADUATION

Instructional Hours 24 48 12 12 96 1452

Credit Hours 3 5 1 1 10 79

*MH065 Review Math 48 3 *If the placement test is passed with a score of 70% or higher, course will not be required to graduate. Recommended Optional Courses CDL101 Commercial Driver License I CDL102 Commercial Driver License II HP130 High Performance Engine Machining

Instructional Hours 120 120 120

Credit Hours 6 6 6

169


A A TAE D E G R E E I N A P P L I E D S C I E N C E D SI S P OL COI M

AUTOMOTIVE/DIESEL TECHNICIAN

Length: 102 Weeks

Students in this program will prepare for entry-level positions in the automotive/diesel industry by acquiring the technical skills currently applicable to the industry. Technical Requirements Instructional Hours AU116 Manual Drive Trains & Axles 120 AU117 Automatic Transmissions/Transaxle 120 AU118 Transportation Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning 120 AU122 Automotive Engine Diagnosis & Repair 120 AU123 Electrical & Electronics I 120 AU126 Suspension & Steering 120 AU127 Hydraulic Brake Systems 120 AU128 Electrical & Electronics II 120 or DT128 Heavy Equipment & Vehicle Integrated Electronics 120 AU130 Automotive Engine Performance 120 AU132 Computerized Engine Control Systems 120 DT119 Theory & Techniques in Welding 120 DT124 Diesel Engine Diagnosis & Repair 120 DT126 Diesel Performance & Diagnosis 120 DT130 Truck Air Systems, Brakes & Preventive Maintenance 120 DT131 Truck Drive Trains 120 DT135 Diesel Engine Electronic Controls 120 Total Technical Hours 1920

Credit Hours 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Related Requirements DP152 Applications of Word and Excel

Instructional Hours 36

Credit Hours 3

General Education Requirements CO179 Introduction to Human Communication MH170 Technical Math UN100 First Year Experience UN292 Portfolio Capstone Total General Hours TOTAL HOURS FOR GRADUATION

Instructional Hours 24 48 12 12 96 2052

Credit Hours 3 5 1 1 10 109

6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 96

*MH065 Review Math 48 3 *If the placement test is passed with a score of 70% or higher, course will not be required to graduate. Recommended Optional Courses CDL101 Commercial Driver License I CDL102 Commercial Driver License II HP130 High Performance Engine Machining

170

Instructional Hours 120 120 120

Credit Hours 6 6 6


A S S O C I A T E D E G R E E I N A P P L I E DD S I EON M CA E I PC L

AUTOMOTIVE / HIGH PERFORMANCE TECHNICIAN

Length: 114 Weeks

Students in this program will prepare for entry-level positions in the high performance industry by acquiring the technical skills currently applicable to the industry. Technical Requirements Instructional Hours AU116 Manual Drive Trains & Axles 120 AU117 Automatic Transmissions/Transaxle 120 AU118 Transportation Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning 120 AU122 Automotive Engine Diagnosis & Repair 120 AU123 Electrical & Electronics I 120 AU126 Suspension & Steering 120 AU127 Hydraulic Brake Systems 120 AU128 Electrical & Electronics II 120 AU130 Automotive Engine Performance 120 AU132 Computerized Engine Control Systems 120 HP101 High Performance Suspension & Steering 120 HP102 High Performance Drive Lines 120 HP105 High Performance Accessory Trends 120 HP130 High Performance Engine Machining 120 HP200 High Performance Fuel/Electronics/Ignition Systems 120 HP201 High Performance Custom Engine Building 120 HP210 High Performance Welding 120 HP215 High Performance Fabrication 120 Total Technical Hours 2160

Credit Hours 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 108

Related Requirements DP152 Applications of Word and Excel

Instructional Hours 36

Credit Hours 3

General Education Requirements CO179 Introduction to Human Communication MH170 Technical Math UN100 First Year Experience UN292 Portfolio Capstone Total General Hours TOTAL HOURS FOR GRADUATION

Instructional Hours 24 48 12 12 96 2292

Credit Hours 3 5 1 1 10 121

*MH065 Review Math 48 3 *If the placement test is passed with a score of 70% or higher, course will not be required to graduate. Recommended Optional Courses CDL101 Commercial Driver License I CDL102 Commercial Driver License II

Instructional Hours 120 120

Credit Hours 6 6

171


AS SO AT D IP LC OIM AE D E G R E E I N A P P L I E D S C I E N C E

HIGH PERFORMANCE TECHNICIAN

Length: 102 Weeks

Students in this program will prepare for entry-level positions in the high performance industry by acquiring the technical skills currently applicable to the industry. Technical Requirements Instructional Hours AU116 Manual Drive Trains & Axles 120 AU117 Automatic Transmissions/Transaxle 120 AU122 Automotive Engine Diagnosis & Repair 120 AU123 Electrical & Electronics I 120 AU126 Suspension & Steering 120 AU127 Hydraulic Brake Systems 120 AU128 Electrical & Electronics II 120 AU130 Automotive Engine Performance 120 HP101 High Performance Suspension & Steering 120 HP102 High Performance Drive Lines 120 HP105 High Performance Accessory Trends 120 HP130 High Performance Engine Machining 120 HP200 High Performance Fuel/Electronics/Ignition Systems 120 HP201 High Performance Custom Engine Building 120 HP210 High Performance Welding 120 HP215 High Performance Fabrication 120 Total Technical Hours 1920

Credit Hours 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 96

Related Requirements DP152 Applications of Word and Excel

Instructional Hours 36

Credit Hours 3

General Education Requirements CO179 Introduction to Human Communication MH170 Technical Math UN100 First Year Experience UN292 Portfolio Capstone Total General Hours TOTAL HOURS FOR GRADUATION

Instructional Hours 24 48 12 12 96 2052

Credit Hours 3 5 1 1 10 109

*MH065 Review Math 48 3 *If the placement test is passed with a score of 70% or higher, course will not be required to graduate. Recommended Optional Courses AU118 Transportation Air Conditioning & Refrigeration AU132 Computerized Engine Control Systems CDL101 Commercial Driver License I CDL102 Commercial Driver License II

172

Instructional Hours 120 120 120 120

Credit Hours 6 6 6 6


ASSOCIATE DEGREE IN APPLIED D ISPC LI EONMC AE

AGRICULTURAL EQUIPMENT TECHNICIAN

Length: 72 Weeks

Students in this program will prepare for entry-level positions in the agricultural industry by acquiring the technical skills currently applicable to the industry. Technical Requirements Instructional Hours AG227 Combines 120 AG228 Tractors 120 AU118 Transportation Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning 120 AU123 Electrical & Electronics I 120 AU128 Electrical & Electronics II 120 or DT128 Heavy Equipment & Vehicle Integrated Electronics 120 DT119 Theory & Techniques in Welding 120 DT124 Diesel Engine Diagnosis & Repair 120 DT126 Diesel Performance & Diagnosis 120 DT131 Truck Drive Trains 120 DT135 Diesel Engine Electronic Controls 120 HY130 Hydraulics 120 Total Technical Hours 1320

Credit Hours 6 6 6 6 6

Related Requirements DP152 Applications of Word and Excel

Instructional Hours 36

Credit Hours 3

General Education Requirements CO179 Introduction to Human Communication MH170 Technical Math UN100 First Year Experience UN292 Portfolio Capstone Total General Hours TOTAL HOURS FOR GRADUATION

Instructional Hours 24 48 12 12 96 1452

Credit Hours 3 5 1 1 10 79

6 6 6 6 6 6 6 66

*MH065 Review Math 48 3 *If the placement test is passed with a score of 70% or higher, course will not be required to graduate. Recommended Optional Courses CDL101 Commercial Driver License I CDL102 Commercial Driver License II HP130 High Performance Engine Machining

Instructional Hours 120 120 120

Credit Hours 6 6 6

173


A A TAE D E G R E E I N A P P L I E D S C I E N C E D SI SP OL COI M

HEATING, VENTILATION, AIR CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION TECHNICIAN

Length: 54 Weeks

Students in this program will prepare for entry-level positions in the heating, ventilation, air conditioning and refrigeration industry by acquiring the technical skills currently applicable to the industry. Technical Requirements HV101 Service & Procedures I HV102 Service & Procedures II HV103 Refrigeration Systems & Controls HV104 Electrical & Electronics HV201 Air Conditioning Systems and Controls HV202 Heating Systems & Controls HV203 Heating Systems II & Heat Pumps HV204 Special Topics & Applications of Refrigeration and Temperature Controls Total Technical Hours

Instructional Hours 120 120 120 120 120 120 120

Credit Hours 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

120 960

6 48

Related Requirements DP152 Applications of Word and Excel

Instructional Hours 36

Credit Hours 3

General Education Requirements CO179 Introduction to Human Communication MH170 Technical Math UN100 First Year Experience UN292 Portfolio Capstone Total General Hours TOTAL HOURS FOR GRADUATION

Instructional Hours 24 48 12 12 96 1092

Credit Hours 3 5 1 1 10 61

*MH065 Review Math 48 3 *If the placement test is passed with a score of 70% or higher, course will not be required to graduate. Recommended Optional Courses CDL101 Commercial Driver License I CDL102 Commercial Driver License II

174

Instructional Hours 120 120

Credit Hours 6 6


A S S O C I A T E D E G R E E I N A P P L I E DD S CL I EON M CE IP A

ALTERNATE FUELS TECHNICIAN Automotive

Length: 78 Weeks

Students in this program will prepare for entry-level positions in the alternate fuels industry by acquiring the technical skills currently applicable to the industry. Students could be certified through the NAFTC (National Alternate Fuels Training Consortium) in the following areas: --Propane Vehicles --Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles --Cylinder Inspection - this certification requires an additional two-day class and a certification test must be completed Technical Requirements Instructional Hours AF101 Alternate Fuels I 120 AF102 Alternate Fuels II 120 AU116 Manual Drive Trains & Axles 120 AU117 Automatic Transmissions/Transaxle 120 AU118 Transportation Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning 120 AU122 Automotive Engine Diagnosis & Repair 120 AU123 Electrical & Electronics I 120 AU126 Suspension & Steering 120 AU127 Hydraulic Brake Systems 120 AU128 Electrical & Electronics II 120 AU130 Automotive Engine Performance 120 120 AU132 Computerized Engine Control Systems Total Technical Hours 1440

Credit Hours 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 72

Related Requirements DP152 Applications of Word and Excel

Instructional Hours 36

Credit Hours 3

General Education Requirements CO179 Introduction to Human Communication MH170 Technical Math UN100 First Year Experience UN292 Portfolio Capstone Total General Hours TOTAL HOURS FOR GRADUATION

Instructional Hours 24 48 12 12 96 1572

Credit Hours 3 5 1 1 10 85

*MH065 Review Math 48 3 *If the placement test is passed with a score of 70% or higher, course will not be required to graduate. Recommended Optional Courses CDL101 Commercial Driver License I CDL102 Commercial Driver License II HP130 High Performance Engine Machining

Instructional Hours 120 120 120

Credit Hours 6 6 6

175


A A TAE D E G R E E I N A P P L I E D S C I E N C E D SI SP OL COI M

ALTERNATE FUELS TECHNICIAN Diesel

Length: 78 Weeks

Students in this program will prepare for entry-level positions in the alternate fuels industry by acquiring the technical skills currently applicable to the industry. Students could be certified through the NAFTC (National Alternate Fuels Training Consortium) in the following areas: --Propane Vehicles --Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles --Cylinder Inspection - this certification requires an additional two-day class and a certification test must be completed Technical Requirements Instructional Hours AF101 Alternate Fuels I 120 AF102 Alternate Fuels II 120 AU118 Transportation Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning 120 AU123 Electrical & Electronics I 120 AU126 Suspension & Steering 120 AU127 Hydraulic Brake Systems 120 AU128 Electrical & Electronics II 120 or DT128 Heavy Equipment & Vehicle Integrated Electronics 120 AU130 Automotive Engine Performance 120 DT124 Diesel Engine Diagnosis & Repair 120 DT130 Truck Air Systems, Brakes, & Preventive Maintenance 120 DT131 Truck Drive Trains 120 DT135 Diesel Engine Electronic Controls 120 Total Technical Hours 1440

Credit Hours 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Related Requirements DP152 Applications of Word and Excel

Instructional Hours 36

Credit Hours 3

General Education Requirements CO179 Introduction to Human Communication MH170 Technical Math UN100 First Year Experience UN292 Portfolio Capstone Total General Hours TOTAL HOURS FOR GRADUATION

Instructional Hours 24 48 12 12 96 1572

Credit Hours 3 5 1 1 10 85

6 6 6 6 6 6 72

*MH065 Review Math 48 3 *If the placement test is passed with a score of 70% or higher, course will not be required to graduate. Recommended Optional Courses CDL101 Commercial Driver License I CDL102 Commercial Driver License II HP130 High Performance Engine Machining

176

Instructional Hours 120 120 120

Credit Hours 6 6 6


COURSES The following pages contain descriptions of the College of Applied Technologies courses offered. The courses are arranged under the various university academic disciplines. The number of credit hours granted for each course is in parentheses. The University reserves the right to withdraw a course from its schedule if the enrollment is not sufficient.

ALTERNATE FUELS AF101 Alternate Fuels I (6) This intensive six-week course incorporates the basic principles of alternative fuels and their positive impact on the environment with state-of-the-art computercontrolled systems. A complete understanding of system maintenance and repair of all components including regulators, converters, lock-offs, mixers and injectors is provided. The course covers all current alternative fuels including methanol, ethanol, compressed natural gas, liquefied natural gas, liquid propane gas, biodiesel, hydrogen, electric, hybrid and flexible fuel vehicles. All safety laws and regulations will be discussed and adhered to. Students are provided lab activities that offer valuable hands-on training needed for future transportation industry maintenance and repair. Prerequisite: AU130. AF102 Alternate Fuels II (6) An in-depth study of propane (LPG) and compressed natural gas (CNG) and an overview study of hybrids and safety. The diagnosis and repair of vehicles, as well as conversion kits and installation procedures will be completely covered. Diagnostic equipment, such as scan tools, engine analyzers and emissions analyzers, will be used. An emission dynamometer will be utilized in this class. Processing bio-diesel and ethanol for testing is also included. Prerequisite: AF101.

AGRICULTURAL EQUIPMENT AG227 Combines (6) The principles, maintenance, electrical, and repair of the complete combine will be studied. Proper adjustments of the cutting, threshing, cleaning, unloading, grain head, corn head and monitoring systems for farm equipment will be covered. Final drives, transmissions, slip clutches and automatic header controls will also be included. An introduction to GPS and Guidance systems will be covered. No Prerequisite.

OF

INSTRUCTION

AG228 Tractors (6) Basic operating principles of components are taught. Maintenance, electrical, and service of the complete tractor will be stressed. Transmission and drive train construction and powerflow will be covered, including powershift transmissions, differential locks, mechanical front drives, and power take offs. Proper repair procedures of the tractor will be taught, including brakes, clutches and accessories. No Prerequisite. HY130 Hydraulics (6) Basic fluid power and the various types of hydraulic pumps, motors and controls, including electro-hydraulic controls, cylinders and hydrostatic drive units are examined. Diagnosis and repair of different types of hydraulic systems and individual components will be covered. Prerequisite: AU123.

AUTOMOTIVE AU116 Manual Drive Trains and Axles (6) Students will examine the basic construction, operating principles, and powerflow of the manual drive train system. They will study diagnosis and overhaul of clutch assemblies, four- and five-speed transmissions and transaxles,four-wheel drive components, front- and rear-wheel drive shafts. Integral and removable ring and pinion replacement and setup will be discussed. Lab projects include disassembly, inspection and reassembly on late-model vehicles and equipment. No Prerequisite. AU117 Automatic Transmissions/Transaxle (6) Principles of hydraulic systems, planetary gear sets, torque converters, electronic control systems and basic transmission components are the basis for this course. Diagnosis, servicing and adjustments of various automatic transmissions and transaxles are covered. Lab work includes disassembly, inspection, reassembly and adjustment on training aids. Lab projects include diagnosis, repair or overhaul of transmissions in latemodel vehicles and demonstration of special tools and techniques. No Prerequisite. AU118 Transportation Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning (6) A study of design characteristics and principles of transportation air conditioning, including basic system operation, heat transfer, component location and compressors is provided. Students should learn the use of refrigerant recovery equipment to lessen the impact of R12 destruction on the environment. Lab work includes assignments to develop the skills and

177


COURSES

OF

INSTRUCTION

knowledge required to perform heating and air conditioning service, diagnosis and repair, and recovery and recycling of R12 & 134A. Basic electrical system principles, use of digital multimeter and automatic climate control diagnosis will be studied. No Prerequisites. AU122 Automotive Engine Diagnosis and Repair (6) The principles of four-stroke engine designs are the foundation for this study. This introduction to automotive engines includes theory, construction and overhaul procedures, including cylinder heads, blocks, bearings, pistons, rods, crankshafts, valve train and gaskets. Proper use of hand tools, precision tools, special engine tools and equipment is demonstrated. Lab work includes application of diagnosis, overhaul and repair procedures on training aids. No Prerequisite. AU123 Electrical and Electronics I (6) This course covers the basic principles of electricity, magnetism and electronics. Basic operation of the complete electrical system is taught, including battery charging, starting, ignition, lighting, and accessory circuits. Through the use of shop manuals and electronic media, heavy emphasis is placed on wiring diagram comprehension. Students study diagnosis, troubleshooting, repair and maintenance of the automotive electrical system. (A digital volt ohm meter and calculator are required for this class.) No Prerequisite. AU126 Suspension and Steering (6) The fundamentals of the chassis, including basic and power steering systems, variable effort power steering systems, suspension systems both basic and computer controlled, geometric centerline alignment, thrust line alignment and total four-wheel alignment provide the focus of this course. Proper procedures in diagnosis of steering and suspension systems for replacing components along with basic frame and body measuring for correct locations are covered. Also covered is the diagnosis of vehicle vibrations and tire pressure monitor systems. Lab work includes steering and suspension repair, tire balancing and alignment on computerized alignment equipment, and computerized wheel balancing, utilizing training aids and live vehicles. No Prerequisite.

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AU127 Hydraulic Brake Systems (6) The fundamental principles of hydraulics pertaining to the automotive and medium duty truck brake systems is presented. Students will study the theory of operation and advanced study of component principles. Students will use standard skills to diagnose and repair hydraulic

systems, drum and disc brake systems, power assist units and anti-lock brake systems. Lab work includes demonstration, on-car practice to provide a working knowledge of diagnosis and repair of the hydraulic systems, drum and disc brake systems, power assist units and associated systems. Included will be coverage of wheel bearings, parking brakes, related electrical circuits and use of on-car brake lathes. No Prerequisite. AU128 Electrical and Electronics II (6) This course will review and build on information taught in the Electrical and Electronics I course. The information covered will include instrumentation, electronic climate controls, cruise control, advanced lighting systems, air bags, multiple types of sensors, vehicle communication, and motorized seatbelts. This material will include automotive and truck electronic applications. The course is an in-depth study of electronic components and how they work in the previously mentioned systems. Also to be covered is the use of digital multimeters, scan equipment, oscilloscopes, and diagnostic charts for computerized management systems. This course will instruct how these devices help in trouble-shooting electrical problems. Prerequisite: AU123. AU130 Automotive Engine Performance (6) Skills in basic engine performance on gasoline fourstroke engines are developed. Diagnosis and repair of these systems and components are stressed: ignition and related electrical circuits, sensors, fuel injection systems, air induction, computer and emission systems. Demonstrations and hands-on work on vehicles will provide a working knowledge of diagnosis using test equipment ranging from timing lights, compression testers, cylinder leakage testers and vacuum gauge to engine analyzers with oscilloscopes and five-gas analyzers. Prerequisites: AU128 or DT128. AU132 Computerized Engine Control Systems (6) The current electronic engine and fuel management systems which are being utilized on todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vehicles are introduced. Included are General Motorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; electronic fuel injection (TBI, PFI, SFI), C3I ignition and direct ignition systems (D.I.S.). Chrysler electronic fuel injection and turbocharger systems are also included. Ford EEC-IV+V and OBDII on Toyota, Nissan, and Honda systems are thoroughly covered. The students should be able to describe system operation, perform on-board computer diagnostic checks and perform repairs in accordance with manufacturersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; procedures. Lab work includes the diagnosis of drivability and engine performance complaints, utilizing modern diagnostic


COURSES computer engine analyzers and scanners on training aids and live vehicles. Prerequisite: AU130.

AUTOMOTIVE MANAGEMENT AM128 Customer Relations Automated Mgt. (3) Students will acquire basic knowledge of the automotive management field, encompassing the use of the microcomputer in parts ordering and handling, inventory control and system pricing. Instruction will include service management, covering such areas as manager, writer and advisor. Students will be exposed to customer relations, evaluation of technicians, including time study proficiency as well as the use of the microcomputer in assisting with management operations. No Prerequisite.

COMMUNICATION CO179 Introduction to Human Communication (3) Students are introduced to theory and skill building in the basic areas of human communication: interpersonal communication, nonverbal communication, small group dynamics, and public communication. No Prerequisite.

DATA PROCESSING DP152 Applications of Word and Excel (3) This course introduces students to the features of Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel and many of their applications. Students will create, format, and edit documents, tables, and mailing labels as well as gain exposure to Windows and file management concepts. Students will also be exposed to a wide variety of fundamental electronic spreadsheet operations and functions through business-related applications. Upon completion of this course, students will be prepared for the Microsoft Application Certification Testing. No Prerequisite.

DIESEL CDL101 Commercial Driver License I (6) In this course students will learn what is required to get a commercial driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license (CDL). They will receive instruction from UNOH instructors who are experienced to teach a commercial driver course. Students will receive class time and driving time in order to help prepare them for the CDL test. Students will also be proficient at pre-trip yard skills. Prerequisites: Department of Transportation (DOT) Physical.

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CDL102 Commercial Driver License II (6) In this course students will continue learning what is required to get a commercial driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license (CDL). They will receive instruction from UNOH instructors who are experienced to teach a commercial driver course. Students will receive class time and driving time in order to help prepare them for the CDL state test. The driving portion will consist of driving safety, starting, stopping, turning, shifting, braking, parking, docking, hook-up and unhook, emergency equipment and driving test practice. Upon successful completion of CDLII and off-site state testing, students will be able to purchase a CDL license. Prerequisites: CDL101, CDL Permit License and Physical. DT119 Theory and Techniques in Welding (6) Students will learn the techniques of welding and cutting of mild steel and aluminum. These materials are commonly used on automotive, truck, trailer, construction and agriculture equipment. Included are oxy acetylene welding, braze welding, Gas Metal Arc Welding (MIG), Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (TIG), Shielded Metal Arc Welding (STICK), Plasma Arc Cutting and flame cutting techniques. Students will perform practice welds in each process. No Prerequisite. DT124 Diesel Engine Diagnosis & Repair (6) This course will cover theory and operation of a 2cycle and 4-cycle diesel engine and their components. Diesel engine systems that will be covered include: overhead adjustments, lube, cooling, fuel, intake and exhaust systems. The engines will be disassembled, measured and assembled to O.E.M. specifications. Engine and components troubleshooting and failure analysis on all engine types and its components will be covered. Engines covered in the course include: Detroit Diesel, Caterpillar, Cummins, Mack, Case, International and Dura-Max (Isusu). This class precedes the D.E.E.C. No Prerequisite. DT126 Diesel Performance and Diagnosis (6) This course includes discussion of the operating principles of a compression ignition engine, operation of both mechanical and electronic fuel injection systems and turbochargers. The students will disassemble, inspect, discuss, assemble and test diesel fuel injection system components such as supply pumps, injection pumps, nozzles, and/or injectors and governors. Testing will include the use of nozzle testers and demonstration of Bacharach injection pump test stand . Students will learn to diagnose, repair and program current electronic-controlled diesel engines used on highway, agricultural, industrial, and other applications. Lab 179


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work will include work on vehicles and/or engines in the live engine lab. No Prerequisite. DT128 Heavy Equipment and Vehicle Integrated Electronics (HEAVIE) (6) This course will review and build on information taught in Electrical and Electronics I. The information covered will include instrumentation, global positioning, automated transmissions, multiple electronic control module communication, electronic climate controls, cruise control, air bags, lighting systems, and multiple types of sensors. The course is an in-depth study of electronic components and how they work in truck and agricultural applications. Also covered are multimeter, scan equipment, oscilloscopes, wiring diagrams, and trouble shooting charts for computerized management systems. Prerequisite: AU123. DT130 Truck Air Systems, Brakes and Preventive Maintenance (6) This course includes discussion, lab and shop exercises. The student will be able to identify and comply with personal and environmental safety practices common to a shopâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s environment. The student will identify air systems, air brakes, and antilock brake system components. The student will perform failure analysis on the truck air system, air brakes and antilock brake systems. The student will perform a complete preventive maintenance inspection on a class eight truck. Special emphasis is given to all truck electronics and Federal DOT rules and regulations covering the qualifications needed to be a brake and preventive maintenance inspector and service technician. No Prerequisite. DT131 Truck Drive Trains (6) The operating principles of the components in truck drive trains are examined. Students will remove, disassemble, inspect, assemble and install an Eaton/ Fuller 9-, 10-, 13- or 18-speed transmission, two-plate clutch, rear drive axle with a power divider, a driveline including U-joints, slip yokes, king pins and related steering components on a non-drive steering axle. While performing these hands-on tasks, students will measure the various components for wear using micrometers, dial indicators and protractors and will learn proper troubleshooting techniques, preventive maintenance and failure analysis, of these components. No Prerequisite.

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DT135 Diesel Engine Electronic Controls (6) This course will cover diesel electronic controls, tuneup, E.G.R., engine brakes,and diagnostic procedures. The procedures will be done in the live engine room on

running engines currently used in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s industry. The student will perform horsepower and torque performance tests using the dynamometer. Electronic troubleshooting will be done using engine manufacture-specific diagnostic programs and handheld electronic devices. The programs include Cummins Insite, Detroit Diesel DDDL, Caterpillar Electronic Technician, Mack/Volvo, VCADS, and International vehicle diagnostics. The hand-held devices include Pro IQ and Prolink. Use of wiring diagrams and D.M.M. will be covered. Engines systems covered include: Detroit D.D.E.C. II-V, Cummins Celect, Celect Plus, Interactive System, Caterpillar A.D.E.M. II & III, and Mack V-MAC II & III. Prerequisite: DT124 and DT128.

ENGLISH EN070 Basic English (3) Students are provided with a thorough review of English grammar usage as well as an introduction to writing. Students with one of the following qualifications do not have to take EN070: 1) have at least 18 ACT or 450 SAT English/writing score, 2) passed the UNOH English placement test, or 3) transferred in credit for a higher-level English course. Class meets daily. (Credit is not counted towards graduation.) No Prerequisite. Graded S/U. EN180 Composition I (5) The aim of this course is to help students learn to write competently at the university level. Emphasis is placed on organization and development of ideas. Essays are typed and revised on the microcomputer. Outside lab time is required. Prerequisite: EN070 or Proficiency Credit. EN200 Composition II (5) This advanced course includes the writing processes common to a variety of academic disciplines, such as investigating and evaluating topics and responding to literature. It emphasizes critical reading and thinking skills and their use in writing essays. Students must write a well-documented research paper. Prerequisite: EN180.

HIGH PERFORMANCE HP101 High Performance Suspension & Steering (6) The objective of this course is to give the students a basic knowledge of racecar vehicle dynamics for dirt, asphalt, road race, drag race, and street performance vehicles. The course starts with a detailed discussion of basic chassis construction and the techniques used to stiffen the chassis on existing vehicles. This is followed by in-depth discussions on front and rear


COURSES suspension designs, spring and shock testing and selection, weight transfer, and tire design. Safety features both built into vehicles as well as driver safety equipment are also explained. Throughout the course students get the opportunity to gain hands-on experience in setting up and tuning racecar suspensions. Prerequisites: AU126 and AU127. HP102 High Performance Drive Lines (6) The objective of this course is to teach students the principles of high performance enhancements that are available for the drive-trains of both street cars and light trucks as well as race cars. Areas of instruction involving the rear end include ring and pinion setup for the Ford 9â&#x20AC;? and quick change rear ends as well as the installation of traction aids, including lockers and spools. Automatic transmissions covers air shifters, transbrakes, torque converters, as well as powerglide modifications for circle track and drag strip. The manual transmissions portion of the class covers the operation and hands-on servicing for Bert, Brinn, G-Force, Jerico, Lenco and other transmissions plus high performance clutch components. Also included in the course is the discussion of high performance braking systems and their components. Prerequisites: AU116 and AU117. HP105 High Performance Accessory Trends (6) During this course students will learn to design, fabricate, and install many of the components involved in the aftermarket appearance and accessories industry. Through both classroom instruction and hands-on training, students will learn how to design, produce, and install vinyl graphics using state-of-the-art vinyl cutters and printers. Next is the instruction on preparation and installation of window film and pin striping, including both paint-on and vinyl style. The class continues with students learning the basics on the installation of mobile audio and video equipment, including the building of component enclosures and the final tuning of completed systems. Next, students will learn to modify a vehicleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ride height through the use of hydraulics and air-ride suspension systems. Students will also learn the basics of custom fiberglass fabrication of vehicle dashboards and center consoles, as well as the basics for covering these components with carpet and vinyl. No Prerequisite. HP130 High Performance Engine Machining (6) The machining operations that are required to repair engines in the typical machine shop are covered. Industry standards and procedures will be taught. The machining operations will include engine block align honing, cylinder boring, cylinder honing, and block milling. Cylinder head repair will include milling,

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bronze liner installation, guide and seat replacement, and three-angle cutting. Connecting rod resizing and crankshaft polishing will also be accomplished. In addition, theory on head straightening, crack repair, and cylinder sleeving will be covered. The students will perform these operations on training components as well as their own components. Prerequisites: AU122 or DT124. HP200 High Performance Fuel/Electronics/Ignition Systems (6) Performance enhancement principles for street and race vehicles provide the foundation for this course. Beginning with the principles of engine performance enhancement, students will learn to measure engine performance using state-of-the-art water brake engine dynamometers from DTS, as well as inertia wheel chassis dynamometer from Dyno jet and eddy current chassis dynamometer from Superflow to discover the effects of ignition, fuel system, exhaust system and air induction changes. Applied systems include products manufactured by Holley, Edelbrock, Accel, Mallory, MSD, Enderle and others. Students will study the importance of airflow, cylinder head porting and polishing; develop skills in porting and measure their results using modern flow benches; learn to program electronic engine management systems; and will apply learned principles and skills to dynamometer engines and training vehicles. Prerequisite: AU130. HP201 High Performance Custom Engine Building (6) The Custom Engine Building class takes the machining class a step further. The principles of high performance enhancements available for the engine are the focus of this course. Students will start with component selection and then the additional machining processes used to increase the performance of the engine will be taught. These processes include fitting splayed main caps, squaring the deck surfaces on V-8 blocks, correcting lifter bore alignment and engine balancing. In addition, the students will learn advanced machine techniques using the RMC V-30 CNC (computer numerical control) machine. This 4-axis CNC allows the operator to perform machining procedures with a higher degree of accuracy. Other machines the students will use include: Sunnen CH-100 line hones, Rottler F5 boring machine, Rottler HP 6A and SV-10 diamond cylinder hones, Sunnen HBS-1300 and DCM 3810 milling machines, Rottler SG 9 and Serdi 3.0 cylinder head seat and guide machines, Sunnen DCB-2000 and Winona Van Norman XL-2000 crankshaft balancers and the Sunnen LBB-1660 rod hone. The students will also learn how to degree camshafts and proper assemble techniques. Modifying the engine using proven after-market components as well as factory performance options will be taught along with

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the theory of modifications including all relevant formulas. Students will apply theory to practice with the hands-on experience of modifying their own engines as well as engines for Northwesternâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s racecars and dyno engines. Prerequisites: HP130 and HP200. HP210 High Performance Welding (6) Students will learn the techniques required for the welding and cutting of the materials most commonly used in the racing and high performance industry. These materials are mild steel, chrome moly, nickel based alloys, aluminum, magnesium, titanium, and stainless steel. Techniques will be taught on how to work on these materials in plate, tubing and casting form. The welding and cutting processes taught include oxyacetylene welding, gas tungsten arc welding (Tig), plasma arc cutting and flame cutting techniques. Students will perform practice welds in each welding process. No Prerequisite. HP215 High Performance Fabrication (6) Students will learn different techniques of working with tubing, sheets and blocks of different types of material. Included is hand-forming techniques as well as large equipment. Students will perform practice with hammer forming, English wheels, tubing benders, brakes, slip rolls, vertical mills, lathes and other miscellaneous equipment. Students will also learn the proper construction techniques of racing chassis, with discussions on choosing the right materials based on metallurgy and safe construction techniques. Prerequisite: HP210 and MH065.

HEATING, VENTILATION, AIR CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION HV101 Service and Procedures I (6) The fundamentals of refrigeration and heating and equipment operation are discussed, including recovery machines, refrigerant, identification, gauges and vacuum pumps. The student will learn the identification of basic components, soldering and brazing and use of all trade related tools. Safety awareness, customer relations and professionalism are stressed, along with employability skills. No Prerequisite.

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HV102 Service and Procedures II (6) Service and Procedures II will cover detailed servicing procedures of heating, air conditioning, refrigeration of heating, air conditioning and refrigeration and heat pump systems. The subject of refrigerant retrofitting will be covered in detail and EPA 608 will be administered. Prerequisites: HV103.

HV103 Refrigeration Systems and Controls (6) This course is an introduction into refrigeration systems and the use of various refrigerants used in the industry. Proper recovery, evacuation and recharging of the systems will be covered. Pressure testing, leak testing, and repair will be performed. Troubleshooting and diagnosing of refrigeration and air conditioning are discussed. The different refrigerant characteristics, lubricants and piping methods are covered. Mechanical controls of high- and low-side system operation, along with compressor types and air handling, are also covered. Prerequisites: HV101 and HV104. HV104 Electrical and Electronics (6) This course is an introduction into basic electricity, voltage ohms and amperage. Included is the coverage of series, parallel and series/parallel circuits. Motor construction, electrical connections and speed controls are covered. Service procedures to check electrical circuits on domestic/commercial refrigeration freezers, coolers and ice makers are examined. No Prerequisite. HV201 Air Conditioning Systems and Controls (6) An introduction into air conditioning systems refrigerant characteristics and properties are discussed. Fans and blowers, silver soldering and brazing of sweat solder joints and piping, switching devices, and compressor operation are covered. Compressor diagnosis and performance testing are also discussed. Recovery and evacuation and refrigerant documentation are also discussed. Prerequisites: HV101 and HV104. HV202 Heating Systems and Controls (6) Gas furnace safety, motor protectors and safety controls, electric furnaces and heaters, standing pilot, auto ignition, auto re-ignition, ultra-high efficient units, zone heating and split systems are studied. Service and repair of propane and natural gas furnaces and oil, electric and gas furnace efficiency testing are covered. Prerequisite: HV104. HV203 Heating Systems II and Heat Pumps (6) This course is a continuation of HV201 and HV202. Additionally, this course covers the principles of heat pump systems and controls, air conditioning and heating cycles, flow defrost cycles, troubleshooting and performance testing. Wiring and electrical demands and heat transfer principles are also studied. Prerequisites: HV201 and HV202.


COURSES HV204 Special Topics & Applications of Refrigeration & Temperature Controls (6) System theory and operation of the following systems are taught: hydronic, absorption, large chillers, pneumatic controls, boilers and radiant heating. Also, this course will discuss diagnostic fees, hourly rates, documentation and accounting. Duct sizing and design calculations and layout of duct systems are discussed. Calculation of heat loads is also included. Also, handson performance testing will be done on all past areas of study. Prerequisites: HV101, HV103, HV104, HV201, HV202 and HV203.

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PSYCHOLOGY PY177 Psychology (3) Introduction to Pyschology is designed to introduce the concepts required for the study of social perceptions, conditioning, learning, intelligence, motivations, emotions, and personality. The primary focus of the course will be an examination of human behaviors that are effectively valuable for work and professional environments and contribute positively to personal well being. Students will also examine the history, methods, and theories of psychology as a behavioral science and the interaction of heredity and environment. No Prerequisite.

MATH SCIENCE MH065 Review Math (3) Basic mathematical operations are studied with emphasis on concepts, facts and properties to prepare the student for college-level mathematics. Use of calculators is limited. Students with one of the following qualifications do not have to take MH065: 1) have at least 18 ACT or 450 SAT math score, 2) passed the UNOH math placement test, or 3) transferred in credit for a higherlevel math course. Credit does not apply to graduation requirements. No Prerequisite. Graded S/U. MH170 Technical Math (5) This course provides each student with the mathematical skills necessary to be a skilled and competent technician. This course will give the technician the basic technical math to apply to topics such as engine balancing, camshaft timing, modifying compression ratio, gear ratios, hydraulics, angles for building frames, motion, electrical, thermodynamics, and geometry. Prerequisite: MH065 or Proficiency Credit.

POLITICAL SCIENCE PS274 The American Political Scene (3) This course is designed to inform students about government and politics in America: how the system works, its history and its strengths and weaknesses. It attempts to integrate the traditional with the modern approach so that students can understand the interconnection between political thought/the formal structure of politics on one hand and the policymaking process/political behavior on the other. Prerequisite: EN070.

SC112 Physical Science (5) This broad survey course investigates the interrelationship of the physical sciences and technology. Conservation of matter and energy is an underlying theme throughout the course. Topics include physics, chemistry, environmental geology, and astronomy. No Prerequisite.

UNIVERSITY SURVEY COURSES UN100 First Year Experience (1) Students receive information on curricula, the grading system, notetaking, study habits, methods of taking tests and previewing textbooks. This course is required of traditional students in their first quarter. No Prerequisite. UN220 Introduction to Diversity Issues (3) Students will explore topics related to diversity in the United States today, such as race, class, religion, sex, and gender, to learn how to better relate to a diverse society. No Prerequisite. UN292 Portfolio Capstone (1) This course is designed for students who are in the final quarter of their associate degree program. It will provide students with the opportunity to prepare a comprehensive portfolio. In this course students will gather documentation and participate in activities to show their ability to demonstrate the University of Northwestern Ohio Goals for Institutional Effectiveness and Student Success. Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing.

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BOARD OF TRUSTEES Thomas Ahl ..................................................................... President, Tom Ahl Chrysler-Plymouth-Dodge, Inc., Lima, OH Troy Breidenbach . .................................................................................. President, Corporate Support Inc., Lima, OH Jim Bronder, C.M.A., C.P.A., M.B.A. ............................................ Controller, University of Northwestern Ohio, Lima, OH David Cheney, J.D. ............................................................ Allen County Magistrate, Lima, OH - Chairman of the Board Sam Halker ......................................................................................... Owner and President, Smith Boughan, Lima, OH Jeff Hardy, J.D. .................................................................................................. President, Hardy & Hardy Co., Lima, OH Dr. Jeffrey A. Jarvis .................................................................................... President, University of Northwestern Ohio Dan Klopp, M.A. ..................................................Vice President of Special Projects, University of Northwestern Ohio Cheryl Mueller, Ph.D. .................. Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, University of Northwestern Ohio Richard Scherger, M.A. ................................................................................................ Licensed Psychologist, Lima, OH Mark Stolly .................................................................................................... Owner, Stolly Insurance Group, Lima, OH Fred Vernon ............................................................... Vice President of Business Services, Huntington Bank, Lima, OH

PRESIDENTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CABINET Dr. Jeffrey A. Jarvis ............................................................................................................................................ President Chris Adams, M.A., B.A. .................................................................................................................. Director of Athletics Jenell Bramlage, Ph.D. .......................................................................... Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs Jim Bronder, C.M.A., C.P.A., M.B.A. .................................................................................................................... Controller Stephanie Davis, M.B.A. ............................................................................... Director of Public Relations & Marketing Marcia Eickholt, B.B.A.. .......................................................................................................... Vice President of Finance Steve Farmer ................................................................................................................... Vice President of Development Robert Fricke .................................................................................................................... Vice President of Student Life Thomas Grothous, B.S., A.A.B. ............................................................................ Dean, College of Applied Technologies Dean Hobler, M.S.Ed., B.S. ...................................................................................................... Dean, College of Business Daniel Klopp, M.A.. ................................................................................................... Vice President of Special Projects Jeffery Le Blanc, M.B.A., B.A. ....................................................................... Vice President for Information Technology Terry Miller, B.A. ................................................................................................... Vice President of University Services Rick Morrison, B.S. ...................................................................................... Vice President of Enrollment Management Cheryl Mueller, Ph.D. ......................................................................... Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Andy Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neal, M.B.A., B.S. ................................................................................... Dean, College of Applied Technologies Don Ricker ....................................................................................................... Vice President of Property Management Wendell Schick, M.B.A., B.A. .................................................................................................... Director of Financial Aid Cheryl Steinwedel, .................................................... Vice President of Public Relations, Marketing, & Special Events Jennifer Bendele (recorder), A.A.B. ........................................................................ Executive Assistant to the President

ADMINISTRATION & STAFF Catie Adams Office Manager, College of Applied Technologies Deb Badertscher Director of New Student Services B.S., The Ohio State University Justin Baker Safety Services Officer Jennifer Bendele Executive Assistant to the President A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio Joseph Boop Assistant Director of Safety Services & Housing Safety Services Officer Rick Bowersock Counselor M.S., University of Dayton B.A., Ohio Northern University Julie Bowsher Housing & Safety Services Office Manager A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio

Jenell Bramlage Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs Professor, Business Ph.D., Capella University M.B.A., University of Findlay B.A., Bowling Green State University Mallory Bramlage Financial Aid Administrative Assistant Chandra Braun Human Resources Officer Jeremy Brinkman Assistant Vice President for Information Technology Director of Administrative Systems B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.B., Rhodes State College CompTIA Network+ Certified Professional James Bronder Controller M.B.A., Ashland University B.S., The Ohio State University A.B.T., University of Toledo CMA - Certified Management Accountant CPA - Certified Public Accountant Kathleen Buettner Cashier

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Stacia Burgoon Registrar M.B.A., University of Northwestern Ohio B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio Michael Callahan Director of MBA Program M.B.A., University of Northwestern Ohio B.A., The Ohio State University Carrie Campbell Accounts Payable Clerk B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio Dave Clevenger Senior Business Analyst A.A.B., Rhodes State College Kimberly Clevenger Assistant Director of Financial Aid B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio Stephanie Davis Director of Public Relations & Marketing M.B.A., University of Northwestern Ohio B.S., Ohio University Angela Dennison Accounting and Purchasing Agent B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio Dave Desenberg Director of Safety Services Safety Services Officer Marlo Duffy Customer Service Representative B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio Ginny Duncan Accounting Manager M.B.A., University of Northwestern Ohio B.B.A., University of Toledo Marcia J. Eickholt Vice President of Finance B.B.A., Tiffin University A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio Robert Elsass Counselor Jeanette Evans Financial Aid Administrative Assistant A.A.B., Rhodes State College Derek Ewing Webmaster B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio James Fair Assistant Director of Housing Safety Services Officer Steve Farmer Vice President of Corporate Development Pat Finnerty Director of Housing Erin Fitzpatrick Associate Registrar B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.S., University of Toledo Justin Flanagan Co-Director of Career Services B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Amanda Ford Graphic Designer

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Mark Foust Safety Coordinator Property Management Staff Robert Fricke Vice President of Campus Life Susan Gerdeman Financial Aid Advisor B.B.A., Tiffin University Greg Gross Network Administrator A.A.S., Rhodes State College Thomas Grothous Dean, College of Applied Technologies B.S., Voc. Ed., University of Toledo A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio Thomas Grothouse Financial Aid Advisor Shelley Hager Office Manager, Administration Building Brook Harris Safety Services Officer Tracey Harris Counselor B.A., Bluffton University Ryan Hasenfratz College of Applied Technologies Equipment Technician/Special Projects A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Joshua Hawkins New Student Services Assistant Dean Hobler Dean, College of Business A.B.D., Capella University M.S.Ed., Capella University B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Murry Howell Maintenance Specialist Diploma, University of Northwestern Ohio Jeffrey A. Jarvis President Doctor of Laws, University of Northwestern Ohio Lori Jarvis Special Projects Coordinator Amanda Johnson Library Associate A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio Kimberly Kantner Department Facilitator Assistant A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio Julius Kirkman Bus Driver Daniel Klopp Vice President of Special Projects M.Ed., Bowling Green State University B.S., The Ohio State University Loren Korzan Director of Advising M.Ed., Bowling Green State University B.S., Bowling Green State University Jeffery Le Blanc Vice President for Information Technology M.B.A., University of Findlay B.A., University of Findlay A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio Jason Maples Maintenance Specialist


A D M I N I S T R A T I O N, Robert Marshal Associate Dean, College of Applied Technologies B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Marty McCaslin Evening Supervisor, College of Applied Technologies Danielle McClure Director of Counseling & Academic Skills M.R.C., Bowling Green State University B.S., Bowling Green State University Lucas McClure Safety Services Officer Mark McClure Technical Support Coordinator A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio CompTIA A+ Certified Professional IT Technician Tom McPheron Dorm Damage Coordinator Kevin Meager Associate Dean, College of Applied Technologies B.S., Voc. Ed., University of Toledo A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Jonathon Menke Carpenter & Special Projects Amy Miller Assistant Director of New Student Services A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio Terry Miller Vice President of University Services B.A., Bluffton University Joe Minnig Director of Dorm Facilities Geri Morris Executive Director of Human Resources B.B.A., Tiffin University A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio Rick Morrison Vice President of Enrollment Management B.S., Ball State University Judy Moyer Cashier Cheryl Mueller Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Ph.D., Bowling Green State University M.A., Bowling Green State University B.A., Ohio Northern University Natalie Mueller Academic Support and Assessment Assistant B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.S., Wright State University Jerry Myers Student Activities Director Diploma, University of Northwestern Ohio Lawrence Myers Safety Services Officer Georgena Nanson Director of the Library M.Ed., Bowling Green State University B.S., Defiance College James Nastally Academic Skills Administrative Assistant B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio Nicole Niemeyer Co-Director of Career Services B.A., University of Toledo

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Andy Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neal Dean, College of Applied Technologies M.B.A., University of Northwestern Ohio B.S., Voc. Ed., University of Toledo A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Rita Oakleaf Testing Center Supervisor B.A., Bluffton University Sara Prinzi Fitness Coordinator NFPT Certified Robin Pyles Cashier B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Don Ricker Vice President of Property Management Tess Rieger Office Manager, College of Applied Technologies A.A.B., Rhodes State College Eric Riffle Maintenance Specialist Jan Roberts Customer Service Representative Shawnna Roob Admissions Administrative Assistant B.S., Miami University Kendra Roxo Office Manager, College of Applied Technologies Vernon Saunders Safety Services Officer Wendell Schick Director of Financial Aid M.B.A., Ashland University B.A., Wittenberg University Dorothy Schroeder Financial Aid Officer/Veteransâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Affairs Jessica Spiers Coordinator of Alumni Affairs B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Cheryl Steinwedel Vice President of Public Relations, Marketing, and Special Events Jodi Stopher Testing Center Supervisor B.S., The Ohio State University Dawn Stratton Office Manager, College of Applied Technologies A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio Rick Suever Information Technology Specialist A.A.S., International Business College Stephanie Swallow Development Administrative Assistant Laura Taylor Administrative Assistant A.A.B., Rhodes State College Angela Thomas Admissions Administrative Assistant A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio Lee Ann Timmerman Financial Aid Officer Cheryl Troyer Academic Advisor M.A., The Ohio State University B.A., Cedarville University 187


A D M I N I S T R A T I O N,

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Steve Truesdale Director of Institutional Buildings Diploma, University of Northwestern Ohio Josh Uphaus Director of Grounds A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio Todd VanSlyck Director of Multimedia A.A.S., Herkimer County Community College Eric VanWagner Safety Services Officer Lucas Vermillion Safety Services Officer Jason Wagner Director of Distance Learning and Instructional Technology M.I,T, American Intercontinental University B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio B.S., Franklin University A.A.S., Rhodes State College Will Watson Landscaper/Special Projects Traci Wells Registrar B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.B., Edison State Community College Andy Wendel Safety Services Officer Taunja Wickham Director of Registration B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.B., Owens State Community College Joan Wilhelm Administrative Assistant Diploma, University of Northwestern Ohio Kari Wireman New Student Services Assistant

ADMISSIONS Jeff Cary Director of Adult Admissions B.A., Defiance College David Henkle Education Relations M.Ed., Bowling Green State University B.S., The Ohio State University Randy Gonzalez Director of Enrollment Advising Don Lowden Assistant Director of Admissions - Tech A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Bruce Patton Assistant Director of Admissions - Business, Health Professions, & Occupational Profes sions B.S., Ohio University Colleges of Business, Health Professions, and Occupational Professions

188

Ohio Representatives Tony Azzarello Bill Cooper B.S., Fairmont State College A.A.S., Fairmont State College

STAFF

John Maier Bruce Patton B.S., Ohio University Jeff Sullivan B.S., Miami University Ryan White B.A., Bluffton University Indiana Representatives Thomas Filus Troy Huffine High School Presenters Kristine Gross Tina Hershberger M.Ed., University of Toledo B.A., University of Toledo Katie Mustain B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio Dawn Ivancic Candy Zimmerman College of Applied Technologies Ohio Representatives Brock Atkins Jon Cottrell John Evans A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio James Jones B.S., Kent State University Denny Kayden M.A., Bowling Green State University B.S., University of Tampa Joe Nichols B.S., The Ohio State University B.S., Clarion University Jim Zeigler A.A.B., Owens Technical College Indiana Representatives Dave Miller Diploma, University of Northwestern Ohio Tom Richey, Regional Manager B.S., Indiana State University David Wooden Michigan Representatives Dave Draper Al Emery, Regional Manager B.A., Western Michigan University Jim McNellis B.S., Eastern Michigan University A.L.A., Oakland Community College Fred Napoleone Bill Richardson M.A., Central Michigan University B.S. , Central Michigan University Mark Rowell M.A., Eastern Michigan University B.S., Ferris State University Pennsylvania Representatives John Terence Moore M.B.A., Michigan State University B.S., Bucknell University Dennis Wittmer B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania


A D M I N I S T R A T I O N, Tennessee Representative Scott Stockdale B.S., West Texas A&M University West Virginia Representative Jason Dick B.A., Marshall University Kentucky Representative Mike Koth Virginia Representative Todd Hawkins B.S., University of Maryland Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, & Florida Representative Robert Alexander A.A.S., University of Maine Lee Fortin, Regional Manager Vermont Representatives Lee Fortin, Regional Manager Tom Larose A.A.S., Community College of the Air Force - Air University New York Representatives Tom Larose A.A.S., Community College of the Air Force - Air University Jerry Pratt Florida Representatives Vince Berardi B.A., Saint Leo University Phillip Carpenter A.A.S., Macomb Community College A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio North Carolina Representative Darren Haydens New Jersey, Delaware, & Maryland Representative Ron Cordts

ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT Chris Adams Director of Athletics M.A., The Ohio State University B.A., Wittenberg University Mike Armbruster Director of Athletic Operations B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Erin Gasser Athletic Trainer Aaron Utrup Director of Sports Information M.B.A., University of Findlay Traci Wells Cheerleading Advisor B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.B., Edison State Community College Baseball Kory Hartman Men’s Baseball Head Coach M.Ed., Ashland University B.G.S., Kent State University A.A.S., Columbus State Community College Greg Eaton Men’s Baseball Assistant Coach Eric Best Men’s Baseball Assistant Coach

FACULTY AND

STAFF

Basketball Chris Adams Men’s Basketball Head Coach M.A., The Ohio State University B.A., Wittenberg University Mike Armbruster Men’s Basketball Assistant Coach B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Matt Metzger Men’s Basketball Assistant Coach Kyle Menchhofer Women’s Basketball Head Coach Julie McCullough Women’s Basketball Assistant Coach Bowling Todd Book Men’s and Women’s Bowling Head Coach Phil Austin Bowling Assistant Coach Dave Jeanerette Bowling Assistant Coach Golf Kevin Kitchen Men’s Golf Head Coach Jeff Cary Men’s Golf Assistant Coach Daniel Reinicke Women’s Golf Head Coach Tom Bader Women’s Golf Assistant Coach Motorsports Paul Higgins Motorsports Team Head Coach Soccer Gavin Oldham Men’s Soccer Head Coach Tennis Terry Hilborn Men’s and Women’s Tennis Head Coach Linda Remy Women’s Tennis Assistant Coach Mike Sarno Men’s Tennis Assistant Coach Volleyball Kevin Kitchen Women’s Volleyball Head Coach Men’s Golf Head Coach B.S., Walsh University

189


A D M I N I S T R A T I O N,

FACULTY AND

FULL-TIME FACULTY Jeffrey Baldauf Automotive & HVAC/R Instructor Service & Procedures I Specialist Service & Procedures II Specialist Electrical & Electronics Specialist Heating Systems & Controls Specialist Air Conditioning Systems & Controls Specialist Refrigeration Systems & Controls Specialist Heating Systems II & Heat Pumps Specialist Special Topics & Applications of Refrigeration Systems & Temperature Controls Specialist Transportation Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Specialist ASE Automotive Certified ASE Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified NATE Certified AHRI ICE Certified RSES EPA Certified, Section 608 MACS EPA Certified, Section 609 B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Deborah Bartlett Associate Professor M.B.A., Tiffin University B.A., Tiffin University A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio Business, General Education, Microsoft Word & Excel Rodney Batch Automotive & Diesel Instructor Hydraulic Brakes Specialist Suspension and Steering Specialist Transportation Air Conditioning & Refrigeration Specialist ASE Automotive Certified ASE Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified MACS Commercial Heating & Cooling Certified Toyota Certified Trainer B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Nathan Baxter Instructor M.S., University of Florida B.S., Ohio Northern University Mathematics Timothy Belt Automotive & Diesel Instructor ASE Automotive Certified A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Randy Blank Associate Professor M.A., The Ohio State University B.A., Bluffton University Psychology

190

STAFF

Angela Bogart Assistant Professor M.B.A., The University of Findlay B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio Accounting Terry Boroff Diesel Instructor Diesel Engine Diagnosis and Repair Specialist Diesel Engine Electronic Controls Specialist ASE Certified Master Truck ASE L2 Advanced Level Specialist Electronic Diesel Engine Diagnosis Detroit Diesel Corp. Engine Certified Trainer Detroit Diesel Corp. Electronic Controls Certified Trainer Detroit Diesel On-Highway Guild Certified Detroit Diesel Off-Highway Guild Certified B.S., University of Toledo - Vocational Education A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Maryann Brohard Professor Ph.D., Bowling Green State University M.A., Bob Jones University B.S., Bowling Green State University Communication/English Mariann Byrne Professor M.B.A., Ashland University B.A., Ashland University Business, Economics Steven Calvert Auto/Diesel Instructor ASE Automotive Certified ASE Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified GM Master Certified Diploma, University of Northwestern Ohio Todd Carr Advisor, Drag Club and MERA Automotive, Diesel, & High Performance Instructor Accessory Trends Specialist Electrical & Electronics Specialist ASE Automotive Certified B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Christine Cavallaro Senior Instructor M.A., National University B.S., Rio Grande College A.A.S., Rhodes State College General Education


A D M I N I S T R A T I O N, David Christen Automotive, Agriculture, & General Education Instructor Computerized Engine Control Systems Specialist Customer Relations Automated Mgt. Specialist Automotive Engine Diagnosis and Repair Specialist Hydraulic Specialist Introduction to Microcomputing Specialist Combine Specialist ASE L1 Advanced Level Automotive Engine Performance Certified ASE Master Automotive Certified ASE Automobile Service Consultant ASE Medium/Heavy Duty Truck Certified GM Certified Toyota Certified Trainer Chrysler Certified Ford Certified Case New Holland Certified Ohio FFA Ag. Industrial Diagnostic Event Coordinator & Judge B.S., University of Cincinnati A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Judith Clark Department Facilitator: Accounting, Finance, and Healthcare Departments Assistant Professor M.B.A., University of Findlay B.A., Bluffton University CFE - Certified Fraud Examiner CICA - Certified Internal Control Auditor Accounting, Business Lisa Clark Department Facilitator: Information Technology, Office Technology, and Medical Departments Assistant Professor A.B.D., Capella University M.A., Union Institute & University B.A., The Ohio State University General Education, English, Communications Earl Comer Automotive & High Performance Instructor Automotive Engine & Diagnostic Repair Specialist High Performance Custom Engine Building Specialist ASE Master Engine Machinist Certified ASE Automotive Certified ASE Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Thomas Corban Automotive & Diesel Instructor Automatic Transmissions Specialist Steering & Suspension Specialist Customer Relations Automated Mgt. Specialist Word and Spreadsheets Specialist ASE Master Auto Certified ASE L-1 Advanced Engine Performance Certified ASE Medium/Heavy Duty Truck Certified ASE Parts Consultant GM Master Certified Daimler Chrysler Certified A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio

FACULTY AND

STAFF

John J. Croft Instructor ASE Automotive Certified ASE Parts Specialist Certified ASE Automotive Service Consultant Certified B.B.A., Cleveland State University General Education, Microsoft Word & Excel Jason Daniels Automotive & Diesel Instructor Electrical & Electronics Specialist ASE Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Kiel Dennison HVAC/R Instructor Service & Procedures I Specialist Service & Procedures II Specialist Electrical & Electronics Specialist Heating Systems & Controls Specialist Air Conditioning Systems & Controls Specialist Refrigeration Systems & Controls Specialist Heating Systems II & Heat Pumps Specialist Special Topics & Applications of Refrigeration Systems & Temperature Controls Specialist NATE Certified AHRI ICE Certified EPA Certified Section 608 MACS EPA Certified Section 609 A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Ryan Dirr Instructor B.S., Wright State University Information Technology Douglas Downing Commercial Driver License & Ag Instructor Advisor, Diesel Club MACS EPA Certified Section 609 ASE Preventative Maintenance A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Chuck Elwer Ag/Diesel Division Head Diesel Instructor Diesel Engine Electronic Controls Specialist Truck Air Systems, Brakes and Preventive Maintenance Specialist Welding Specialist ASE Master Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified ASE L2 Advanced Level Specialist Electronics Diesel Engine Diagnosis ADS Certified TC1 B.S., Voc. Ed., University of Toledo Kurt Emans Instructor M.B.A., Bluffton University B.A., Bluffton University Automotive Management, Math, General Education, Microsoft Word & Excel

191


A D M I N I S T R A T I O N,

FACULTY AND

Brady Emmons Advisor, MERA Auto, Diesel, and High Performance Instructor Accessory Trends Specialist Chrysler Gold Certified MACS Certified ASE Master Automotive Certified ASE Truck Certified ASE Machining Certified A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Terry Enyart Automotive & Diesel Instructor Electrical & Electronics Specialist ASE Master Automotive Certified ASE L1 Advanced Engine Performance Specialist ASE Painting & Refinishing Certified ASE Medium/Heavy Truck Certified B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Julia Etzkorn Instructor M.S., New York University B.S., Xavier University B.A., Xavier University Sport Marketing and Management John Fielding Associate Professor M.S.E., Purdue University B.S.E.E., Valparaiso University PE - Ohio Registered Professional Engineer CQM - ASQ Certified Manager of Quality Mathematics Kevin Frische Assistant Coach, Motorsports Team High Performance Instructor High Performance Engine Machining Specialist High Performance Custom Engine Building Specialist High Performance Fuel Systems, Electronics, & Ignitions Specialist ASE Master Engine Machinist Certified ASE Diesel Certified ASE Automotive Certified ASE Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio James Frueh Advisor, Race Club and Over-the-Wall Club Automotive & Diesel Instructor Hydraulic Brake Systems Specialist Transportation Air Conditioning Specialist ASE Master Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified ASE Master Technician ASE Collision Repair & Refinish Certified GM Master Certified Toyota Certified Trainer B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio

192

STAFF

Ronald Gillette Instructor M.B.A., University of Northwestern Ohio B.S., The Ohio State University Agribusiness Lucas Groh Instructor M.A., University of Toledo B.S., Bowling Green State University English/General Education John Hamel Automotive, Diesel, & High Performance Instructor Welding Specialist Motorsports Welding Specialist Aerospace Certified Welder ASE Automotive Certified ASE Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified Toyota Certified Trainer B.S. Voc. Ed., University of Toledo A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Steve Hayes CASE IH & New Holland Instructor Agricultural Instructor Hydraulics Specialist Tractors/Combines Specialist ASE Master Automotive Certified ASE Master Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified B.S. Voc. Ed., University of Toledo A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Paul Higgins Head Coach, Motorsports Team High Performance Division Head Automotive & High Performance Instructor Automotive Engine Diagnosis and Repair Specialist High Performance Engine Machining Specialist High Performance Custom Engine Building Specialist High Performance Fuel/Electronics/Ignitions Systems Specialist ASE Master Diesel Certified ASE Collision Repair & Refinish Certified ASE Master Engine Machinist Certified ASE Master Automotive Certified B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Michael Hunt Diesel Instructor Truck Air Systems, Brakes & Preventive Maintenance Specialist Truck Drive Trains Specialist Heavy Specialist ASE Master Certified Medium/Heavy Truck Technician ASE L2 Advance Level Specialist, Electronic Diesel Engine Diagnosis B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio


A D M I N I S T R A T I O N, Todd Hunt Advisor, FFA Automotive & Diesel Instructor Electrical & Electronics Specialist ASE L2 Advance Level Specialist, Electronic Diesel Engine Diagnosis ASE Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified ASE Automotive Certified ADS TC1 Certified Cummins Certified Detroit Diesel Certified Fuller Transmission Certified B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Brad Immele Automotive Instructor Manual Drive Trains & Axle Specialist Hydraulics Brakes Specialist ASE Master Automotive Certified ASE Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified MACS Certified Chrysler Certified Technician Hyundai Certified Technician A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Diploma, University of Northwestern Ohio James Jenkins Automotive & Diesel Instructor Automotive Engine Performance Specialist Transportation Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Specialist ASE Master Automotive Certified ASE Master Engine Machining Certified ASE L1 Advanced Level Automotive Engine Performance Certified ASE Master Heavy Duty Truck Certified Toyota Certified Trainer Certified for EPA 609 and Section 608 A.B., Ohio University Nancy Karhoff Associate Professor M.B.A., The University of Findlay B.S., Bowling Green State University MOS Specialist Certified, Word 2003 and Excel 2003 Office Technology Shara-Leigh Kauffman Medical Assisting Practicum Director Instructor R.N., St. Ritaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s School of Nursing Medical John F. Kennedy Automotive/Diesel Instructor Electrical & Electronics Specialist Automotive Engine Performance Specialist ASE Master Automotive Technician Certified ASE L1 Advanced Drivability Technician Certified ASE Master Heavy Duty Truck Technician Certified Snap-On Diagnostic Equipment Trainer Ford Senior Master Technician Diploma, University of Northwestern Ohio

FACULTY AND

STAFF

Nathan Kern Auto/Diesel Instructor Transportation Air Conditioning & Refrigeration Specialist Suspension & Steering Specialist Welding Specialist ASE Automotive Certified ASE Medium/Heavy Duty Truck Certified MACS Certified Chrysler Certified Technician A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Sarah Kidd Department Facilitator: Agribusiness, Automotive Management, Travel, & College of Technologiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; General Education Departments Advisor, FFA Senior Instructor M.S., Bowling Green State University B.S., University of Findlay General Education, Science Shannon Kies Automotive Division Head Automotive & Diesel Instructor Transportation Air Conditioning & Refrigeration Specialist Automotive Engine Performance Specialist Computerized Engine Control Systems Specialist MACS Certified ASE Automotive Certified ASE Medium/Heavy Duty Truck Certified ASE L1 Advanced Level Automotive Engine Performance Certified Snap-On Diagnostic Equipment Trainer A.A.B., Rhodes State College Robyn King Assistant Professor Ph.D., Walden University M.P.A., Golden Gate University M.S., Golden Gate University Business Steve Klausing Automotive Division Head Advisor, Race Club and Motorsports Team Alternate Fuels & Automotive Instructor Computerized Engine Control Systems Specialist Suspension & Steering Specialist Automotive Engine Performance Specialist ASE Master Automotive Certified ASE L1 Advanced Level Automotive Engine Performance Certified ASE ENG (Natural Gas) Certified CNG Cylinder Inspector Certified Toyota Certified Trainer Natural Gas Maintenance & Inspection Certified Propane Maintenance & Inspection Certified B.S., Voc. Ed., University of Toledo A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio

193


A D M I N I S T R A T I O N,

FACULTY AND

Lynn Lease Assistant Professor Instructional and Curriculum Designer M.A., Ball State University B.S., Ball State University General Education Thomas Leonard Assistant Professor Ph.D., University of Illinois B.S., Indiana University Marketing Tim LeVan Automotive Instructor Steering & Suspension Specialist Automotive Engines Specialist ASE Automotive Certified Diploma, University of Northwestern Ohio Randy Lucius Assistant Coach, Motorsports Team High Performance Division Head Automotive, Diesel, & High Performance Instructor High Performance Fuel/Electronics/Ignition Systems Specialist Electrical & Electronics Specialist ASE Master Automotive Certified ASE Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified Toyota Certified Trainer B.S., Voc. Ed., University of Toledo A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Nathan Mailhot Automotive Instructor Electrical & Electronics Specialist Automotive Engine Performance Specialist Snap-On Diagnostic Equipment Trainer ASE Master Automotive Certified ASE L1 Advanced Level Automotive Engine Performance Certified MACS Certified Chrysler Certified Technician B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Christopher Marker Technical Support Team Coordinator Auto, Diesel, & High Performance Instructor Alternate Fuels Trainer Hydraulics Brakes Specialist Accessory Trends Specialist Transportation, Air Conditioning & Refrigeration Specialist Steering & Suspension Specialist ASE Automotive Certified ASE Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified MACS Certified Toyota Certified Trainer B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio

194

STAFF

Robert Marshal Associate Dean, College of Applied Technologies Automotive & Diesel Instructor Commercial Driver License Instructor Transportation Air Conditioning & Refrigeration Specialist Diesel Engine Electronics Control Specialist Diesel Engine Diagnosis & Repair Specialist Certified in Thermo King Trailer Unit Service ASE Master Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified ASE L2 Advanced Level Specialist in Electronic Diesel Engine Diagnosis ASE School Bus Technician ASE Automobile Technician ASE Truck Equipment Technician Universal Certified in Refrigerant Transition and Recovery from Ferris State University Toyota Certified Trainer B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Kent McCleary Automotive, Agricultural, & Diesel Instructor Electrical and Electronics Specialist Automotive Engines Specialist European Automotive Service Specialist Hydraulics Specialist ASE Automotive Certified ASE Engine Machinist Certified ASE Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified ASE L2 Advanced Level Specialist, Electronic Diesel Engine Diagnosis Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) Certified Toyota Certified Trainer M.B.A., University of Northwestern Ohio B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Mindy McDonald Medical Assisting Director Instructor B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio CMA (AAMA) - Certified Medical Assistant Medical Assisting Philip McMurry Assistant Professor Ph.D., Kent State University M.A., Kent State University B.A., Grove City College History


A D M I N I S T R A T I O N, David McPherson Assistant Coach, Motorsports Team Advisor, Auto-Cross Club Automotive & High Performance Instructor Automatic Transmissions Specialist High Performance Suspension & Steering Specialist High Performance Drive Lines Specialist Motorsports Welding Specialist ASE Master Automotive Certified ASE L1 Automobile Advanced Engine Performance Certified Toyota Certified Trainer Chevrolet Certified Cadillac Certified B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Kevin Meager Associate Dean, College of Applied Technologies Diesel & General Education Instructor Truck Drive Trains Specialist Diesel Engine Specialist: Diesel Engine Diagnosis & Repair & Diesel Engine Electronic Controls ASE Medium/Heavy Duty Truck Certified B.S., Voc. Ed., University of Toledo A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Carmel Morse Assistant Professor Ph.D., University of Nebraska M.A., Wright State University B.A., University of Dayton General Education, English Timothy Mulready Auto & Diesel Instructor Electrical & Electronics Specialist Engine Performance Specialist ASE Automotive Certified ASE Medium/Heavy Duty Truck Certified GM Certified Daimler Chrysler Certified B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Aaron Napierala Instructor B.S., Bowling Green State University Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator (MCSA) Network+ Certified Professional A+ Certified Professional Information Technology Dale J. Neidert Automotive Diesel Instructor Electrical and Electronics Specialist Maintenance Journeyman A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Fred Newhouse Auto & Diesel Instructor Advisor, Diesel Club Commercial Driver License Instructor Electrical & Electronics Specialist State Certified CDL Examiner MACS EPA Certified, Section 609 A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio

FACULTY AND

STAFF

Jeffrey Nidiffer Advisor, Off-Road Club Automotive & High Performance Instructor Manual Drive Trains and Axles Specialist High Performance Steering & Suspension Specialist High Performance Drive Lines Specialist ASE Master Automotive Certified Daimler Chrysler Certified Toyota Certified Trainer GM Certified B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Holly Norton Professor Coordinator of Writing Across the Curriculum Ph.D., Bowling Green State University M.A., Iowa State University B.A., Luther College English/Communication Gabe Oakley Senior Instructor M.A., Ball State University B.B.A., Mount Vernon University A.A.B., Rhodes State College Information Technology Randy Pack Automotive Instructor Electrical & Electronics Specialist ASE Master Automotive Certified A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Andrew Pohlman Assistant Coach, Motorsports Team Diesel & High Performance Instructor Welding Specialist Motorsports Welding Specialist Motorsports Fabrication Specialist High Performance Suspension & Steering Specialist High Performance Fuel/Electronics/Ignitions Systems Specialist ASE Master Automotive Certified Mazda Master Certified B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Cynthia Preston Associate Professor A.B.D., Northcentral University M.B.A., Golden Gate University B.S., Wright State University CFM - Certified Financial Manager CMA - Certified Management Accountant Accounting, Business, Finance, Economics Rhonda Priest Instructor M.B.A., Ashland University B.B.A., Tiffin University A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio CFM - Certified Financial Manager CMA - Certified Management Accountant CPA - Certified Public Accountant Accounting 195


A D M I N I S T R A T I O N,

FACULTY AND

Adam Prusakiewicz Automotive Instructor Electrical & Electronics Specialist Diesel Specialist A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Mark Putnam Department Facilitator: College of Business General Education and Legal Departments Professor M.A., The Ohio State University B.A., Michigan State University English, General Education/Humanities Kurtis Reichley Diesel Instructor ASE, Master Heavy Duty Truck Certified ASE Master Automotive Certified ASE L2 Advanced Level Specialist Electronics Diesel Engine Diagnosis CDL Licensed, Class A & B A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Matthew Ricker Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning, & Refrigeration Instructor Service & Prcoedures I Specialist Service & Procedures II Specialist Electrical & Electronics Specialist Heating Specialist Heat Pump Specialist Mobile Air Conditioning License 609 Certified EPA Universal 608 Certified ICE Certified - Residential, Light Commercial, & Commercial Refrigeration A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Rosanne Ridinger Associate Professor M.B.A., Ashland University B.A., University of Findlay Office Technology Aaron Roth Diesel & Agricultural Instructor Advisor, Diesel Club Welding Specialist Combines Specialist Tractors Specialist Motorsports Welding Specialist Welding Certified ASE Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Kim Sadler Instructor M.S., Regis University B.S., The University of Toledo Medical Assisting

196

STAFF

Lonnie Schulz Advisor, MERA Automotive & High Performance Instructor Manual Drive Trains & Axle Specialist Steering & Suspension Specialist Accessory Trends Specialist High Performance Drive Lines Specialist ASE Automotive Certified A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Billy Sergent Diesel Instructor Diesel Performance and Diagnosis Specialist Diesel Engine Diagnosis & Repair ASE Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified ASE L2 Advanced Level Truck, Electronic Diesel Engine Diagnosis B.S. Voc. Ed., University of Toledo A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Julie Shellenbarger Assistant Professor M.B.A., Franklin University B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio RHIA - Registered Health Information Administrator Medical, Office Technology, Business Sherrill Silvers Diesel Instructor Truck Drive Train Specialist Diesel Performance and Diagnosis Specialist Truck Air Systems, Brakes & Preventive Maintenance Specialist ASE Automotive Certified ASE Master Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified ASE L2 Advanced Level Specialist, Electronic Diesel Engine Diagnosis B.S., The Ohio State University Ryan Snyder Auto Instructor Electrical and Electronics Specialist MACS Certified Toyota Certified Instructor ASE Master Automotive Certified A.A.S. University of Northwestern Ohio Scott States Senior Instructor M.Ed., Bowling Green State University B.S., Math Education, -Bowling Green State University MOS Specialist Certified - Word 2003 & Excel 2003 Math, Microsoft Word & Excel


A D M I N I S T R A T I O N, Barry Stirn Advisor, Race Club Automotive, Diesel, & High Performance Instructor Automotive Engine Specialist Hydraulic Brake Specialist Engine Machining Specialist Automotive Machinist Specialist Automotive Engine Diagnosis and Repair Specialist ASE Master Automotive Certified ASE Master Machinist Certified ASE Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified Toyota Certified Trainer B.S. Voc. Ed., University of Toledo A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Kevin Stotts Associate Professor J.D., Ohio Northern University B.A., The Ohio State University Business, Paralegal Mike Streicher Assistant Coach, Motorsports Team USAC Intern Advisor Diesel & High Performance Instructor Welding Specialist Motorsports Fabrication Specialist Motorsports Welding Specialist Motorsports Steering & Suspension Specialist High Performance Steering & Suspension Specialist Thomas Sypherd Automotive & Diesel Instructor Alternative Fuels Trainer, NAFTC Air Conditioning & Refrigeration Specialist Automatic Transmission Specialist ASE Master Automotive Certified ASE Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified GM Master Certified A.A.S. University of Northwestern Ohio David Tapley Automotive & Diesel Instructor Electrical & Electronics Specialist Welding Specialist ASE Automotive Certified ASE Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified Toyota Certified Trainer B.S., Purdue University A.A.S., Purdue University Gary Tinnel Automotive & Diesel Instructor Manual Drive Trains & Axles Specialist Automatic Transmissions/Transaxle Truck Drive Train Specialist Toyota Certified Trainer ASE Automotive Certified ASE Master Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified B.S., Voc. Ed., University of Toledo A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio

FACULTY AND

STAFF

Jon Tomlinson Department Facilitator, Business Administration and Marketing Departments Assistant Professor M.B.A., Wright State University B.S., Wright State University Business, Health Care Steven Trammell Diesel Instructor Commercial Driver License Instructor Diesel Performance & Diagnosis Specialist Diesel Engine Diagnosis & Repair Specialist Truck Air Systems, Brakes & Preventive Maintenance Specialist ASE Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Steve Tucker Auto & Diesel Instructor Electrical & Electronics Specialist Manual Drive Train & Axles Specialist Suspension & Steering Specialist ASE Automotive Certified ASE Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified Toyota Certified Trainer B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Randy Waller Division Head, HVAC/R and Automotive Advisor, Off-Road Club Automotive, Diesel, & HVAC/R Instructor Service & Procedures I Specialist Service and Procedures II Specialist Electrical & Electronics Specialist Heating Systems & Controls Specialist Air Conditioning Systems & Controls Specialist Refrigeration Systems & Controls Specialist Heating Systems II & Heat Pumps Specialist Special Topics & Applications of Refrigeration Systems & Temperature Controls Specialist Transportation Air Conditioning & Refrigeration Specialist Computer Automated Management Specialist ASE Automotive Air Conditioning Certified ASE Truck Air Conditioning Certified ASE Bus Air Conditioning Certified ASE Automotive Electrical Certified NATE Certified AHRI ICE Certified GAMA Certified RSES EPA Certified Section 608 MACS EPA Certified Section 609 B.S. Voc. Ed., University of Toledo Hsin Wang Instructor M.S., New York University Travel Shannon Warman Senior Instructor M.A., Bowling Green State University B.A., Wright State University General Education

197


A D M I N I S T R A T I O N, David Warren Diesel Instructor Diesel Engine Diagnosis & Repair Specialist A.A.S., Rhodes State College Tim Weiss Senior Instructor M.B.A., University of Dayton B.A., Bellarmine College CFE - Certified Fraud Examiner CICA - Certified Internal Control Auditor Accounting Matthew Wells Assistant Professor Ph.D., University of Kentucky M.A., University of Kentucky B.S., Grand Valley State University Mathematics Michael White Automotive & High Performance Instructor Automotive Engine Diagnosis & Repair Specialist High Performance Engine Machining Specialist ASE Automotive Certified ASE Master Machinist Certified Toyota Certified Trainer Ford Corporate Trainer B.S. Voc. Ed., University of Toledo A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio William White Advisor, Drag Club Automotive & High Performance Instructor High Performance Drive Lines Specialist Manual Drive Trains & Axles Specialist High Performance Engine Machining Specialist High Performance Custom Engine Building Specialist ASE Automotive Certified ASE Master Machinist Certified B.S. Voc. Ed., University of Toledo A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Chris Woods Automotive & Diesel Instructor Portfolio Capstone Instructor Transportation Air Conditioning & Refrigeration Specialist Hydraulic Brake Systems Specialist Automotive Engine Performance Specialist Steering & Suspension Specialist ASE Master Automotive Certified ASE Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified MACS Air Conditioning Certified Toyota Certified Trainer Chevrolet Certified B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio

FACULTY AND

STAFF

Jeffery A. Yost Automotive & HVAC/R Instructor Service & Procedures I Specialist Service & Procedures II Specialist Electrical & Electronics Specialist Heating Systems & Controls Specialist Air Conditioning Systems and Controls Specialist Refrigeration Systems & Controls Specialist Heating Systems II and Heat Pumps Specialist Special Topics & Applications of Refrigeration Systems & Temperature Controls Specialist Transportation Air Conditioning & Refrigeration Specialist NATE Certified AHRI ICE Certified RSES EPA Certified, Section 608 MACS EPA Certified, Section 609 ASE Automotive Certified ASE Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified A.A.S. University of Northwestern Ohio David Young Automotive & Diesel Instructor Electrical & Electronics Specialist ASE Automotive Certified ASE Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio John Yutzy Automotive & Diesel Instructor Electrical & Electronics Specialist T.D.T. Specialist ASE Master Automotive Certified ASE Master Medium Heavy Duty Truck Certified ASE L-1 Advanced Engine Performance Certified ASE L-2 Advanced Level Specialist, Electronic Diesel Engine Diagnosis ASE Heavy Truck PMI Certified GM Master Certified B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.S., University of Northwestern Ohio David Zuwerink Assistant Professor Ph.D., The Ohio State University M.S., The Ohio State University B.S., Grand Valley State University A.A., Muskegon Community College Science, General Education

ADJUNCT FACULTY Jenny Apple M.B.A., Wright State University B.B.A., Austin Peay State University Business Jan Bachman M.B.A., Bowling Green State University B.S., Ferris State College A.A.S., Northwestern Michigan College Accounting

198


A D M I N I S T R A T I O N, Debra Badertscher B.S., The Ohio State University Math

Barry Barnt M.S., University of Dayton B.S., The Ohio State University General Education James Beougher M.B.A., Tiffin University B.S., Wright State University A.A.B., Wright State University Business Jenell Bramlage Ph.D., Capella University M.B.A., University of Findlay B.A., Bowling Green State University Business John Bramlage M.B.A., University of Dayton B.S., Wright State University Business Aaron Braun M.B.A., University of Northwestern Ohio B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A., Edison State Community College General Education, Microsoft Word & Excel Deborah Brown Ph.D., The Ohio State University M.S., The Ohio State University B.S., The Ohio State University Agribusiness

FACULTY AND

STAFF

Lisa Cashel M.B.A., Indiana Tech B.B.A., University of Toledo CMA - Certified Management Accountant Accounting Danette Citti Ph.D., Texas Tech University M.A., Texas Tech University Psychology Michelle Clementz M.A., Wright State University B.A., Wright State University General Education Bari Courts Ph.D., Capella University M.B.A., University of Cincinnati B.S., Kenyon College Business, Economics Michelle Dixon M.B.A., Tiffin University B.A., University of Findlay Accounting Michael Domin M.B.A., Case Western Reserve University B.S.B.A., Bowling Green State University Business Ginny Duncan M.B.A., University of Northwestern Ohio B.B.A., University of Toledo Accounting

Ralynn Brown M.A., Old Dominion University English, General Education

Stefanie Elwood M.S., Missouri State University B.A., Ohio University General Education

Jerry Bunn M.A.T., Bowling Green State University B.S., The Ohio State University Math

Holly Gleason J.D., Ohio Northern University B.A., Westminster College Business, Paralegal

John Burkhart M.B.A., Bluffton University B.A., Bluffton University CMA - Certified Management Accountant CFM - Certified Financial Manager Accounting, Finance

Matthew Gonzalez Ph.D., Capella University M.B.A., St. Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s University B.B.A., University of Texas Business

Michael Callahan M.B.A., University of Northwestern Ohio B.A., The Ohio State University Business

R. Kay Green A.B.D., Argosy University M.B.A., Walden University B.B.A., Savannah State University Business

Marilyn Carroll Ph.D., Capella University M.B.A., University of Phoenix B.S., University of Phoenix Business

Christopher Hage M.E., University of Florida B.S., Washington University B.A., Rollins College Math, Science

199


A D M I N I S T R A T I O N,

STAFF

Dan Hopkins M.A.T., Miami University B.S., Miami University General Education, Science

Susan Mann A.B.D., TUI University M.A., Webster University Business, Marketing

Susan Hymer M.Ed., University of Georgia B.S., University of Tennessee Health Care

Juan Martinez J.D., University of Detroit Mercy M.B.A., The University of Toledo B.A., The Ohio State University Business

William D. Kellermeyer General Education, American Political Scene Jennifer Kenjura M.B.A., Texas Woman’s University B.B.A., New Mexico State University Finance, Business Suzanne Ketner M.S., University of Dayton B.S., University of Dayton General Education Loren Korzan M.Ed., Bowling Green State University B.S., Bowling Green State University Office Technology, Business Craig Kuhlman M.B.A., University of Findlay B.A., University of Findlay B.A., Ambassador College Business, Finance Karen Lackey-Wince M.B.A., Tiffin University B.S., The Ohio State University Business Peggy Lee Ph.D., Capella University M.S., Illinois State University B.S., Illinois State University Business, Communication Cindy Leis M.B.A., Tiffin University B.A., Bluffton University Business Dana Leland Accounting, Finance Calvin Lindo M.S., Carnegie-Mellon University B.A., Atlantic Union College Business, Finance Pauline Lundeen M.B.A., Bowling Green State University B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania Business

200

FACULTY AND

Susan McCain M.A., Antioch University Yoga Instructor Melissa McClurg M.Ed., Wright State University B.B.A., Tiffin University CPA - Certified Public Accountant Accounting Mark Miller Ph.D., Capella University M.B.A., Saint Edward’s University B.S., The Ohio State University Business Michael Miller B.S., The Ohio State University Business Wayne Moening M.B.A., The University of Findlay B.B.A., The University of Toledo Business Natalie Mueller B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.S., Wright State University University Courses Susan O’Neal M.S., Capella University B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio Psychology Brian Ogstad A.B.D., Argosy University M.B.A., Friends University B.S., Barclay College Legal Assisting Leslie Phillips M.A., University of Arkansas B.S., University of Arkansas Office Technology Anthony Rahrig M.B.A., Wright State University B.S., Wright State University A.A.S., Wright State University, Lake Campus CFP - Certified Financial Planner Business


A D M I N I S T R A T I O N, David Reed A.B.D., Ohio University M.S., Ohio University M.P.T., Ohio University B.S., Ohio University Health Care/General Education Mark Revels Ph.D., Indiana State University M.S., University of Denver B.B.A., University of Kentucky Business Jackie Rhoades A.B.D., Drew University M.P., Drew University M.A., Ashland Theological Seminary B.S.B.A., Ashland University Philosophy & Religion

FACULTY AND

STAFF

Robert Vega D.M., University of Phoenix M.B.A., Chaminade University M.A., University of Redlands B.S., Loma Linda University A.A.S., Loma Linda University Business, Health Care Jason Wagner M.I.T., American Intercontinental University B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio B.S., Franklin University A.A.S., Rhodes State College Information Technology Dawn Nation Ward J.D., Ohio Northern University B.A., University of Nevada Legal Assisting

Andrea Ross M.A., Western Michigan University B.A., Western Michigan University English, Communications

Chip Welch M.B.A., Indiana University B.S., Indiana Tech Business

Krista Schlemmer M.B.A., Wright State University B.S., University of Northwestern Ohio A.A.B., University of Northwestern Ohio Accounting

Julie Wells Ph.D., University of Kentucky M.A., University of Kentucky B.S., Grove City College Math

Kimberley Scott Ph.D., Capella University M.A., Webster University Business Herb Shaw M.A., Bowling Green State University A.B., Taylor University Accounting Ellen Sneed M.S., Indiana Wesleyan University B.S., Purdue University A.A.B., Wright State University Business Janice Spangenburg Ph.D., Regent University M.A., Fielding Graduate M.S., Troy University B.A., St. Leo University Business Roland Sprague Ph.D., Walden University M.S., The Pennsylvania State University B.S., University of Rochester Mathematics Stacy Tremains B.S., University of Toledo Medical Assisting

201


ADVISORY BOARDS

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ADVISORY BOARDS COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADVISORY BOARDS ACCOUNTING Jennifer Birkemeier ........................................................................................... E.S. Evans & Company, CPA’s, Lima, OH Sharon Cole, CPA .................................................................................................... M.A. Hoops & Associates, Lima, OH Howard Foltz ................................................................................ Columbus Grove High School, Columbus Grove, OH Sue Odenweller, Alumni ................................................................................... Rea & Associates, Inc., CPA’s, Lima, OH Tracey Regula, Alumni ......................................................................................... Sielschott & Walsh, CPA’s, Lima, OH Robert Sielschott, CPA, Alumni .............................................................................. Sielschott & Walsh, CPA’s, Lima, OH Robert Terrill, Accounting Manager ...................................................................................... American Trim, Lima, OH Andrea Wiggins ....................................................................................................... State Accounting Service, Lima, OH Judy Clark, Department Facilitator ............................................................ University of Northwestern Ohio, Lima, OH

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION/MARKETING Steve Boroff, Vice President of Operations & Human Resources .................. Superior Federal Credit Union, Lima, OH Matt Childers, Marketing Manager ................................................................................... Maverick Media, Lima, OH Bill Clinger, Marketing Director ................................................................................................... Lima News, Lima, OH Joey Cox, Engineer ............................................................................. Husky Energy Lima Refining Company, Lima, OH Kevin Creamer, General Sales Manager ............................................................................................... WLIO, Lima, OH Mary Elmquist .............................................................................................................................. Consultant, Lima, OH Dino Gerdeman, Sales Manager .................................................................................. Time Warner Cable , Lima, OH Rick Gross, Principal ......................................................................................................... Bath High School, Lima, OH Stacie Haines, Marketing Director ..................................... Otterbein Retirement Living Community, Cridersville, OH Michael Ley, VP/Agent .................................................................................................. Ley Insurance Agency, Lima, OH Marcel Wagner, Jr., President/CEO ...................................................... Allen Economic Development Group, Lima, OH Jon Tomlinson, Department Facilitator ..................................................... University of Northwestern Ohio, Lima, OH

COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS ADVISORY BOARD MEDICAL ASSISTING & HEALTH CARE Lisa Carroll, Director, Medical Records & HIPAA Privacy Officer .......................... St. Rita’s Medical Center, Lima, OH Debi Cooper, R.N., Office Manager ........................................................................... Drs. Sheehan & Wisser, Lima, OH Dr. Henry Gerad, Medical Director ......................................................... Gerad Center for Cancer Treatment, Lima, OH Nancy Hauenstein, Nurse Manager ...................................................... Gerad Center for Cancer Treatment, Lima, OH Sheryl Helmig, Health Career Instructor ..................................................................... Apollo Career Center, Lima, OH NoraLu Kahle, Nurse Manager ........................................................................ Orthopedic Institute of Ohio, Lima, OH Cheri Martin, Director of Patient Access & Output Express Testing ..................... St. Rtia’s Medical Center, Lima, OH Kerri Motter ................................................................................................................. Lima Medical Supply, Lima, OH Jackie Shriver, Nurse Practitioner ................................................................... Alliance for Women’s Health, Lima, OH Kym Taflinger, Grants & Special Projects Director ........................................ Allen County Health Partners, Lima, OH Lisa Clark, Department Facilitator - Medical Assisting .......................... University of Northwestern Ohio, Lima, OH Jon Tomlinson, Department Facilitator - Health Care ............................... University of Northwestern Ohio, Lima, OH

COLLEGE OF OCCUPATIONAL PROFESSIONS ADVISORY BOARDS AGRIBUSINESS Lynae Anspach, Alumni ............................................................................................................................... Rawson, OH Lucy Bambauer, FFA Advisor, Ag Instructor ........................................................... Delphos High School, Delphos, OH Don Barnhart, FFA Instructor .................................................................................... Leipsic, High School, Leipsic, OH William Gable ....................................................................................................... Gulf Coast Accounting, Bluffton, OH Aaron Gaskill, Alumni ........................................................................................ Helena Chemical Company, Berne, IN Todd Hunt, Instructor, College of Applied Technologies ........................... University of Northwestern Ohio, Lima, OH Nathan Lehman, Alumni ................................................................................................... Lehman Feed Mill, Berne, IN Mark Light, 4-H Educator .................................................................................... Allen County OSU Extension, Lima, OH Bill McKibben, Owner ............................................................................................................... Soil Tech, Bluffton, OH Andrea Metz ........................................................................................................................................ Cargill, Lima, OH 203

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ADVISORY BOARDS Dave Nusbaum, County Executive Director .................................................................. Farm Service Agency, Lima, OH Jennifer Riethman ................................................................................................... Farm Credit Services, Delphos, OH Rick Williams ................................................................................................... Bayer Crop Science, Middle Point, OH Sarah Kidd, Department Facilitator ........................................................... University of Northwestern Ohio, Lima, OH

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Lt. James Baker ........................................................................................................ Lima Police Department, Lima, OH Greg Gross, Network Administrator ......................................................... University of Northwestern Ohio, Lima, OH Doug Metzger, Information Technology Director ............................................................ Lakeview Farms, Delphos, OH Mark Miller, Chief Information Officer ..................................................................... Metokote Corporation, Lima, OH Peggy Miller, Information Technology Specialist ......................................................... Apollo Career Center, Lima, OH Curtis Vannette, Network Engineer .................................................................................. Time Warner Cable, Lima, OH Jason Wagner, Director/DL & Instructional Technology ......................... University of Northwestern Ohio, Lima, OH Lisa Clark, Department Facilitator ........................................................................... University of Northwestern Ohio

OFFICE TECHNOLOGY Linda Bales .......................................................... Vantage Career Center, Medical Specialist Program, Van Wert, OH Lynette Harnishfeger, Legal Assistant ....................................................... Balyeat, Leahy, Daley, and Miller, Lima, OH Heather Reed, Instructor, Administrative Professional ................ Ohio High Point Career Center, Bellefontaine, OH Krista Swinehart, Transcription Team Leader ........................................................ St. Rita’s Medical Center, Lima, OH Joan Winkle, Plant Controller .................................................................. Continental Structural Plastics, Carey, OH Lisa Clark, Department Facilitator ........................................................... University of Northwestern Ohio, Lima, OH

PARALEGAL Lynette Harnishfeger, Paralegal ......................................................................... Daley, Balyeat & Leahy, LLC, Lima, OH Nancy Hogan, Paralegal and Real Estate Agent ................................................... CCR Real Estate Company, Lima, OH John Leahy, Jr., Esq. ............................................................................................. Daley, Balyeat & Leahy, LLC, Lima, OH Dawn Maag, Paralegal ............................................................................. Putnam County Probate Court, Ottawa, OH Dawn (Nation) Ward, Attorney ..................................................................................... Nation Law Office, Kenton, OH Edward B. Pedlow IV, Esq. .................................................................................. Kilco Title Agency/Attorney, Lima, OH Honorable John R. Willamowski ................................................................ Third District Court of Appeals, Lima, OH Mona Willamowski, Esq. ................................................................................................................................ Lima, OH Mark Putnam, Department Facilitator ..................................................... University of Northwestern Ohio, Lima, OH

TRAVEL AND HOTEL MANAGEMENT Peggy Baker, Independent Event Planner ........................................................................................................ Lima, OH Karen Kleman .................................................................................................. Northwestern Travel Service, Lima, OH Cindy Langenkamp, LNHA, Administrator ...................... Vancrest Health Care & Rehabilitation Center, Delphos, OH Dan Peterson, General Manager .................................................................................... Courtyard Marriott, Lima, OH Christine Pleva, Executive Director ................................ Lima/Allen County Convention & Visitors Bureau, Lima, OH Jeanne Previte ....................................................................................................................... Jeanne’s Kitchen, Ada, OH Erin Roberts, Alumni ......................................................................................... Spectacular Adventures, Delphos, OH Michael Showalter, Manager .................................................................................................... Fairfield Inn, Lima, OH Brad Will, General Manager ............................................................................................. Howard Johnson, Lima, OH Rebecca Wilson, Account Executive .................................................................................... MLT Vacations, Sidney, OH Sarah Kidd, Department Facilitator ......................................................... University of Northwestern Ohio, Lima, OH

GRADUATE COLLEGE ADVISORY BOARD Joey Cox, Engineer ............................................................................. Husky Energy Lima Refining Company, Lima, OH Stacie Haines, Marketing Director ..................................... Otterbein Retirement Living Community, Cridersville, OH Holbrook Hankinson, Director/Learning & Leadership Development .................... St. Rita’s Medical Center, Lima, OH Mark Miller, Chief Information Officer ..................................................................... Metokote Corporation, Lima, OH Jeffrey Sprague, Vice President ........................................................... Allen Economic Development Group, LIma, OH Marcel Wagner, Jr., President/CEO ...................................................... Allen Economic Development Group, Lima, OH Michael Callahan, Department Facilitator ............................................. University of Northwestern Ohio, Lima, OH

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ADVISORY BOARDS GUIDANCE COUNSELOR ADVISORY BOARD Lisa Ciminillo ............................................................................................................................................. Lima Senior Al Clum .................................................................................................................................................................. Elida Nancy Clum ............................................................................................................................................. Lima Shawnee Paul Green ................................................................................................................................... Waynesfield-Goshen Deb Hinckley .................................................................................................................................. St. Mary’s Memorial Linda Hoersten ...................................................................................................................................................... Perry Kim Metz .................................................................................................................................................... Wapakoneta Angela Meyer ............................................................................ Lima/Allen County College Access Program Director Sharri Miller ........................................................................................................................................................... Bath Bob Seggerson ............................................................................................................................ Lima Central Catholic Christie Solomon .......................................................................................................................... Apollo Career Center Randy Woods ................................................................................................................................................. Allen East

COLLEGE OF APPLIED TECHNOLOGIES - INDUSTRY ADVISORY BOARDS AG EQUIPMENT Mike Bensman .................................................................................................................................... Koenig Equipment James Bonifas ................................................................................................................................... Kennedy Kuhn Inc. Todd Channell ......................................................................................................................... Farmers Equipment, Inc. Ron Gillette, Instructor, College of Business ........................................................... University of Northwestern Ohio Mike Grote ....................................................................................................................................... Kennedy Kuhn, Inc. Duane Hoersten .............................................................................................................................................. HG Violet Eric Homier ..................................................................................................................................... Homier & Sons, Imp. Roger Homier ............................................................................................................................................ Homier Farms John Horstman ............................................................................................................................................... HG Violet Adam King ....................................................................................................................................... Apple Farm Service Ken Koenig ........................................................................................................................................ Koenig Equipment Mick Michel ...................................................................................................................................... North West Tractor Dave Moenter .................................................................................................................. Schumacher-Maag Company Dick Schrader ............................................................................................................................... Homier & Sons, Imp. Phillip Schroeder ............................................................................................................... Findlay Implement Company Jeff Stober ........................................................................................................................................ Holgate Implement Joe Streaker .................................................................................................................................. Streaker Tractor Sales Howard Violet ................................................................................................................................................... HG Violet Jeff Weaver ....................................................................................................................................................... HG Violet Eric White ......................................................................................................................................... Koenig Equipment Nick Wrasman .................................................................................................................................................. HG Violet University of Northwestern Ohio Administration Jeff Jarvis ......................................................................................................................................................... President Cheryl Mueller ................................................................................... Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Tom Grothous ................................................................................................... Dean, College of Applied Technologies Andy O’Neal ...................................................................................................... Dean, College of Applied Technologies Kevin Meager .................................................................................... Associate Dean, College of Applied Technologies Robert Marshal ............................................................................... Associate Dean, College of Applied Technologies Chuck Elwer ....................................................................................... Division Head, College of Applied Technologies

AUTOMOTIVE Randy Austin, Regional Director ................................................................................................ Carquest Distribution Jim Dorsten ............................................................................................................................... TriStar Career Compact Dennis Frieden, President ................................................................................................................ Frieden Automotive Brian Neely ............................................................................................................................... Elida Road Tire Service Dave Paronto ................................................................................................................ Allen Nott Honda Toyota Scion Jeff Steinke ....................................................................................................................................................... Carquest Dale Stahl, Representative ................................................................................................................................ Snap-On Rick Walls ....................................................................................................... Mike Swaney Pontiac-Buick-GMC Truck

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ADVISORY BOARDS University of Northwestern Ohio Administration Jeff Jarvis ......................................................................................................................................................... President Cheryl Mueller ................................................................................... Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Tom Grothous ................................................................................................... Dean, College of Applied Technologies Andy O’Neal ...................................................................................................... Dean, College of Applied Technologies Kevin Meager .................................................................................... Associate Dean, College of Applied Technologies Robert Marshal ............................................................................... Associate Dean, College of Applied Technologies Steve Klausing ................................................................................... Division Head, College of Applied Technologies Shannon Kies ..................................................................................... Division Head, College of Applied Technologies

DIESEL Brad Anderson ....................................................................................................................... Northwest Fuel Injection Bill Bowers, Service Manager .......................................................................................................... Stoops Freightliner Scott Campbell ........................................................................................................................................... Roadranger Darwin Burkholder ............................................................................................................................. Diesel Consultant Roger Duff, Management Consultant ......................................................................................Second Pair of Eyes Shop Jack Garrison .......................................................................................................................................................... Ryder Jeff Gast .......................................................................................................................................... Stoops Freightliner Shane Groner, Technical Service Manager ............................................................................... Road Ranger Marketing Jim Haveman ............................................................................................................................................... Independent Jerald Havenaar ............................................................................................................................... Roadranger/Eaton Mike Kidd .................................................................................................................................................................... TTC Tim May ............................................................................................................................................................ KBT, Inc. John Sidebottom ............................................................................................................................. Kenworth of Dayton Lucas Smith .................................................................................................................................... Kenworth of Dayton Jim Whitmer, National Training Manager ............................................................................................................ Eaton Eric Wilcox ............................................................................................................................ Northwest Fuel Injection University of Northwestern Ohio Administration Jeff Jarvis ......................................................................................................................................................... President Cheryl Mueller ................................................................................... Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Tom Grothous ................................................................................................... Dean, College of Applied Technologies Andy O’Neal ...................................................................................................... Dean, College of Applied Technologies Kevin Meager .................................................................................... Associate Dean, College of Applied Technologies Robert Marshal ............................................................................... Associate Dean, College of Applied Technologies Chuck Elwer ....................................................................................... Division Head, College of Applied Technologies

HEATING, VENTILATION, AIR CONDITIONING/REFRIGERATION Bennie Barnes .................................................................................................................................................. Habegger Lance Buettner ........................................................................................................................................ Smith-Boughan Don Ditto, Owner/Lead Technician ................................................................................ Grothous Plumbing & Heating Mike Flynn, Owner ...................................................................................................................... R.A. Flynn & Sons, Inc. Vince Gilbreath ..................................................................................................................... Quality Indoor Air Service Matt Goecke ............................................................................................................. Matt’s Heating & Air Conditioning Jeff Greve, Owner .............................................................................................................................. Perry Refrigeration Luke Hefner ............................................................................................................................................... Allied Supply John Kromer ........................................................................................................................................... Johnson Supply Craig Miller ................................................................................................................................ Copeland Corporation Keith Puhman ............................................................................................................................ All Temp Refrigeration Jim Shearer, Owner ......................................................................................................... Shearer’s Plumbing & Heating Tim Williams ............................................................................................................................. Copeland Corporation University of Northwestern Ohio Administration Jeff Jarvis .......................................................................................................................................................... President Cheryl Mueller ................................................................................... Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Tom Grothous ................................................................................................... Dean, College of Applied Technologies Andy O’Neal ...................................................................................................... Dean, College of Applied Technologies Kevin Meager .................................................................................... Associate Dean, College of Applied Technologies Robert Marshal ............................................................................... Associate Dean, College of Applied Technologies Randy Waller ..................................................................................... Division Head, College of Applied Technologies 206

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ADVISORY BOARDS HIGH PERFORMANCE Dan Bowers ......................................................................................................................................... Advanced Chassis Ken Bowers, Owner ............................................................................................................................. Advanced Chassis John Buskirk .............................................................................................................................. Harts Machine Service Dan Fournier ................................................................................................................................. Fabrication Supplier Ron Fournier .................................................................................................................................. Fabrication Supplier Ray Franks ................................................................................................................... Profiler Performance Products Earl Gaerte .............................................................................................................................................. Gaerte Engines Don Gerardot ............................................................................................................... Gerardot Performance Products Mike Green .................................................................................................................. Profiler Perofrmance Products Tom Hardesty ............................................................................................................................. Racer / Smith-Boughan Mickey Holmes ...................................................................................................................................... Lincoln Electric Doug Kaufman ......................................................................................................................... Engine Builder Magazine Bill McKnight ....................................................................................................................................................... Clevite Al Noe .................................................................................................................................................... Stainless Works Rob Moser ........................................................................................................................................ Moser Engineering Phil Rickhard .............................................................................................................................. Dyno Tech Engineering Tim Sosebee ............................................................................................................................................. Speed Engines Michael Van Horn ..................................................................................................................................... 12 Volt Group University of Northwestern Ohio Administration Jeff Jarvis ......................................................................................................................................................... President Cheryl Mueller ................................................................................... Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Tom Grothous ................................................................................................... Dean, College of Applied Technologies Andy Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neal ...................................................................................................... Dean, College of Applied Technologies Kevin Meager .................................................................................... Associate Dean, College of Applied Technologies Robert Marshal ............................................................................... Associate Dean, College of Applied Technologies Paul Higgins ....................................................................................... Division Head, College of Applied Technologies Randy Lucius ..................................................................................... Division Head, College of Applied Technologies

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ADVISORY BOARDS

NOTES

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1441 North Cable Road, Lima, OH 45805

Please send to:

Attention: Admissions

A P P L I C AT I O N F O R E N R O L L M E N T

To apply online: Visit - www.unoh.edu. Admissions Phone Number: (419) 998-3120 PLEASE PRINT NAME: First

Middle

Last

Fax Number: (419) 998-3139 Maiden Name

SEX

MAILING address

City state

AREA CODE/PHONE NUMBER BirthdATE RESIDENCE COUNTY

M or F

zip

Filing FOR social secuRity Number Financial Aid Yes ___ No____

High School Diploma name of home high school career center (if applicable) Military Yes ____ GED No ____ ____ ____ Expected to receive Year Month Have you attended another college? ____ ____ Received Yes ___ No ___ If yes, name of college and year last attended? Year Month Are you a U.S. citizen? Yes ___ No ___   Ohio Resident Yes ___ No ___

Have you ever been convicted of a felony, adjudicated as a juvenile for the equivalent of a felony, or are there any such charges pending against you at this time? YES __ NO __ If answered “yes”, indicate the state and county of your conviction. STATE ________________COUNTY_______________ Student: E-mail

Student: Cell Phone

Parent: E-mail

Parent: Cell Phone

Entering as:

CollegeS OF:

Delivery method:

dorm Request:

___ New Applicant

___ Business

___ Traditional

___ Require campus housing

___ Re-Enrolling

___ Occupational Professions

___ One-Night-A-Week

___ Do not require campus

Last date of attendance: _________

___ Health Professions

___ Online Degree

housing

___ Non-Degree Seeking Student

___ Applied Technologies

___ Post-Secondary Option Student (Circle desired quarter/session)

(see reverse side)

___ Undecided

$100 (non-refundable) housing deposit is due 60 days after acceptance date to guarantee college housing.

Start Date___________________________

Colleges of: Business, Occupational Professions, and Health Professions Fall Winter Spring Summer College of Applied Technologies: January

Program of study

February March

May

June August October November

Time preference Application fee College of Business ___ Morning College of Occupational Professions ___ Cash College of Health Professions ___ Afternoon ___ Check ___ Day ___ Evening ___ Evening ___ Credit Card Tech

I hereby apply for enrollment in the program indicated. My application fee of $20 is enclosed. The application fee will be fully refundable if the application is not accepted. I understand that I can request cancellation of the application within thirty days of the signature dated below and receive a full refund. After 30 days the application fee is non-refundable. Date________________________________ , 20_____

X Applicant Signature_________________________________________________________

Date________________________________ , 20_____

X Parent/Guardian Signature___________________________________________________

As the authorized representative of the University of Northwestern Ohio, I have interviewed the applicant and certify that in my judgement the application meets the requirements and standards of the University and recommend his/her acceptance. By_________________________________________ (# ) Approved_______________________________________________________ (Authorized Representative) (College Administrator) Racial/Ethnic Background (Although optional, ethnic information is requested to fulfill reporting obligations to the federal government.) Black

American Indian or Alaskan Native

Asian

Hispanic

White

Hawaiian or Pacific Islander

Other

The University of Northwestern Ohio admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin, gender identity, age, and sexual orientation to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the University. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs. The University of Northwestern Ohio may deny admission to any applicant for any reason not prohibited by law, including conviction of a crime or the fact that the applicant has been subject to discipline at another academic institution.


PROGRAM OF STUDIES GRADUATE A D V COLLEGE ISORY BOARDS 80 Master of Business Administration

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS BACCALAUREATE PROGRAMS 52 81 53 59

Accounting (4-year track) Accounting - CPA (5-year track) Business Administration Business Administration Accelerated 82 Forensic Accounting 83 Marketing

ASSOCIATE PROGRAMS 1 Accounting 3 Business Administration 60 Business Administration Accelerated 4 Marketing

Business Administration Concentration in: 56 Agribusiness Management 57 Automotive Management 55 Marketing

73 Undeclared Major ND Non-Degree Seeking

COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS BACCALAUREATE PROGRAMS 54 Health Care Administration 58 Health Care Administration Accelerated

ASSOCIATE PROGRAMS

DIPLOMA PROGRAMS

32 Medical Assistant Technology 20 Medical Office Management

76 Medical Coding 71 Medical Transcriptionist

COLLEGE OF OCCUPATIONAL PROFESSIONS BACCALAUREATE PROGRAMS 61 Specialized Studies 74 Specialized Studies - Accelerated

ASSOCIATE PROGRAMS

DIPLOMA PROGRAMS

45 Agribusiness Marketing/Management Technology 47 Automotive Management 69 IT - Computer Forensics 65 IT - Digital Multimedia Design 66 IT - Microsoft Networking Technology 75 IT - Network Security 35 Legal Assisting 25 Legal Office Management 9 Office Management 62 16 67 18

Specialized Studies Sport Marketing and Management Travel & Hotel Management Word Processing / Administrative Support

41 15 68 63 30 70 19

Agribusiness Management Executive Assistant IT - Graphic Designer IT - Microsoft Networking Technology Paralegal Travel and Hospitality Word Processing Specialist

CERTIFICATES 64 IT - Microsoft Administrator 72 IT - Microsoft Networking

COLLEGE OF APPLIED TECHNOLOGIES BACCALAUREATE PROGRAMS 90 91 92 93 94

Specialized - Automotive/Bus. Admin. Specialized - Diesel/Bus. Admin. Specialized - Auto/Diesel/Bus. Admin. Specialized - Agricultural/Bus. Admin. Specialized - High Performance/Bus. Admin. 95 Specialized - Auto/High Performance/ Bus. Admin. 96 Specialized - HVAC/Bus. Admin.

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ASSOCIATE PROGRAMS 51 22 24 77 33 49 50

DIPLOMA PROGRAMS

Agricultural Equipment Technology Automotive Technology Auto/Diesel Technology Auto/High Performance Technology Diesel Technology High Performance Technology HVAC/R Technology

39 42 44 21 23 78 31 37 43

Agricultural Equipment Technician Auto/Alternate Fuels Technician Diesel/Alternate Fuels Technician Automotive Technician Auto/Diesel Technician Auto/High Performance Technician Diesel Technician High Performance Technician HVAC/R Technician

Accredited By The Higher Learning Commission of The North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (NCA) 30 North LaSalle Street - Suite 2400 Chicago, IL 60602 (312) 263-0456

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ADVISORY BOARDS University of Northwestern Ohio REQUEST FOR ACADEMIC TRANSCRIPT Please fill in form COMPLETELY.

SEE BACK OF PAGE FOR IMPORTANT DETAILS!

Date ___________________________________________

ATTENTION: STUDENT RECORDS DEPARTMENT I hereby give permission to release information from the file of: FIRST NAME

MIDDLE

LAST

MAIDEN

FULL ADDRESS:

CITY:

STATE:

SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER:

ZIP CODE:

BIRTHDATE:

NAME OF HIGH SCHOOL:

CLASS OF:

NAME OF CAREER CENTER:

ADDRESS:

CITY:

STATE:

(Signature of: _____ Student

_____ Parent

ZIP CODE:

_____ Guardian)

Please send ______ transcripts to:

PLEASE ATTACH THIS FORM WITH THE TRANSCRIPT.

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHWESTERN OHIO ATTENTION: REGISTRAR 1441 NORTH CABLE ROAD LIMA OH 45805

OFFICE USE ONLY Student #: _______________

Starting Date: ______________________

HS #: _________________ 211

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ADVISORY BOARDS

Attention School Official: If the student is not yet a graduate, a preliminary transcript does not need to be official. It can be hand delivered, faxed, or sent by mail. Upon graduation, a final and official transcript is required. In order for the University of Northwestern Ohio to consider the student’s final transcript official, the following information must be included: • • • • •

Date of Graduation Signature of School Official Rank of Student Imprint/Raised Seal Cumulative GPA

If your school does not have a raised seal or does not rank students, it must be noted on the transcript by the school official. This transcript must be sent directly from the high school to the University of Northwestern Ohio. Hand delivered or faxed transcripts are not recognized as official. Thank you for your cooperation!

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Catalog 2011-2012

UNOH Catalog 2011 - 2012  

University of Northwestern Ohio Catalog