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Emergency Response Fund

Kenya

Credit: OCHA . Dan DeLorenzo

Annual Report 2011

Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs


Emergency Response Fund – Kenya Annual Report 2011

Acknowledgements

taking time off from their respective busy schedules to carry out the task of reviewing and recommending funding for ERF project proposals. The TRB member organizations include: CRS; World Vision; Save the Children –UK; and Concern Worldwide. We look forward to a continued collaboration in further enhancing the ERF.

The Government of Kenya: We wish to offer our appreciation to the Government of Kenya, Provincial Administrations and key line ministries who have supported implementation of ERF projects. The projects thrived well on cordial relations and strong linkages with the line ministries that include, among others, the Ministries of Agriculture; Livestock; Health; Water and Irrigation; and Ministry of State for Development of Northern Kenya , who played important roles in community mobilization and targeting of beneficiaries. Chiefs and elders as well as District Steering Groups (DSGs) were also crucial in community mobilization, verification of beneficiaries and identification of locations that showed vulnerability.

Sectors: Special thanks go to Sector Coordinators and their Working Groups for collectively technically reviewing project proposals within their respective sectors. The inter-sector coordination working group has also been instrumental in facilitating collective consultations, deliberations and consensus on the prioritization exercise and criteria for funding. This exercise has contributed to the refinement of accountability and transparency in allocating funding to humanitarian partners.

Donors: The humanitarian community would like to thank the donors for contributing much needed resources to facilitate response to the various humanitarian emergencies in the country. In 2011, DFID was the highest contributor to the ERF, followed by contributions from the SDC and SIDA Sweden. Appreciation also goes to a past contributor to the Fund that includes Norway.

Beneficiaries: We would also like to acknowledge the role and engagement of the beneficiaries themselves for their participation in consultations and selection processes of the most vulnerable recipients of humanitarian assistance that has resulted in better programming on the ground.

Technical Review Board:

OCHA staff and management:

We would like to acknowledge the dedication, professionalism and commitment exemplified by members of the Technical Review Board (TRB) for

Finally, we wish to acknowledge the tremendous contributions of OCHA staff at both field and HQs level in supporting the management of the Fund. We look forward to a continued and fruitful collaboration.

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Emergency Response Fund – Kenya Annual Report 2011

Executive Summary Humanitarian Context 2011 was the year of a severe food security crisis in countries reported in the Horn of Africa region including Kenya. A combination of drought-induced crop failure, poor livestock conditions, rising food and non-food prices and eroded coping capacities are some of the key factors that contributed to the food crisis, which resulted in 3.75 million people in Kenya food-insecure. Kenya was already experiencing ongoing humanitarian crisis that pre-dated the food crisis of 2011. In this regard, those areas that already had faced the worst effects of past drought conditions and also faced entrenched poverty, limited investment, and intermittent conflict further experienced a compounded food security situation.

approximately 100 per day due to increased insecurity along the Kenya/Somalia border that led to a halt to the registration of new asylum-seekers from Somalia in October. The overall refugee population in Dadaab in north-eastern Kenya stood at 450,000 as of the end of September 2011. Overall refugee and asylum-seekers in the country numbered 590,921 as of September 2011.

The five-fold increase in the number of refugee arrivals compromised the quality of service delivery and further exacerbated existing environmental concerns such as deforestation and tensions between the host and refugee communities. The continuing influx of the refugees totally overwhelmed existing educational facilities: according to a an inter-agency assessment of the education sector in Dadaab, the pupil to classroom ratio stands at 113:1, while the teacher-to-pupil ratio stands at 1:85, while more than 50% of school-aged children in Dadaab do not attend school.

Associated with the food crisis were the disturbing malnutrition rates and disease outbreaks such as dengue fever and malaria. Food insecurity also interrupts and complicates anti-retroviral treatment for people living with HIV, and exposes affected people to HIV transmission through heightened cases of transactional sex and sexual/gender-based violence. An estimated 385,000 children under 5 and 90,000 pregnant and lactating women suffered from acute malnutrition. The eastern parts of Turkana in North West Kenya reported 37.4% global acute malnutrition which is far above the emergency threshold of 15%. These were the highest malnutrition rates recorded in the last decade. The continual rise in fuel and food prices also further reduced household purchasing power.

The political environment remained fragile with the potential for inter-communal violence and population displacement triggered by a number of key processes. These include the on-going political reform processes, the International Criminal Court investigation linked to the 2007-2008 post-election violence, and outcomes of the hearings conducted on past historical injustices through the Truth, Justice and Reconciliation Commission. Overall reform processes stipulated in Agenda 4 of the National Accord and passing of associated relevant electoral laws to facilitate implementation of the new constitution remain in progress.

Conflict was also one of the underlying causes of the complex 2011 crisis in the Horn of Africa. The increase in refugee flows that numbered 154,450 into Dadaab and 8,132 into Kakuma since January 2011 were accompanied by growing insecurity in and around the refugee camps in north-eastern and north-western Kenya. The recurring conflict and instability in Somalia coupled with the Horn of Africa drought caused massive cross-border influxes at the rate of 30,000 arrivals per month in the Dadaab refugee camp alone. The arrival figures however later drastically decreased to

The projects funded by the ERF targeted nearly 1 million beneficiaries i.e. 987,980 for humanitarian needs in the various sectors that include: Agriculture and Livestock; Early Recovery; Education; Food Security; Protection; Nutrition and Water and Sanitation.

2


Emergency Response Fund – Kenya Annual Report 2011

Country Map

3


Emergency Response Fund – Kenya Annual Report 2011

Information on Contributors Donor contributions to humanitarian response in the country is channeled to three OCHA managed humanitarian funding mechanisms: i) Kenya Emergency Humanitarian Response Plan (EHRP); ii) the Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF); and iii) the ERF.

the Agriculture and Livestock Sector. As the level and intensity of needs increased over the course of the year, the humanitarian country team requested support from the CERF rapid response window, and received $16.7 million for response in food, nutrition, health, WASH and agriculture and for refugee assistance.

EHRP- In December 2010, humanitarian partners launched the 2011+ Kenya EHRP requesting $526 million for interventions in eight sectors for drought response, for the multi-sector response to refugees, and for coordination. As the crisis in Somalia escalated and drought conditions in Kenya intensified, the appeal requirements increased to $742 million, the largest amount ever requested for Kenya through a consolidated appeal mechanism. At the end of 2011, the appeal was 71.2% (US$528 million) funded with the bulk of the funding channeled to the Food Aid sector (85%) and Multi-sector Assistance to Refugees (70%).

ERF – Contributions to the ERF since June 2009 to 2011 amounted to $6,344,360. No contributions were received in 2010. Carryover funds from 2009 were used to implement projects in 2010. In 2011, $3.2 million was used to support implementation of 22 projects.

All the funding mechanisms complement each other in terms of gap filling and strengthening response for greater impact.

Below is a graph showing individual donor contributions to the Kenya ERF from 2009 to 2011.

CERF - During 2011, Kenya received two allocations amounting to $22 million from the CERF. In January 2011 Kenya was selected to receive $6 million under the first annual allocation from the under-funded emergencies window. The funds were used to support the on-going refugee operation and the drought response by

Donor Contributions 2009 - 2011 (US$) 1,500,000 1,000,000 500,000 0 SIDA Norway

Y 2009

Y 2010

1,721,530

Y 2011 773,754

871,179

DFID

1,584,786

DEZA/SDC

1,392,111

Public

1,000

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Emergency Response Fund – Kenya Annual Report 2011

Fund Overview Summary of ERF Allocations in 2011 Requested for 2011 in US$ 2,000,000

Carry over from 2010 in US$ 1,004,994

Amount received in 2011 in US$ 3,752,097

ERF allocations in 2011 by partner type in US$

ERF allocations in 2011y project type in US$

UN Agencies

0

Emergency response

International NGOs National NGOs

2,193,087 1,183,361

Preparedness

Total

3,230,704

Total

37%

WASH

36%

Food Security

13%

Protection

5%

Nutrition

5%

Early Recovery

4% 0

1,187,108 1,172,360 433,089 147,991 147,753 142,403 400,000

800,000

5

2,640,814 735,634 3,230,704

Kenya ERF allocation by Sector (US$ and % of Total) Agriculture & Livestock

Total available in 2011 in US$ 4,757,091

1,200,000


Emergency Response Fund – Kenya Annual Report 2011

Kenya ERF 2011 allocation by Province (US$ and % of Total) 50%

Eastern

1,627,203

27%

North Eastern

872,421

13%

Nairobi

5%

Eastern / North Eastern

5%

Rift Valley 0

433,089 150,000 147,991 400,000

800,000

1,200,000

6

1,600,000


Emergency Response Fund – Kenya Annual Report 2011

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Emergency Response Fund – Kenya Annual Report 2011

Results of ERF Projects per Sector Overview of Agriculture and Livestock

O

th er

Be an Po ta to /C as sa va Ve ge ta bl e

ea

P

pe a

Pi ge on

ow

C

G ra m

re en

G

So rg hu m

M ai ze

The 2010 short rains (October-December) performed poorly in general and had significant food security implications that resulted in severe crop losses of over 90% of the overall anticipated maize crop in marginal agricultural areas. The short rains account for over 70% of annual output in the marginal agricultural zone. The graph below details the crops grown by farmers during the 2010 short rains season along with the percentage of households who experienced complete crop Crops Planted and Crop Failure Experienced failure. More drought tolerant crop varieties, 100% 90% particularly legumes like cowpeas and green 80% grams, have been shown to perform well, even in 70% 60% dry conditions. Based on this evidence, the 50% intervention provided a diverse seed package to 40% 30% farmers and tying this to information sharing and 20% capacity building to promote more extensive use 10% 0% of drought tolerant crops. Good quality seeds had a further advantage in that the crop seed yielded was still of a high standard and can be re-used for several seasons thereby enhancing sustainability. % of HH who Planted Crop

In addition, livelihood assets such as livestock in pastoral and agro-pastoral households were protected by de-worming and vaccinations while households benefitted from cash injections into the local economy. % Farmers Experienced Complete Crop Failure (No Harvest)

Number of projects

Budget in US$

8

1,187,108

Implementing agencies Kenya Red Cross, Vetworks, VSF-Suisse, VSF-Germany, ACF(2), PISP,CRS

Geographic Area Marsabit, Isiolo, Makueni, Kitui, Wajir

Outputs ■ Total number of beneficiaries – 49,875 households Gender consideration: The nature of the projects under this sector focused on households as the unit of targeting. Nonetheless, the projects had special consideration for women, men, young, elderly and other vulnerable categories. ■ Project results: Through projects under this sector livelihood assets in pastoral and agro-pastoral households were protected by de-worming and vaccinations of 211,800 livestock of different species. The project injected cash into the local economy through slaughter destocking of 11,288 small ruminants worth KES. 12.9 million (US$157,654). The distribution of meat from the destocking contributed to enhanced food security for the targeted households and provided a source of proteins and also reduced negative coping mechanisms. 2,970 livestock (breeding stock) were reached through supplementary feeding. In addition, 1,000 households benefitted through the provision of seeds and tools. An additional 300 households received cash transfers amounting to $115 per household for purchase of a 90 kg sack of maize and a 90 kg sack of beans, which made a significant contribution to their food requirements over the program Animals being presented for slaughter destocking in Isiolo / VSF-S period. Under VSF Germany’s slaughter destocking program,

8


Emergency Response Fund – Kenya Annual Report 2011

3,000 households benefitted from the distribution of meat The method of destocking in the two communities in Marsabit involves slaughter destocking. Each household benefits by presenting four small ruminants for slaughtering and receives 1120 Kenyan shillings per animal. These activities have enable households to rapidly access cash to meet their minimum food basket and calorific requirements. A sample data collected from nutritional surveillance sections at clinics in two of the locations indicated a decline (however slow) in the rates of severe and moderate malnutrition amongst children U/5 and pregnant and lactating mothers. The statistics show a decline of aggregate figure of malnutrition amongst the aforementioned vulnerable groups from an average of 280 persons in April to 263 in May 2011, a 7% decrease. ■ The projects contributed to building community resilience through cash for assets, protection of livelihood assets through animal health care services and provision of livestock feed supplements and hay relief. This ensured that communities will still be able to cope with future disasters after the emergency. ■ ERF’s added value to the project: The ERF funds provided an opportunity for timely response (project implementation is between two to six months) and helped in preventing livestock losses or value depreciation from the impacts of drought. The ERF also allowed the building of communities’ capacity to contribute to project implementation through beneficiary involvement in project implementation. The ERF funding also provided an early opportunity to respond to the drought and save the pastoralists from losing their livestock to the drought and also disposing their livestock through the destocking project.

Overview of Early Recovery Early recovery interventions are key in order to mitigate the impacts of recurrent droughts and build resilience. Early recovery interventions involve a number of activities that include, among others, protecting households’ livestock productive assets through hay distribution and livestock vaccinations; rebuild households’ food crop seed banks with appropriate seed varieties; and enhance the use of weather information for agricultural planning. Number of projects 1

Budget in US$ 142,403

Implementing agencies Eastern Community Development and Humanitarian Organization (ECDHO)

Geographic Area Makueni County

Outputs ■ Total number of beneficiaries – 12850 households ■ Gender consideration: The targeting criteria gave attention to female headed households and special needs of children headed households. ■ Project results: 1000 households were reached with assorted drought tolerant seeds, capacity building on appropriate agricultural practices and the utilization of meteorological early warning information for agricultural planning, 200 households were reached with fodder production and management technical support and grass seeds which realized the reseeding of an estimated 200 acres of pasture land. 10,000 households were reached with post harvest management campaigns. The farming activities during the short rains were supported through provision of livestock feed to 500 draught animals for 450 vulnerable households. Through the project, 14200 livestock were de-wormed and 1200 households trained on the livestock husbandry and supplied with ecto- pests control chemicals. ■ ERF’s added value to the project: The ERF funding helped in the early recovery of vulnerable households who could not afford planting materials and thus improved households’ food security through own production.

9


Emergency Response Fund – Kenya Annual Report 2011

Overview of Food Security Drought also had a significant impact on chronically poor urban populations in the Nairobi slums due to a sharp rise in the price of basic staple foods. The ERF funded projects generally aimed at reducing food insecurity and malnutrition of inhabitants in informal settlements in Nairobi by increasing households’ purchasing power and food access. Project activities included Cash for Work (CFW), small scale urban agriculture and hygiene and nutrition awareness campaigns and which allowed slum dwellers to access cash. The money helped the food insecure populations cope with the food price crisis, improve environmental conditions of the settlements and enhance hygiene and nutrition" Solidarites International has produced a video of its ERF funded project focusing on, "Building community resilience to cope with soaring food prices".

Small scale urban agriculture: seed, seedling and sacks distribution for domestic use / COOPI

To view the video please click on the following link: Building community resilience to cope with soaring food prices, or directly at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WTFPauqJzqA&feature=youtu.be

Number of projects 3

Implementing agencies

Budget in US$ 433,089

Solidarites International, Concern Worldwide, COOPI

Geographic Area Mukuru, Korogocho, and Huruma slums, – Nairobi

Outputs

■ Total number of beneficiaries – 8,816 households ■ Gender consideration: The projects targeted generally gave priority to vulnerable female headed households and vulnerable children. ■ Project results: The projects enhanced food security for 6,816 households in the informal settlements Nairobi through establishment of sack gardens for production of vegetable, cash for work projects and disbursement of a monthly stipend to cushion vulnerable households against soaring food prices. The projects also incorporated hygiene and sanitation programmes especially in river banks and drainage channels. The project also integrated hygiene and sanitation practices through information and advocacy messages to at least 5400 and protection of 500 meters of river banks. Through integrated capacity building programmes the projects also enhanced resilience of the households to cope with high food prices in urban areas. ■

Shoats destocked 1,400. 500 households given cash. 6 animal health workers trained.

■ ERF’s added value to the project: The ERF funding provided an opportunity for stakeholders to understand

vulnerabilities in urban areas and respond to needs of affected people in urban settings.

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Emergency Response Fund – Kenya Annual Report 2011

Overview of Protection Natural disasters such as drought and floods have led to displacement of populations and led to separation of children from their families. Drought conditions in 2011 resulted in separated and unaccompanied minors from the entire North Rift of Kenya. ERF funds have supported an innovative and attractive approach to the needs of the unaccompanied, orphaned and abandoned children affected by hunger and malnutrition. The project works with street children using innovative, attractive approaches therefore, the specific objectives of the project and what they must achieve to fulfill the overall aims are as follows: - Use of sports: the project will use the medium of sport (street soccer, basketball, volleyball, pool, martial arts etc) and recreational activities including art, drama music and theatre as a method to pull street children to the 2 centres to act as an incentive for them to return on a regular basis and as a tool for development. - The project will also establish 2 safe centres in Eldoret town. The centres will follow the model of youth friendly centres, providing street children with food and nutritional support, counseling, health, shelter, sanitation, education assessment services, psychosocial needs analysis and protection as they prepare for long term reintegration and education. Number of projects 1

Implementing agencies

Budget in US$ 147,991

Kenya Community Sports Foundation (KESOFO)

Geographic Area Eldoret- Uasin Gishu

Outputs

■ Total number of beneficiaries – 1000 street children ■ Gender consideration: The project targets vulnerable unaccompanied children. ■ Project results: The project is ongoing and will address protection issues affecting vulnerable children rehabilitation of street children, establishment of safe children playing spaces and creation of HIV/AIDS awareness. ■ ERF’s added value to the project: The ERF funding provided an opportunity for stakeholders to focus on street children

who are most vulnerable during the high food prices crises in the urban areas and address the underlying issues in the conflict hotspots in the target geographic areas.

Overview of Nutrition Drought conditions have contributed to high malnutrition rates. ERF funds to IMC was aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality related to acute malnutrition among children of under-five years and pregnant and lactating women (PLW) in the four districts of Meru North. The project seeks to achieve this by identifying and treating malnourished children as well as PLW through implementation of High Impact Nutrition Interventions. Number of projects 1

Budget in US$ 147,753

Implementing agencies International Medical Corps UK

Geographic Area Meru district

Outputs

Total number of beneficiaries – 25,997 beneficiaries Gender consideration: The projects targeted generally gave priority to vulnerable female headed households and vulnerable children. Project results: The project is supporting the implementation of High Impact Nutrition Interventions in Meru. The project is targeting 24,055 children under 5 years and 1862 pregnant and Lactating women. The project will also enhance the capacity of health workers in the district to implement the project. ERF’s added value to the project: The ERF provided was instrumental in filling a critical gap by providing an opportunity to address acute malnutrition among children under five years and pregnant and lactating women in an area that was not 11


Emergency Response Fund – Kenya Annual Report 2011

targeted by other stakeholders.

Overview of WASH Mandera: At the peak of the drought crisis, humanitarian reports indicated increase in trekking distances in search of water for domestic and livestock use from the normal 5 to 10 km to 10-30 km. It was estimated that households were consuming an average of 3-5 litres/person/day compared to the usual 10 lts/person/day. In addition, the cost of water had reportedly gone up with a 20 litre jerry can being sold for Kshs 20 up from Kshs 2. Cases of conflict over scarce water resources had been reported in Mandera (Boji Garse). The schools,health centres and villages targeted for water trucking support are those without permanent water supply sources and relying on water ferried from elsewhere. Emergency repairs and fuel subsidy to strategic water sources ensure their continued functionality and water access to all for domestic and livestock use. Hygiene promotion and water treatment activity targeted communities relying on hand dug wells, particularly areas characterized by high incidence of diarrheal diseases. COOPI ERF implemented project: Emergency support to distressed households in Mandera county

Number of projects 8

Implementing agencies

Budget in US$ 1,172,360

Northern Aid (2), Wajir South Development Association (WASDA), Danish Refugee Council(DRC), Islamic Relief Worldwide, World Vision, Catholic Relief Services (CRS), COOPI

Geographic Area Wajir, Mandera, Moyale, Kitui, Isiolo

Outputs

Total number of beneficiaries – 87,578 households Gender consideration: The projects targeted the entire communities but particularly were of great benefit to women who are the ones in search for water and have to walk long distances in absence of these interventions. Project results: The projects ensured that 87,578 households had access to safe drinking water through repairs of boreholes and training on hygiene promotion, installation of generators and submersible pumps, water trucking and fuel subsidies to boreholes. Maintenance and fuel subsidies to 25 strategic water points. The interventions also supported water access for 527,074 livestock of various species (camels, goats, cattle, sheep, donkeys etc). 527,074, livestock accessed water. 156,104 animals were vaccinated or received prophylactic treatment. 1,000 breeding stock received hay and feed supplements. ERF’s added value to the project: The ERF funding provided early response and saved lives of the targeted beneficiaries as well as protecting their livelihood assets. The project has contributed to stabilization of pastoralist’s livelihoods as well as setting the pace for recovery phase. The project has also contributed to reduced vulnerability level by curtailing further displacement of pastoralists and their herds from their current locations/villages while also promoting protection of few existing water infrastructure such as water pans, boreholes and roads through devising water drainages to allow water flows. The activities around the protection of water resources has resulted in continuous supply of adequate clean water which in turn has resulted in reduced level of water borne diseases. 12


Emergency Response Fund – Kenya Annual Report 2011

Summary and analysis of achievements its coordination capacity. This ultimately had a positive impact for the prioritization exercise for ERF funding. The dedicated sector coordination capacity for 5 sectors and in some cases dedicated information management capacity resulted in availability of more consistent analysis of needs, coverage and gaps across all sectors and which in turn informed the sectors and Technical Review Board responsible for reviewing project proposals to make decisions on areas of humanitarian intervention to facilitate effective targeting of assistance and response to cover gaps.

ERF contribution to enhanced Coordination The ERF is a tool that substantially contributed to enhanced coordination among humanitarian partners and donors in 2011. The ERF improved coordination by strengthening the link between priorities and funding decisions. Information on donor funding decisions was followed up through telephone interviews and one-onone meetings with donors. In addition, the peak of the humanitarian crisis in 2011 triggered OCHA to ramp up ______________________________________________ Innovative

Programs

and

Lessons

Learned households received a cash transfer with the support from a local bank (Equity Bank). Over 270 families immediately after the cash transfer were able to withdraw and use the money to acquire food and essential commodities at home.

Cash Transfer Programming gaining currency within the ERF There is a growing recognition that the use of cash transfers and vouchers in an emergency enables immediate access to food and nutrition and also kick starts the recovery process.

Financial literacy for 300 Households: Beyond the humanitarian assistance that facilitated purchase of essential commodities, the 300 households also received the opportunity to be financially empowered. As an exit strategy, linkage to financial institutions was paramount. Equity Bank rolled out a 12 weeks training for the beneficiaries on financial literacy with an aim of equipping them with skills to sustain savings individually and in groups. Equity Bank has a micro-finance and loaning policy working with a person holding a bank account with the bank. Therefore EB has an interest to ensure the bank accounts remain open and facilitate continuity of the accounts through productivity and savings by the rural vulnerable.

Cash Transfer Programming complementing Agricultural support - Cash transfer activities have provided respite to food security emergency situations in the short term and particularly prior to the next harvests that results in the necessity to address immediate food insecurity at the household level. High food prices in combination with low incomes, insufficient relief supplies and failed harvests (leading to little or no household food stocks) are putting great strain on the capacity of households to access sufficient food. Given that households need to acquire the vast majority of their food through purchase, and assuming that food availability in the local markets is maintained, household purchasing power for food access is critical. ACF’s Cash transfers program presents an effective means of quickly ensuring that households can access the food they require whilst providing them with the flexibility to choose what they want, including the purchase of other essential items and services. Empowering beneficiaries humanitarian assistance

beyond

Complementarity in program implementation Most of the ERF projects complemented already similar existing projects or were pioneer projects for emerging needs. Examples World Food Programme (WFP) has supported the Government of Kenya through Home Grown School Feeding Programme (SFP) in most schools of Kajiado County. However, some schools have not been beneficiaries of this SFP and are therefore affected by the

immediate

Financial literacy for 300 households - Through the cash transfer program implemented by COOPI, 300 13


Emergency Response Fund – Kenya Annual Report 2011

current drought and famine. World Vision Kenya (WVK) through support of ERF funds filed the gap by providing school meals to the children thereby enhancing school enrollment and retention rate. Vetworks is another organization that worked alongside other organizations in complementing activities while implementing its ERF funded project that focused on protection and rebuilding of livestock assets

Currently the project is implemented alongside other complementary livestock interventions funded by FAO Kenya (with funding channeled through the Kenya EHRP/CAP). The ERF component of the project focuses on poultry vaccinations, vector control, disease surveillance and de-worming); as well as supplementary feeding. The CAP funded component focused on poultry restocking aimed at distributing 12,500 local improved indigenous birds to 2500 households in 12 other districts in Kitui and Makueni.

Of note is the complementarity of this ERF project with other funding sources and agency interventions.

Project Monitoring recipient agencies. Both mid and end of term Narrative and Financial project reports from the agencies are made available to OCHA. OCHA aims to increase the frequency of field visits to ERF funded projects and to put in place other monitoring mechanisms such as telephone interviews where field visits are not possible.

Monitoring and Reporting: Although limited monitoring activities took place in 2011 due to the limited capacity within OCHA as well as budget constraints; this area is among the priorities for the ERF for 2012. This activity has in the meantime been primarily undertaken by the

Gender Consideration The Gender Marker will be fully rolled out in 2012. However an analysis of Gender incorporation in projects implemented in 2011 revealed that most projects had made an appreciable effort in incorporating gender perspectives particularly in the selection of target groups through targeting female headed households; the participation and involvement of both men and women in the implementation of the projects (more women seemed engaged in the projects than men); and in the overall strategies that were used in community mobilization. The following are some of the areas that would be necessary for the project implementers to further strengthen some of the projects: 1. Inclusion of capacity building activities on rights and leadership skills (particularly to the project committees) during the implementation and linkages to existing structures, e.g. to the

2.

14

gender and social affairs offices that could continuously support capacity building of community groups even after the exit of the implementing partners for sustainability. This not only serves to strengthen women’s representation in decision making project committees; which has been identified as a gap area to focus on; but also builds the confidence in leadership thereby enhancing participation in project planning and implementation, a critical aspect in good programming. Training of implementing partners and the beneficiaries-during implementation on Gender, GBV and SEA in humanitarian programming, including provision and development of easy to use tools and the Gender Marker to guide implementation


Emergency Response Fund – Kenya Annual Report 2011

Conclusion and Way Forward The ERF has proved to be an effective tool in responding to immediate humanitarian needs as well as supporting the early recovery of disaster affected households.

Beneficiaries have been receptive of the support and efficiently utilized it to rebuild their livelihoods.

A number of initiatives for the Fund are planned for 2012 with the aim of promoting effective programming and transparency. The initiatives include:

Demonstrating impact of the Fund Information products including the annual reports will be able to tell the story of how the funds have been used to help the affected populations. In addition, donor missions to the field will be carried out to offer the donors an opportunity to see first-hand the response on the ground using ERF funds.

Strengthening the Governance Structure of the Fund The establishment of the Advisory Board (AB) remains high on OCHA’s and the HC’s agenda. The AB will greatly assist in providing guidance on policy issues and strategic direction of the Fund.

Strengthening Monitoring and Reporting OCHA aims to increase the frequency of field visits to ERF funded projects and to put in place other monitoring mechanisms such as telephone interviews where field visits are not possible. OCHA's increased field presence in April 2012 in Dadaab, Lodwar and in upper Eastern is expected to facilitate this process.

Increase in size of the Fund The small size of the fund meant that fund disbursements have predominantly been undertaken in proactive rounds and there has been limited availability of funds on an adhoc basis for new emergencies. The current size of the Fund is $ 2 million. This may be reviewed for 2012 to increase the size to $ 4 million in addition to reviewing the current ceiling of funds per project of $ 150,000 to $200,000 for better impact in project implementation.

Roll out of the Gender Marker in the ERF The application of the Gender Marker is now mandatory in pooled funds. Follow up actions on application of the Gender Marker in the ERF include:

-The review of the ERF monitoring template to include a Gender checklist.

Annual Stakeholders’ Review of the Fund The Stakeholders’ review is aimed at gathering feedback from beneficiary agencies on the performance of the Fund. The information will be used to inform OCHA as manager of the Fund on areas for potential improvement.

-Training of ERF partners on the Gender Marker and other easy to use tools that will enhance the identification and better articulation of processes and methodologies that impact on the overall integration of gender. Efforts to advocate for commitment to gender by the humanitarian stakeholders (implementing partners and donors) through consistent engagement in donor fora and the humanitarian platforms.

Timely audit processes The delay in the procurement of auditors through UNDP has resulted in the delay of remittance of the 20% approved fund balance to various agencies. In order to address this problem, OCHA will initiate through UNDP a Long Term Agreement (LTA) with an audit firm by July 2012. This will circumvent the lengthy procurement process required for every audit round.

-Increased involvement of cross cutting thematic focal points in monitoring missions to further identify issues on the ground to enhance support to the humanitarian partners and document progress and good practice.

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Emergency Response Fund – Kenya Annual Report 2011

Glossary AB – Advisory Board ACF – Action Against Hunger ASAL – Arid and Semi-Arid Lands CERF – Central Emergency Response Fund COOPI – Cooperazione Internationale (COOPI) CRS – Catholic Relief Services DEZA - Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC DEZA) DFID - Department for International Development DSG – District Steering Group ECDHO – Eastern Community Development and Humanitarian Organization (ECDHO) EHRP – Emergency Humanitarian Response Plan ERF – Emergency Response Fund HC – Humanitarian Coordinator HINI – High Impact Nutrition Interventions IMC- International Medical Corps KESOFO – Kenya Community Sports Foundation (KESOFO) LTA – Long Term Agreement NA- Northern Aid OCHA – Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs PLW – Pregnant and Lactating Women PISP – Pastoralist Integrated Support Programme (PISP) SDC - Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation SIDA - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency TRB – Technical Review Board WASDA – Wajir South Development Association

16


Emergency Response Fund – Kenya Annual Report 2011

Annex1. Kenya ERF Projects 2011 SN

Project code

Organisation

Start date

Project Title

End Date

Sectors

Area

Project Funding Status Amount (US$)

1

ERF-DMA-0462-016

7-Mar-11

2011 Drought response operation

14-Sep-11

Ended

149,125

ERF-DMA-0462-017

1-Mar-11

Wajir Drought Response Project

30-Sep-11

Agriculture & Livestock WASH

Marsabit

2

Kenya Red Cross Society (KRCS) Wajir South Development Association (WASDA)

15 locations in Wajir North

Ended

149,421

3

ERF-DMA-0462-018

Danish Refugee Council

31-Mar-11

Emergency Response to the drought in Fafi, Lagadera and Wajir South districts of North Eastern Province.

30-Jun-11

WASH

Lagadera, Fafi and Wajir South Districts

Ended

125,000

4

ERF-DMA-0462-019

Islamic Relief WorldWideKenya

13-Apr-11

Emergency WASH programme for the families affected by drought in North Eastern Kenya

31-May-11

WASH

Ended

150,000

5

ERF-DMA-0462-020

Catholic Relief Services Kenya Program

31-Mar-11

Isiolo Emergency Response Project

30-Sep-11

WASH

Ended

149,939

6

ERF-DMA-0462-021

Northern Aid

2-Apr-11

Mandera Emergency Drought Response

30-Sep-11

WASH

Ended

150,000

7

ERF-DMA-0462-022

Veterinaires Sans Frontieres -Germany

31-Mar-11

Rapid Drought Emergency Intervention for Pastoralists in Marsabit

30-Sep-11

Agriculture & Livestock

Ended

150,000

8

ERF-DMA-0462-023

Pastoralist Integrated Support Programme (PISP)

31-Mar-11

Marsabit Drought Emergency Response 2011 (MDEP 2011)

30-Jun-11

Agriculture &Livestock

Ended

150,000

9

ERF-DMA-0462-024

Actions Against Hunger(ACF)

1-Apr-11

31-Jul-11

Agriculture & Livestock

Ended

149,999

10

ERF-DMA-0462-025

VSF-Suisse

31-Mar-11

Rapid response to protect the livelihoods and productive assets of vulnerable households affected by drought conditions Emergency slaughter de-stocking in Isiolo district

North Eastern Kenya - Mandera (North and East) and Wajir (West and North) Oldonyiro, Kina & Central divisions of Isiolo Distrct Mandera West & Central DistrictsMandera County Maikona & North Horr (Ileret & Dukana) Divisions, Marsabit County North Horr; Marsabit North; Loyingalani;Marsabit south; Marsabit south central (Greater Marsabit Garbatulla District (Kinna, Sericho and Garbatulla Division)

30-Sep-11

Agriculture & Livestock

Greater Isiolo District

Ended

150,000

17


Emergency Response Fund – Kenya Annual Report 2011

11

ERF-DMA-0462-026

Cooperazione Internationale (COOPI)

31-Mar-11

Emergency Support to distressed households in Mandera County, North Eastern, Kenya (ESDH) Wajir-Moyale Emergency Response (WAMER) Project

30-Sep-11

WASH

Mandera County

Ended

150,000

12

ERF-DMA-0462-027

World Vision Kenya

31-Mar-11

30-Jun-11

WASH

Ended

150,000

29-Sep-11

Building Community Resilience to cope with increasing food crisis

25-Mar-12

Food Security

Wajir South (Wajir County) and GolboMoyale (Marsabit County) Mukuru slum in Nairobi

13

ERF-DMA-0462-028

Solidarites International

Ended

148,000

14

ERF-DMA-0462-029

Concern Worldwide

29-Sep-11

Food Security Crisis Intervention in Korogocho Slum, Nairobi

20-Mar-12

Food Security

Korogocho slums in Nairbi

Ended

137,096

15

ERF-DMA-0462-030

Catholic Relief Services Kenya Program

29-Sep-11

Kitui Emergency Response Project

20-Mar-12

Agriculture & Livestock

Ended

142,752

16

ERF-DMA-0462-031

Cooperazione Internationale (COOPI)

27-Sep-11

Food Security and Lielohood Assistance for Vulnerable Slum Dwellers in Nairobi

NCE granted to 4/20/2012

Food Security

Ended

147,993

17

ERF-DMA-0462-033

Actions Against Hunger(ACF) USA

29-Sep-11

29-Feb-12

Agriculture & Livestock

Ended

148,000

18

ERF-DMA-0462-034

VETWORKS Eastern Africa

23-Dec-11

26-Jun-12

Agriculture & Livestock

Makueni & Kitui County

Ongoing

147,232

19

ERF-DMA-0462-035

Kenya Community Sports Foundation (KESOFO)

25-Nov-11

Emergency Response to improve Food Security and promote early recovery in drought affected marginal farming areas Mitigating Makueni and Kitui County livestock keeping population risk exposure to ravaging drought The Child-Safe Spaces for Sports & Feeding Project

Mutha, Mutomo, Yatta divisions -Kitui district Huruma & Mathare informal settlements, Starehe constituency, Nairobi Kibwezi & Makindu districts (Makueni County)

31-May-11

Protection

Ended

147,991.

20

ERF-DMA-0462-036

Eastern Community Development and Humanitarian Organization (ECDHO)

27-Sep-11

Makueni District Rapid Drought Response Project

25-Nov-11

Early Recovery

Urban - Eldoret Town; Uasin Ngishu County Makueni countyMakindu

Ended

142,403

21

ERF-DMA-0462-039

International Medical Corps UK

4-Nov-11

Scaling Up of High Impact Nutrition Interventions at the Health Facilities in Meru North District of Kenya

NCE granted to 4/30/2012

Nutrition

Ended

147,753

22

ERF-DMA-0462-040

Northern Aid

23-Dec-11

Mandera Emergency Floods Response Project

26-Mar-12

WASH

Tigania west, Tigania east, Igembe, North and Igembe south districts of Meru. Mandera County

Ended

148,000.00 3,230,704

18


Emergency Response Fund – Kenya Annual Report 2011

For further information, please contact OCHA Eastern Africa: Gabriella Waaijman, Deputy Head of Office, waaijman@un.org, Tel. (+254) 732600012 Patrick Lavand’Homme, Head of Coordination in Kenya, lavand’Homme@un.org, Tel. (+254) 710602326 Luluwa Ali, ERF Fund Manager, ali19@un.org, Tel. (+254) 727532144 OCHA ERF Updates are available on: http://ochaonline.un.org/kenya/Financing/EmergencyResponseFund/tabid/5507/language/en-US/Default.aspx

19


Emergency Response Fund Kenya: Annual Report 2011 | OCHA