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WILLIAM S. BOYD SCHOOL OF LAW

SALTMAN CENTER FOR CONFLICT RESOLUTION The Desert Talking Piece Fall 2015

• Hal Abramson and Lisa Blomgren Amsler Named Saltman Senior Scholars • Pat Mulroy Joins Saltman Center as a Practitioner in Residence • Boyd Students Win Regional ABA Client Counseling Competition

Saltman Center Director Jean Sternlight Earns Multiple Awards WILLIAM S. BOYD SCHOOL OF LAW

University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William THE S. DESERT BoydTALKING School of Law PIECE 1


The Desert Talking Piece Fall 2015

Director Sternlight Earns Multiple Awards

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aybe this is what happens when you let the world see your gray hair. This year Jean Sternlight has been awarded two major honors in the field of conflict resolution. The American Bar Association Section on Dispute Resolution named Sternlight its 2015 Outstanding Scholar at its spring meeting in Seattle. Announcing the award, the ABA Section stated, “Professor Sternlight is a rigorous and thoughtful scholar and colleague who has written prolifically and passionately about arbitration and its place in the justice system. She has mentored the next generation of dispute resolvers, dispute resolution scholars, and practitioners; organized special journal issues on dispute resolution topics;

participated in organizing national gatherings; and taken a leadership role on the policy of dispute resolution both within the Section of Dispute Resolution and nationally. Professor Sternlight’s work and efforts have contributed greatly to the field.” In addition, the American College of Civil Trial Mediators awarded Sternlight its 2015 Lifetime Achievement Award at its annual conference held over the summer in California. While Sternlight is not a mediator, she has written extensively and enthusiastically about mediation in both books and articles. She observes that she is particularly thrilled to get the award as “some of my best friends are mediators!”

CONGRATULATIONS!

The Saltman Center for Conflict Resolution at the UNLV William S. Boyd School of Law congratulate Jean Sternlight on receiving the 2015 American Ba Association Section of Dispute Resolution’s Award for Outstanding Scholarly Work and the American College of Civil Trial Mediators’ 2015 Lifetime Achievement Award.

FROM LEFT: SALTMAN CENTER FOUNDERS MICHAEL AND SONJA SALTMAN, JEAN STERNLIGHT, AND BOYD SCHOOL OF LAW DEAN DANIEL HAMILTON

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es ar d

TOP ROW: SALTMAN CENTER ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR LYDIA NUSSBAUM, FOUNDERS MICHAEL AND SONJA SALTMAN, AND BOYD SCHOOL OF LAW DEAN DANIEL HAMILTON BOTTOM ROW: JEAN STERNLIGHT WITH HER PARTNER, PROFESSOR SYLVIA LAZOS, AND THEIR CHILDREN

JEAN STERNLIGHT’S VIEWS ON LEGAL SCHOLARSHIP Upon being awarded the 2015 ABA Dispute Resolution Section Award for Outstanding Scholarly Work, Director Sternlight gave a brief acceptance speech, the gist of which is set out below. After acknowledging her deep appreciation for her family, sponsors Michael and Sonja Saltman, Boyd School of Law Dean Daniel Hamilton, and the dispute resolution community, Sternlight provided her views on the nature of dispute resolution scholarship: To be perfectly honest, when I first entered legal academia in 1992 I was appalled at some of the culture I encountered relating to scholarship. Though this was back in the day, before Al Gore had invented the internet, I used to receive long lists of law review articles that had been published in a given week. As I saw the listed titles I tended to think ‘Don’t these professors have something better to do with their time?’ I had just spent eight years in practice, where I had seen that many people with good claims could not get the legal help that

WILLIAM S. BOYD SCHOOL OF LAW

they needed, so I wondered whether some of the brilliant professors who were writing those articles might better spend their time providing assistance to people who needed legal help. Second, I was concerned that many in legal academia, at least at the school where I first taught, perceived that a law professor had to make a choice between being a good teacher and being a good scholar. They thought that interest in teaching signaled a lack of scholarly commitment. But I did not buy it. While I had these concerns about the culture of scholarship in legal academia, I knew I still loved writing. Finding the time to do more writing was one of the reasons I had chosen to enter legal academia in the first place. So, I vowed to try to do only worthwhile scholarship—that would serve a cause beyond mere belly-button gazing or obtaining glory for myself or my school. And, I vowed to try to be both a good teacher and a good scholar. Indeed, my very first article in legal academia, entitled “Symbi-

otic Legal Theory and Legal Practice,” made the point that teaching and theory can be mutually supportive. I have focused on two main goals in my writing: making the world more just, and trying to train better attorneys. My work critiquing mandatory arbitration is ultimately focused on how we can use dispute resolution tools to improve our world. Indeed, I have tried to end most of my articles in this vein with the word “justice.” My other strand of work, focused on training better attorneys, has examined both how to help attorneys use psychological tools to more effectively represent their claims and also how to integrate the teaching of dispute resolution throughout the curriculum, again in order to improve law practice. I love our field of dispute resolution because it helps to serve these ends of creating a more just society and also improving lawyers’ ability to help their clients. I also love this field because all of you, my colleagues, are so wonderful.

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The Desert Talking Piece Fall 2015

NEW FACES

SENIOR SCHOLARS

Hal Abramson and Lisa Blomgren Amsler Named Saltman Senior Scholars

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rofessors Hal Abramson and Lisa Blomgren Amsler, both leading scholars and teachers in the field of conflict resolution, were named Saltman Senior Scholars in February 2015. Director Sternlight explains that “Both Hal and Lisa have longstanding ties to the Saltman Center and Boyd School of Law. Naming them Saltman Senior Scholars will reinforce this close connection and ensure that our program continues to benefit from the association with these two conflict resolution stars.” Abramson previously visited Boyd for a year and taught a course on mediation advocacy in the Saltman Summer Institute. Blomgren Amsler visited at Boyd for a year and a half, teaching courses on ADR and labor law and also helped to organize a major Saltman Center conference on Democracy and the Workplace. Both Blomgren Amsler and Abramson taught courses in the 2015 Saltman Summer Institute, and their new status as Saltman

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Senior Scholars ensures their return to Boyd often in future years. Abramson, a full-time faculty member at Touro Law Center in New York, is an expert in domestic and international commercial mediation, and has given classes and trainings throughout the United States as well as in numerous foreign countries. His award-winning book, Mediation Representation: Advocating as a Problem Solver, now in its third edition, was at the core of Abramson’s Saltman Summer Institute course on mediation advocacy. Abramson says, “It is my honor to have this opportunity to be formally associated with the innovative Saltman Center and to engage with its excellent faculty and the superb students at UNLV.” Blomgren Amsler is Professor and Keller-Runden Chair in Public Service at Indiana University’s School of Public and Environmental Affairs where she has taught since 1992. Editor of three books on dispute resolution and collaborative

governance, and author of more than 90 articles, monographs and book chapters, Blomgren Amsler is particularly known for her work with respect to systems design. Noting that while she is “a lawyer by training and practice,” Blomgren Amsler says she spends most of her time teaching in an interdisciplinary policy school. Blomgren Amsler reports, “It was a gift to be a visiting professor at the Boyd School of Law a few years ago and get to know its great faculty and terrific students. Becoming a Saltman Senior Scholar gives me an intellectual home with people who understand how important and universal the field of negotiation and dispute resolution is for all disciplines.”

WWW.LAW.UNLV.EDU


NEW FACES

PAT MULROY JOINS SALTMAN CENTER AS A PRACTITIONER IN RESIDENCE

A Leader in the International Water Community, Mulroy Brings a Wealth of Experience to Her New Role

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at Mulroy, a leader in the international water community for more than 25 years, has joined the Boyd School of Law as a Senior Fellow for Climate Adaptation and Environmental Policy and also as a Practitioner in Residence for the Saltman Center for Conflict Resolution. Along with UNLV, she shares appointments at the Desert Research Institute (DRI) and the Brookings Institution. “We are delighted to welcome Pat Mulroy to the UNLV Boyd School of Law,” said Daniel Hamilton, dean of the law school. “She has for decades been a leading authority in our state and around the world on the critical public policy issues surrounding water, conservation

WILLIAM S. BOYD SCHOOL OF LAW

and natural resources. We look forward to Ms. Mulroy working with our nationally recognized Saltman Center for Conflict Resolution and to forging new partnerships with DRI and the Brookings Institution.” In her new role at Boyd, Mulroy’s focus is on helping communities in waterstressed areas throughout the American Southwest and the rest of the world develop strategies to address increased water source volatility and identify solutions that balance the needs of all stakeholders. “We are fortunate to have Pat Mulroy as part of our dispute resolution team,” said Saltman Center Director Jean Sternlight. “Disputes over water have historically defined many civilizations, and certainly

that is particularly true in our parched Southwest. We are hopeful that with Ms. Mulroy’s help the Saltman Center can become an important contributor to the resolution of water disputes.” Mulroy has served as General Manager of both the Las Vegas Valley Water District and the Southern Nevada Water Authority (SNWA). Among her accomplishments, she was instrumental in the development of the SNWA, helping to guide Southern Nevada through an unprecedented period of growth and one of the worst droughts in the history of the Colorado River. Mulroy is a member of the Nevada Gaming Commission, as well as a member emerita of the Water Research Foundation Board of Trustees. THE DESERT TALKING PIECE

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The Desert Talking Piece Fall 2015

ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

AN INTERVIEW WITH PEGGY KING ’04 ies were under the direction of the late Dr. Craig Walton, who introduced me to the concept of “communitarianism.” We all exist in a variety of communities. I find the challenge of seeking to balance our individual roles with our obligations to those communities both difficult and fascinating. Through most of my time at Boyd, I focused on advocacy for parties who often are denied a voice in the system. During my last semester, I took an ADR class with a relatively new professor to Boyd named Jean Sternlight. It felt a perfect fit. For many disputes (excluding cases involving domestic violence), it seems eminently reasonable to bring all of the parties together to seek a resolution where there are not “winners” and “losers.” ADR essentially fed my “communitarian” drive.

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eggy King graduated from Boyd in December 2004 and now works as a full-time mediator at the Family Mediation Center at the Clark County Family Court.

What inspired you to get into law, mediation, and conflict resolution? Growing up as a kid, my family was a grab bag: my father was a Republican and an engineer; my mother a Democrat and an English teacher; and all three brothers are clergy, in three different denominations. Every meal involved running for a dictionary or encyclopedia to supplement the discussion du jour. Nonetheless, Watergate was the only time I ever heard raised voices. Fast-forward to the late ’90s, I was working on my master’s degree in Ethics and Policy Studies at UNLV when I was accepted into law school. Many of my graduate stud-

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What has been your career path? After law school, I took mediation training at the Neighborhood Justice Center (NJC). Afterward, I volunteered for them at every opportunity. I particularly loved working on victim offender mediations that they used to handle. We helped juvenile offenders who were diverted from detention negotiate with their victims (sometimes another juvenile) and drafted any agreements, keeping offenders out of the criminal justice system if they followed their agreement. In addition to doing the volunteer work with NJC, I was employed part-time with the Senior Citizens Law Project and on-call with Cirque, working backstage in wardrobe. I then got a full-time job doing legal research for Nevada Assistance for Injured Workers. I continued to volunteer for NJC, but my time was more limited. When I was offered the position at the Family Mediation Center, I finally stopped doing two and three

jobs at a time and concentrated on just one. What’s the biggest misconception or challenge about your field? I work at Family Court. Parties are “ordered” to mediation. Some clients feel that they won’t be able to settle their disputes, due to their prior communications with the other party. Because we are court-connected, many believe that we have the ability to decide their disputes. Instead, mediation is about self-empowerment. Mediators work to facilitate communication between parties, not to sit as a judge. What’s most challenging is that many of our clients have a history of substance abuse or mental illness or other issues that may impact their ability to negotiate on equal footing. Frequently, cases have some element of domestic violence. Balancing the power in the room is a constant challenge. Proudest moment in your post-law career? Being hired to be a full-time mediator at the Family Mediation Center was a proud moment for me. Not many happy events take place at family court, but I feel that my work there is significant and that I can assist families in reaching peaceful resolutions. I am also proud to be a member of the Clark County Domestic Violence Fatality Review Initiative, a multidisciplinary team that identifies indicators of escalating levels of domestic violence and makes recommendations to policymakers to reduce deaths. What would people be surprised to know about you? For more than 20 years following my undergraduate degree, I was a circus performer. For seven years with Ringling, my home was the circus train. Most of those years I worked as a clown, but I also did an aerial act until a rather impromptu descent from the trapeze landed me in the hospital. What can’t you work without? Flowers! I don’t buy coffee in the morning, but instead get flowers every week for my office. I try to keep my office looking serene and a bit happy.

WWW.LAW.UNLV.EDU


BOYD STUDENTS STEPHEN DAVIS AND SEAN YOUNG

HANDS-ON FOCUS

CLIENT COUNSELING Boyd Students Win Regional ABA Competition

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NLV William S. Boyd School of Law students Stephen Davis and Sean Young recently took first place in the 2015 American Bar Association (ABA) client counseling regional competition in Eugene, Ore. The ABA Law Student Division Client Counseling Competition is a simulation of a law office consultation where students conduct an interview with a client and then give options on how to proceed. This year, the mock clients all presented family law issues. To win the regional, Davis and Young defeated law students from Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, Utah and Wyoming. Advancing next to the national competition, held in Durham, N.C. in March, the team had a wonderful and educational time but did not prevail. Saltman Center Graduate Fellow Jae Barrick ’13 as well as Boyd School of Law Professors Lydia Nussbaum, Rebecca Scharf, and Jean Sternlight coached the team. Davis is a second-year student who began law school with 15 years of experience in construction management. During his time at Boyd, he has assumed leadership

2014-2015

Academic Year

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8 advanced clinic students sworn-in under the law student practice rule

roles in a variety of student organizations — he is president of Legally Speaking, the school’s chapter of Toastmasters International; vice president of the Organization of Part-time and Non-traditional Law Students; and treasurer of our student chapter of the Federal Bar Association. He is also a junior staff member on the Nevada Law Journal. Also in his second year, Young is the Richard L. Brown Community Service Scholarship recipient for his outstanding work in Boyd’s community service program. He serves as secretary of the Asian Pacific American Law Student Asso-

The Strasser Mediation Clinic

BY THE NUMBERS ... third-year Boyd law students

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WILLIAM S. BOYD SCHOOL OF LAW

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hours of facilitative mediation training and observations

husbands, wives, and parents at the Clark County Family Court who successfully resolved their disputes in mediation with the Clinic

100

ciation. He brought with him to law school experience in the business world. For more than eight years, Young and his family have owned and operated a dog grooming business in Las Vegas. Dealing with applicable state regulations of the family enterprise and developing operational policies and procedures sparked his interest in the law and prompted his decision to apply to Boyd.

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+

2014-2015 MEDIATION CLINIC

families, neighbors, businesses, judges, and lawyers provided with free mediation services by the Mediation Clinic

small claims and neighborhood cases mediated by Clinic students at the Neighborhood Justice Center

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The Desert Talking Piece Fall 2015

GUEST SPEAKER

PROFESSOR SHARON PRESS Regulating Mediation

T PHOTO COURTESY OF HAMLINE UNIVERSITY

his past spring, the Saltman Center invited Sharon Press, now a law professor at Hamline University, to lead several discussions on the pros and cons of taking a more regulatory approach to mediation. States vary tremendously in the extent to which they regulate mediation. Unsurprisingly perhaps, given its culture, Nevada exemplifies a state in which mediation is not highly regulated. While individual courts and state agencies do have certain rules and standards regarding mediation and mediators, we have no centralized state agency that governs mediation and, as a consequence, the nature of mediation varies substantially by context. Florida, in contrast to Nevada, exemplifies a centralized approach to regulating mediation. Press, former Director of the Florida Dispute Resolution Center, has once said, “Florida’s regulatory

scheme may not be the best, but it is certainly the most.” Florida has a centralized office that helps define and regulate mediation and set standards for mediators, mediation training, and mediation ethics. In her first talk, over the lunch hour, Professor Press shared her insights with law professors and students. Her second talk, in the evening, brought together judges, mediators, attorneys, and legislators from around the state. Using technology to beam the talk to an auditorium in Reno, hundreds of miles to the north, we brought together decision makers from the two most populous parts of the state. While we may not have reached consensus on all issues, certainly Professor Press helped begin an important conversation and brought us many new ideas to consider. We hope to continue to use technology to minimize our geographic distances.

GUEST SPEAKER

PROFESSOR THOMAS C. WRIGHT Truth and Reconciliation Commissions in Argentina and Chile When horrible human rights abuses occur, as happened in Chile and Argentina in the 1970s and 1980s, it is sometimes suggested that “truth and reconciliation commissions” should be used to help right the wrongs and restore civil society. Yet, not all such commissions are created equal and not everyone agrees that these commissions are the best way to achieve justice. Historian Thomas C. Wright, UNLV emeritus, spent much of

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his career studying human rights abuses and politics in Chile and Argentina. This spring, he shared results of his research in a talk cosponsored by the Saltman Center. Drawing from his most recent book, Impunity, Human Rights and Democracy: Chile and Argentina, 1990-2005, Wright argued that: “Truth commissions were useful in fostering reconciliation among some aggrieved Chileans and Argentines, but they did not

bring closure to all, especially to families of the disappeared who demanded not just truth, but justice. The truth commissions were also important in promoting justice by forwarding their findings to the courts, where immediately in Argentina and eventually in Chile, this information provided evidence against human rights violators when they were taken to court.”

WWW.LAW.UNLV.EDU


GUEST SPEAKER

PROFESSOR DONNA SHESTOWSKY How Litigants View Legal Procedures

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ll too often we think about alternative legal procedures through the lens of attorneys, rather than disputants themselves. Yet, it is disputants more than lawyers whose lives will be affected by the choice of whether to litigate, mediate, arbitrate or negotiate a particular dispute. And, the empirical work of Professor Donna Shestowsky, U.C. Davis, teaches that disputants and attorneys do not necessarily view process choices in the same way as one another. Last fall, Professor Shestowsky presented her work on how litigants view legal procedures “ex ante,” i.e. before the dispute has been resolved, to a room of fascinated law professors and students. Drawing on the data explored in depth in her article from the Iowa Law Review, Shestowsky explained that litigants in multiple jurisdictions preferred mediation, judge

trials, and an unusual form of negotiation in which clients are present, to other forms of dispute resolution such as jury trial, arbitration, and traditional negotiation. Shestowsky, who holds a Ph.D. in psychology as well as a J.D., explained her results in terms of the psychology of procedural justice and litigant psychology more broadly. Her results will help lawyers represent their clients more effectively and will also help courts and other policymakers decide how best to design their processes. We look forward to a return visit by Professor Shestowsky once she has completed the next stage of her work: examining how disputants view various procedural alternatives once they have actually experienced them. Like the first, this new study promises great insights for attorneys, policymakers, and all friends of the Saltman Center.

GUEST SPEAKER

PROFESSOR SEAN FOLEY To Forgive but Not Forget: Saudi Arabia and the Middle East in the Age of ISIS In conjunction with the History and Political Science Departments at UNLV, the Saltman Center hosted Professor Sean Foley for a University Forum lecture, “To Forgive but Not Forget: Saudi Arabia and the Middle East in the Age of ISIS.” Professor Foley described the historic friendship between the United States and Saudi Arabia, a relationship dating back to the First World War. Saudi Arabia, in addition to enjoying a close ecoWILLIAM S. BOYD SCHOOL OF LAW

nomic relationship with the United States that is tied to Saudi Arabia’s great oil reserves and the United States’ consumption of fossil fuels, also shares a close cultural connection. Tens of thousands of Saudi students attend colleges and universities in the United States, and one of the largest McDonald’s franchises is in Riyadh. This close relationship, however, is threatened by the United States’ diplomatic discussions with

Iran. As Professor Foley explained, Saudi Arabia is a predominantly Sunni Muslim country, with deep suspicions of Iran, a majority Shi’a Muslim country. The Middle East region is increasingly being divided along fault-lines that divide these two geo-political competitors. Professor Foley warned that American failures to understand the mistrust between these two nations have been disastrous.

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The Desert Talking Piece Fall 2015

GUEST SPEAKER

KENNETH FEINBERG Mass Disaster Victim Compensation

In December, Kenneth Feinberg, renowned for helping to compensate victims of mass disasters, lectured at the Boyd School of Law to an enthusiastic audience. The Saltman Center co-sponsored the talk, which was part of the Judge Lloyd D. George Lecture on the Judicial Process. Feinberg, both attorney and mediator by training, has been key to resolving many of our nation’s most challenging and widely known disputes. He is best known for serving as the Special Master of the Federal September 11th Victim Compensation Fund of 2001. As he describes in his book What Is Life Worth?, Feinberg first entered this world of victim compensation when he was appointed Special Master in the Federal Agent Orange Product Liability litigation. Feinberg has also assisted in numerous other high-profile disasters, including

administering the Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund following the tragic shootings at Virginia Tech; running the Gulf Coast Claims Facility, established to process claims for compensation arising out of the Gulf of Mexico oil spill in 2010; and helping to resolve claims arising out of the General Motors Ignition Switch litigation. In his talk, Feinberg emphasized that all these programs are based on “thinking outside the box” of the traditional litigation system. As he states, “In my work I benefit from neither a degree in divinity nor one in psychology or psychiatry. But these specialties come to the fore in trying to do justice, in attempting to compensate fairly.” To watch a webcast of Feinberg’s talk, visit law.unlv.edu/saltman-center/webcasts

CONFERENCE

Magistrate Judges and the Transformation of the Federal Judiciary Sept. 25-26

THE ROLE OF FEDERAL MAGISTRATE JUDGES IN CONFLICT RESOLUTION

FORMER CHIEF JUDGE OF THE U.S. DISTRICT COURT OF NEVADA PHILIP PRO

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This September the Saltman Center will co-sponsor with Duke Law School and Boyd School of Law a conference that examines federal magistrate judges’ contribution to conflict resolution. The conference began as the brainchild of now-retired Judge Philip Pro, former Chief Judge of the U.S. District Court of Nevada and current member of the Saltman Center Board of Advisors, who began his judicial career as a federal magistrate judge. Topics explored by the conference will include better understanding of who magistrate judges are, their powers and the functions they perform, and how their role has been changed—and threatened—by recent constitutional jurisprudence. As Judge Pro has observed, “The Federal Magistrates Act of 1968, which created these judgeships, represented the culmination of years of effort to improve the quality of justice and to expedite the disposition of the growing caseloads in the federal courts.” Among many other duties, federal magistrate judges often develop and staff important ADR programs. In

the Ninth Circuit, for example, Magistrate Judge Valerie Cooke established a program where volunteers mediate pro se prisoners’ section 1983 civil rights claims. Often, magistrate judges themselves mediate pending matters, conduct settlement conferences, or provide early neutral evaluations. The collaboration between UNLV and Duke to put on this conference developed because Judge Pro recently completed an LL.M. in Judicial Studies at Duke, writing a thesis on magistrate judges’ role in the federal court system. Judge Pro, who after retiring from the federal bench joined JAMS as an arbitrator and mediator, argues that “the evolution of the Magistrate Judges System demonstrates the federal judiciary’s capacity to provide an accessible forum in which litigants can receive a fair, inexpensive, and expeditious resolution of their disputes.”

WWW.LAW.UNLV.EDU


FACULTY SPOTLIGHT

THE ROUND-UP

Jean Sternlight

Lydia Nussbaum

Director of the Saltman Center for Conflict Resolution and Michael and Sonja Saltman Professor of Law jean.sternlight@unlv.edu

Associate Director of the Saltman Center for Conflict Resolution, Director of the Strasser Mediation Clinic, and Associate Professor of Law lydia.nussbaum@unlv.edu

As discussed elsewhere in this newsletter, Director Sternlight received several important awards this year. She also published an article in the Brooklyn Law Review titled “Disarming Employees: How American Employers are Using Mandatory Arbitration to Deprive Workers of Legal Protection,” as well as an article in the Journal of Legal Education (with Jennifer Robbennolt) titled “Psychology and Effective Lawyering: Insights for Legal Educators.” As well, she participated in a panel, “Teaching Arbitration,” at the ABA Section of Dispute Resolution in Seattle, Wash. Director Sternlight gave numerous presentations to both practitioners and academics this year. For example, she spoke on the relevance of the psychology of ethics to negotiators and mediators in Las Vegas, Reno, Los Angeles, and San Antonio. She also presented on employment arbitration at UCLA and the University of Colorado, taught Las Vegas attorneys about the psychology of negotiation, provided university administrators with insights on conflict resolution, and co-facilitated a roundtable discussion on problem-solving lawyers with Associate Director Nussbaum at the annual meeting of the Society of American Law Teachers.

It has been a busy year for Professor Nussbaum. In addition to directing the Mediation Clinic and teaching a first-year law student elective on dispute resolution and problem-solving, she finished writing an article titled, “Mediation as Regulation: Expanding State Control of Private Disputes,” forthcoming in the Utah Law Review. Nussbaum also attended and presented at a number of conferences. At the AALS ADR Section Works in Progress Conference at Southwestern Law School, Nussbaum spoke about how mediation is increasingly being deployed by state legislatures to cure a variety of public ills, more plausibly in some instances than in others. Nussbaum also developed and participated in a panel at the ABA Dispute Resolution Section Conference in Seattle, Wash., on how states regulate disputants through a variety of statutory mediation requirements. Nussbaum also presented on mediation clinics with colleagues from around the country at the AALS Clinical Legal Education Conference in Rancho Mirage, Calif. Nussbaum had opportunities to collaborate with Director Sternlight in a variety of settings. Together, Sternlight and Nussbaum presented two CLE programs on mediation and judicial settlement organized in Las Vegas and in Reno by the State Bar of Nevada’s Dispute Resolution Section.

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WILLIAM S. BOYD SCHOOL OF LAW

SALTMAN CENTER FOR CONFLICT RESOLUTION

The Desert Talking Piece Fall 2015

2 Director Sternlight Earns Multiple Awards

8 Professor Thomas C. Wright: Truth and Reconciliation Commissions in Argentina and Chile

4 Hal Abramson and Lisa Blomgren Amsler Named Saltman Senior Scholars

9 Professor Donna Shestowsky: How Litigants View Legal Procedures

5 Pat Mulroy Joins Saltman Center as a Practitioner in Residence

9 Professor Sean Foley: To Forgive but Not Forget: Saudi Arabia and the Middle East in the Age of ISIS

6 Alumni Spotlight: An Interview with Peggy King ’04 7 Client Counseling: Boyd Students Win Regional ABA Competition 7 The Strasser Mediation Clinic by the Numbers 8 Professor Sharon Press: Regulating Mediation

EVENTS SEPT. 25-26, 2015 Conference: “Magistrate Judges and the Transformation of the Federal Judiciary” OCT. 15, 2015 Saltman Center Guest Speaker: Michael Helfand from Pepperdine University School of Law on “Between Law and Religion: When Religious Law Meets Arbitration” OCT. 26, 2015 Saltman Center Guest Speakers: Jane Murphy from the University of Baltimore School of Law and Jana Singer from the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law on “Divorced from Reality: Children, Parents and Problem-Solving Courts”

10 Kenneth Feinberg: Mass Disaster Victim Compensation 10 The Role of Federal Magistrate Judges in Conflict Resolution

For more information, visit www.law.unlv.edu/saltman-center/events Facebook “f ” Logo

11 Faculty Round-up

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Saltman Center for Conflict Resolution: Fall 2015 Newsletter  

Saltman Director Jean Sternlight earns multiple national awards, while we welcome Pat Mulroy, a leader in the international water community...

Saltman Center for Conflict Resolution: Fall 2015 Newsletter  

Saltman Director Jean Sternlight earns multiple national awards, while we welcome Pat Mulroy, a leader in the international water community...

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