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UNLV Registered Student Organization

Handbook


toc table of contents Introduction Location Website Contact Us

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5 5 5 5

Student Organization Registration Defining a RSO

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Organization Categories

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The UNLV Involvement Center

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Registration Registering a New Organization Re-Registering an Existing Organization

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Registration Eligibility Requirements

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Additional Governing Bodies

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Membership Guidelines General Membership Officers and Executive Boards Advisors

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Space Reservations on Campus Student Union Event Services Academic Buildings TAM Alumni Building

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Financing Your Organization

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Additional Benefits and Resources Student Organization Resource Center Involvement Fair

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RSO Conduct NSHE and Student Conduct Code RSO Related Policies

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RSO Development Resources Constitution and Bylaw Writing Delegating in Your Organization Effective Feedback Goal Setting Meeting Evaluation Checklist Motivating Your Members New Member Orientation Planning a Retreat Recruitment and Retention Teambuilding The Group Process Transitioning Your Organization

Appendix a. W-9 b. Liability Form c. Trademark and Licensing d. Risk Management Matrix e. RSO Expectation Discussion Worksheet f. Officer Checklist g. Member Checklist

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DISCLAIMER

This UNLV Registered Student Organization Handbook and/or any other written materials regarding Registered Student Organizations (hereinafter for ease of reference “Handbook�) is intended to be a guideline. It shall not be construed or interpreted to create an express and/or implied contract of any type. Also, it should not be construed or interpreted in any manner to create any legal, equitable and/or administrative rights, remedies and/or obligations greater than or in addition to those expressly created by Nevada and/or Federal statutory, administrative, common, or constitutional law. UNLV assumes no legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information provided in this Handbook or for any damages resulting in whole or in part, from any use of or reliance thereon even if UNLV has been specifically advised of the possibility of such damages. UNLV makes no claims, promises, or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of the contents of this Handbook and expressly disclaims liability for errors or omissions contained within its content. No warranty of any kind, implied, expressed, or statutory, including but not limited to the warranties of non-infringement of third party rights, title, merchantability, fitness for a particular use is given with respect to this Handbook. These guidelines are not intended to create, nor shall they in any manner be interpreted or construed to create, any third party beneficiary rights in any person and/or legal entity. This Handbook is subject to change, termination, updates, revisions, or amendments at any time with or without notice. Also, new policies and procedures regarding any subject matter contained herein may be adopted at any time with or without notice.

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Introduction

Being a part of a registered student organization (RSO) is only one example of getting involved at UNLV and can be one of the most fulfilling aspects of your college experience. Making new friends, building relationships, networking, and establishing a strong skill set for the workforce are just some of the many benefits that come from getting involved. Through your involvement in a RSO at UNLV there are great opportunities for you to develop leadership experience, interpersonal relationships, and decision making skills. Additionally, you can make an impact both on campus and in the larger Las Vegas community. This handbook provides information and resources to aid in the success of your RSO. Go Rebels! Location: Office of Civic Engagement and Diversity University of Nevada, Las Vegas 4505 S. Maryland Parkway Las Vegas, NV 89154-2008 The Office of Civic Engagement and Diversity (OCED) is located on the third floor of the Student Union in suite 316. OCED is responsible for overseeing RSO’s on behalf of UNLV and is your first resource for information regarding your RSO. Website: A directory of RSOs can be found at: getinvolved.unlv.edu Facebook: Involvement UNLV Twitter: @UNLVInvolvement Contact Us: Office Hours: Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Phone: (702) 895-5631 Fax: (702) 895-5700 Email: SU316@unlv.edu Student Organization Registration

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Student Organization Registration

Defining a RSO: Student Organization Registration Defining a RSO: The University of Nevada, Las Vegas defines a Registered Student Organization as a group of five or more students actively enrolled at UNLV who share a common purpose or interest. A Registered Student Organization is entirely operates and organized by actively enrolled students with the exception of a required full-time UNLV faculty or staff advisor. Registered Student Organizations may also be members of other University based communities that impose additional standards of conduct. Registered Student Organizations shall not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of race, age, color, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, gender, veteran status, or disability. The benefits of forming and becoming a member of a Registered Student Organization are explained herein. However, you need to be aware there are certain matters which are not benefits. Please read the important detailed [footnote] below. The term Registered Student Organization in this section shall also apply to the individual student members thereof. In summary, a Registered Student Organization is not an agent, representative, or employee of UNLV. You are not permitted to act as an extension of UNLV. Therefore, along with any other relevant considerations you must contemplate the following: ***Registered Student Organizations are not granted the non-profit nor tax-exempt statuses from UNLV. If an organization desires to be considered tax-exempt and/or or non-profit, they must obtain at their own expense such status through the IRS or a national affiliation. ***Registered Student Organizations receive no insurance coverage of any type from UNLV. UNLV makes no representation about the ability of a Registered Student Organization to obtain any private insurance coverage. The ability to obtain any type of insurance coverage is at the sole discretion, expense and risk of the Registered Student Organization. ***As an entity of the State of Nevada, UNLV, is insured through the State of Nevada’s self-insurance program and is afforded limited liabilities as per the Nevada Revised Statutes Chapter 41. You are not entitled to the coverage of this self-insurance program and the limited liabilities contained therein i.e. among other matters you are not entitled to a defense or indemnification. You do not have any liability coverage of any type. ***UNLV is not responsible whatsoever for the contracts, indebtedness, obligations, and/ or liabilities of a Registered Student Organization. You are responsible for the same. You

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are not entitled to advice and/or representation from UNLV Office of General Counsel. You are required to obtain and pay for any necessary legal advice and/or representation. A Registered Student Organization may be personally responsible for any damages from a lawsuit. ***You have no authority to enter into any type of contract (defined as a legal obligation of any type) which would bind UNLV. It is your duty and obligation to always make it clear to third parties any contract entered into is solely between them and your Registered Student Organization i.e. UNLV is not a party to the contract and is not responsible for the same. FOOTNOTE OR ATTACHMENT The State of Nevada ex. rel. Board of Regents of the Nevada System of Higher Education, on behalf of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (hereinafter “UNLV”) shall not be legally required to defend, indemnify, and/or hold harmless any Registered Student Organization and/or their individual members acting singularly or collectively (hereinafter for ease of reference “RSO”). UNLV’s association with any RSO is only for the limited purposes and extent specified in this Handbook and/or any other written materials. A RSO to the greatest extent permissible shall have the right to supervise, manage, operate, control, and direct the performance of the details of its operations. A RSO is not considered to be a legal entity of UNLV. A RSO and/or its members are not and shall not be construed in any manner to be employees, representatives, servants, officers and/or agents of UNLV. Therefore, an RSO is solely legally responsible for its actions and/or failure to act. A RSO is not covered by liability insurance by UNLV; does not qualify for tax exempt and/or nonprofit status from UNLV; is required to when necessary seek the advice and/or representation of its own legal counsel; is solely responsible to defend and personally pay any matter pertaining to legal proceedings i.e. attorneys fees, costs, interest and/or damages. A RSO is not entitled to defense and/or indemnity under NRS Chapter 41. A RSO shall at all times act as, and deemed to be, an independent organization (or legal entity) from UNLV. A RSO is not an employee for any purpose, including federal tax purposes. Nothing in this Handbook and/or any other written materials shall be deemed or construed to create a joint venture, partnership, agency, create relationships of an employer-employee or principal-agent, or other affiliation or relationship between the parties other than that of UNLV and an independent RSO. No relationship shall be deemed, construed, and/or perceived which creates any liability for UNLV whatsoever, with respect to the indebtedness, liabilities, and obligations of a RSO. UNLV and student organizations shall not be liable for the debts, liabilities or obligations of the other.

A RSO is not appointed and shall not act as an agent of UNLV and shall

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have no right, power, or authority to enter into any agreement, contract, or other obligation on behalf of UNLV or otherwise bind UNLV. A RSO shall not execute any document or instrument on behalf of UNLV and shall not at anytime hold themselves out to any third party as an agent of UNLV or imply to any third party that they have any authority to so act on behalf of UNLV. Organization Categories Student organizations at UNLV can self-select their organization interest through the UNLV Involvement Center. This allows them to be searched by self-assigned keywords. The designated categories are as follows: Academic/Pre-Professional/Honorary Groups that further the content knowledge and experience in an academic field or professional area. Some of these organizations may have Greek Letters in their name, but are not associated with the Greek Life governing structures. Graduate/Professional Student Organization Organizations created and maintained by graduate or professional students. These organizations must contact GPSA after completing the online registration. Spiritual/Faith-Based Groups that promote the personal growth of associated members in relation to spirituality and/or religion. Diversity & Multicultural Groups that celebrate, educate and communicate the nature of specific shared identities and experiences such as race, class, gender, sexual orientation, ability, and ethnicity. International Groups that celebrate, educate, and communicate the nature and individualities of a specific culture or nationality outside of the United States. Club Sports Organizations founded around a sport that can be categorized as recreational, instructional, or competitive as defined in the Club Sports Manual. These organizations must contact Club Sports after completing the online registration. Civic Engagement & Advocacy Groups that further the progress of an idea or initiative to affect the community at large (Service, Political, Social Justice, Advocacy). Special Interest Groups that encourage social interaction around a shared interest or theme.

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Fraternities & Sororities Groups that are directly associated with the Greek Life procedures and policies on campus and have an existing relationship with one of the four Greek governing councils. The Involvement Center: The UNLV Involvement Center was established in Fall 2012, as a site devoted to RSOs and encouraging and promoting involvement. The center is accessible through MyUNLV and is easy for students, faculty, and staff to access. The Involvement Center is the central portal through which organizations will receive campus updates and alerts, complete registration, manage membership, and post events and news. It is an expectation that RSOs actively use The Involvement Center in their organization operations. The Involvement Center also allows for uninvolved students to search organizations based upon interests and connect directly with members of RSOs. RSOs can link their profile on the Involvement Center to facebook, twitter, Google Plus and external websites. Further students can communicate directly with RSOs through communication features on the center. Click here to access MyUNLV and visit the UNLV Involvement Center: https://my.unlv. nevada.edu Registering a NEW RSO: Making the decision to create a new student organization can be very exciting and overwhelming at the same time. UNLV works with over 250 registered student organizations, all of which have a wide variety of interests. Before beginning the process of forming a new student organization, it is recommended that the group research existing student organizations included on the UNLV Involvement Center Organization Directory. If a group of students is unable to identify an existing organization that is of interest, then the group is encouraged to create a new student organization. All organizations must be initiated and governed by current students of UNLV. A new registered student organization is defined as an organization that has never previously existed at UNLV before meaning it is an entirely new organization. A new registered student organization is also defined as an organization that has been on campus before but has been considered inactive by the university or at least one academic year. Here are some questions to consider to aid in creating a new student organization: • • • •

What is the purpose of the organization? What will be the goals of the organization? How will the organization plan to accomplish its goals? What is unique about the organization?

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• Are there other students who may be interested in joining the organization? • What type of commitment will members need in order to form the organization? • How will the organization identify and recruit members? • Does the organization know of a UNLV faculty or staff (full-time employee) member who would be interested in serving as an advisor to the group? Answering these questions will help the group to begin the registration process. If a group would like assistance, contact the SORCE at 895-5576, email them at sorce@unlv.edu, or visit the Student Union 305. Additionally, every semester interest sessions are offered for students who are thinking about starting a new registered student organization. These sessions allow for students to collaborate and gain feedback about their potential organization and develop an understanding of the process of becoming a RSO. New Organization who wish to become active must attend one of these interest meetings. For the dates and times of these meetings contact the Office of Civic Engagement and Diversity. New Organization Registration Process All organizations must maintain an organization profile through the UNLV Involvement Center and include a roster of members. The registration process, benefits, resources and university communication utilizes the UNLV Involvement Center. In order to complete the new organization registration and create an organization profile: I. Log into MyUNLV II. Select the UNLV Involvement Center III. Select Organizations IV. Once on the Organizations page, scroll down the left hand side and click “Register a New Organization” In this registration, you will be asked to provide information including: I. The name, contact information, and a brief description of the organization II. The names and rebel mail emails of the organization’s President (or equivalent), Vice President (or equivalent), Secretary/Treasurer (or equivalent), UNLV Faculty or Staff Advisor, and two scheduling liaisons (the members of your organization who will make room reservations). III. The goals or outcomes of the organization for its first semester as an organization IV. A plan for membership recruitment and retention for the first semester as an organization. V. Complete a brief online training video Once the organization has completed the registration they must attend a RSO Meeting in which policies, procedures, and resources are discussed. The meetings are offered throughout the semester. Contact the Office of Civic Engagement and Diversity for

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information about upcoming meeting dates. If the proposed organization meets all of the criteria they will be made an active registered student organization for that academic year. All RSOs must complete this process and register or re-register with the university annually beginning in August. Re-Registering Your RSO All organizations must maintain an organization profile through the UNLV Involvement Center and include a roster of members. The registration process, benefits, resources and university communication utilizes the UNLV Involvement Center. In order to complete the re-registration process and update the organization profile: I. II. III. IV. V.

Log into MyUNLV Select the UNLV Involvement Center Select Organizations Search for your organization Once your organization is located select, “Register this Organization”

In this registration, you will be asked to provide information including: I. The name, contact information, and a brief description of the organization II. The names and rebel mail emails of the organization’s President (or equivalent), Vice President (or equivalent), Secretary/Treasurer (or equivalent), UNLV Faculty or Staff Advisor, and two scheduling liaisons (the members of your organization who will make room reservations). III. The goals or outcomes of the organization for its first semester as an organization IV. A plan for membership recruitment and retention for the first semester as an organization. V. Complete a brief online training video Once the organization has completed the registration they must attend a RSO Meeting in which policies, procedures, and resources are discussed. The meetings are offered three times at the beginning of the Fall semester. Contact the Office of Civic Engagement and Diversity for information about upcoming meeting dates. If the organization meets all of the criteria they will be made an active registered student organization for that semester. All RSOs must complete this process annually. Registration Eligibility and Requirements Any group of actively enrolled students that have convened to support or practice a common interest and wish to seek the resources and benefits of a registered student organization must at all times maintain: 1. Register each semester (Fall and Spring) by following the guidelines posted at: https://unlv.collegiatelink.net/organization/sorce and click on the “Documents”

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tab.

a. Attend a mandatory information session hosted by Civic Engagement & Diversity (refer to Registration Process). b. Update the organization profile within the UNLV Involvement Center. (New organizations will create a new profile.) 2. Consist of at least five registered UNLV students. 3. Have a faculty or staff advisor employed by the University of Nevada Las Vegas. Full-time faculty or staff are highly encouraged. A faculty or staff advisor should be able to commit to the organization for the entire 2012-2013 academic year. While Graduate Assistants are free to be involved at the students’ request, they cannot serve as Faculty/Staff Advisors. 4. Maintain updated information posted on the UNLV Involvement Center. 5. Ensure that the organization does not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of race, age, color, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, gender, veteran status, or disability. 6. Openly communicate with members and interested contacts that the organization and members of the organization are not covered by liability insurance. 7. Understand that registered student organizations do not carry the taxexempt or the non-profit status from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas or the Nevada Board of Regents, but can become eligible by filing the appropriate documents required by the IRS. 8. Comply with the student code of conduct, UNLV policies and procedures, state and federal law and ordinances when conducting organizational business. 9. Report “any building or property owned or controlled by a student organization that is officially recognized by the institution;� during the registration process.

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Additional Governing Bodies Governance UNLV’s registered student organizations and their members are afforded the opportunity to organize and manage their operations. Since organizations are highly encouraged to govern themselves, members are given the opportunity to develop and enhance their leadership skills and acquire meaningful experiences that contribute to their collegiate experience. Although registered student organizations are self-governed, there are guidelines set forth by entities such as the Nevada System of Higher Education, UNLV, Civic Engagement & Diversity, CSUN Student Government, Graduate and Professional Student Association, Fraternity & Sorority Life, Club Sports, and additional sponsoring departments. Most of the policies are outlined within this manual. Constitution/Bylaws: While not required, each organization should create a constitution as a governing document to refer to for organizational procedures. An example outline is available by visiting the Student Organization Resource Center on the UNLV involvement Center. University Guidelines UNLV established the goal of creating an inclusive and just community. The university strives to establish a spirit of community in accordance with high standards of academic excellence and freedom, institutional and individual integrity, and constitutional protections. Each member of the university, including student organizations, shares responsibility for maintaining conditions, conducive to the achievement of the university’s goals. The UNLV Student Conduct Code is designed to provide basic standards to ensure a means to fulfill its purpose. Additional Governing Bodies CSUN: CSUN is the undergraduate student government at UNLV and is funded through a fee assessed to all undergraduate students. The Consolidated Students of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas provides funding for undergraduate registered student organizations. In order to be eligible for funding, organizations must be registered and complete the requirements listed on-line at: http://getinvolved.unlv.edu/studentorgs GPSA: The Graduate & Professional Student Association provides support and networking for graduate organizations that complete the registration requirements and submit an updated constitution and signed signature form to the GPSA Office. More details can be found at: http://gpsa.unlv.edu Club Sports: The UNLV Club Sports Program provides students the opportunity to

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participate, educate, and compete in recreational activities as a means to enhance their collegiate experience and provide a vehicle for a well-rounded education through physical, social, and leadership development. Any organization seeking the Club Sports status must be fully registered and complete the additional requirements set forth by the Club Sports Council. More information is available at srwc.unlv.edu or by emailing srwc. clubsports@unlv.edu. Fraternity & Sorority Life: Fraternities and sororities must complete the registration requirements, act in accordance with their respective governing council policies, and comply with policies enacted by the Fraternity & Sorority Life staff at UNLV. More details regarding Fraternity & Sorority Life at UNLV can be found at: http://getinvolved.unlv.edu/ greeklife/

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Membership Guidelines

General Membership: Registered student organizations (RSO) cannot unlawfully discriminate on the basis of race, age, color, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, gender, veteran status, or disability. Each registered student organization (RSO) must maintain a minimum of five (5) registered UNLV students. Registered student organizations may also, if the organization deems it applicable, consist of community, alumni, or faculty/staff members in addition to the required five student members and UNLV faculty/staff advisor. These additional members may only serve as general members to the organization and cannot hold officer positions or act as the organizations scheduling liaisons. Members of registered student organizations are advised that the success of their involvement experience is largely based upon the effort and initiative taken by the individual member. It is the responsibility of all involved students to stay informed of registered student organization business and UNLV communication. This can mostly be accomplished through the use of the UNLV Involvement Center, organization calendar, message system and news updates. Officers/Executive Boards The structure of membership within the organization may be unique and determined by the collective members. Only students actively enrolled at UNLV may hold an officer or scheduling liaison role. If positions (offices, executive boards, directorships, etc.) or hierarchies are created, the registered student organization members need to collectively create a constitution to govern how, when and to whom responsibility will be delegated. Outlines for constitutions are available at the UNLV Involvement Center on the SORCE page additional or assistance is available in the Student Organization Resource Center (SORCE, Student Union 305). While it is the responsibility of each member to stay informed of organization business and UNLV communications, it is highly suggested that the leadership within the organization creates an expectation for open communication with members and interested contacts. Faculty/Staff Advisors Every registered student organization must have a full-time UNLV faculty/staff advisor at all times. This advisor must be employed by the University of Nevada, Las Vegas as a faculty or staff member. If there is a change in the advisor for a registered student organization, the organization roster must be updated immediately. This is located within the organization profile under Roster. Accurate campus contact information must be provided for each advisor. The contact information of the advisor must be the UNLV office phone number and UNLV email address as this information will be published on-line. Do not provide personal cell phone and email addresses for Faculty/Staff Advisors. Organizations that

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are affiliated with community or national entities may carry additional advisors, but must retain a full-time faculty or staff member. During the registration process faculty/staff advisors will be contacted directly to confirm their role as the organizations advisor. Faculty/staff advisors will have series of requirements they must complete by the registration deadline in order for the organization to become active. If the faculty/staff advisor listed does not confirm their role as the advisor or complete the requirements by the deadline, the organization will be unable to active for that academic year.

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Space Reservations on Campus

Registered Student Organizations afford the ability to utilize UNLV space in planning events, meetings, and organization functions. Below details the various departments and areas of campus through which RSOs can make space reservations. During registration every organization is asked to provide two scheduling liaisons defined as the organization members who will make reservations on behalf of the organizations. The scheduling liaisons must be actively enrolled students at UNLV. These two scheduling liaisons can be changed by contacting the Office of Civic Engagement and Diversity. Please note that there are different policies and procedures each department utilizes in handling reservations. Student Union Event Services (SUES) Registered Student Organizations have the privilege of utilizing the Student Union, Student Recreation and Wellness Center, and campus green space for discounted rates through the Student Union Event Services Office. The opportunity to utilize these spaces is a privilege for RSOs and the violation of SUES policy for abuse of this privilege may result in the RSO’s loss of SUES space usage. It is imperative to read and understand all SUES Policies and procedures stated below. Additionally, reservation forms can be accessed by: 1. Log into the UNLV Involvement Center and click Campus Links on the right hand corner. 2. Select the desired Student Union Event Services form and submit your complete form electronically. SUES Policies and Procedures: General Reservation Policy http://www.unlv.edu/sites/default/files/24/SUESGeneralReservationPolicy.pdf Advertising Policy http://www.unlv.edu/sites/default/files/24/SUESAdvertisingPolicy.pdf Facility Use Policy: http://www.unlv.edu/visit/visitingcampus/reserve-space/guidelines Outdoor Space Policy http://www.unlv.edu/sites/default/files/24/SUESOutdoorSpacePolicy.pdf Food Services and Catering Policy http://www.unlv.edu/sites/default/files/24/SUESFoodServiceAndCateringPolicy6-12.pdf Additional Policies and Procedures can be found by visiting: http://www.unlv.edu/eventservices/policies-and-procedures

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Academic Buildings Registered Student Organizations have the benefit of utilizing academic building space. The Office of the Registrar oversees this reservation process. To reserve space in academic buildings: 1. Log into the UNLV Involvement Center and click “Campus Links” in the right hand corner. 2. Select the Academic Building Reservation Request Form. 3. Complete and submit your form. Please be detailed as possible. a. The Academic Building Reservation Request Form will be submitted electronically, and you will be able to access a PDF of your completed form submissions within your individual portal under My submissions. 4. You will be contacted via email, portal message, or phone by the space management staff for your desired location. Additional steps may be required. TAM Alumni Building Registered Student Organizations have the benefit of using the TAM Alumni Building at a cost. To reserve space in the TAM Alumni Building: 5. Log into the UNLV Involvement Center and click “Campus Links” in the right hand corner. 6. Select the TAM Alumni Building Reservations. 7. This will take you to the printable TAM Alumni Building Reservation Form.. a. The Richard TAM Alumni Center Facility Use Reservation form is not electronic and will have to be dropped off at the facility itself. 8. You will be contacted via email, portal message, or phone by the space management staff for your desired location. Additional steps may be required.

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Financing Your Organization

Registered student organizations are responsible for the management of all funds relating to their organization. Fiscal management and decision-making processes must be outlined within the constitution of the registered student organization. Some organizations are subject to fiscal guidelines based upon any national, international or professional affiliations. Student organizations should maintain transparency with the membership of the organization regarding the management of funds. Student organizations cannot act as an extension of UNLV in that they are not covered by liability insurance or tax-exempt status from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas or the Nevada Board of Regents. Registered student organizations must seek tax-exempt status as well as purchase their own liability insurance when needed. Funding Opportunities • • •

CSUN (Student Government) Office of Civic Engagement and Diversity Student Funding Board Co-Sponsorship Opportunities o Students Organizing Diversity Activities (SODA) o International Council o Other opportunities may be found by contacting registered student organizations or departments with missions that parallel the mission or purpose of the initiative being funded. • University Department: Some university departments are willing to help fund RSO initiatives if the initiatives are parallel to the department mission and values. • Fundraising • Membership dues Bank Accounts UNLV does not encourage registered student organizations to maintain an off-campus bank account. Faculty/staff advisors are not to serve as signatures of bank accounts. In order to open an off-campus bank account they must first acquire an EIN number from the IRS. Registered student organizations are responsible for any income tax reporting and are encouraged to consult a certified tax consultant or attorney for additional support and guidelines. Organizations may need to file a FORM 990-N with the IRS within three years of establishing an organization with a Tax ID# and thereafter. Registered student organizations do not carry the non-profit nor tax-exempt statuses from UNLV. If an organization wished to be considered tax-exempt or non-profit they must attain such status through the IRS or a national affiliation. To obtain an EIN, call 1-800-829-4933 and provide the requested information (SSN, mailing address, etc). Do not use UNLV in the name of the organization. This information

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must be updated before officer transitions are complete. This number is used to complete a W-9 (available in the CSUN office Student Union 316) in order to receive funding from CSUN, Student Funding Board, other campus reimbursements, and to create off-campus bank accounts. To apply for an EIN on-line: http://www.irs.gov Click on the Business tab Click on Employer ID Numbers in the left side column Click on Apply for an EIN Online in the center of the page Click on APPLY ONLINE NOW at the bottom of the page A pop-up window will appear. Read the message and click Okay Click on Begin Application Select the option to View Additional Types, Including Tax-Exempt and Governmental Organizations Click on Continue Select Social or Savings Club Click on Continue *From here you will need to complete the information for yourself. When you leave the organization, please transfer the EIN number to the new officer responsible for the organization by contacting the IRS. Reimbursements Proper documentation is needed when seeking a reimbursement from UNLV. Please gather the following: 1. Original detailed receipts (make copies for your own documentation/ record-keeping. 2. NSHE Number of the individual being reimbursed OR EIN number for the registered student organization being reimbursed 3. If the purchase is made by a debit or credit card, a copy of the statement showing the purchase is required to accompany this documentation. The name and purchase must match the receipt provided, but the account number and non-related purchases can be marked over with black marker. Philanthropy Philanthropy is the act of donating money, goods, services, time and/or effort to support a socially beneficial cause, with a defined objective and with no financial or material reward to the donor. Such events also serve as a way to build community among UNLV students and the Las Vegas community. Funds raised by an RSO for an outside entity are to be gifted in their entirety (100%) to the named philanthropy. Costs incurred to create the philanthropic event must be fully funded by the organization before the philanthropy is conducted. University funds may

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not be donated to off campus interests. Fraternities and Sororities must also comply with the Fraternity and Sorority Life Philanthropy policy that addresses additional Fraternity and Sorority Life community concerns, points, and procedures. Fundraising Fundraising is considered a normal organizational function. The funds raised will be managed by the registered student organization and will be managed as directed by the constitution created by the organization. If an organization initiative is to donate such funds to a philanthropic organization, they are required to appropriately document all transactions and comply with the philanthropy guidelines. Student organizations do not fall under the tax-exempt and non-profit status of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Student organizations may apply for either status through the United States Internal Revenue Services. Some organizations may be covered through their affiliations with professional, national or international organizations. More information can be found at http://www.irs.gov Membership Dues Registered student organizations may collect dues to cover organization expenditures if desired. Funds collected will be managed by the organization as prescribed by the constitution created by the organization. Contracts, Sales, and Licensing Guidelines for sale of merchandise Some groups have been quite successful in conducting regular concession sales items such as t-shirts, flowers, etc. There are a number of state laws and campus policies that impact concessions and other sales. No door-to-door solicitations are allowed on the UNLV Campus. Contact the Office of Event Services located in the Student Union for more information about the sale of merchandise at on-campus venues. Raffles, Free Drawings, and giveaways The distribution of prizes or gifts by chance where money is exchanged is against University policy, and therefore prohibited, However, free drawings, or “give-a-ways” may be held if: • All persons who request a ticket are accommodated. • No participant is required to donate money to obtain tickets for the drawing and this is printed on the tickets. • It is made clear whether or not the ticket holder needs to present in order to win. Use of Licenser Brands Non-commercial Registered UNLV student organizations may use the university’s marks and logos on materials that might include stationary, signs, posters, banners, and clothing. UNLV

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Licensing Graphic Guidelines and/or UNLV’s graphic standards manual must be followed. Use of the Rebel Head must be approved through Athletics before additional approvals can be granted. Commercial Registered UNLV student organizations that conduct promotions, giveaways, and fundraisers, and that offer products for resale that involve the manufacturing of clothing, novelties, and other logo merchandise, are required to submit an internal licensing agreement for approval from the licensing director. All products must be purchased through vendors licensed by the university through the Collegiate Licensing Company for non-commercial and commercial purposes. Rebel Head must be approved through Athletics before additional approvals can be granted. To obtain more information about these guidelines or a list of approved vendors, student organizations may contact UNLV Trademarks and Licensing Department at (702) 895-0294.

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Additional Benefits and Resources

Student Organization Resource Center (SORCE) The SORCE is a space shared and open to all registered student organization members working on official organization business. The SORCE provides resources, including but not limited to, art supplies, limited printing, teambuilding packets, goal setting strategies, etc. (some resources may be limited in availability). Provided resources are only to be used for official registered student organization business. Resources cannot be used for personal or academic purposes as the budget is limited to support over 300 registered student organizations. Location: Student Union, Third Floor Rm. 305 Hours: Monday-Thursday 10am-9pm, Friday 10am-4pm Contact: Email: sorce@unlv.edu Phone: (702) 895-5576

Involvement Fair All registered student organizations in good standing with the University, Office of Civic Engagement & Diversity and any other relevant governing entities (Club Sports, GPSA, Fraternity & Sorority Life, etc.) are invited to participate in the Student Involvement Fairs. Involvement Fairs are typically held during the first month of the spring and fall semesters. Each fair consists of a two-day event sponsored by the Office of Civic Engagement & Diversity. Each participating organization is provided with table space and chairs for 1or 2 members to staff the table. Each fair usually consists of about 100-150 organizations providing opportunities for students to get involved on campus and within the local community through membership recruitment or event marketing. Registration for the Involvement Fairs occurs through the UNLV Involvement Center a few weeks prior to each fair. More information is provided within the registration form and mandatory organization registration sessions.

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RSO Conduct

Nevada System of Higher Education and Student Conduct Code The behavior of all students and student organizations, as members of the university community, is governed by the Nevada System of Higher Education and the UNLV Student Conduct Code. Students and student organizations may also be members of other university-based communities that impose additional standards of conduct, intercollegiate athletic teams’ expectations, club sports’ expectations and Fraternity & Sorority Life social organizations’ expectations. The rights and responsibilities accorded students by the Student Conduct Code extend to all such student conduct codes, standards, and governing documents. The Student Code of Conduct applies to all students taking a course at UNLV, during break periods and to all persons who are not officially enrolled for a particular term but have a continuing relationship with the university. Student organizations, including fraternities and sororities, as well as their members, may be held collectively and/or individually responsible for violations of the Student Conduct Code. For the complete version of the Code of Conduct please visit: http://studentconduct.unlv.edu/conduct Rights and Responsibilities The University of Nevada, Las Vegas is an academic community in which all persons share responsibility for its quality and well-being. As members of the university community, students can reasonably expect all of the guarantees and protections afforded students at public institutions by the United States and Nevada Constitutions. Following is a listing of some of the student rights as outlined in UNLV Conduct Code. Refer to the UNLV Student Conduct Code for a complete listing I. The right to exercise their freedoms without fear of university interference. II. The right to be free from discrimination on the basis of race, gender, age, religion, creed, national origin, disability or sexual orientation. III. The right to engage in inquiry and discussion, to exchange thought and opinion, and to speak, write, and print freely on any subject in accordance with the guarantees of federal and state laws. IV. The right to engage in peaceful and orderly speech, protest, demonstration, and picketing within the public forum to the extent that such activity does not disrupt the educational functions of the university. The university reserves the right to approve the time, place and manner of such activities. V. The opportunity to participate in the formulation of policy directly affecting students through membership on appropriate committees as determined by the President of the

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University, CSUN and other recognized groups within the University. VI. Ready access to established University policies and procedures. The officers or leaders and advisors of a student organization may be held collectively and/or individually responsible when Student Council Code and NSHE Code violations are committed by persons associated with the organization who have received consent or encouragement from the organization or from its officers or leaders. University officials may direct the officers or leaders of a student organization to take action designed to prevent or end such violations by the organization or by any persons associated with the organization that can reasonably be said to be acting on its behalf. Failure to make reasonable efforts to comply with such a directive shall be considered a violation of this Code both by the officers or leaders of the organization and by the organization itself. Sanctions for organizational misconduct may include revocation of that use of University facilities, privileges, resources, or benefits for a definite period of time, denial of University recognition or registration, and suspension of participation in or sponsorship of social or intramural activities or events, as well as other appropriate sanctions permitted under the Student Conduct Code or other codes, standards and governing documents of the University.

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RSO Related Policies Alcohol: No alcohol is allowed to be stored, possessed, or consumed on UNLV property or at a UNLV sponsored event unless prior approval has been issued by the Vice President of Student Affairs. Please refer to the UNLV Student Conduct Code and the UNLV Alcohol Event Policy. Violations of the policies will warrant an investigation and is punishable by the Board of Regents Code of Student Conduct. Hazing: Any and all forms of hazing are strictly prohibited, and punishable under the Student Conduct Code and State and Federal Law. Student consent is not a legal defense and all actions that could be interpreted as hazing should be strongly analyzed. Here are a few questions you can ask yourself to determine if an activity could be hazing. • Is it hazing? If you are asking this question it probably is. If in doubt call the advisor of the student organization. • Is alcohol involved? • Would all members, current and new, want to participate? • Is there a risk of injury or safety concerns? • Do you have any reservation describing the activity to parents, a professor, or University Official? • Would anyone object to the activity being photographed for the school newspaper, or filmed by a local television station? Juvenile Policy: Any on-campus event open to the attendance and/or participation of juveniles is required to have the faculty/staff advisor of the registered student organization responsible for the event in attendance for the duration of the event. Adapted from the policy “Juveniles on Campus” for student organizations: http://www. unlv.edu/policies/facilities_use.html#juveniles Media on Campus: UNLV has several student run media outlets, including KUNV, Rebel Yell, Vagus Nerve, and UNLV-TV, in which any organization may submit material to. NonUNLV media Markets are required to subject all material to approval of the Office of Public Affairs, which may be contacted at (702) 895-3101. Off-Campus Partnerships: Partnerships and collaborations with off-campus interests (businesses, non-profit organizations, religious institutions, national organizations, etc) are encouraged only when the interest of the students is first priority. Please refer to the Office of Student Union & Event Services at 702-895-4449 when such partnerships bring off-campus entities to campus for sales, marketing, contracts, and licensing. Such instances may be subject to financial responsibility by the registered student organization. Officer Transitions: The responsibility of an outgoing officer does not end at elections. Outgoing officers are responsible for properly transitioning the newly elected/appointed officers to be successful which includes but is not limited to: • Providing all organizational documentation • Update fiscal officer information for the incoming officer by calling the IRS with the new officer information and the correct Employer Identification Number

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(EIN). If you have lost the number you will need to update this information from a previous officer or you will need to call 1-800-829-4933 • Set up transition meetings to discuss historical context, current issues, and future vision • Transfer administrative access to involvement portal to appropriate officers • Training on involvement portal (Orgsync) administration Risk Management: Many factors contribute to the levels of risk involved with any activity, including but not limited to: climate, transportation, crime, access to medical resources, personal health, dining accommodations, wildlife, natural disasters, individual training/ preparation, first response team accessibility, lodging, terrain, activity specific risks, etc. While all risk associated with any event is not be avoidable, student organizations are encouraged to research all aspects of their activities and prepare for the potential risks involved, while being aware of additional risks throughout the activity. The Office of Civic Engagement & Diversity provides the Risk Matrix (located though the UNLV Involvement Center, on the SORCE page under documents) as one option to help students begin to assess the risk involved with their activities. Travel: Students traveling off-campus for organization related activities are responsible for upholding the Student Conduct Code and are strongly encouraged to take precaution with all aspects of travel. Create and maintain appropriate documentation (see general examples listed below). Provide a copy of these records with a responsible individual not attending the activity but who is informed of the itinerary and purpose of the trip. Maintain copies of all applicable documentation with the group traveling. Documentation may include: • Liability release forms • Insurance • Medical emergency contact information for all attendees • Emergency contact information (campus, destination specific, travel accommodations, etc.) Student organizations cannot act as an extension of UNLV in that they are not covered by liability insurance or tax exempt status from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas or the Nevada Board of Regents. Registered student organizations must seek tax exempt status as well as purchase their own liability insurance when needed.

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RSO Development Resources

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Constitution and Bylaw Writing In order to be eligible to attain CSUN funding at UNLV, you are required to submit a constitution and bylaws when registering. You can update your documents at any time. Here are a few things to keep in mind and a few tips when writing your constitution and bylaws. Constitution • Your organization’s constitution should be a guiding document that guides your organization in decision making around programs, membership selection, and the overall direction of your group. • Depending on the stability of your organization and the strength of your constitution, your group should revisit its constitution once a year to revise and amend as necessary. It’s supposed to be a living document that changes over time (think of all of the changes to the US Constitution over the past 200+ years!). • If your constitution needs a major overhaul to reflect your group’s interests and needs, it’s okay! If you need help facilitating this process, you can contact the SORCE staff at 895-5576. • Your constitution should be stable and require at least 2/3 or 3/4 membership approval to revise. Items in your constitution should be very basic. More specific topics should be covered in your group’s bylaws. Suggested Constitution Format Article I- Name State the full name of your organization. Article II- Preamble States the purpose of your organization. Article III- Non-discrimination clause As a registered student organization at UNLV, you are agreeing to comply with the non-discrimination clause of the University and the appropriate recognizing body (CSUN, GPSA, OCED, Outdoor Programs). You can find the nondiscrimination clause on the sample constitution below. Article IV- Membership Who is eligible for membership? Who makes up your membership? (i.e.- undergraduate students, graduate students, both undergraduate and graduate students) Article V- Officers/ Executive Board What are the roles and responsibilities of officers in your organization? (President, Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer, etc.) Article VI- Elections What is the rough timeline for elections? (spring or fall semester) How are officers elected? What happens if a position is vacant? What are the terms of offices? Article VII-Amendments How can the group amend this document? How many people are required to be in attendance for an amendment to pass (quorum)? How many people must make an affirmative vote for an amendment to this document (traditionally, 3/4 or 2/3 affirmative vote)? Bylaws

• Committee structure (standing and ad hoc committees, who serves on committees? etc.) • Meeting time, dates, location • How are meetings run? (Robert’s Rules of Order is a good base) • Any other items that you deem important to your organization *Your bylaws should be easier to revise than your constitution and updated as needed.

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Delegating in Your Organization

What does it mean to delegate? • To delegate means to assign, request assistance with, or pass an administrative task or part of a programmatic step to another individual or group of individuals. Why Delegate? Benefits for you: • BREATHE!- the world doesn’t rest on your shoulders • Allow for member ownership of organization • Develop new leaders… Why do I resist it? • If you want a job done right, you have to do it yourself. • My members don’t follow-through. • There’s not enough time. • We’re all busy – even my members. • My members don’t like me following-up with them. Why Delegate? Benefits for the members: • Members become more invested (take ownership again later) • Further growth for your organization • Builds morale Why do members resist it? • They’re too busy. • They don’t feel like they know how to do it. • They don’t like doing it. • They fear criticism. When Not to Delegate • You don’t even want to do the task! • Individual’s qualifications don’t meet those needed for the task. • It’s going to be a failure anyway (you know it won’t work, but don’t want to accept responsibility). • You haven’t put thought in to it. • Expectations are unreasonable. Steps to Delegate 1. Choose the appropriate person (volunteer v. experience). 2. Clearly define responsibilities and expectations.

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3. Make sure that it makes sense to delegate. 4. Follow-up, but don’t micro manage! 5. Support your people! 6. Give accurate and honest feedback. Evaluate the success of delegating- with individual and you.

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Effective Feedback

Why is it important? • Can improve future meetings. • Enhances and maintains relationships among members. • Enables members to comfortably give feedback in the future. Effective feedback is useful for the organization, whether it is positive or negative. What constitutes Effective Feedback? • It is given during a time when it is relevant. One should not wait in giving feedbacks, but do consider if the person receiving the feedback is ready. • Be specific and avoid using vague inferences. The more specific it is, the more likely the situation will be fixed and the feedback be understood. • Do not make your feedback suggesting that you are the dominant one. • Suggest alternatives instead of forcefully giving out advice. • Instead of giving advice, share information instead, leaving the receiver the chance to decide how to deal with the situation. • Take responsibility for your feedback by using pronouns like “I” and “my.” • Make sure that the feedback is understood clearly by both sides. Communication is very important in feedback and in running an organization. • Be at a location where the amount of distractions is limited and where not many people can hear the discussion. • Take into account of what a person does and not what you think a person is. • It applies to what has been said, done, or how it has been said or done, and not why. Bringing up the “why” will begin to question one’s intent.

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Goal Setting

Goal Setting Stat

Goals not written down + no plan of action = 7% probability of success Clearly defined, well-written goals + plan of action = 70% probability of success

Goal Setting – Things to Keep in Mind • Goals should be reviewed about once a year • Should be connected to Mission Statement, previous goals, objectives, direction of organization, etc. • Group participation o Members should be aware of the goals and are in agreement Goals Should Be • Owned by the organization • Specific • Measurable • Realistic • Periodically evaluated and revised Steps to Goal Setting • Brainstorming • Prioritize o Are there other goals being pursued at the same time? o What goals can be completed in the shortest time? Longest? Requires the most participation? • Determine plans of action • Implement plan of action o Will there be a need for a committee group? Any delegation of responsibilities? Participation of members? Developing an Action Plan • What should you do? o Community service projects? o Icebreakers? Retreats? o Fundraisers? o Recruitment/Awareness? o Events? • When should you? o Yearly? By semester? Weekly? Monthly? • How should you? o Consider the dedication and time that will be needed for a plan to be

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• • •

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executed. o Does it relate to your organization’s purpose? How frequently? Who should you include in the action plan? o Advisor? Board members? Members? And remember, “Consistent activity is key to success…”


Meeting Evaluation Checklist

Meeting Evaluation Checklist 1. Was the meeting well organized? 2. Did the meeting start on time? 3. Was the location booked ahead of time? 4. Were members informed about the meeting? 5. Were guests introduced and welcomed? 6. Was there an agenda? 7. Was the purpose of the meeting made? 8. Was there a smooth shift from the last meeting? 9. Were the officers prepared in making their announcements? 10. Was one topic discussed at a time? 11. Did anyone who wanted to speak have the chance to? 12. Was discussion relevant to the topic on hand? 13. Did the head of the meeting sum up what was discussed and decided? 14. Did the meeting move along at an effective pace? 15. Were all previous tasks completed? 16. Did the meeting go through what was planned on the agenda? Participation 1. Members of the organization engaged in the discussion and decisionmaking. 2. The head of the meeting answered questions in the best way possible. 3. Members were able to voice any suggestions. 4. Tasks were able to be divided. 5. Members were able to help plan for the following meeting’s agenda. Attitude

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Attendance was good and everyone who came was on time. Members knew each other. There was a little icebreaker at the beginning (See icebreakers packet). There was some humor throughout the entire meeting. Members and board members easily interacted and helped one another. Members are comfortable in giving their opinions There is a light and happy atmosphere.

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Motivating Your Members

What is motivation? • The act or instance of motivating • The state or condition of being motivated • Something that motivates • To motivate o To provide with an incentive; move to action; impel (www.dictionary.com, 2006) Motivation 101 Types of motivation: • Intrinsic- motivation driven by the self- i.e.- enjoying time, personally satisfying • Extrinsic- motivation from an outside force- i.e. - recognition, rewards, etc. *What does this look like in your organization?* Motivating your Members for Success • What types of motivators work for you and your members? • What types of things don’t work for your members? • Where are the frustrations coming from your members? From you? Top 10 Tips for Success 10.) Let go! Share the responsibilities with everyone. 9.) Hold a constructive forum 8.) Develop a mission/ set goals 7.) Set guidelines and expectations 6.) Aim high 5.) Educate and delegate 4.) Provide incentives and encouragement 3.) Measure your progress and celebrate successes 2.) Mix it up! 1.) Get excited and have fun!

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New Member Orientation Why is it important? • Most likely, new members are not fully aware of your organization’s goals, purpose, structure, as well as the advantages that are offered, and the activities/events hosted by your organization. • New members are likely to stay and be kept interested if they know more about the organization, its responsibilities, how it is run, and the benefits there are from being a member. • Orientation will enable new members to easily incorporate themselves to your organization instead of being a mere bystander. o Orientation gives them more confidence in voicing their opinions without much hesitation. o They will not be afraid in lending their special talents and their time to your organization. • The organization can efficiently and comfortably move on as being a productive group without much confusion. New member orientation should include: • Introduction of members o Icebreakers – (see Icebreakers packet from SORCE room) o Keep an account of members’ email and phone number information o Have old members and new members interact • Inform about your organization’s history, purpose, and structure • When did it start? How did it start? Why? • What is your organization’s mail goal(s)? • Any board positions? The criteria for being part of the board? What are the responsibilities of each role? • Inform about any procedures and policies • Are there any dues? • Are there any requirements to be part of the organization? • Any requirements to stay in the organization? Attendance requirement? GPA requirement? • Traditions and programs – calendar of events • Are there are any major events your organization hold as traditions? • Any activities that are held regularly? • Retreats? • Upcoming events? • Tell about your organization’s benefits • SORCE ROOM! • Priority room scheduling • Sodexho • Any other resources available to recognized organizations? • Any other group affiliations? National chapters? Formal orientation with new members o Icebreakers o Keeping an account of email and phone number information Possible Activities

o o o o o

Retreats Movie nights Picnic outings Hikes/Camping Icebreakers

• After orientation, focus on team-building and motivating your new and old members. (Packets on teambuilding and motivating your members are available in the SORCE room).

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Planning a Retreat

Why Retreats Should Be Planned • Creates stronger bonds between members. • Interrupts the repetition of having just regular meetings. • Being able to see and interact with fellow members outside the education environment. • Provides opportunities to share more memories together • Takes away the daily worries people have and just have fun! • Fosters participation. • Influences teambuilding. Planning a Retreat 1. What is the main purpose of having one? • New Member Orientation • Teambuilding • Motivating Members • Officer Transitions • Goal Setting • Problem Solving 2. What is your organization’s budget? • Affects the retreat activity itself as well as other factors 3. Is equipment needed? • TV? DVD player? VCR? Monitors? • Overhead • Notebooks, handouts • Will they be already provided? Is there a cost? 4. How long should the retreat be for? • One day, overnight, whole weekend? • Consider other activities such as football weekends, upcoming holidays and breaks as well as Study Week and Finals week. These times are not favorable when planning a retreat. 5. Where will it be? • Campus, camp, hotel, someone’s house, restaurant? • For a best bet, it should be somewhere close to campus or somewhere most people are willing to drive to. 6. Will there be a need for transportation? And if yes, what? • Car pools • Bus for larger groups 7. Will there be food and drinks? • Pot luck • Restaurant • Catering (Sodexho?)

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• Have a food and drinks committee? Will there be any recreation? • There should be some “free” time where members can freely communicate to one another without having to worry about other distractions. 9. Who should attend? • All members or just board members? • Advisor or retreat assistant (It is useful to sometimes have someone else plan the retreat, because it will take away the stress from all the members. It would also keep everyone in the group in the same level as far as planning power.) • SORCE Staff are available to assist organizations in planning retreats. Call 5-5576 for assistance. 10. What is on the agenda? • Make sure that there is a specific agenda formed ahead of time that will help to accomplish your goals. • Even though the agenda should be planned to the minute, it should also be flexible. • Distribute the agenda to all members participating ahead of time so that they will be prepared and it will make the retreat go well without any problems. 8.

Who Will Do What? Forming committees will decrease the amount of responsibility a small amount of people will take and will instead increase the productivity of planning the retreat. • Finding information, reserving the location, transportation accommodations • Planning the menu, ordering, food arrangements, tables/chairs, allergies • Cooking crew, catering • Set-up and clean-up crews • Recreation director • Workshop coordinators Qualities of a Good Retreat Coordinator 1. Judgment – Be able to evaluate the situation thoroughly 2. Attentiveness – Be able to listen and acknowledge other’s opinions 3. Evaluation skills – Be able to understand the opinions given clearly 4. Respect – Be respected by group and vice versa as well 5. Concern – Be interested about the group 6. Listen – Be able to listen to the input and feedback the group provides Timeline for Planning a Retreat (this should be flexible based on your group) Two Months Before • Have the exact date and time of the event, knowing that there will be no major conflicts • Inform all those participating • Know and reserve the location

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• Form additional committees if needed One Month Before • Have an idea of the retreat’s schedule/format • Contact any other resources Two Weeks Before • Send letters to all participants with the necessary information, including costs, travel arrangements, what to bring, ideal clothing, etc. • Reproduce schedules, maps, and any other essential handouts • Gather the needed equipment (slide projectors, monitors, visual aids, etc) • Make final arrangements for food if there will be no catering (what are the people bringing? Who is cooking?) One Week Before • Contact the retreat location and finalize reservations • Have final committee meetings and be sure that everyone is aware of each of their responsibilities Day Before • Call the committee heads to check for any last-minute problems • Rest so that you can be energized for tomorrow! Have Fun! Retreat Ideas • Camping/hiking, eating out at a restaurant, movie nights, game board night, outdoor sports, ice skating, picnic

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Recruitment and Retention Recruitment Reasons UNLV Students Don’t Join an Organization 1. No TIME! 2. Don’t know about it 3. Have to work 4. Just don’t want to 5. No connection to campus 6. Uninformed 7. Other priorities Easy Things to Remember While Recruiting 1. Don’t be afraid to make your organization known. Promote what your all about 2. Share your passion and goals 3. Discuss why your organization should matter to them 4. Share similar interests 5. Invite them to join The Connection Between Salesmanship and Recruitment • Present the main points, offer the details later • Be excited about your cause-Why did YOU join? • Effective communication doesn’t always require words • “The art of salesmanship is showmanship” -Jack Carroll o www.saleslinks.com Helpful Hints to Recruitment • Know your organization o Have a consistent message to give to potential members • Know what opportunities there are for your members o Who will be responsible for projects/attending meetings? • Know your calendar o Invite others to your meetings and events Retention – Keeping the good people you already have in your organization Reasons Members Leave an Organization • Lack of communication • No delegation • No longer fun • Organization not a priority • Stagnant • Have spent a lot of time in it already • No longer connected • Not appreciated • Not a worthwhile experience • Lack of organization How to Keep Members • Have fun! o No one wants to volunteer without enjoying the experience • Provide incentives o What incentives are there to sticking around? (more responsibility, more recognition, etc.) • Delegate o Give your members something to do so they are invested in your group • Create a mentoring program o This will help seasoned members stick around and recruit newer members to stay • Talk to your members o Ask them what their thoughts are for the group • Think outside the box! o Be creative. Stand out from other organizations

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Recruitment and Retention

What is having an effective team? • Members enjoy being part of the team. • Those in the team are aware, understand, and believe in the organization’s purpose and goals. • The officers help create a friendly, responsive, team atmosphere in the group. • There is not much tension among members. • When conflicts arise, they are discussed openly in an organized and constructive manner. • Members are able to freely say their opinions and voice out any reservations. • Members listen to what others have to say and respond back. • Those who have greater power in making decisions are those who have great knowledge on the topic. • There is trust and confidence among group members. • When tasks are given out, they are clear and easily accepted. When should organizations use teambuilding exercises? • When organizations are just newly formed. • When a significant amount of new members have joined. • After an organization has taken a long break. • When members appear to be bored or annoyed. • When members appear to be drifting apart and/or moving in different directions. • During a time of conflict in the organization. • When a break is needed from the general routine. • When team spirit needs to be heightened • When it is realized that the organization is not being run as a team. • When it is seen that the goals previously made are not being reached. How to organize teambuilding • Set aside several hours. • Set up a retreat (See Retreat Handout in the SORCE room) • Reserve a comfortable, informal environment (living room, outside the campus, carpeted meeting room) • Make one meeting wholly devoted to teambuilding. • Make sure that it is a priority for everyone to share information about who each of them are, what each thinks about the organization, and how each expects to fit in the group. • Have everyone answer every question. • Make sure everyone listens to everybody.

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Teambuilding Exercises • There are many teambuilding exercises available. Some address specific needs such as Group Dynamics or Leadership Styles, Consensus Building, Goal Setting, Communication, or Setting Standards and Roles within the organization. • There are hundreds of resources in the Leadership Library (located in the SORCE room) that help out with teambuilding exercises to meet any organization needs – make an appointment for an individual consultation. Group Formation or Reformation Teambuilding Exercises • Brown Bag 1. Give each member a brown paper bag and markers 2. Have members decorate the outside of the bag with words, pictures, or symbols that describe them. The outside of the bag represents that an individual is willing to readily share with others (i.e. love to ski, talk on the phone, travel). 3. Give each member three small slips of paper 4. Instruct members to write something on each piece of paper that the other people in the room might not know about them, but should if they are going to work together as a team. The small pieces of paper should go inside the bag, representing the inner person (i.e. hate it when others are late, afraid to fail) 5. When everyone is done, ask each member to share, one at a time, their bag and the three slips of paper (should explain why they wrote, drew each item). When one member is speaking, instruct all other members to be completely silent, directing all of their attention to the speaker (this sets a tone of trust). •

Most Treasured Item 1. Prior to the teambuilding day, ask members to bring with them one item from home that is their most treasured item (i.e. picture, baseball cap, trophy, ring) 2. At the meeting/retreat have all member sit in a circle. One at a time, each member should share their most treasured item with the others, explaining why the item means so much to them (when one individual is speaking all other members should be completely silent, directing all of their attention to the speaker)

Fill in the Blank 1. Have members sit in a circle (if you have a large organization, may want to break down into smaller groups) 2. As you read the following open-ended statements, have each member fill in the rest of the statement (one at a time). You may want to take notes to refer to later and feel free to add other statements, even ones that don’t necessarily pertain to the organization. o I joined this organization because…

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o The biggest asset I bring to this organization is… o My biggest fear about what can happen this semester in this organization is… o Last semester, I was the most proud of our organization for… o I feel the organization could have done _________ better last semester. o I expect _________ from the other members of this organization. o The other members of this organization can expect _________ from me. o It is important to me that this organization accomplish… Sometimes it is more effective to have an outsider facilitate the teambuilding so that all members are on the same level. LEAD Team can facilitate teambuilding exercises for you, including the Trust Fall and Ropes Course Activities.

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The Group Process Why is it important? • Enables members to understand how the organization is run. • Decreases the amount of conflicts in the future. • Helps the organization function effectively and efficiently. Communication • Who talks? For how long? How often? • At whom do people look when they speak? o Officers o Selected individuals o The group o No one • Who talks after whom? Who interrupts after whom? • What style of communication is used (tone of voice, gestures, declaration, questions, etc) Participation • Which members participate the most? Which members participate the least? • Is there any shift in the participation? (Any increase or decrease?) • How are those silent treated? How is their silence viewed? Disinterest? Disagreement? Fear? Overwhelmed? Overshadowed? • Who talks to whom? Do you see the reasoning behind the interactions? • Who is the one that keeps the talk going? Who brings the organization back on track? Why? Decision Making • Is there an individual(s) who makes decisions and implements them without consulting with the rest of the organization? How does this impact the rest of the group? How do the rest feel? • Is the topic being shifted from one to another? Who creates the shift? Are there any reasons behind the interactions? • Is there enough support within the group to have the motion be popular and practical? • Are the minority opinions heard when a majority is pushing the decision? • Is there an attempt to get all members involved? • Are contributions made in which they receive or generate no conversation? Organizational Roles • In order to succeed in goals a few roles must be played. o Task • Expressed the need to accomplish a goal. • e.g.: initiator, contributor, speaker, elaborator, energizer, recorder. o Maintenance • Improve relationship of members • e.g.: encourager, harmonizer, compromiser. o Self Oriented • Those who are selfish focus on personal needs. • e.g.: aggressor, dominator, blocker. All of these observations are very important to the group process. To understand the group functions you must move towards an organization that provides a system in which all members are given a voice. Observation and evaluation is very important and can help you develop your group process, and build your team.

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Transitioning Your Organization

Why Transition? • Organizational knowledge • Minimizes confusion • Sense of closure/sense of empowerment • Passes on specialization • Increases knowledge and confidence of new leadership • Supports momentum and accomplishments for new leadership Steps to Transitioning • Organize your information • Finish all projects that you can • Prepare an end-of-the-year report – they’re fun  • Review the Constitution, bylaws, goals – provide this • Schedule at least two meetings with the old and new officers • Provide any shadowing and/or training if necessary • Make a binder! • Incorporate the transition into your constitution Responsibilities of Outgoing Officers • Finish your projects • Be honest! • Take the time to meet with your new officer • Be helpful, not hurtful • Gather important documents • Take the time to gather your thoughts • Train the new officer Responsibilities of Incoming Officers • Take the time to meet with outgoing officers • Acknowledge work of past officers • Become familiar with information • Be thoughtful – prepare questions for your meetings • Utilize all past officers and advisor! • Meet with all those who are applicable to your position

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Appendix

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Appendix A How To Fill Out a W-9

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Appendix A Copy of W-9

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Appendix B [Your Group’s Name and Specific Activity] UNLV / NSHE / State of Nevada Assumption of Risk/ Release of Liability Form Page 1 of 2

I,____________________________________, understand and agree that the [specific activity] sponsored by [your group] of which I am a [member, student volunteer, participant, etc.] involves certain risks and that regardless of the precautions taken by [your group], some bodily injuries may occur. Specific risks/hazards involved in [specific activity] include but are not limited to the following: 1. [Driving to or from the specific activity] 2. [NOTE: Be as specific as possible, listing each and every conceivable hazard] 3. 4. Knowing this information, in consideration of my participation in [specific activity] sponsored by [your group], I expressly and knowingly release [your group], its representatives, officers, advisors and agents; the Board of Regents of the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) on behalf of the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) and the State of Nevada, their officers, agents, and employees, from any and all claims and causes of action for property damage, personal injury or death sustained by me arising out of any travel or activity conducted by or under the auspices of [your group] caused by risks associated by this activity and/or the negligence of the sponsoring group. Participant acknowledges that [your group] is a separate legal entity from UNLV, NSHE, and the State of Nevada and should be treated as such. In addition, I understand and agree [your group] cannot be expected to control all of the risks articulated in this form but may need to respond to accidents and potential emergency situations. Therefore, I hereby give my consent for any medical treatment that may be required during my participation with the understanding that the cost of any such treatment will be my responsibility. Neither UNLV nor [your group] carry medical or accident insurance for the activities mentioned unless the participants are informed otherwise. As such, participants should review their personal insurance portfolio. Finally, I voluntarily and knowingly agree to protect, hold harmless, and indemnify [your group], its representatives, officers, advisors and agents; the Board of Regents of the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) on behalf of the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) and the State of Nevada, their officers, agents, and employees, against all claims, demands, or causes of action for property damage, personal injury, or death, including defense costs and attorney’s fees arising out of my participation in the [specific activity] sponsored by [your group]. I have read the agreement and have willingly signed for the consideration expressed and with a full understanding of its purpose. Participant represents that he/she is eighteen (18) years of age or older and is otherwise competent to execute this agreement, or that his/her legal guardian is also signing. Print Name ____________________________________

ID #____________________________________

Date of Birth___________________________________

Phone# ________________________________

Local Address __________________________________________________________________________________ E-mail Address _________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________ Participant Signature

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_______________________________________ Date


[Your Group’s Name and Specific Activity] UNLV / NSHE / State of Nevada Assumption of Risk/ Release of Liability Form Page 2 of 2

If you are under 18 years of age, a parent/guardian must sign this also. By signing the document you are saying that you have read, understood, and agree to the conditions set forth in the release of liability. _______________________________________ Parent / Guardian Signature

____________________________________ Date

Person to Notify in Case of an Emergency Your Name___________________________________________ Date of Birth__________________________________________ Name ________________________________________________ Phone #_______________________________________________ Address ______________________________________________ City___________________

State___________________

Zip_______________

Please list any special services you may require due to an existing medical condition or physical disability: ____________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ONE COPY SHOULD REMAIN IN A DESIGNATED LOCATION THAT CAN BE ACCESSED IN CASE OF EMERGENCY AND ONE COPY SHOULD ACCOMPANY THE GROUP FOR THE TRIP OR ACTIVITY.

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Appendix C Trademark and Licensing

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Appendix D Risk Management Matrix

EVENT: ______________________ DATE OF EVENT __________ PLANNING DATE

STEP ONE List All Event Activities

Adopted from Texas A&M University

ACTIVITY Activities include all aspects of your event

STEP TWO Identify the Risks Associated with each Activity Some examples of things to consider:

ASSOCIATED RISKS

External- Weather, criminal acts Specific to Organization- Contact sports, weapons, climbing Common Risks- Traveling, crowd control, alcohol, and hazing

STEP THREE Use the Matrix to Assess your Activities, without Using any Methods to Manage your Risks PROBA BILITY SERIO USNES S

A

B

C

D

I

5

5

4

3

II

5

4

3

2

III

4

3

2

1

IV

3

2

1

1

Determine your initial score by finding the intersection with the highest score. The lower the score, the lower your risk.

STEP FOUR Brainstorm Methods to Manage Risks, See if you METHOD TO MANAGE

can Reduce the Probability that Something Will go Wrong

STEP FIVE Return to the Matrix to Re-Assess, using the Methods to Manage Risks

Determine your final score by finding the intersection with the highest score. The lower the score, the lower your risk.

STEP SIX Determine Whether or Not to Conduct Event and/or

Modify/Eliminate Activities

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Appendix D Risk Management Matrix

EVENT PLANNING MATRIX SERIOUSNESS OF RISK •I May result in death

PROBABILITY

SERIOUSNESS

•II May cause severe injury, major property damage, significant financial loss, and/or result in negative publicity for the organization and/or institution •III May cause minor injury, illness, property damage, financial loss and/or could result in negative publicity for the organization and/or institution •IV Hazard presents a minimal threat to safety, health and wellbeing of participants

B

C

D

I

5

5

4

3

II

5

4

3

2

III

4

3

2

1

3

2

1

1

IV

WHAT DO WE HAVE IN PLACE TO REDUCE THE RISKS THAT WE IDENTIFIED?

___ Initial Score ___ Final Score This form has been provided as an educational tool to help student leaders to develop a process for identifying and discussing potential risk issues. This form is intended for use as part of a larger event planning process, and should only serve as a starting point for your discussion on risk management. It is not designed to take the place of a careful review of applicable rules, policies, and laws, or discussion with your advisor. Completion of this form does not imply approval or authorization of your event by UNLV. Adopted from Texas A&M University

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A

ACTIVITY

ASSOCIATED RISKS

PROBABILITY THAT SOMETHING WILL GO WRONG •A Likely to occur immediately or in a short period of time, expected to occur frequently •B Probably will occur in time •C May occur in time •D Unlikely to occur

METHOD TO MANAGE


Appendix E Registered Student Organization Expectation Discussion Worksheet This form is designed to help advisors and student officers arrive at a clear and mutually agreed upon role of the advisor in student organization affairs. Directions: The advisor and each officer, chairperson and coordinator should respond to the following items. For each of the following statements, respond on a scale of 1-5 how important this function is: 1. Essential for the advisor to do 2. Helpful for the advisor to do 3. Nice but they do not have to do 4. Would prefer they not do 5. Absolutely not the advisor’s role The advisor is expected to: 1. ____ Attend all committee meetings they specifically advise. 2. ____ Attend all general meetings. 3. ____ Attend all events planned by you and your committee/area. 4. ____ Attend events outside of their specific responsibilities. 5. ____ Attend social activities planned by your committee/area. 6. ____ Call meetings with students when s/he believes it’s necessary. 7. ____ Meet weekly with individual chairperson(s), members. 8. ____ Explain University policy when relevant to the discussion. 9. ____ Explain University policies and depend upon the officers to carry them out. 10. ____ Take the initiative in creating teamwork and cooperation among officers and members. 11. ____ Let the group work out its problems including making mistakes and “doing it the hard way.” 12. ____ State what his/her responsibilities are, as s/he sees them, at the beginning of the school year. 13. ____ Get a carbon copy of all official correspondence. 14. ____ Inform the group of infractions of University Policy. 15. ____ Prohibit a decision when it violates University policy. 16. ____ Speak up during meeting discussions when s/he has relevant information. 17. ____ Speak up during discussion when s/he believes the group is likely to make a poor decision. 18. ____ Be quiet during meetings unless called upon. 19. ____ Provide input to the meeting minutes before they are written in final form. 20. ____ Help the President or officer prepare the agenda before each meeting. 21. ____ Provide input into all official correspondence before it is sent out. 22. ____ Exert his/her influence with officer(s), chairperson(s) or coordinator(s) between meetings.

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23. ____ Initiate ideas for group discussion when s/he believes they will help the group. 24. ____ Take an active part in formulating the goals for the group. 25. ____ Keep the group aware of its stated objectives when planning events. 26. ____ Recommend programs, speakers, etc... to the group for consideration. 27. ____ Lobby for programs, speakers, etc‌, to be selected by the group. 28. ____ Be familiar with University facilities, services, and procedures which affect group activities. 29. ____ Be responsible for planning leadership skills workshops. 30. ____ Help design posters, flyers and other publicity materials. 31. ____ Proof all publicity materials including posters, flyers and newspaper ads before going to print. 32. ____ Help the group clean up after programs/events. 33. ____ Require officers to clear all expenditures with him/her before financial commitments are made. 34. ____ Require officers to clear all contractual obligations with him/her. 35. ____ Be a custodian of all group materials, records, etc. during member and officer transitions. 36. ____ Take an active part in the transition between old and new officers at the end of the year. 37. ____ Mediate interpersonal conflicts when they arise. 38. ____ Advocate for the organization when there is conflict with the University or University staff. Source: Michael Miller, Wentworth Institute of Technology (Adapted for the University of Nevada, Las Vegas June 2010)

56


Appendix F The Role of Officers Listed below are some expectations advisors may have of their officers. This form is designed to help advisors and student officers arrive at a clear and mutually agreed upon role of officers in student organization affairs. Directions: The advisor, each officer and member should respond to the following items. For each of the following statements, respond on a scale of 1-5 how important this function is: 1. Essential for the officers to do 2. Helpful for the officers to do 3. Nice but they do not have to do 4. Would prefer they not do 5. Absolutely not the role of the officer ____ Officers should be aware of and fulfill their responsibilities ____ Officers should keep the advisors informed of organization business. ____ Officers should fulfill their required office hours on a weekly basis. ____ Officers should attend all retreats/events if there is no conflict with their academic responsibilities. ____ Officers should collaborate with the Office of Civic Engagement & Diversity. ____ Officers should address problems/issues that they have with individuals, with that individual, not with others. _____Officers should consult the advisor in regards to questions about University policy. _____Officers should consult the advisor before taking an issue to a higher University authority. _____Officers should make ethical decisions. _____Officers should handle the money of the students ethically. _____No exceptions will be made for the officers for lack of program planning. _____Officers should strive to build collaborative relationships with advisors and university entities.

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Appendix G The Role of Members Listed below are some expectations advisors, officers and members may have of the general member population. This form is designed to help student organizations arrive at a clear and mutually agreed upon role of general members in student organization affairs. Directions: The advisor, each officer and member should respond to the following items. For each of the following statements, respond on a scale of 1-5 how important this function is: 1. Essential for the members to do 2. Helpful for the members to do 3. Nice but they do not have to do 4. Would prefer they not do 5. Absolutely not the role of the members ____ Members should be aware of and fulfill their responsibilities ____ Members should stay informed of organization business. ____ Members should attend all organization retreats/events if there is no conflict with their academic responsibilities. ____ Members should address problems/issues that they have with individuals, with that individual, not with others. ____ Members should consult the advisor in regards to questions about University Policy. ____ Members should consult the advisor before taking an issue to a higher University authority. ____ Members should make ethical decisions. ____ Members should participate when there is no conflict with their academic responsibilities. ____ Members should strive to build collaborative relationships with advisors, officers and university entities. Source: Michael Miller, Wentworth Institute of Technology (Adapted for the University of Nevada, Las Vegas June 2010)

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UNLV RSO Handbook  

UNLV's handbook for registered student organizations (RSO).

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