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UNLV Registered Student Organization Advisor

Handbook


toc table of contents

I. The Advisor Role

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a. General Responsibilities

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b. Benefits of Advising

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c. Providing Effective Advising and Working with Students 8 d. UNLV Advisor Specifics

II. Registered Student Organizations at UNLV a. The Mission of UNLV

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b. Registered Student Organization Governance

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c. The RSO Registration Process

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d. Forming New Student Organization

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e. The UNLV Involvement Center

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f. Membership Guidelines

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g. Accessing Benefits and Resources

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h. Financing Your Organization

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i. Student Conduct Code

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j. RSO Related Policies

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III. Additional Resources

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b Organizational Assessment

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c. Expectation Building

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d. The Role of Officers

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e. The Role of Members

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f. Facilitating a Workshop

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a. Group Development

IV. Thank you!

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DISCLAIMER

This UNLV Registered Student Organization Handbook and/or any other written materials regarding Registered Student Organizations (hereinafter for ease of reference “Handbook�) is intended to be a guideline. It shall not be construed or interpreted to create an express and/or implied contract of any type. Also, it should not be construed or interpreted in any manner to create any legal, equitable and/or administrative rights, remedies and/or obligations greater than or in addition to those expressly created by Nevada and/or Federal statutory, administrative, common, or constitutional law. UNLV assumes no legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information provided in this Handbook or for any damages resulting in whole or in part, from any use of or reliance thereon even if UNLV has been specifically advised of the possibility of such damages. UNLV makes no claims, promises, or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of the contents of this Handbook and expressly disclaims liability for errors or omissions contained within its content. No warranty of any kind, implied, expressed, or statutory, including but not limited to the warranties of non-infringement of third party rights, title, merchantability, fitness for a particular use is given with respect to this Handbook. These guidelines are not intended to create, nor shall they in any manner be interpreted or construed to create, any third party beneficiary rights in any person and/ or legal entity. This Handbook is subject to change, termination, updates, revisions, or amendments at any time with or without notice. Also, new policies and procedures regarding any subject matter contained herein may be adopted at any time with or without notice.

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Introduction: Letter to Advisors

Greetings! I would first like to start by saying thank you for giving your time as an advisor to a registered student organization at UNLV. Your commitment and dedication is truly valued. Student organizations at UNLV would not be as successful if it were not for the continued support of faculty and staff guiding members to be great leaders of their organizations and within the UNLV community. The advisor role is one that comes with great responsibility. Student leaders look to advisors as a supportive figure, a sounding board, and a resource. Even more than that, the advisor also has the duty to hold members accountable, even when it means the members may not like the outcome. Advisors are often not appreciated for the additional hours they dedicate to attending organization meetings and events, and the time they put towards mentoring members. It takes true commitment to make the time investment that advisors make. Advisors can also be an important influence in a student’s life. Being a leader in a student organization can provide the opportunity to develop skills to be successful in the professional field. Whether time management, communication, organization, or conflict resolution, student organization leaders gain a plethora of experiences. An advisor can be there to support this development, provide mentorship, and help students find their path. They can be a role model, exemplifying what it means to be a leader, and guide students to thrive in whatever roles they hold. The advisor can be the catalyst for change in an organization and in students’ lives. Again, the advisor role is one that is not always given credit but one that is truly valued. The over 200 student organizations at UNLV need advisors like you to help them succeed and add value to the university. I cannot thank you enough for your time and commitment in choosing to serve as an advisor.

Sincerely, Katy Armstrong Program Coordinator for Student Involvement and Organization Development

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The Advisor Role

Adapted from The University of Michigan Guidebook for Student Organization Advisors A Registered Student Organization (RSO) advisor has a number of roles when supporting student members. The following are some of the many roles an advisor may play as they work to support an organization: I. A Mentor: As an advisor, you can encourage and support leadership development amongst organization members and help them use their experience in a student organization to benefit their ultimate professional goals. Additionally, you have a wealth of knowledge and experiences to share with student organization members. II. A Consultant: An advisor should be available to an organization when they need assistance with figuring out a solution to a problem, making a difficult decision, event planning, budgeting, fundraising, earning funding or developing the organization. As the advisor, you can provide guidance to the organization in the decision making process and use your knowledge to help the organization come to a solution. While the students should act as the final decision makers, you can be a sounding board for them as they reach decisions. III. A Resource: As a faculty or staff at UNLV, you can be a wealth of knowledge for the organization when it comes to university information, policies and procedures. While, as an advisor, you are not expected to know everything, you can provide guidance to the organizations as they navigate UNLV. At a university of UNLV’s size, it can sometimes be difficult to navigate when trying to complete student organization initiatives. As an advisor, you can offer suggestions to help the organization figure out where they can get answers and assist them with connecting with other faculty and staff on campus who can support them. IV. A Liaison: At times, an advisor may need to act as an advocate or liaison for the organization with both university departments and outside organizations. This may mean helping student members connect with offices on campus or work to find out information on behalf of the organization. V. A Mediator: Running a RSO is not always an easy job and at times there may be discourse amongst members when making decisions. As the advisor, you can help members navigate and manage the conflict to achieve resolution.  

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General Responsibilities Every RSO will have different expectations for what purpose the advisor serves and these specifics should be communicated and agreed upon by both the organization and advisor. Generally, there are some expectations that advisors should meet in order to best support the organization.

I. Attend at minimum one to two organization meetings a month. These can include both general membership and executive membership meetings. Being present helps to build the advisor relationship and instill both trust and support between the advisor and organization.

II. Be available to meet with individual members. This availability can be something that is made into a formalized process by the organization or something done more informally. This does not mean being available to the organization member 24/7 but instead is intended to further the mentorship role the advisor can serve.

III. Attend Organization Events. RSOs invest a great deal of time into event planning and preparation. Having the advisor present can offer support to an RSO and create a greater connection with the advisor. Additionally, the advisor can help with risk management and liability by being in attendance.

IV. Offer to be available after hours. RSOs often host events in the evenings or weekends when there are few people of campus. Though not required, offering to be an emergency contact and provide the organization support can give them a familiar support in emergency.

V. Hold members accountable. Being in a RSO provides students the opportunity to develop skills they can use when they graduate and one of those skills includes accountability. Encouraging internal accountability amongst members is key. Do not be afraid to report behavior of the organization to a campus office for further involvement.

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Benefits of Advising Being an advisor can be an incredibly rewarding and can facilitate both self and member growth and development. Every advising experience will be different and unique. Some of the benefits to advising include: I.

Developing mentorships and deeper relationships with students

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Watching students grow into leadership roles

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Feeling satisfaction in watching the organization grow and overcome obstacles

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Earning recognition for the work of the organization

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Personal growth and development

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Opportunities to network with campus and community partners

Providing Effective Advising and Working with Students While advising will vary depending upon the organization and student relationship, here are some general tips to assist with developing effective advising for RSO’s. I. Set agreed upon expectations for the advisor relationship and hold members accountable to these expectations. II. Know what you want to achieve from advising the organization and seek opportunities to meet these goals. III. Learn and understand the history, structure, and vision of the RSO in order to best advise them. Understand what has worked for the RSO, what is tradition for the RSO, and what the RSO may need to improve upon. IV. Determine what advising style you believe is important to the success of the organization. This style may change as the organization develops and grows. V. Understand your position as a role model and how you impact the decision making, behavior, and attitude of the organization. VI. Keep the lines of communication open and be available for members via whatever communication channel you and the members decide is appropriate. VII. Allow for growth through mistakes, understanding different learning and communication styles. VIII. Provide feedback regularly
 

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UNLV Advisor Specifics Advising Philosophy Statement Members of student organizations and advisors at UNLV contribute to building a sense of community and affinity towards UNLV through mutual learning and personal growth. As advisors, we focus on the development of students into world citizens by encouraging self-governance and student driven initiatives. Through intentional challenge, students are expected to evaluate congruence between their values and their organization. While providing students opportunities to function outside of their comfort zone, we support students by promoting an inclusive environment where we can fail safely without retribution. We aid students in the navigation of university resources and services while providing historical context. Guidance from advisors can create purposeful involvement with student organizations which assists students with their professional development by providing opportunities to learn and refine life skills, interpersonal communication, and enhance their professional network.

Function/Role The function or role of the advisor to a student organization can be described as a compilation of mentor, guide, teacher, leader, follower, and motivator. Advisors hold important knowledge, life skills, historical context, and access to resources vital to the progress of a student organization and the development of the student members. Successful advisors find the delicate balance between being overly involved and uninvolved with organization business and development. Advisors encourage students to hold one another accountable for the progress of the organization and are invested in the personal and professional development of each member of the organization. Many advisors find themselves interacting with students outside the classroom and organization business providing informal academic and career assistance. Strong mentor relationships built between students and faculty can have a positive effect on the success of the students.

Rewards and Challenges Rewards Intentional student involvement on a college campus can lead to many rewards for the institution, advisors and the students. The institution can benefit from intentional student involvement because of increased student retention, recruitment, and students may feel a stronger sense of ownership towards the institution thus contributing to the betterment of the campus climate. The advisors can benefit from directly observing college student development, forming networks of

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people interested in similar interests and career paths, observing changes in fads, cultures and student life, and further a purpose important to the advisor. Students can benefit by finding balance within their lives by participating in their interests and hobbies, increased networking and relationships with advisors, transferrable skills, and increased knowledge about campus and community resources. Ideally, institutions, advisors and students work together to support one another throughout this endeavor.

Challenges Each institution may face challenges such as communication, legality issues, resource allocation, campus support for organizations, and education of student responsibility. A challenged faced at UNLV is educating the campus about the difference between an institution “recognizing” or “registering” student organizations. Recognizing organizations is typically done at private institutions as most of the student organizations are directly promoting the university mission. Student organizations at UNLV are “registered”. This allows the institution to know what organizations exist and it allows the registered student organizations to access benefits and resources. There is no implication that the institution endorses the purpose of each registered student organization. Registered student organizations do not carry the tax exempt status or non-profit title of UNLV and are not eligible for legal representation from the university. This poses a challenge to students trying to raise funds for their organization as donors may refuse to donate because the donation may not be able to be deducted from their taxes. Advisors may be challenged to manage their time differently, communicating with students, clarifying expectations and being patient with students at different stages in their development. Advisors will be challenged to encourage students to find creative solutions to their challenges, without over controlling the organization, even if it is well-intended. Students may also be challenged by a new or increased sense of responsibility, becoming overly involved and navigating a new environment. Students may struggle with advisors who are overly involved or with the lack of guidance from an uninvolved advisor. Students will also be faced with new ethical and moral dilemmas with more freedom to choose their own path.

Responsibilities Advisors can assist students to utilize the Risk Management Matrix posted on the UNLV Involvement Center. This process will aid students in identifying potential risks for activities and events conducted through the student organization partnered with a waiver form for participants to complete. It is highly important

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for students to prepare for all potential risk to ensure safety for themselves and others in order to avoid injury as a result of negligence. When planning an event some circumstances may require general liability insurance. Student Union and Event Services (Student Union 315, (702) 895-4449) has a list of potential venders for such insurance. It is the responsibility of the organization to obtain appropriate insurance for activities. Students and registered student organizations may be held accountable for their actions on or off campus. It is important for all students and registered student organization functions to be in compliance with local, state and federal laws, in addition to the Student Conduct code.

Financial Advisors are not fiscally responsible for the organization unless it is written into their PDQ as such; advisors are not to be signatories on financial accounts (bank credit union, etc.). Some University Organization advisors are responsible for the budget of the student organization as allocated by UNLV. Student organizations are responsible for filing appropriate federal documentation regarding financial income and expenditures. Student organizations should be encouraged to keep accurate and detailed documentation of all financial records and consult an accountant for additional financial guidance.

Organization and Institution Advocacy It is important for advisors to provide neutral territory for students to ask questions and seek understanding while navigating the institutional policies and resources. Advisors can support students by providing resources, asking challenging questions and listening to the students’ questions and concerns. The better understanding each advisor has regarding institutional polices, the better equipped they will be to answer student questions or guide students to finding the answers on their own.

Conflict Conflict within groups is inevitable and can be healthy if managed appropriately. Some conflict can be managed by creating or maintaining a structured decision making process outlined in the constitution. Accurate and detailed record keeping for financial decisions, meeting notes, etc. may also help to alleviate some conflict before it elevates. Advisors may be asked to help resolve conflict within the student organization or the advisor might find themselves in the middle of conflict with the group. These situations may be a great learning opportunity for the students to witness appropriate conflict resolution strategies and in some

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circumstances grow closer as a group. More information is provided in the Leadership Library on specific conflict resolution strategies. Some basic tips include:

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address conflict early

seek understanding

withhold judgment

listen to all perspectives

be authentic

recognize those contributing to the resolution process

encourage the group to find a resolution


Registered Student Organizations at UNLV

The Mission of UNLV The University of Nevada, Las Vegas is a research institution committed to rigorous educational programs and the highest standards of a liberal education. We produce accomplished graduates who are well prepared to enter the work force or to continue their education in graduate and professional programs. Our faculty, students, and staff enthusiastically confront the challenges of economic and cultural diversification, urban growth, social justice, and sustainability. Our commitment to our dynamic region and State centrally influences our research and educational programs, which improves our local communities. Our commitment to the national and international communities ensures that our research and educational programs engage both traditional and innovative areas of study and global concerns. UNLV’s distinctive identity and values permeate a unique institution that brings the best of the world to our region and, in turn, produces knowledge to improve the region and world around us. UNLV is committed to and driven by these shared values that will guide our decision making: •

High expectations for student learning and success;

Discovery through research, scholarship, and creative activity;

• Nurturing equity, diversity, and inclusiveness that promotes respect, support, and empowerment; •

Social, environmental, and economic sustainability;

• Strong, reciprocal, and interdependent relationships between UNLV and the region around us; •

An entrepreneurial, innovative, and unconventional spirit.

UNLV’s Core Themes The core themes of UNLV, the objectives, and their indicators of achievement, express the mission of the university. The core themes describe in broad statements what UNLV plans to accomplish and reflect the values that are shared by faculty and staff. Evaluation of the metrics associated with the indicators of achievement will demonstrate how effectively UNLV is carrying out its mission. Core Theme 1: Promote Student Learning and Success Core Theme 2: Advance and Support Research, Scholarship, Creative

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Activity Core Theme 3: Foster Inclusion and Community Engagement Student Affairs Mission The Division of Student Affairs provides quality services and programs that create educational opportunities, foster collegiate success, enhance continuous learning, and promote a just and inclusive campus. Working in partnership with the university and surrounding communities, Student Affairs is a service-oriented division that strives to establish a safe and secure learning environment that is diverse, dynamic, and student-centered.

The Office of Civic Engagement and Diversity (OCED) The Office of Civic Engagement & Diversity provides educational endeavors, resources, and involvement opportunities guided by our commitment to social justice, community building, diversity, civic engagement, leadership, and a global perspective enacted through a holistic learning environment that engages students, faculty, staff and community members. Social Justice– advocate for fairness, impartiality, inclusion and equality while addressing systemic social and environmental issues. Community Building– establish and sustain a vibrant community of place, personal relationships and common interests Civic Engagement– participate intentionally as a citizen in the democratic process, actively engaging in public and direct service Diversity– respect and engage the many different dimensions of diversity in our public lives Leadership– engage in the non-positional process of responding to and addressing the needs of a group and community in order to achieve positive social change Global Perspective– develop international understanding that enables students to participate successfully in a global society Holistic Learning- promote seamless integration of curricular and co-curricular education and enhance appreciation for lifelong learning.

How Student Organizations Fit In UNLV established the goal of creating an inclusive and just community. The university strives to establish a spirit of community in accordance with high

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standards of academic excellence and freedom, institutional and individual integrity, and constitutional protections. Each member of the university, including student organizations, shares responsibility for maintaining conditions, conducive to the achievement of the university’s goals. The UNLV Student Conduct Code is designed to provide basic standards to ensure a means to fulfill its purpose.

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Registered Student Organization Defined The University of Nevada, Las Vegas defines a Registered Student Organization as a group of five or more students actively enrolled at UNLV who share a common purpose or interest. A Registered Student Organization is entirely operates and organized by actively enrolled students with the exception of a required full-time UNLV faculty or staff advisor. Registered Student Organizations may also be members of other University based communities that impose additional standards of conduct. Registered Student Organizations shall not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of race, age, color, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, gender, veteran status, or disability. The benefits of forming and becoming a member of a Registered Student Organization are explained herein. However, you need to be aware there are certain matters which are not benefits. Please read the important detailed [footnote] below. The term Registered Student Organization in this section shall also apply to the individual student members thereof. In summary, a Registered Student Organization is not an agent, representative, or employee of UNLV. You are not permitted to act as an extension of UNLV. Therefore, along with any other relevant considerations you must contemplate the following: ***Registered Student Organizations are not granted the non-profit nor tax-exempt statuses from UNLV. If an organization desires to be considered tax-exempt and/or or non-profit, they must obtain at their own expense such status through the IRS or a national affiliation. ***Registered Student Organizations receive no insurance coverage of any type from UNLV. UNLV makes no representation about the ability of a Registered Student Organization to obtain any private insurance coverage. The ability to obtain any type of insurance coverage is at the sole discretion, expense and risk of the Registered Student Organization. ***As an entity of the State of Nevada, UNLV, is insured through the State of Nevada’s self-insurance program and is afforded limited liabilities as per the Nevada Revised Statutes Chapter 41. You are not entitled to the coverage of this self-insurance program and the limited liabilities contained therein i.e. among other matters you are not entitled to a defense or indemnification. You do not have any liability coverage of any type. ***UNLV is not responsible whatsoever for the contracts, indebtedness, obligations, and/ or liabilities of a Registered Student Organization. You are responsible for the same. You are not entitled to advice and/or representation from UNLV Office of General Counsel. You are required to obtain and pay for any necessary legal advice and/or representation. A Registered Student Organization may be personally responsible for any damages from a lawsuit. ***You have no authority to enter into any type of contract (defined as a legal obligation of any type) which would bind UNLV. It is your duty and obligation to always make it clear to third parties any contract entered into is solely between them and your Registered

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Student Organization i.e. UNLV is not a party to the contract and is not responsible for the same. FOOTNOTE OR ATTACHMENT The State of Nevada ex. rel. Board of Regents of the Nevada System of Higher Education, on behalf of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (hereinafter “UNLV”) shall not be legally required to defend, indemnify, and/or hold harmless any Registered Student Organization and/or their individual members acting singularly or collectively (hereinafter for ease of reference “RSO”). UNLV’s association with any RSO is only for the limited purposes and extent specified in this Handbook and/or any other written materials. A RSO to the greatest extent permissible shall have the right to supervise, manage, operate, control, and direct the performance of the details of its operations. A RSO is not considered to be a legal entity of UNLV. A RSO and/or its members are not and shall not be construed in any manner to be employees, representatives, servants, officers and/or agents of UNLV. Therefore, an RSO is solely legally responsible for its actions and/or failure to act. A RSO is not covered by liability insurance by UNLV; does not qualify for tax exempt and/or nonprofit status from UNLV; is required to when necessary seek the advice and/or representation of its own legal counsel; is solely responsible to defend and personally pay any matter pertaining to legal proceedings i.e. attorneys fees, costs, interest and/or damages. A RSO is not entitled to defense and/or indemnity under NRS Chapter 41. A RSO shall at all times act as, and deemed to be, an independent organization (or legal entity) from UNLV. A RSO is not an employee for any purpose, including federal tax purposes. Nothing in this Handbook and/or any other written materials shall be deemed or construed to create a joint venture, partnership, agency, create relationships of an employer-employee or principal-agent, or other affiliation or relationship between the parties other than that of UNLV and an independent RSO. No relationship shall be deemed, construed, and/or perceived which creates any liability for UNLV whatsoever, with respect to the indebtedness, liabilities, and obligations of a RSO. UNLV and student organizations shall not be liable for the debts, liabilities or obligations of the other. A RSO is not appointed and shall not act as an agent of UNLV and shall have no right, power, or authority to enter into any agreement, contract, or other obligation on behalf of UNLV or otherwise bind UNLV. A RSO shall not execute any document or instrument on behalf of UNLV and shall not at anytime hold themselves out to any third party as an agent of UNLV or imply to any third party that they have any authority to so act on behalf of UNLV.

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Registered Student Organization Governance UNLV’s registered student organizations and their members are afforded the opportunity to organize and manage their operations. Since organizations are highly encouraged to govern themselves, members are given the opportunity to develop and enhance their leadership skills and acquire meaningful experiences that contribute to their collegiate experience. Although registered student organizations are self-governed, there are guidelines set forth by entities such as the Nevada System of Higher Education, UNLV, Civic Engagement & Diversity, CSUN Student Government, Graduate and Professional Student Association, Fraternity & Sorority Life, Club Sports, and additional sponsoring departments. Most of the policies are outlined within this manual.

Additional Governing Bodies CSUN: CSUN is the undergraduate student government at UNLV and is funded through a fee assessed to all undergraduate students. The Consolidated Students of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas provides funding for undergraduate registered student organizations. In order to be eligible for funding, organizations must be registered and complete the requirements listed on-line at: http:// getinvolved.unlv.edu/studentorgs GPSA: The Graduate & Professional Student Association provides support and networking for graduate organizations that complete the registration requirements and submit an updated constitution and signed signature form to the GPSA Office. More details can be found at: http://gpsa.unlv.edu Club Sports: The UNLV Club Sports Program provides students the opportunity to participate, educate, and compete in recreational activities as a means to enhance their collegiate experience and provide a vehicle for a well-rounded education through physical, social, and leadership development. Any organization seeking the Club Sports status must be fully registered and complete the additional requirements set forth by the Club Sports Council. More information is available at srwc.unlv.edu or by emailing srwc.clubsports@unlv.edu. Fraternity & Sorority Life: Fraternities and sororities must complete the registration requirements, act in accordance with their respective governing council policies, and comply with policies enacted by the Fraternity & Sorority Life staff at UNLV. More details regarding Fraternity & Sorority Life at UNLV can be found at: http:// getinvolved.unlv.edu/greeklife/

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The RSO Registration Process General RSO Guidelines: Any group of students that have convened to support or practice a common interest and wish to seek the resources and benefits of being registered with the university as a registered student organization must complete the following steps annually: I. Complete annual registration (runs August-October)*: Additional guidelines regarding registration can be found at www.getinvolved.unlv.edu The two steps to registration are: a. Attend a mandatory information session hosted by OCED. Dates for 2013-2014 academic year meetings are available at www.getinvolved.unlv. edu b. Update the organization profile on the UNLV Involvement Center, or create a profile if the organization is new. *New Organization Registration time frame may vary. See Forming a New Organization

II. Additional to completing the requirements above, in order to be consider for university RSO status, organizations must: a. Consist of at least five registered UNLV students. b. Have a full-time faculty or staff advisor employed by UNLV. While Graduate Assistants and part-time staff are free to be involved in RSOs, they are not eligible to serve as faculty/staff advisors. c. Maintain updated information posted on the UNLV Involvement Center including an updated roster, calendar of events, and documents. d. Ensure that the organization does not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of race, age, color, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, gender, veteran status, or disability. e. Openly communicate with members and interested contacts that the organization and members of the organization are not covered by liability insurance. f. Understand that registered student organizations do not carry the tax-exempt or the non-profit status from UNLV, or the Board of Regents, but can become eligible by filing the appropriate documents required by the IRS. g. Understand that registered Student organizations are not eligible for legal representation from UNLV. h. Comply with the Student Code of Conduct, UNLV policies and procedures, state and federal law and ordinances when conducting

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organizational business. i. Report, “any building or property owned or controlled by a student organization that is officially recognized by the institution;” during the registration process. j. Complete a brief online training video

Forming a New Student Organization The UNLV community works with over 300 registered student organizations, all of which have a wide variety of interests. Before beginning the process of forming a new student organization, it is recommended that the group research existing student organizations through the UNLV Involvement Center which can be accessed by logging into MyUNLV, https://my.unlv.nevada.edu. If a group of students is unable to identify an existing organization that is of interest, then the group is encouraged to create a new student organization. All organizations must be initiated and governed by actively enrolled students of UNLV with an active Rebelmail address. A new registered student organization is defined as an organization that has never previously existed at UNLV before meaning it is an entirely new organization. A new registered student organization is also defined as an organization that has been on campus before but has been considered inactive by the university or at least one academic year. Here are some questions to consider to aid in creating a new student organization: • What is the purpose of the organization? • What will be the goals of the organization? • How will the organization plan to accomplish its goals? • What is unique about the organization? • Are there other students who may be interested in joining the organization? • What type of commitment will members need in order to form the organization? • How will the organization identify and recruit members? • Does the organization know of a UNLV faculty or staff (full-time employee) member who would be interested in serving as an advisor to the group? Answering these questions will help the group to begin the registration process. If a group would like assistance, contact the SORCE at 895-5576 or visit the Student Union 305.

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Registration Process All organizations must maintain an organization profile through the UNLV Involvement Center. The registration process, benefits, resources and university communication utilizes the UNLV Involvement Center. Students need to log into the UNLV Involvement Center to gain access to organizations in which they hold membership or seek to join. To Access the UNLV Involvement Center: 1. Visit https://my.unlv.nevada.edu 2. Click on the UNLV Involvement Center button located on the homepage 3. Upon first entering, provide Name and rebelmail information Joining or Creating a Registered Student Organization Group Portal: 1. Log into MyUNLV 2. Click the UNLV Involvement Center 3. Click Organizations 4. Search for organizations of interest by using keywords, based upon interests, by category, or through the alphabetical directory. a. If you are creating a new student organization, click organizations, scroll down the left hand side, and click on Register New Organization and complete the organization profile. Registration is completed on-line by renewing your organization profile within the UNLV Involvement Center. This must be completed each annually. 1.

Update the on-line organization profile • Existing organizations: will simply update their organization profile by searching their organization and click the register button. Existing organization will only be eligible to re-register from August 1-October 30th annually. • New organizations: New organizations will have two opportunities to register per year (Fall and Spring). 2. Attend the mandatory organization registration session (dates available on-line at: the UNLV Involvement Center). New organizations must also attend a new organization information session (dates available on-line at: the UNLV Involvement Center). 3. Complete a brief online training video. The registration will only be available during a set period of time. After the organization has completed the registration process, they will have access to the resources and benefits of a registered student organization and the ability to seek further access to benefits from the following: GPSA or CSUN, Fraternity& Sorority Life or Club Sports.

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Please refer to the corresponding section of this manual for further details.

Organization Types Student organizations at UNLV are designated an overarching type depending upon their interests. Additionally, RSOs have the capability to select different interests through the UNLV Involvement Center in order to attract students with similar interests to join. Overarching types of organizations are as follows: Academic/Pre-Professional/Honorary Groups that further the content knowledge and experience in an academic field or professional area. Some of these organizations may have Greek Letters in their name, but are not associated with the Greek Life governing structures. Graduate/Professional Student Organization Organizations created and maintained by graduate or professional students. These organizations must contact GPSA after completing the online registration. Spiritual/Faith-Based Groups that promote the personal growth of associated members in relation to spirituality and/or religion. Diversity & Multicultural Groups that celebrate, educate and communicate the nature of specific shared identities and experiences such as race, class, gender, sexual orientation, ability, and ethnicity. International Groups that celebrate, educate, and communicate the nature and individualities of a specific culture or nationality outside of the United States. Club Sports Organizations founded around a sport that can be categorized as recreational, instructional, or competitive as defined in the Club Sports Manual. These organizations must contact Club Sports after completing the online registration. Civic Engagement & Advocacy Groups that further the progress of an idea or initiative to affect the community at large (Service, Political, Social Justice, Advocacy). Special Interest Groups that encourage social interaction around a shared interest or theme. Fraternities & Sororities Groups that are directly associated with the Greek Life procedures and policies on campus and have an existing relationship with one of the four Greek governing councils.

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The UNLV Involvement Center The UNLV Involvement Center was established in Fall 2012, as a site devoted to RSOs and encouraging and promoting involvement. The center is accessible through MyUNLV and is easy for students, faculty, and staff to access. The UNLV Involvement Center allows for RSOs to manage the operations of their organization, communicate easily to members, collaborate with other RSO’s, advertise upcoming events, and connect with campus partners quickly and easily. It also allows for uninvolved students to search organizations based upon interests and connect directly with members of RSO’s. It is a “one stop shop,” for RSO’s and involvement! The UNLV Involvement Center is accessible through MyUNLV. 

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Membership Guidelines General Membership Registered student organizations (RSO) cannot unlawfully discriminate on the basis of race, age, color, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, gender, veteran status, or disability. Each registered student organization (RSO) must maintain a minimum of five (5) registered UNLV students. Registered student organizations may also, if the organization deems it applicable, consist of community, alumni, or faculty/staff members in addition to the required five student members and faculty/staff advisor. These additional members may not serve in executive roles with the organization and may only serve as general members Members of registered student organizations are advised that the success of their involvement experience is largely based upon the effort and initiative taken by the individual member. It is the responsibility of all involved students to stay informed of registered student organization business and UNLV communication. This can mostly be accomplished through the use of the UNLV Involvement Center, organization calendar, message system and news updates.

Officers/Executive Boards The structure of membership within the organization may be unique and determined by the collective members. If positions (offices, executive boards, directorships, etc.) or hierarchies are created, the registered student organization members need to collectively create a constitution to govern how, when and to whom responsibility will be delegated. Outlines for constitutions are available at the UNLV Involvement Center, on the SORCE page additional assistance is available in the Student Organization Resource Center (SORCE, Student Union 305). Constitution and bylaws are highly recommended by the university and should be updated every one to two years. While it is the responsibility of each member to stay informed of organization business and UNLV communications, it is highly suggested that the leadership within the organization creates an expectation for open communication with members and interested contacts.

Faculty/Staff Advisors Every registered student organization must have a faculty/staff advisor at all Every registered student organization must have a full-time faculty/staff advisor at all times. This advisor must be employed by the University of Nevada, Las Vegas as a faculty or staff member. If there is a change in the advisor for a registered student organization, the organization profile must be updated immediately. This

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is located within the organization profile under profile. Accurate campus contact information must be provided for each advisor. The contact information of the advisor must be the UNLV office phone number and UNLV email address as this information will be published on-line. Do not provide personal cell phone and email addresses for Faculty/Staff Advisors. Organizations that are affiliated with community or national entities may carry additional advisors, but must retain a full-time faculty or staff member. 

Faculty/Staff Advisor Requirements An advisor to a Registered Student Organization must be a full-time faculty or staff member at UNLV. Advisors shall be requires to take the steps explained herein to be denominated as a volunteer. A person who performs volunteer service as an Advisor under the direct supervision and control of and for the benefit of UNLV is considered an employee. Therefore, the sole remedy to an Advisor for injury occurring during the course and scope of their duties shall be workers compensation. Advisors shall not sign and/or enter into any contracts and/or legal obligations of any type on behalf of the Registered Student Organization. This is due to the fact UNLV is not responsible whatsoever for the contracts, indebtedness, obligations, and/or liabilities of a Registered Student Organization. Your status as an employee and engaging in the type of conduct just mentioned could lead to the legal liability of UNLV. Advisors who fulfill the requirements provided below shall be entitle to the following benefits: 1. Workers compensation coverage as explained above 2. As an entity of the State of Nevada, UNLV, is insured through the State of Nevada’s self-insurance program and is afforded limited liabilities as per the Nevada Statuses Chapter 41 (provided In Appendices). Advisors acting within the course and scope of their duties and as a result of their activities with a RSO shall be entitled to be defended and indemnified provided their actions are not wanton or malicious. The key provisions of NRS 41.0349 are contained in the appendix of this handbook. A faculty/staff advisor must complete the below requirements upon organization registration as part of the organization’s ability to become active. Once an organization completes the online registration the advisor will be notified to complete their portion of the requirements. If the faculty/staff advisor does not complete the requirements below by the October 30th deadline the organization will not be considered active by the university. The requirements are as follows:

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1. Complete a brief online training. 2. Complete and sign the online Advisor Agreement (example provided in appendix) 3. Complete an online Advisor Volunteer Form (example provided in appendix).

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Accessing Benefits and Resources Advisor Welcome and Appreciation At the beginning and end of each academic year, advisors will be invited to participate in an open forum and celebration regarding their role as a faculty/ staff advisor. These events will be an opportunity to learn new information, ask questions and network with other faculty/staff advisor. Additionally, they are an opportunity for the students and university to say thank you to advisors who often serve tirelessly in their roles. Faculty/staff advisors are highly encouraged to attend these events and will be notified regarding dates, times, and locations via email.

Student Organization Resource Center (SORCE) The SORCE is a space shared and open to all registered student organization members working on official organization business. The SORCE provides resources, including but not limited to, art supplies, limited printing, teambuilding packets, goal setting strategies, etc. (some resources may be limited in availability). Provided resources are only to be used for official registered student organization business. Resources cannot be used for personal or academic purposes as the budget is limited to support over 300 registered student organizations.

Financial Benefits/Resources Registered student organizations have multiple opportunities to apply for financial assistance for official registered student organization business, activities, and initiatives. For in-depth instructions, details and policies, please review the section of this manual titled: Financing Your Registered Student Organization.

Campus Space Reservations Student organizations seeking to host an event on campus should begin by determining in which building their desired space is located. Forms to reserve space on campus can be accessed through both visiting campus offices and online as detailed below: Note: Only reservations requests submitted by approved scheduling liaisons will be considered for space approval. Scheduling liaisons may be updated by the organization administrator (usually a president or like officer) by emailing Katy Armstrong, katy.armstrong@unlv.edu.

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To submit space and marketing requests for the Student Union, SRWC or green space on campus: 1. The approved Scheduling Liaison must submit the appropriate reservation request form for the service desired. 2. Paper forms can be found online at: http://eventservices.unlv.edu/ forms.html or visit the Student Union event Services office in the Student Union room 315. Electronic forms can be found by: 1. Log into the UNLV Involvement Center and click Campus Links on the right hand corner. 2. Select the desired Student Union Event Services form and submit your complete form electronically. Student Involvement Fair Participation All registered student organizations in good standing with the University, Office of Civic Engagement & Diversity and any other relevant governing entities (Club Sports, GPSA, Fraternity & Sorority Life, etc.) are invited to participate in the Student Involvement Fairs. Involvement Fairs are typically held during the first month of the spring and fall semesters. Each fair consists of a two-day event sponsored by the Office of Civic Engagement & Diversity. Each participating organization is provided with table space and chairs for 1or 2 members to staff the table. Each fair usually consists of about 100-150 organizations providing opportunities for students to get involved on campus and within the local community through membership recruitment or event marketing. Registration for the Involvement Fairs occurs through the UNLV Involvement Center a few weeks prior to each fair. More information is provided within the registration form and mandatory organizations registration sessions.

Marketing on the UNLV Campus I. Printed Materials: Registered student organizations may post fliers in designated areas throughout campus. Posting policies exist for Housing and Residential Life and the general UNLV campus can be found by visiting the SORCE room, Student Union 305. II. The Student Organization Resource Center (SORCE) staff members maintain five (5) locked bulletin boards across campus. Registered student organizations can submit up to five (5) copies of fliers advertising official registered student organization business which comply with all UNLV policies. Fliers no larger than 11in X 17in must be submitted by 5:00 PM on Thursdays. One additional copy may be submitted to the Student Union Information desk

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located on the first floor of the Student Union to be posted on a the first floor bulletin board.

Public Expressive Zones (free speech) There are multiple locations on campus where students and the public do not need reservations to utilize the outdoor space. Maps with these zones marked can be attained at the Student Union Information desk.

Electronic Marketing Registered student organizations can advertise their events and initiatives through the UNLV Involvement Center and website by adding their events to the events tab on their organization profiles and selecting the option to request the event be placed on the community-wide calendar. After the request is reviewed by OCED staff, the event will either be accepted or denied. Successful events will be in compliance with the Student Conduct Code and the mission of UNLV.

News/RAVE Announcements In addition to the community-wide calendar, students can also submit news announcements to the Program Coordinator in the Office of Civic Engagement & Diversity overseeing student organizations to be posted on the website as well as sent through the RAVE email system. Successful news requests will be in text format (no attachments) and in compliance with the Student Conduct Code and the mission of UNLV.

Student Union Event Services (SUES) Marketing Opportunities To access or reserve the following marketing opportunities, please visit the Student Union Event Services website accessible through the UNLV Involvement Center. All campus space reservation process and guidelines apply (see Campus Space Reservations section). I. Marketing Tables: One table and two chairs can be reserved indoors and outdoors at the Student Union and Student Recreation & Wellness Center. II. Digital Plasma Screens: Digital display televisions are located in the Student Union and Student Recreation & Wellness Center to post digital advertisements for one week at a time. III.

Table Tents: The Student Union allows student organizations to provide

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mini fliers (4 in X 6 in) for the SUES staff members to insert into plastic holders on the tables in the dining area on the first floor of the Student Union for one week at a time. Interior and Exterior Banners: Indoor and outdoor banner space may be reserved over the balconies of the Student Union. Advertising Policy http://eventservices.unlv.edu/pdf/policies/AdvertisingPolicy. pdf  

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Financing Your Organization: Fiscal Responsibility Registered student organizations are responsible for the management of all funds relating to their organization. Fiscal management and decision-making processes must be outlined within the constitution of the registered student organization. Some organizations are subject to fiscal guidelines based upon any national, international or professional affiliations. Student organizations should maintain transparency with the membership of the organization regarding the management of funds. Student organizations cannot act as an extension of UNLV in that they are not covered by liability insurance or tax-exempt status from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas or the Nevada Board of Regents. Registered student organizations must seek tax-exempt status as well as purchase their own liability insurance when needed.

Funding Opportunities •

CSUN (Student Government)

Office of Civic Engagement and Diversity Student Funding Board

Co-Sponsorship Opportunities

o Students Organizing Diversity Activities (SODA) o International Council o Other opportunities may be found by contacting registered student organizations or departments with missions that parallel the mission or purpose of the initiative being funded. • University Department: Some university departments are willing to help fund RSO initiatives if the initiatives are parallel to the department mission and values. •

Fundraising

Membership dues

Bank Accounts UNLV does not encourage registered student organizations to maintain an offcampus bank account. UNLV also does not allow faculty/staff advisors to be signatures on bank accounts. In order to open an off-campus bank account they must first acquire an EIN number from the IRS. Registered student organizations are responsible for any income tax reporting and are encouraged to consult a certified tax consultant or attorney for additional support and guidelines. Organizations may need to file a FORM 990-N with the IRS within three years of establishing an organization with a Tax ID# and thereafter. Registered student

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organizations do not carry the non-profit nor tax-exempt statuses from UNLV. If an organization wished to be considered tax-exempt or non-profit they must attain such status through the IRS or a national affiliation. To obtain an EIN, call 1-800-829-4933 and provide the requested information (SSN, mailing address, etc). Do not use UNLV in the name of the organization. This information must be updated before officer transitions are complete. This number is used to complete a W-9 (available in the CSUN office Student Union 316) in order to receive funding from CSUN, Student Funding Board, other campus reimbursements, and to create off-campus bank accounts. To apply for an EIN on-line: http://www.irs.gov Click on the Business tab Click on Employer ID Numbers in the left side column Click on Apply for an EIN Online in the center of the page Click on APPLY ONLINE NOW at the bottom of the page A pop-up window will appear. Read the message and click Okay Click on Begin Application Select the option to View Additional Types, Including Tax-Exempt and Governmental Organizations Click on Continue Select Social or Savings Club Click on Continue *From here you will need to complete the information for yourself. When you leave the organization, please transfer the EIN number to the new officer responsible for the organization by contacting the IRS.

Reimbursements Proper documentation is needed when seeking a reimbursement from UNLV. Please gather the following:

2.

1. Original detailed receipts (make copies for your own documentation/ record-keeping. NSHE Number of the individual being reimbursed OR

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EIN number for the registered student organization being reimbursed 3. If the purchase is made by a debit or credit card, a copy of the statement showing the purchase is required to accompany this documentation. The name and purchase must match the receipt provided, but the account number and non-related purchases can be marked over with black marker.

Philanthropy Philanthropy is the act of donating money, goods, services, time and/or effort to support a socially beneficial cause, with a defined objective and with no financial or material reward to the donor. Such events also serve as a way to build community among UNLV students and the Las Vegas community. Funds raised by an RSO for an outside entity are to be gifted in their entirety (100%) to the named philanthropy. Costs incurred to create the philanthropic event must be fully funded by the organization before the philanthropy is conducted. University funds may not be donated to off campus interests. Fraternities and Sororities must also comply with the Fraternity and Sorority Life Philanthropy policy that addresses additional Fraternity and Sorority Life community concerns, points, and procedures.

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Fundraising Fundraising is considered a normal organizational function. The funds raised will be managed by the registered student organization and will be managed as directed by the constitution created by the organization. If an organization initiative is to donate such funds to a philanthropic organization, they are required to appropriately document all transactions and comply with the philanthropy guidelines. Student organizations do not fall under the tax-exempt and nonprofit status of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Student organizations may apply for either status through the United States Internal Revenue Services. Some organizations may be covered through their affiliations with professional, national or international organizations. More information can be found at http://www.irs. gov

Membership Dues Registered student organizations may collect dues to cover organization expenditures if desired. Funds collected will be managed by the organization as prescribed by the constitution created by the organization.

Contracts, Sales, and Licensing Some groups have been quite successful in conducting regular concession sales items such as t-shirts, flowers, etc. There are a number of state laws and campus policies that impact concessions and other sales. No door-to-door solicitations are allowed on the UNLV Campus. Contact the Office of Event Services located in the Student Union for more information about the sale of merchandise at oncampus venues.

Raffles, Free Drawings, and giveaways The distribution of prizes or gifts by chance where money is exchanged is against University policy, and therefore prohibited, However, free drawings, or “give-aways” may be held if: • All persons who request a ticket are accommodated. • No participant is required to donate money to obtain tickets for the drawing and this is printed on the tickets. • It is made clear whether or not the ticket holder needs to present in order to win.

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Use of Licenser Brands I.

Non-commercial

Registered UNLV student organizations may use the university’s marks and logos on materials that might include stationary, signs, posters, banners, and clothing. UNLV Licensing Graphic Guidelines and/or UNLV’s graphic standards manual must be followed. Use of the Rebel Head must be approved through Athletics before additional approvals can be granted.

II.

Commercial Registered UNLV student organizations that conduct promotions, giveaways, and fundraisers, and that offer products for resale that involve the manufacturing of clothing, novelties, and other logo merchandise, are required to submit an internal licensing agreement for approval from the licensing director. All products must be purchased through vendors licensed by the university through the Collegiate Licensing Company for non-commercial and commercial purposes. Rebel Head must be approved through Athletics before additional approvals can be granted. To obtain more information about these guidelines or a list of approved vendors, student organizations may contact UNLV Trademarks and Licensing Department at (702) 895-0294.

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Nevada System of Higher Education and Student Conduct Code The behavior of all students and student organizations, as members of the university community, is governed by the Nevada System of Higher Education and the UNLV Student Conduct Code. Students and student organizations may also be members of other university-based communities that impose additional standards of conduct, intercollegiate athletic teams’ expectations, club sports’ expectations and Fraternity & Sorority Life social organizations’ expectations. The rights and responsibilities accorded students by the Student Conduct Code extend to all such student conduct codes, standards, and governing documents. The Student Code of Conduct applies to all students taking a course at UNLV, during break periods and to all persons who are not officially enrolled for a particular term but have a continuing relationship with the university. Student organizations, including fraternities and sororities, as well as their members, may be held collectively and/or individually responsible for violations of the Student Conduct Code. For the complete version of the Code of Conduct please visit: http://studentconduct.unlv.edu/conduct

Rights and Responsibilities The University of Nevada, Las Vegas is an academic community in which all persons share responsibility for its quality and well-being. As members of the university community, students can reasonably expect all of the guarantees and protections afforded students at public institutions by the United States and Nevada Constitutions. Following is a listing of some of the student rights as outlined in UNLV Conduct Code. Refer to the UNLV Student Conduct Code for a complete listing I. The right to exercise their freedoms without fear of university interference. II. The right to be free from discrimination on the basis of race, gender, age, religion, creed, national origin, disability or sexual orientation. III. The right to engage in inquiry and discussion, to exchange thought and opinion, and to speak, write, and print freely on any subject in accordance with the guarantees of federal and state laws. IV. The right to engage in peaceful and orderly speech, protest, demonstration, and picketing within the public forum to the extent that such activity does not disrupt the educational functions of the university. The university reserves the right to approve the time, place and manner of such activities. V. The opportunity to participate in the formulation of policy directly affecting students through membership on appropriate committees as determined by the President of the University, CSUN and other recognized groups within the University.

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VI. Ready access to established University policies and procedures. The officers or leaders and advisors of a student organization may be held collectively and/or individually responsible when Student Council Code and NSHE Code violations are committed by persons associated with the organization who have received consent or encouragement from the organization or from its officers or leaders. University officials may direct the officers or leaders of a student organization to take action designed to prevent or end such violations by the organization or by any persons associated with the organization that can reasonably be said to be acting on its behalf. Failure to make reasonable efforts to comply with such a directive shall be considered a violation of this Code both by the officers or leaders of the organization and by the organization itself. Sanctions for organizational misconduct may include revocation of that use of University facilities, privileges, resources, or benefits for a definite period of time, denial of University recognition or registration, and suspension of participation in or sponsorship of social or intramural activities or events, as well as other appropriate sanctions permitted under the Student Conduct Code or other codes, standards and governing documents of the University.

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RSO Related Policies Alcohol No alcohol is allowed to be stored, possessed, or consumed on UNLV property or at a UNLV sponsored event unless prior approval has been issued by the Vice President of Student Affairs. Please refer to the UNLV Student Conduct Code and the UNLV Alcohol Event Policy. Violations of the policies will warrant an investigation and is punishable by the Board of Regents Code of Student Conduct.

Hazing Any and all forms of hazing are strictly prohibited, and punishable under the Student Conduct Code and State and Federal Law. Student consent is not a legal defense and all actions that could be interpreted as hazing should be strongly analyzed. Here are a few questions you can ask yourself to determine if an activity could be hazing. • Is it hazing? If you are asking this question it probably is. If in doubt call the advisor of the student organization. • Is alcohol involved? • Would all members, current and new, want to participate? • Is there a risk of injury or safety concerns? • Do you have any reservation describing the activity to parents, a professor, or University Official? • Would anyone object to the activity being photographed for the school newspaper, or filmed by a local television station? Juvenile Policy Any on-campus event open to the attendance and/or participation of juveniles is required to have the faculty/staff advisor of the registered student organization responsible for the event in attendance for the duration of the event. Adapted from the policy “Juveniles on Campus” for student organizations: http:// www.unlv.edu/policies/facilities_use.html#juveniles

Media on Campus UNLV has several student run media outlets, including KUNV, Rebel Yell, Vagus Nerve, and UNLV-TV, in which any organization may submit material to. NonUNLV media Markets are required to subject all material to approval of the Office of Public Affairs, which may be contacted at (702) 895-3101.

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Off-Campus Partnerships Partnerships and collaborations with off-campus interests (businesses, non-profit organizations, religious institutions, national organizations, etc) are encouraged only when the interest of the students is first priority. Please refer to the Office of Student Union & Event Services at 702-895-4449 when such partnerships bring off-campus entities to campus for sales, marketing, contracts, and licensing. Such instances may be subject to financial responsibility by the registered student organization.

Officer Transitions The responsibility of an outgoing officer does not end at elections. Outgoing officers are responsible for properly transitioning the newly elected/appointed officers to be successful which includes but is not limited to: •

Providing all organizational documentation

• Update fiscal officer information for the incoming officer by calling the IRS with the new officer information and the correct Employer Identification Number (EIN). If you have lost the number you will need to update this information from a previous officer or you will need to call 1-800-829-4933 • Set up transition meetings to discuss historical context, current issues, and future vision •

Transfer administrative access to involvement portal to appropriate officers

Training on involvement portal (Orgsync) administration

Risk Management Many factors contribute to the levels of risk involved with any activity, including but not limited to: climate, transportation, crime, access to medical resources, personal health, dining accommodations, wildlife, natural disasters, individual training/preparation, first response team accessibility, lodging, terrain, activity specific risks, etc. While all risk associated with any event is not be avoidable, student organizations are encouraged to research all aspects of their activities and prepare for the potential risks involved, while being aware of additional risks throughout the activity. The Office of Civic Engagement & Diversity provides the Risk Matrix (located though the UNLV Involvement Center, on the SORCE page under documents) as one option to help students begin to assess the risk involved with their activities.

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Travel Students traveling off-campus for organization related activities are responsible for upholding the Student Conduct Code and are strongly encouraged to take precaution with all aspects of travel. Create and maintain appropriate documentation (see general examples listed below). Provide a copy of these records with a responsible individual not attending the activity but who is informed of the itinerary and purpose of the trip. Maintain copies of all applicable documentation with the group traveling. Documentation may include: • Liability release forms • Insurance • Medical emergency contact information for all attendees • Emergency contact information (campus, destination specific, travel accommodations, etc.) Student organizations cannot act as an extension of UNLV in that they are not covered by liability insurance or tax exempt status from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas or the Nevada Board of Regents. Registered student organizations must seek tax exempt status as well as purchase their own liability insurance when needed.

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Additional Resources

Campus Resources Sometimes in your role as an advisor for a Registered Student Organization, you will be asked to provide resources to a student in need. You may grow concerned about a student’s health and safety and want to refer them to available resources. The following information outlines the basic resources on campus. More information on “How to Help a Student of Concern” can be found at http:// studentconduct.unlv.edu/concern/index.html or http://studentconduct.unlv.edu/ concern/pdf/How-to-Help-Guide.pdf Academic Success Center: http://academicsuccess.unlv.edu/advising/ or 8953177 Career Center: http://hire.unlv.edu/ or 895-3495 Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS): http://srwc.unlv.edu/caps.html or 895-3627 Disability Resource Center (DRC): http://drc.unlv.edu/ or 895-0866 International Student and Scholars: http://studentlife.unlv.edu/international/ or 895-0169 Jean Nidetch Women’s Center: http://womenscenter.unlv.edu/index.htm or 8954475 Student Health Center: http://srwc.unlv.edu/theSHC.html or 895-4226 Student of Concern: http://studentconduct.unlv.edu/concern/ Office of Student Conduct (OSC): http://studentconduct.unlv.edu/ or 895-2308 Office of Housing and Residential Life: http://housing.unlv.edu/ or 895-3489 Vice President for Student Affairs: http://studentaffairs.unlv.edu/ or 895-3656 You should call UNLV Police Services at 911 from a campus phone [or (702) 8953669 from a cell phone] if the incident is nearing the level of crisis. A crisis exists whenever a person’s behavior poses imminent danger of: • causing or threatening harm to self or others, • impeding lawful activities of other members of the campus community, • interfering with the health, safety, or well being of other members of the UNLV community and/or, • experiencing a health emergency. For non-emergency UNLV Police Services, dial 311 from a campus phone.

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Group Development Tuckman’s model of group development provides one view of the stages through which groups typically progress. Having an understanding of the model and the student organization members may assist the advisors of organizations in guiding the group through challenges and successes throughout the year. Below is an overview of Tuckman’s group development model with the addition of the fifth stage adjourning (Tuckman and Jensen, 1977): Forming: Members test the environment and other members to determine their place in the organization and become more independent in their role within the group. Storming: Conflict and resistance to demands placed on the members, tends to rise within the organization with an increased level of emotion. Norming: Members begin to find ways to work with one another and form a sense of cohesiveness. Performing: The group members begin to functionally accomplish tasks and responsibilities. Adjourning: The group completes tasks and responsibilities while beginning to prepare for change within relationships. Strategies and additional tools for supporting groups throughout the different stages of development, group dynamics and advising resources are available in the Leadership Library located in the SORCE (Student Union 305).

Organizational Assessment Students and advisors can benefit from a regular performance assessment. Feedback from such assessment can enhance future performance if integrated into the structure of the organization. Such assessments can be based upon the goals of the organization, expectations created by the organization and satisfaction surveys. For additional support and strategies, please contact the Office of Civic Engagement and Diversity at (702) 895-5631.

Expectation Building Student organizations and advisors are encouraged to work together to create or review a list of expectations of one another whenever new officers are elected or new members join. On the following page is a list of things to consider in discussion regarding expectations. Please include any additional items relevant to your organization.

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Example of Advisor Agreement Statements As the Advisor to a Registered Student Organization, I affirm that I am a full or part-time faculty or staff member of UNLV. As the Advisor to a Registered Student Organization, I understand that I am responsible for distributing all information I receive from the University officials regarding student organizations to the officers of the organization. As the Advisor to a Registered Student Organization, I affirm that the organization shall not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of race, age, color, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, gender, veteran status, or disability. As the Advisor to a Registered Student Organization, I affirm that this organization has 5 UNLV student members. The decision-making and organization direction is driven by UNLV students. As the Advisor to a Registered Student Organization, I affirm that my participation as an advisor is a part of my role at UNLV and falls under the NSHE policies regarding workers compensation. I understand that my behavior needs to be consistent with the professionalism expected of University employees/advisors and all NSHE/UNLV polices apply. As the Advisor to a Registered Student Organization, I affirm that all members understand that student organizations and their members ARE NOT COVERED by liability insurance, do not qualify for tax exempt status, and are not eligible for legal representation for the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. As the Advisor to a Registered Student Organization, I affirm that I understand and will comply with University Student Conduct Code and UNLV policies and procedures as found in the Registered Student Organization Handbook and RSO Advisor Handbook.

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Example of the Advisor Volunteer Agreement VOLUNTEER AGREEMENT (Student Organization Advisor)

SECTION I – VOLUNTEER INFORMATION Name: ________________________________________ NSHE#: _______________________

Employment Information: UNLV Department:_________________________________Title:________________________

Date of Birth*: _________ Phone #:_______________ Driver’s License #:____________

Home Address:

______________________________________________________________________________ Street City State Zip

In case of emergency, please contact: ______________________________________________________________________________ Name Relationship Phone Number ______________________________________________________________________________ Name Relationship Phone Number

As a volunteer, I agree to abide by all applicable rules and regulation of the UCCSN, UNLV, and guidelines of this department and to fulfill the volunteer responsibilities to the best of my ability. I understand that I will receive no monetary benefits in return for the volunteer service I provide and that the University may terminate this agreement at any time without prior notice. I also understand that my participation as an advisor to a Registered Student Organization (RSO) as a part of my role at UNLV falls under the NSHE policies regarding workers compensation. I understand that my behavior needs be consistent with the professionalism expected of University employees/advisors and that all NSHE / UNLV policies apply.

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______I have read a copy of the volunteer assignment description form and I ascertain that I am physically able to complete the tasks listed. ______I have read a copy of the volunteer assignment description form and I request the following accommodation(s) to complete these tasks: ____________________________________________________________________________ Volunteer’s Signature: Date:

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Registered Student Organization Expectation Discussion Worksheet This form is designed to help advisors and student officers arrive at a clear and mutually agreed upon role of the advisor in student organization affairs. Directions: The advisor and each officer, chairperson and coordinator should respond to the following items. For each of the following statements, respond on a scale of 1-5 how important this function is: 1.

Essential for the advisor to do

2.

Helpful for the advisor to do

3.

Nice but they do not have to do

4.

Would prefer they not do

5.

Absolutely not the advisor’s role

The advisor is expected to: 1.

____ Attend all committee meetings they specifically advise.

2.

____ Attend all general meetings.

3.

____ Attend all events planned by you and your committee/area.

4.

____ Attend events outside of their specific responsibilities.

5.

____ Attend social activities planned by your committee/area.

6.

____ Call meetings with students when s/he believes it’s necessary.

7.

____ Meet weekly with individual chairperson(s), members.

8.

____ Explain University policy when relevant to the discussion.

9.

____ Explain University policies and depend upon the officers to carry them out.

10. ____ Take the initiative in creating teamwork and cooperation among officers and members. 11. ____ Let the group work out its problems including making mistakes and “doing it the hard way.” 12. ____ State what his/her responsibilities are, as s/he sees them, at the beginning of the school year.

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13.

____ Get a carbon copy of all official correspondence.

14.

____ Inform the group of infractions of University Policy.


15.

____ Prohibit a decision when it violates University policy.

16.

____ Speak up during meeting discussions when s/he has relevant information.

17. ____ Speak up during discussion when s/he believes the group is likely to make a poor decision. 18.

____ Be quiet during meetings unless called upon.

19.

____ Provide input to the meeting minutes before they are written in final form.

20.

____ Help the President or officer prepare the agenda before each meeting.

21.

____ Provide input into all official correspondence before it is sent out.

22. ____ Exert his/her influence with officer(s), chairperson(s) or coordinator(s) between meetings. 23. ____ Initiate ideas for group discussion when s/he believes they will help the group. 24.

____ Take an active part in formulating the goals for the group.

25.

____ Keep the group aware of its stated objectives when planning events.

26.

____ Recommend programs, speakers, etc... to the group for consideration.

27.

____ Lobby for programs, speakers, etc‌, to be selected by the group.

28. ____ Be familiar with University facilities, services, and procedures which affect group activities. 29.

____ Be responsible for planning leadership skills workshops.

30.

____ Help design posters, flyers and other publicity materials.

31. ____ Proof all publicity materials including posters, flyers and newspaper ads before going to print. 32.

____ Help the group clean up after programs/events.

33.

____ Require officers to clear all expenditures with him/her before financial

commitments are made. 34.

____ Require officers to clear all contractual obligations with him/her.

35. ____ Be a custodian of all group materials, records, etc. during member and officer transitions. 36. ____ Take an active part in the transition between old and new officers at the end of the year. 37.

____ Mediate interpersonal conflicts when they arise.

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38. ____ Advocate for the organization when there is conflict with the University or University staff. Source: Michael Miller, Wentworth Institute of Technology (Adapted for the University of Nevada, Las Vegas June 2010)

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The Role of Officers Listed below are some expectations advisors may have of their officers. This form is designed to help advisors and student officers arrive at a clear and mutually agreed upon role of officers in student organization affairs. Directions: The advisor, each officer and member should respond to the following items. For each of the following statements, respond on a scale of 1-5 how important this function is: 1.

Essential for the officers to do

2.

Helpful for the officers to do

3.

Nice but they do not have to do

4.

Would prefer they not do

5.

Absolutely not the role of the officer

____ Officers should be aware of and fulfill their responsibilities ____ Officers should keep the advisors informed of organization business. ____ Officers should fulfill their required office hours on a weekly basis. ____ Officers should attend all retreats/events if there is no conflict with their academic responsibilities. ____ Officers should collaborate with the Office of Civic Engagement & Diversity. ____ Officers should address problems/issues that they have with individuals, with that individual, not with others. _____Officers should consult the advisor in regards to questions about University policy. _____Officers should consult the advisor before taking an issue to a higher University authority. _____Officers should make ethical decisions. _____Officers should handle the money of the students ethically. _____No exceptions will be made for the officers for lack of program planning. _____Officers should strive to build collaborative relationships with advisors and university entities.

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The Role of Members Listed below are some expectations advisors, officers and members may have of the general member population. This form is designed to help student organizations arrive at a clear and mutually agreed upon role of general members in student organization affairs. Directions: The advisor, each officer and member should respond to the following items. For each of the following statements, respond on a scale of 1-5 how important this function is: 1.

Essential for the members to do

2.

Helpful for the members to do

3.

Nice but they do not have to do

4.

Would prefer they not do

5.

Absolutely not the role of the members

____ Members should be aware of and fulfill their responsibilities ____ Members should stay informed of organization business. ____ Members should attend all organization retreats/events if there is no conflict with their academic responsibilities. ____ Members should address problems/issues that they have with individuals, with that individual, not with others. ____ Members should consult the advisor in regards to questions about University Policy. ____ Members should consult the advisor before taking an issue to a higher University authority. ____ Members should make ethical decisions. ____ Members should participate when there is no conflict with their academic responsibilities. ____ Members should strive to build collaborative relationships with advisors, officers and university entities. Source: Michael Miller, Wentworth Institute of Technology (Adapted for the University of Nevada, Las Vegas June 2010)

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Facilitating a Workshop Before facilitating a workshop it is first important to: •

Establish a mission or purpose for the workshop

• Establish learning or goals that you wish to be achieved by participants as a result of the workshop •

Set group expectations

• Prepare discussion and reflection questions ahead of time. While you may not always stick with these, it can help you keep on track with achieving the overall goal. •

Know your audience.

• Plan to assess the workshop either formally or informally to plan for future improvement.

Icebreaker: Select an activity that will act as an introductory warm-up for the group. This is beneficial when the group is new or there are new members, or when the energy in the room feels low. For ideas for icebreakers visit https://unlv.collegiatelink.net/organization/ sorce/documentlibrary.

Pairs: Allow participants if the workshop to communicate with each other about topics being discussed within the workshop. This allows for members to both share their perspective as well as gain new perspective from a peer. Additionally, it allows for members to get to know each other better and build connections.

Discussion: Provide the opportunity for participants to discuss, as a group, the results of their individual conversations. This is an opportunity for you to help facilitate dialogue amongst group members in regards to seeing commonalities, differences, and points of interest within the conversation. Additionally, it can serve as a way in which to help move the group forward.

Groups: Allow participants a chance to gather in groups (preferably three or more) and discuss or reflect further upon the larger group discussion. This can be helpful in allowing

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Group Discussion: Allow individual groups to share with collective group what they communicated and observed. This can also become a larger group discussion again.

Closing: Provide an opportunity to tie everything together and give students one more opportunity to make connections and share insights. A clear message should be communicated through the closing.

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Thank you! Through this handbook, we hope to have provided you with the necessary tools and information you need to support your organization(s) to the fullest. The Office of Civic Engagement and Diversity is here to support you in your role, and hope to continue to build a partnership with you. Please contact our office with questions and we thank you again for your time! Office of Civic Engagement and Diversity Front Desk Student Union, Rm. 316 SU316@unlv.edu (702) 895-4102

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UNLV RSO Advisor Handbook  

UNLV's advisor handbook for registered student organizations (RSO).

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