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C L E N C B H W K L O V P A G Q R E N M W L Y V B J K E E F W N Y U N D S A J D E R K L O V W U I K L T S R D G H J I J R U R T Q A N I B P M T Y E Q T G B F B K Y G M N E L X U I L Y A O O P G B Q D F N V H T Y U Q W E D X Z W U J G H B B P M T Y E Q X D A W B R Y O E E G A H G A R D E N I N G E S B R A Y D M E G A E E F A S H I O N E C I I C G S S U Y F V N K U H K T I Y X J K W W N C I Y A M K P R E O G S X T A R L W R N M T G B F B K L F N L B C E Q U J H Y F A G Q R C F U E J M A G A Z I N E S A O U Q S G N A A S S G O P B D K U V F U L Z D U K H G R P H B W E D H U R K D B A S E H W H O W B T N U K B A R U E W D R T Z P Y L B R E H M Y L J M L S U M M E R C A M P Y N A Y N K T S T P O J J X L N I O Z K V N F E T E V A T M T L G Y N D L V G E O C A C H I N G A C B Y W S V B F D T J H L C W A T E T H E L X U O S U M M E R

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TABLE OF CONTENTS 7 10 13 16 18 22 24 28 31 34 39 42 44 46 “Sneaker fold” By Kenneth Dixon

“Insult-o-scopes” By Allie oops

“Where has jazz gone?” By whitney way

“sunset fashion” jordan figura

“Rajvee Subramanian – living his American dreams” by Sharon wittke

poetry

“first impressions” by allison matyus

“geocaching” by nicholas burke

5 things you gotta do this summer in carbondale

“social gardening” By Jessica Wettig

“club baskeyball shines” by terraence peacock

“emerging streetwear” by travell johnson

“White Paint” by ashleigh brown

“summercamp festival” by allison matyus


EDITORS’ LETTER

After blood, sweat, and tears we have finally finished the 5th issue of Unleashed and think it’s the best one yet. We have seen improvement in every issue, while discovering new talents within ourselves. Instead of conforming to a typical, structuralist form of other magazines, we have transformed into a more concrete identity of ourselves. Yes, we are still a student-oriented magazine catering to Southern Illinois University students, but we are so much more than that. For our Spring/Summer Edition we have just begun to delve into all the diverse aspects of the students who make up our campus. Our hope is to see the passion that went into the creation of this issue of UNleashed Magazine continue into future issues. Our goal is to provide entertainment and an omelette of information. Yes, we meant omelette. With tomatoes, onions, mushrooms, feta, chives, spinanch, ham, more mushrooms, sausage, pepperoni, wait... No. I mean peppers. Mmm... Peppers. Chedder, artichokes, basil. Yes! Basil! So good. Avacado, salsa, oregano... And bacon! Mmm... Nom nom nom... Muncha muncha muncha... Wait? What! No! Wait?! Where’s my orange juice?!

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“We are all in the midst of a

REVOLUTION...”

“...in the way information moves from one place to another. The School of Journalism at Southern Illinois University Carbondale is a good place to get in on the ground floor. Every day we teach students how to use new technology to communicate news, photos, ads, video and audio on all of the new platforms that have changed the face of media.” -School of Journalism Director William H. Freivogel

Investigate your options: - Advertising - Photojournalism

- News/Editorial -New Media News Production

School of Journalism

For more information: journal.siu.edu 618-536-3361


SNEAKER

FOLD D i x o n By Kenneth

? e m a l b o t Who’s M

ichael Jordan, Chuck Taylor, Addidas, Reebok, Nike, Puma, or Keds? Or, perhaps Spike Lee is the culprit for making Nikes and Air Jordans look so cool in “Do The Right Thing.” The sneaker culture has come a long way from the first form of footwear worn by ancient Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans in ancient times. Fashion trends seem to change more than seasons -- sometimes even monthly. It can become difficult to “keep up with the Joneses,” and follow all of the shoe, accessory, denim and knit efforts that designers thrust into the fashion market. However, one item reigns supreme in the fashion world’s race to evolve -- the sneaker.

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he sneaker, or gym shoe, has evolved through numerous alterations in theme, color, low-top, mid-top, high-top, leather, suede and Velcro. This craze that shoe-heads call “sneaker culture” has become all too variant. Feeling a little classy, retros will always be a constant cop or must-buy for retro footwear enthusiasts because of their timelessness and vintage appeal. Hybrid sneakers, disputable “contributors” to sneaker culture, seem to remain in the race among other competitors of the shoe supplying market . The retro Air Jordans, one the top selling basketball shoes of all time, hit the scene in 1984, but didn’t become popular until the late 1980s/early 1990s, while hybrid counterparts hit the scene in the 21st century. The 1980s gave birth to sneaker culture, driven by the growth of hip-hop and the rising popularity of basketball shoes, which could be attributed to one of the greatest NBA players of all-time: Michael Jordan. Rappers like LL Cool J, Run DMC, the Beastie Boys, and N.W.A. began to produce songs and promote sneakers through their music and lifestyle depicted in the media and music videos. Transitioning from the 1980s, the 1990s was an exceptional decade for kicks, exposing the diverse culture of gym shoes through sitcoms and movies like Martin, Saved By the Bell, Fresh Prince, Forrest Gump, and Poetic Justice. Celebrities showcased dope sneakers from Air Max, Jordans, and Vans to Addidas and Reeboks. Stars like Will Smith, Tom Hanks, Christopher Martin and Mark-Paul Harry Gosselaar demonstrated how sneakers were worn in a variety of ways by different people of diverse race and background. Sneaker culture has evolved since the 1980s and 1990s. Though the leading premiere shoes seem to be continuously alternating, Nike still plays a prominent role in the shoe game, as Nike Air Turfs, Air Max, Air Griffey’s, and Nike Zoom Rookie are leading the fresh new fads in stores and on websites. Completely far out kicks like Foamposites, are new additions to the “must cop” list for UNLEASHED 6

sneaker heads. Penny Hardaway, creator of the most anticipated Foamposite of the year, the Galaxy Foamposite, was released February 2012, causing a ruckus on the net and in stores. People young and old stood in six-plus hour lines just to purchase these limited kicks, forcing police to control crowds at mall entrances, while shoe websites like Footlocker.com went down shortly after 12 a.m. from the rush of online orders. False flaggers who portray themselves as sneakerheads have caused a false and negative depiction of true sneakerheads in the media. Nice kicks brought this issue to light when a horde of shoppers resorted to violence in order to obtain pairs of Galaxy Foamposites in several malls across the nation. This was our introduction to huge crowds rampaging over shoes. Another case drew media attention when Jordan’s Concord 11s were released in December 2011. The sneaker community believes in using non-violent methods to cop their shoes – and completely condemns actions that have caused inaccurate negative stereotyping of true sneakerheads. Harming other people to buy a pair of shoes crosses the line. Authentic sneakerheads make sacrifices on a daily basis for their shoes, whether it’s standing in massive lines to get the newest pair of J’s, waking up at 1 a.m. to head to the store, taking alternate walking routes to keep your kicks in tip-top shape, or spending your rent money on a pair of gym shoes you know you don’t actually need. The timelessness of the sneaker trend appears to be alive and in color, with no signs of dying out. The sneaker culture has remained dominant in the lives of the young and of the wise, as a way of life and form of expression of style, emotion, and personality.


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INSULT-O-SCOPES

Get Your May Forecast with a HOT Kick and a By: Allie- OOPS! SPLASH of humor.

Taurus

S

(April 20th – May 20th) ATTENTION: WORST BEST FRIEND EVER!

WARNING: If you are sensitive to complete nonsense and have no sense of humor, do not read these INSULTO-OSCOPES. Note the word, “INSULT.” Only read if you do not suck at life and actually have a sense of humor because these forecasts are right up your alley. ENJOY!

o basically you think you’re ALL that Taurus, but I am here to burst your bubble this month. In trying to plan this “gala” (yeah go look it up, I know you’re a moron) event, your instincts are basically gonna prove they aren’t worth a poop, and bail out on you- making you look insane. I mean everyone is going to be staring at this little thing you thought (May 21st - June 20th) you could call a “party” and be like “B!tch is CRAY! What was STALKER ALERT! she thinking?” So you’re going to end up crying to your therapist, seeking advice, but since you’re a “know-it-all” college student, pparently Gemini, you have been worshipping you won’t actually follow it, and prove just how idiotic you REALLY someone from “afar” (you kow that’s called a ARE! HIGH FIVE TAURUS! But to REAAAALLLLY top it off creepy stalker, right?). Well, stalker, I mean, Gemini, this month, you’re going to be gossiping about someone this person has gone and lost their mind, and decided to you “care” about (because gossiping about them proves give you a chance (I think deep down they just feel sorry how much you care) and be overheard by someone for you, stalker). But lo and behold you’re a typical Gemini, who is going to spread that ALL around campus. and once someone wants you back you don’t care for them Proving you, Taurus, to be the BESTEST anymore, so you run away all, “I’m scared of commitment,” friend anyone can have! COUGH!

Gemini

A

but really tou think they are more F@&%ed up than you (NOT POSSIBLE). So after you’re itself to you in the near future ( how you are a golden graduate, I’ll never know). (June 21st - July 22nd) But, your inner “twin” comes out of you pondering, SLACKER! “financial gain?” or “comfort with being closer to family?” DUH! TAKE THE MONEY AND RUN, ancer, your forecast just annoys STALKER, RUN! me so lets just make this quick! Basically, you’re suppose to be creating a sense of responsibility within yourself (let’s face it, that’s impossible for a person like you) because your tendency to slack off on jobs is going to be harmful not just to yourself but every one else too (*cough* SELFFISH BASTARD *cough*). But luckily, karma is a bitch and comes back around on you making you a crybaby! (HA! HA!) And in romance, you’re lazy as (August 23rd - September 22nd) usual, making all the wrong moves, Slap that Smile Off your Face... Again! BOOOORING (WHY anyone EVER chooses to have “intimate relations” with irgo, you’re all smiley this month, thinking you, I have NO IDEA)! “Oh yea, I rock,” when really you need to (July 23rd- August 22nd) get a clue and understand this month is about to Jerk, Jerk, ... JERK! sucker punch that smile off your face. Because while eo, you’re basically just a big ‘ol you’re all in your butthole thinking it smells glorious from bully this month (JERK!). Attacking yesterday, there are other people seeing your moronic the credentials of another may be good self all in la la land and stealing your glory (HA!HAAA!) courtroom procedure for Perry Mason, but So because you’re a moron, someone steals your no one likes a prick, Leo, so I’m advising you spotlight, replacing you (yeah, who’s smiling now, to go run head first straight into a wall. And Virgo). What’s pathetic is your creativity is apprently because you’re such a jerk, you make the sky high right now and well ya snoozed so ya situation in your classrooms and work like lose. And now you have people smiling in your very unpleasant (yea, basically just from face, but they don’t like you (I mean who the sight of your face). You’ve given even would?). yourself enough rope, Leo, now just swing (the world would be a much better place)! UNLEASHED 10

Cancer

C

Virgo

Leo

L

V


Libra

Scorpio

(September 23rd- October 22nd) Get Lost!

(October 23rd- November 21st) Monthly Special (Barf)

A

pparently, Libra, you are making a “big omeone’s been causing you trouble push” in business this month, however, scorpio, freaking quit being a pansy (like because you suck at life this “push” is just going normal) and punch that A-HOLE in the face! to push you right on out into the wilderness, so I After all the fighting, somehow you all become hope you have a compass (which I am sure you friends (how anyone likes you blows my mind). wouldn’t know how to read anyways) because And no one likes a fat a$$ Scorpio so lay off the you are going to become quite lost (that’s an doughnuts, and exercise- a little fresh air won’t kill understatement)! And don’t be so selfish Libra, you (or your breath). Because the quit being such a show-off trying to take all forecast tells me you have a romantic the glory for everyone else’s ideas. interest approaching fast - remember (November 22nd- Decmeber 21st) college rules- NO BABIES Sucks to Be You! WRAP IT UP (or get an asically, Sag (rhymes with Vag), you are STD, what do I care)? going to be a moron and screw up your romantic situation. Better buy some protection because you are about to hit Slutty-ville, USA. If you would just get your head out of your butt, you would realize you are not always right, and you could avoid Sluttyville, but you won’t because you’re a moron. And with your love life sucking, you are going to ake a terrible “gut” decision (it’s never a good sign when you feel like you are going to puke) regarding business. If you were smart (January 20th- February 18th) *cough*you would wait on that You Annoy Me! decision (but from the looks of (Decmeber 22nd- January 19st) your love life, not so quarius, your horrorscope is about as You Bore Me! much)! worthless as you are. Let’s make this ou’re life such this month Capricorn quick, with your judgemental side (like you have any (take a big snooze while you read this)! room to judge) you are quick to make a call in a You start off by boring me with your “shocking”problem that doesn’t even concern you endless concerns regarding a loved on (remember (what’s new) instead of hearing both sides first (I hope Romeo died from this kind of stupidty). Then, you you choke on that shock). Karma plans to bitch slap continue to be worthless at life by messing up that judgement right off your face when the whole truth your finances; you don’t realize ridiculous partying comes out (ha ha!). In handling your funds, you (throwing up on yourself every night is NOT the best would be smart to save for the long-haul (but way to spend your money. Then you try to maintain you’re an idiot) just in-case things go sour (and t your cool in dealing with a younger crowd (because they will because you always suck at life). you are sooo mature--dumbass). In all this boredom, somehow your boss is more of a dumbass than you because you get promoted (incredible how even the ones surrounding (March 21st- April 19th) you are stupid - that figures!). Whiner! Whiner!

S

Sagittarius

B

Aquarius

Capricorn

A

Y

Aries

Pisces

(February 19th- March 20th) Listen up! (But you won’t)

W

hy I waste my time with you, Pisces, I will never know, but here we go. You have been considering a major business decision make it now (or trip on it for all I care). IF you were smart (but you’re not you would seek some advice from the past. Don’t be a dumbass and move too quickly in a romantic situation. Those stupid fears you’ve been talking to yourself about your head are false (that’s what they call a schizo, Pisces, take your pills!).

A

ries, no one likes a cry baby but apparently you decide to be one when you don’t get your way in a business deal. You will insist on fairness like the little crybaby you are, and somehow win the battle (annoying!). You will deal with a touchy domestic situation (Why are you dealing with it still only proves how stupid you are). You would be wise to deal with it from the beginning (but you’re not smart enough) so you will wait ‘til the end like all the other morons (in fact, move on up to the front of the moron line, Aries). This month, keep in mind that you are not a doctor. Talk to an actual doctor before you kill yourself or just die for all I care). UNLEASHED 11


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P

olyrhythmic beats, improvisational melodies and careful harmonic deviation are keynote characteristics of jazz music. Over ninety years have passed since the height of the American jazz boom in the 1930s. Since then over 120 colleges and universities in the U.S. have incorporated jazz studies as a major in their academic catalogs, according to jazzamerica.org. The audience of college educated adults for live jazz has declined 4.5 percent since 1982. A survey conducted by the National Endowment for the Arts not only suggest the audience of jazz music in shrinking, but getting older. The latest NEA survey revealed the median age of adults who attend jazz concerts in America is 46 compared to 29 in 1982. Coordinator of jazz studies and jazz instructor at SIUC, Richard Kelley, said jazz music is regarded by many of generation X as “grandma’s music.” He said while the jazz genre has suffered social outsourcing among younger demographics, its significance withstands as the primary influential force of modern popular music. “Jazz is the most viable genre of music left,”

Kelley said. “Rhythm and blues is the foundation of most music genres in American culture,” he said after adding that jazz is the original rhythm section of American music culture. The saxophone player of 20 years said people of the newer generations may not realize many popular contemporary artists not only sample but recycle concepts of their jazz predecessors. Kelley said lyrical content such as love, bad relationships and social revolution are characteristics practiced in jazz and emulated by contemporary musicians. Kelley mentioned how the improvisation of jazz and be-bop music influenced the self-expression aspect in hip-hop. Kelley said the structure of American rock band groups was based on the successful combination of instruments such as the guitar, drums and percussion, bass and piano; a combination common among and first used by jazz musicians. Younger listeners are very much influenced by jazz music Kelley said. he added the appreciation of jazz music with younger generations can easily be improved with education. UNLEASHED 13


“A

rt can’t exist in a vacuum,” he said. Professional Jazz singer Jodi Lynn Merriday agreed with Kelley and said education is the ultimate resolution to jazz appreciation among younger generations. “Jazz is the truth,” Merriday said. “You have to have a sense of self to fully appreciate anything worth value.” Merriday holds a PhD in African American Studies and teaches African Diaspora at Georgia State University. She said younger students, especially African American students, should value jazz music as well as its status as an art form because jazz music and African American culture are undeniably connected. Merriday performed a jazz tribute concert honoring jazz legends Billie Holliday, Abbey Lincoln and Nina Simone at the Carbondale Civic Center as one of the Black History Month festivities sponsored by SIUC. The neo-soul vocalist said jazz music served as a significant social revolution for African Americans during the 1920s through 1930s. “Jazz was the music of the young people. Back then, it was a source of expression for people who were not included in all aspects of American society,” she said. “It’s important for young people nowadays to know where the music they have today came from … it all came from jazz.” Merriday said the gradual decline of jazz listenership among today’s youth cannot be solely attributed to audience apathy. “Jazz artists should come out of their ivory tower,” she laughed. Merriday said jazz artists should make more of an effort to

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reach out to younger crowds. Kelley said the transformation of jazz music from being the epitome of popular music to a form of high art is a consensus shared by listeners, jazz musicians and venues. Because of this mentality, Kelley said many venues that service young adults are less likely to book jazz musicians. “Most clubs and bars like to bring out rock bands and hip-hop artists to attract younger crowds,” he said. “When they hear jazz they just don’t see money.” Kelley described this phenomenon as an unfortunate cycle contributing to the unpopularity of jazz among younger generations. However, he remains optimistic about the future of jazz music. He says jazz will never again be the epicenter of popular music, but it is now an essential part of American music culture. “Jazz isn’t going anywhere,” he said. “People still get really excited to hear jazz.” As jazz music is now considered a high art form, Kelley said it is a significant permanent element in American history. He said this concept is reinforced by universities and colleges across the nation that now offer jazz studies as a major. Kelley suggested a simple solution to decreasing listenership: for young people to listen to jazz artists. “Artistic curiosity is important,” he said. “Jazz music isn’t for everyone ,just like rock and hip-hop isn’t for everyone, but there are so many different categories of jazz … just try it.”


Located on the historical Carbondale Main Street 127 N. Washington 618-549-7712

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(618) 529-5130 1001 E Main St Carbondale, IL 62901 Visit on us on Facebook


inally, the gloomy afF ternoons and chill of winter have been

replaced with warmth and sunshine. Time to change out that wardrobe of yours, and stock up on hot fashion that will surely turn heads. Bright, bold prints and 70s-inspired glam, are the themes this season. Color blocking, sheer fabric, and floral prints should be making their way inside your wardrobe. It’s time to make chunky sweaters and fur boots a thing of the past. We believe that how you dress inspires the way you feel. The goal is to look and feel as carefree as the birds flyin’ high.

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From Left to Right, (Back Row) Kelly Smith, Patrick Losure, Jordan Figura, Maurice Hatch, Allison Matyus, Katie Walleck, Whitney Way, Ledell Dixon, (Front Row) Darcell Crockett, John Lantz, Luke Thuston

SUNSET FASHION

Photos By: Dani McGrew Styled By: Jordan Figura, Allison Matyus Layout By: Kevin Manley Clothing Provided By: PacSun, The Buckle For more Spring Fashion Photos, check out www.myunleashed.com

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y r t Poe

There once was an artist named saint, Who swallowed some samples of paint, All shades of the spectrum Flowed out of his rectum With a colorful lack of restraint “Don’t bother your miniscule head With college — don’t need higher ed.” That’s the Rick and Mitt screed, Though they’re multi-degreed. Informed-voters — yes, that’s what they dread.

There once was an old man of Esser, Whose knowledge grew lesser and lesser, It at last grew so small, He knew nothing at all, And now he’s a college professor

The games that we play, the things that we say, all goes around in 360 degree circle that all seems the same. With high hopes and great ambition there is now little faith I instill in the future. This catch and toss with hearts isn’t a sport to me anymore, while on this worn track I always seem to come up short. From heart break to heart throb, I’ve crushed them and got hearts robbed. I know my love is good and goes deeper than you know, but me searching and finding love is moving all a little too slow. My women friends all say men are dogs and do dirt but the truth of the matter is, men are also getting hurt. It has been so long since I’ve had that consistency, when the one I would see and continue to meet was there for me. When I truly care I have no problem giving my all, and at times, like a sucker for these pretty girls, I tend to fall. Pretty lady why do you act so, I’m attractive too, but I don’t play games when I’m actually feeling you. The good guys never win the fight in this game of chess, that seems like I foolishly use checkers in. Putting the wrong pieces to these puzzles only concludes in failure so maybe I’ll just stop expecting good outcomes. Back to the drawing board, so hope for the best and expect the worse when out here chasing these skirts.

In the car In the rain As the wipers go Back and forth As I smoke Cigarette after cigarette The smoke forming clouds Night Drive That dance in the air, By Allison Until they disappear. Matyrus Driving to nowhere But escaping my mind. Disappearing into the night like the clouds of smoke. All silent but thoughts, And the rain.

Vicious Cycle

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By Kenneth Dixon


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FIRST IMPRESSION

by ALLISON MATYUS

The music scene in Carbondale is always blowing up with different artists and different genres. From electronic music, to country, to rap and hip-hop, music brings people together at SIUC, and it has brought together two up and coming artists that Carbondale should keep a close eye on. Tim Boozeman and DJ Cordero, seniors at SIUC, are taking that dedicated passion for music to the next level. Boozeman and Cordero have been involved with producing music and rapping/singing for almost seven years. Up until recently, it was only a hobby for the duo, but now, they are taking their talent to the next level completely. Their first EP, called First Impression, will debut this summer, and they will be releasing tracks and spreading the word about their music until then. Their unique style of hip-hop mixed with a variety of influences and genres and their dedicated motivation to make good music is what makes them different from the rest. UNLEASHED 24


Where does your musical inspiration come from?

TIM: My inspiration just comes from everyday situations and being alive and wanting to do better. I listen to music all the time, so I wake up and try to put all my motivation into it. I have a lot of musical inspirations and I like a lot of different kinds of music. What really inspires me though is people who keep it real in their music. My music reflects what I’ve been through and how I live. DJ: Every now and then when I go through my day, I’ll feel similar situations that I feel like people can relate to that I go through, so I like to talk about that in my music. When you have a song that people can be like, “I hear what he’s saying”, that’s what I strive to do. It comes from my heart. I make what moves me.

What artists inspire you?

TIM: I like artists that are creative and twist styles to make it theirs. I like the old stuff way better than the new stuff that’s out there. I like the ‘90s era, that’s probably the best music ever made. They had a lot to say back then so I definitely respect their style and their motivation to put it out there. I also like jazz and I like rap as well as electronic music. As far as artists go, I like Atmosphere, 311, Biggie, The Cool Kids, Chiddy Bang, and Mimosa. DJ: I appreciate artists who have good lyrics. I like music that sounds great but also means something. I listen to The Roots, Run DMC, and Griz. I like dubstep and hip-hop, but acoustic will always have my heart because I play the guitar.

We have a mini recording studio in my Where do you TIM: room. It’s small, but it does the trick. I write my music everywhere. I’ll be at work and I’ll write and think of something and then I’ll just start it down in my phone. Sometimes I’ll record your writing hear a song that helps me get an idea for a new track. DJ: We do all the recording in music? Tim’s room, which we call “the lab”. It con-

sists of a microphone, a computer, a keyboard, and a controller for making the music. We spend hours in there. When you are making a beat, you can literally play the same thing over and over again before it is finished because you have to go back and fix things. UNLEASHED 25


What’s your favorite song you have recorded so far?

TIM: We have a lot of songs and I like them all a lot. I listen to them on repeat. Pretty much every song is just contagious. All our friends walk around singing these songs. If I had to pick one though, I’d pick Death Trap. That’s the first song that DJ and I really recorded together and came up with this whole idea. Death Trap is the first video we have coming out too. Once we had that one, we knew the potential we had for more. DJ: I feel like we could really take this as far as we want to, it’s just really up to us. We have some unfinished songs, because we get an idea for another one and start to work on that instead. My favorites though are Wake Up and Death Trap.

What is your song making process?

TIM: I hear a beat and then what I like to do is just freestyle a couple of bars and see what kind of flavor I’m feeling–like if I want to go fast or slow, or have it be serious, or light hearted. What I usually do is think of things throughout the day. I’ll be walking to class and just think of a cool line that plays over and over in my head. I also have a few freestyles recorded or written down and I will take a little piece of that and add or change a few things. A lot of my verses are old stuff that I’ve written down combined with my freestyles. I always revise my lyrics; I’ll write something then go through and make it better or catchier or add more meaning to it in order to get my point across. I really try to get messages across in my music. I try to always push the boundaries, but keep it within my realm. DJ: It depends on where you want to go. You can try to make a beat then add vocals and build a whole song in a program like Fruity Loops or Ableton, which is what we use for our music. If you want to do live acoustics, you can mic a drum set or a guitar. Tim does 75% of the producing of the tracks. The main thing though is to not get stuck in a box; we try to have variety in our songs. Variety is the spice of life and gives music range and flavor. You have to have the yin and the yang–the serious stuff as well as the fun, party stuff.

Where do you guys want this to go?

TIM: We have a whole movement coming out; it’s more than just the music. A few people have actually offered us deals to sign with them but we want to do this at our own momentum. I don’t want to sacrifice anything just to get on with someone else. We will definitely be performing shows within the next few months at parties or bars in Carbondale. We’re not sure where we’re headed, but we’ll know it when we get there. DJ: We are perfecting our craft right now and then implementing that when that’s done. Right now, we are just going to put music out, because we still have a lot of stuff to organize and we also want to focus on being students. We will preform anywhere that will have us. Overall, we just want to make something happen with our music and have a good time while doing it. UNLEASHED 26


CHECK OUT youtube.com/ smoothtelevision

and look for FIRST IMPRESSION

this summer.

How have you involved others in your music?

TIM: Whenever we get a song done, I always play it to my friends first and we will build ideas off of each other. Everyone will hear it and it instantly becomes an anthem which is confirmation to us that it’s good. A few of our friends are also talented and have music skills. My roommate, Bobby Freyer, is really good at production and making beats, so he’s helping us out with that too. DJ: The thing that’s cool about the people we hang out with is that a lot of them are really talented. Our friends Kyler Ferrell and Kevin O’Connor rap in some of our songs with us. Kyler’s a cinema major, so he will be helping us shoot our music video. We want our friends to be honest and upfront too; if you don’t like it, let us know. I have to make music for myself first, and then everybody else. Basically, everyone who supports our music and helps spread the word are a huge help to us.

How do you plan on spreading the word?

TIM: We are going to start locally and then spread out. It will spread itself too, if the music is worth it. If people like the music, it will catch on. The better our music is, the more it will grow on its own. DJ: We are going to get a Twitter, Facebook, Soundcloud, and YouTube account and be active on all of them. We are going to get graphics going and post up flyers. We will also probably burn copies of our EP and hand them out when the time comes. Written and photographed by Allison Matyus. Designed by Eric Eagan. UNLEASHED 27


Geocac

Iwanted f you have ever to trek through the wild

following clues to find hidden treasures like Indiana Jones, minus the pits full of snakes, then geocaching might just be for you. Think of geocaching as the world’s biggest game of hide and go seek. Except instead of randomly searching for something, you

The contents that are always found in a cache are a pencil and a logbook. Most caches contain toys and random objects that are placed inside by fellow geocachers. It’s always a good idea to bring trinkets along with you to trade with the cache.

Think of geocaching a world’s biggest game o and go seek.

are given GPS coordinates and clues to help you locate a cache. The challenge comes in when you make it to the location and actually have to find the cache. The hiding

Seasoned geocachers will donate a signture

spot is usually easy to find but in some cases

item to show that they have also made the

they can be in trees, holes, and cracks.

discovery. It’s also fun to check out caches

There are over 1.6 million listed caches in over

you have already found every few weeks,

200 countries around the world. There’s even

just to see how many others have made the

one in the international space station. Caches

discovery.

come in many shapes and sizes, varying in

The easiest way to start your adventure is

appearance from Tupperware containers to

with a smartphone. There are geocaching

faux logs and rocks. There are also Nano

aps that use your phones GPS to show all

containers close to the size of a fingertip. If you

caches in your area. Even if you don’t have a

aren’t alert and on the lookout, it’s easy to

GPS or you just want a challenge, you can

spend hours trying to find one.

enter the coordinates into Google maps and

UNLEASHED 28


ching by Nicholas Burke

just print out your very own treasure map. By going to www.geocaching.com it’s as simple as registering and typing in your zip code to get lists of all local caches. Carbondale’s zip code brings up literally hundreds of locations in the surrounding area including spots all over campus. Almost every building at SIU has a cache located around it. What better way to spend your break between classes than going on a treasure hunt. One thing to make sure of when geocaching is that there are no muggles

as the of hide

around. Geocaching.com reads, “A muggle is a non-geocacher. Based on "Muggle" from the Harry Potter series, which is a non-magical person. Usually this term is used after a non geocacher looks puzzled after befriending a geocacher searching for a cache, or when a non-geocacher accidentally finds a cache.”

Most muggles will be intrigued with caches and leave them alone, but some will plunder all of the treasure. After you find a cache and sign the logbook always remember to try and put it back exactly how you found it. Even if you think you have a better spot for it. So if you’re ready to stop being a boring muggle and journey deep into the vastness of the planet earth on search of hidden treasure, Geocaching is waiting for you.

Written by Nicholas Burke. Designed by Eric Eagan.

Sites like geocaching.com and opencaching.com offer valuable resources to the geocaching community.

UNLEASHED 29


Discover

The Alternative

Shawnee Trails Wilderness Outfitters 222 W. Freeman Campus Shopping Center Downtown Carbondale (618) 529.2313

Visit us on Facebook

1


1 2 3 4 5 SUNSET CONCERT

You can’t say that you spent a summer in Carbondale if you haven’t been to a Sunset Concert. Every Thursday evening, from June 14, through July 26, you can enjoy a FREE OUTDOOR CONCERT. A different genre of music is presented each week. This year’s line-up hasn’t been announced yet, but in past years we’ve listened to blues, reggae, country, electronic, bluegrass, world, and too many more to list. The venue alternates between the steps of Shryock Auditorium on campus to Turley Park (you know, that park across from Tequilas, Westroads and Walgreens, west). As soon as we get the schedule, we’ll post it at myunleashed.com. Oh, one last thing… it’s BYOB (blanket, silly!).

5 Things You Gotta Do

(COBDEN)

CANOEING ON

CAMPUS LAKE

8-10pm May 6, June 4, July 3, August 2 Free canoes, kayaks, paddle boats. No reservations,

Strawberry Short cake!

FLAMM Nom-nom-nom! in late ORCHARDS Starting April or early

(COBDEN)

Pick your own strawberries at Blueberry Hill – the season should start late April. Later in the season, pick blueberries and blackberries. Freshly picked berries are also available. 618-893-2397

BLUEBERRY HILL FARMS

MIDNIGHT

May, local strawberries will be ripe. Pick up a quart or two, or drop in for some home made strawberry shortcake at Flamm’s “Fruit and Cream” roadside café. Come back for peach cobbler in July and then apple pie in the fall. 618-893-4241

So get there early Bring your student id

This Summer In Carbondale

Did you know we have a competitive women’s flat track roller derby team right here in Southern Illinois? For a raucous good time, go to soill rollergirls.com The So Ill Roller Girls. You can buy tickets online or in Carbondale at Longbranch Coffee House or Bomber Crew Tattoo. UNLEASHED 31

ROLLER DERBY!


Recipe Italian Marinated Mushrooms

More recipes at

RecipeSource.com

Amount Measure Ingredient --------------------------------------------------------1 lb Fresh mushrooms 1/4 c Lemon juice 1/2 c Olive oil (vegetable oil may be substituted) 2 Green onions with tops-thinly sliced 1/4 c Chopped fresh parsley 1 Clove garlic, finely chopped 3/4 ts Salt 1/4 ts Freshly ground pepper

Paprika Parsley sprigs Bread sticks (optional) Cut mushrooms into 1/8-inch slices. Mix mushroom slices and lemon juice in large bowl (glass or plastic). Stir in oil, onions, 1/4 cup parsley, the garlic, slat, and pepper. Toss; cover and refrigerate at least 3 hours, stirring occasionally. Just before serving, remove from mixing bowl to serving bowl, using slotted spoon. Sprinkle with paprika. Garnish with parsley sprigs. Serve with long, thin bread sticks if desired.

Potato Skins With Black Beans And Salsa Amount Measure Ingredient -------------------------------------------------6 medium baked potatoes 3/4 cups nonfat black bean dip 3/4 cups nonfat nacho dip 3/4 cups salsa 3/4 cups low-fat sour cream fresh cilantro sprigs -- optional 1. Preheat oven to 400째F. 2. Halve baked potatoes lengthwise; scoop out pulp, leaving 1/4inch pulp attached to skin (avoid breaking skin). Place potato skins on large baking sheet, skin-sides down; bake 5 minutes.

UNLEASHED 32

Per serving: About 99, 3 g pro, 19 g car, 1 g fat, 9% cal from fat, 3 mg chol, 295 mg sod, 1 g fiber.

3. Fill each potato skin with 1 tablespoon bean dip and 1 tablespoon nacho dip. Return to oven; bake 10 minutes. Remove from oven; let cool 5 minutes. Top each potato with 1 tablespoon salsa and 1 tablespoon sour cream. Garnish with cilantro. Serve hot. Makes 12 servings. Preparation time: About 20 minute. Baking time: About 15 minutes. Standing time: About 5 minutes.


Mon - Sun 10:00 am - 6:00 pm

1 618.529.4300 2031B South Illinois Avenue, Carbondale, IL 62903 http://www.arniessandwiches.com/

Mon - Sun 7:00 am - 10:00 pm

10% off

w/ student ID

FREE POOL

1 618.529.5191

on Sundays

2141 South Illinois Avenue Carbondale, IL 62903 http://www.facebook.com/arnoldsmarket

Mon-Thur 11am-Midnight Friday until 2am

Murdale Shopping Center 1925 West Main Carbondale, Illinois 618-529-9363 Breakfast is served TheMississippiFlyway.com 2012_04_10_710_AD_clothing&coupon_Unleashed_F.pdf 3 4/10/12 2:24 Saturday & Sunday 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Y E H

Soon to be Graduates!

And tricks?!

Need tips?

For the

REAL

world?

As if college wasn’t stressful enough.

How To Live Like an

“Adult”

Now at www.MyUNleashed.com Yeah... way. er Th e is a

PM


Ever wonder   exactly   where   your   fruits   and   vegetables   come   from?  What  state  -­-­  what  country?  What  if  you  knew  that  you   didn’t  have  to  look  very  far?  In  fact,  you  only  have  to  look  as  far   as  your  local  community  garden.

Community gardening  was  introduced  in  the  United  States  by   social   and   educational   reformers   in   Detroit   in   the   1890s,   according   to   the   University   of   Missouri   Extension   website.   A   community   garden,   as   defined   by   the   American   Community   Gardening   Association   is   a   garden   maintained   by   a   group   of   people.  Though  the  reasons  for  involvement  have  changed  over   the   years,   the   foundation   of   the   movement   has   always   been   about  bringing  community  together.    “People  who  sweat  together  get  along  together,”  said  Dr.  Kathy   Ward,  professor  of  Sociology  at  SIUC,  who  got  involved  with  the   Cobden  Community  Garden  after  she  heard  about  the  need  for   volunteers  on  a  local  radio  station.  Learning  to  grow  your  own   food   organically   not   only   helps   your   physical   health,   but   the   work  itself  builds  character,  she  said.   Jeri  Kinser,  director  of  the  Illinois  Migrant  Council  Technology   Learning   Center   in   Cobden,   founded   the   Cobden   Community   Garden   in   2004   on   land   owned   by   Paul   Frank   as   an   effort   to   develop   an   agricultural   learning   environment   for   children.   Gardening   was   just   an   idea   that   was   brought   up,   Kinser   said  and  the  center  has  run  with  it  ever  since.   Recently,  I  spent  some  time  with  Dr.   Ward  and   a   small  group   of  volun-­ teers,  made  up  mostly  of  sociol-­ ogy   students   recruited   by   Dr.   Ward.   We   began   our  

UNLEASHED 34


afternoon at  the  Yellow  Moon  Cafe  in  Cobden,  where   the   group   eats   every   Wednesday   before   getting   to   work.   Tasty   homemade   pickles   and   butternut   squash   soup  are  just  a  couple  of  menu  offerings  that  fuel  the   workers  and  help  keep  the  tradition  of  hard  work  and   community  alive.  During  lunch,  the  agenda  for  the  day   is  carefully  planned,  and  each  person  is  assigned  a  task   for  the  work  ahead.   Meade   Aronson,   a   graduate   student   studying   social   work  from  Makanda,  mentioned  she  is  volunteering  as   part   of   a   requirement   for   Ward’s   class.   Aronson   sees   this  not  just  as  course  credit,  but  as  a  learning  opportu-­ nity   as   well   since   she   is   starting   her   own   farm   in   Makanda.   This   fits   well   into   Ward’s   philosophy   of   growing  students  as  well  as  plants. Ryan   Ceresola,   a   graduate   student   from   Seattle,   learned   about   the   volunteer   gardening   opportunity   from   Ward.  He   has   gained   knowledge   of   small   towns   through   volunteering,   although   the   agriculture   thing   isn’t  new  to  him.  He  acknowledged  gardening  is  fairly   popular  in  his  hometown.  Ward  said  that  she  believes   Ryan  is  in  the  best  shape  he  has  ever  been  in  his  life.   “Those  two  feet  don’t  dig  themselves,”  Ceresola  added,   referring  to  the  deep  digging  required  by  the  double-­ digging   tilling   method   which   is   done   to   increase   soil   aeration  and  fertility. The   double-­digging   tilling   method   and   raised   beds   were   introduced   this   year,   enabling   the   garden   to   produce  more  crops.  Ward  also  says  a  strategy  is  used   where  the  same  crops  are  planted  spaced  out  from  each  

other in   the   form   of   triangles   and   octagons.   This   encourages   the   plants   to   produce   more   seeds   and   saving  more  seeds  helps  save  money. Ward  explains  how  this  year’s  strategy  for  planting  has   gradually   gotten   more   systematic.   In   the   past,   crops   were   planted   using   a   monocropping   method,   where   one  row  contains  one  kind  of  crop.  Now  the  focus  in  on   a  more  bio-­intensive  strategy  where  multiple  crops  can   be   planted   together,   strategically   planting   different   plants  which  benefit  each  other. Ceresola   jokes   “Kathy’s   just   into   this   being   a   perfect   scientific  machine.” Though  the  garden  grows  crops  year  round,  it  is  gener-­ ally  inaccessible  until  April,  due  to  the  lack  of  care  and   activity   throughout   winter.   Ward   said   someone   just  

UNLEASHED 35


children of the learning center. The combination creates a striking scene in front of a colorful schooland agriculture-themed mural painted in 2007 by Jose Guarado, an SIUC Masters of Fine Arts student at that time.

needs to be there to keep nature under control. Low hoop covers are used to make miniature greenhouses, which help hold warmth over the soil. This also protects the crops from weather damage. Organic material is also added to the soil for nutrients.

Garlic, sweet potatoes, kale (“the new beef”), chard and carrots are some of the other crops grown in the Cobden community garden. Cool weather crops, such as greens and turnips, were planted for the first time this season. Ward mentioned how certain crops can endure the cold whereas others flourish in warmer weather. She explained that this is one of the reasons organic gardening is linked to the practice of eating seasonally available foods. Kinser, the garden founder, always intended on having an organic theme to the garden. “I never wanted to use any chemicals”, she says.

Planting doesn’t always start in the garden. The center currently grows spinach, brussels sprouts, cauliflower and broccoli in boxes, carefully crafted with leaves, newspaper with little ink and a special blend of fertilizer and soil, according to Ceresola. These crops are then moved into the garden, as soon as temperatures are consistently high enough.

Ward said that when it comes to eating organic food, people tend to complain about the effort it takes to grow your own food, not realizing it is cheaper to buy seeds than organic produce at the store. Ward, who recently turned vegan said, “You can pay for it now (in dollars), or you can pay for it later (in health and medical bills).” Eating vegan is a choice that she wishes she had made much earlier.

You can tell it’s spring when wildflowers are in bloom all around the garden, advantageous for both their beauty and the nutrients they provide to the soil. Interspersed in the garden are colorful rocks, painted by the

In addition to the sociology students whom Dr. Ward recruits, the Cobden Community Garden is maintained by local volunteers and the children at the Learning Center. One of the primary functions of the center is to

UNLEASHED 36


tutor the children, but it also teaches them how to improve their overall health for a lifetime. Children are taught about gardening seasonally and the benefits of eating organically grown foods. Garden involvement also helps the children learn to think strategically. The Learning Center has recently integrated the calculation of germination rates into tutoring plans to help the children understand fractions in school. Ward said the children are fascinated by the miracle of seeds and describes teaching gardening as undeniably rewarding. Justy Sullivan, a senior from Crystal Lake studying sociology, said, “I love when they help each other,” as she spoke of her volunteer experience in tutoring. She said she learned how to teach the older children how to teach the younger ones. Although growing one’s own organic produce is less expensive than buying, maintaining the garden isn’t as inexpensive as one might think. While Ward provides the primary funds for the garden, the center has received donations from various agencies and has run a variety fundraisers over the years. Kinser mentioned one year the center made bilingual cookbooks and sold them to raise money for the garden. Water for the garden is donated by the City of Cobden. Ward requires community service as class assignments for her students, and offers the project as one of the ways to fulfill that requirement. Written by Jessica Wettig. Photographed by Nicole Hester. Designed by Eric Eagan.

UNLEASHED 37


Got Dirt?


: Layout By: Kevin Manley

S

IU has a history of basketball dominance. This domination dates back to the late 1960s when NBA Hall of Famer, Walt Frazier, led SIU to the National Invitation Tournament. He carried not only the team, but the city of Carbondale on his back and was named MVP of the tournament in the country’s most celebrated arena, Madison Square Garden. SIU’s basketball legends also go back to the mid 70s when former NBA player Mike Glenn led SIU to the Sweet 16 of the NCAA tournament, the school’s first tournament appearance. At the turn of the 20th century, former coach Bruce Weber led the Salukis to the Sweet 16 in 2002 and predecessor Chris Lowery led the team to the best national ranking in school history: 11th in 2007. But for the last couple of years, SIU’s basketball program has been anything but dominant. In SIU’s last four seasons, the team is 49-75. This year’s team finished the season 8-23 setting a school-record for losses in a season which led to the firing of Head Coach and former SIU player Chris Lowery. In the wake of SIU’s worst season in school history, basketball is not at all dead. There is another team on this campus who is less mentioned but carrying the success that the basketball program has failed to accomplish the last two years: the SIU Club Basketball team. SIU has a club basketball team also known as an extramural basketball team. Not to be confused with intramural, extramural teams travel to different schools to play tournaments against different universities. These teams are made up of tuition paying students that do not play for a scholarship, but just play for the love of the game. SIU has several different club programs, but this is the first year the school has had a club basketball program. UNLEASHED 39


Patrick Colvin, a Master’s student at SIU, took the initiative to put together a club team and sought out the best basketball players on campus. He wanted to put together a team that could represent the Recreation Center as well as the school to travel and be competitive. His recruiting skills are impressive as the team he has put together. The team has won two out of the three tournaments. This year and has a 15-2 record in those tournaments. The most impressive thing about this team is that it’s not yet a Registered Student Organization (RSO), meaning they cannot be allocated any money. The money they receive from winning these tournaments allows them to continue traveling and paying entry fees to play in more tournaments. Not to mention, in every tournament they play in, they are not only the best team on the court, but also the best looking team on the court. The team was issued uniforms the SIU basketball program fails to use. They weren’t just issued uniforms but they were issued warm-ups, shooting shirts, pads, wristbands and more. “When we go places people ask if we are sponsored by Under Armour because we have so much gear, so we are so thankful to have the relationship between Saluki Athletics and the intramural office to have us looking like a real professional team,” Colvin said. The team has played in three tournaments.

UNLEASHED 40


They won a tournament in Minnesota Feb. 3-5, hosted and won a tournament at SIU Feb. 17- 19, and lost a tournament at Georgia Southern University Feb. 23-25. The team was also invited to play in a national tournament after their win in Minnesota. “It’s going to be sixteen of the best extramural teams from all around the country on April 13-15 at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.” Colvin said. “It’s a televised tournament on CBS and that’s going to be really exciting.” Colvin said they are just trying to play as many tournaments as they can and to not only jell as a team but to see where they are against different competition in different regions, so when they get to nationals they have a good chance of winning. Since SIU’s basketball season is over, it would be great to see the team who plays for fun prep against the team who plays for scholarships. But Colvin said he gets that question more often than not. “I try not to compare our team to their team because they are scholarship players that are recruited by the school, and we’re just a bunch of guys that hoop in the gym everyday and have a passion for basketball,” Colvin said. “If we were able to orchestrate a game, we would at least be competitive with them.” Competitive is an understatement; looking at the statistics, if that game were to be played, I’d have my money on the club basketball team.

Club Sports at SIU

For a complete list of Sports Clubs, visit reccenter.siu.edu

Baseball

Soccer (Men’s)

Volleyball (Men’s)

Softball

Soccer (Women’s)

Volleyball (Women’s)

President: Corben White Email: corbenw.03@gmail.com

President: Sam Gill Email: slgill3x@siu.edu Email: elhaum@siu.edu

President: Jared Rosine Email: jrosine@siu.edu

President: Kathryn J Tebbe Email: ktebbe@siu.edu

President: Jimmy White Email: whitejr@siu.edu

President: Elhaum Mogharreban Email: elhaum@siu.edu

UNLEASHED 41


EMERGING STREETWEAR Style is defined as, “a manner of doing something.” Everyone defines their personal style through how they walk, talk, and especially how they dress. The way that we dress makes us feel a certain way. It defines our mood. It tells a story about us. It gives us an identity. Just ask Brandon Hampton and Tommie Jones.

Tommie Jones, co-owner of indie streetwear brand, Fly & Dope, has a passion for clothing. The undergraduate marketing major has a clear idea of his own definition of style. “Fly & Dope is a lifestyle brand. It represents you -you just being you. You don’t have to be the best looking or the best dressed to wear it.” Jones shares ownership of the brand with his brother, Mar who shares Tommie’s passion. The expression behind fashion comes from within, but it relates to different sub-cultures as well. Different social subcultures such as goth and punk rockers would say that they are supposed to wear heavy eyeliner, messenger bags, fishnet long-sleeved shirts, and baggy pants with chains hanging from them. The dress and attitude that people associate with goth culture are generally related with heavy metal or rock music. In the same way, streetwear correlates with the genre of hip-hop that was influenced by rappers like Lil’ Wayne and Pharrell. Pharrell Williams, one of Joneses’ inspirations, has his own clothing brand called Billionaire Boys Club, also known as BBC. Lil’ Wayne is also dabbling in the apparel industry. He recently launched a clothing brand titled Trukfit, inspired by skateboarding. 23-year-old Brandon Hampton is an entrepreneur who specializes in streetwear that appeals to young men and women. He owns and designs the Fame & Fortune brand. Hampton is an art major who also studies Fashion Design and Merchandising at SIU. He describes the difficulties of starting and creating a brand, saying, “The biggest difficulty is the proper financial assistance to start a business and run a business and keep it going.

UNLEASHED 42

Jones said the hardest of the struggles of starting a brand would be the legalities and the company you keep. “Connections. Knowing people. It’s nice to know somebody that knows somebody that can help you out and be loyal. You want to be able to think that somebody can help you out,” he said. Fame & Fortune is in the developing stages, but Hampton creates his own pieces, from denim jackets, to beanies that were recently featured in SIUC’s Rip The Runway, an annual event that showcases aspiring designers and models. Brands such as FINAOrio, Fame & Fortune, & Clout Club were spotlighted during the event. These brands are reminiscent of the popular brand, Stüssy, created by Shawn Stussy, who started his brand using his logo on t-shirts that he sold out of his car in California in the early 1980s. The t-shirt is by far the staple piece of all streetwear clothing. A successful signature t-shirt that is appealing can garner fans instantly if it is designed well. Stüssy is recognized as one of the pioneers in streetwear apparel and has been embraced by the hip-hop and skater communities of today. Jones and Hampton alike are influenced by music and current trends of hip-hop. Artists like Chris Brown, Big Sean, and Tyga have been responsible for bringing back the snapback hat that was popular during the early 1990s. “I think hip-hop has influenced fashion [in streetwear culture] a lot because consumers look to their favorite artist and see what they’re wearing,” Hampton said. More and more hip-hop artists are launching their own streetwear brands. For example, Pusha-T of hip-hop duo, Clipse, recently released his clothing brand Play Cloths, currently one of Jones’ favorite brands. Jones agrees with Hampton’s philosophy but feels that we should move away from trends.


“Fashion shouldn’t be about a trend. It should be about what you make it and how you want to wear it,” he said. Hampton and Jones agree that passion is a key component in this craft. “Fashion is an art: the passion of creating something new and trying to do things people have never done before. I try to be innovative,” said Hampton about Fame & Fortune. Jones says his family is what keeps him inspired and motivated. “My brother keeps me going and continuing to create and the whole Fly & Dope team. The passion of wanting to succeed and wanting to know more about the craft day to day is a major component in my drive,” he said. Hampton and Jones share a characteristic of being in creative control with their definition of style. They have a keen desire to learn and willingness to share knowledge. They both have websites where you can learn more about their brands, as well. Hampton’s website is: amourfaf.com. Jones’ brand, Fly & Dope, has a website with an online shop: flyanddope.bigcartel.com. The Chicago-based SIU indie brands represented in this article are just part of what streetwear brands are achieving right here at SIU. UNleashed will profile more brands on its website: MyUnleashed.com.

Written by Travell Johnson. Photographed by Eric Eagan. Designed by Eric Eagan.

UNLEASHED 43


WHITE PAINT By Ashleigh Brown

for colored girls who have considered painting themselves white when their skin color isn’t good enough UNLEASHED 44


“Y

ou can’t play with us!”

These words cut like a knife through my four year old skin. On the pre-kindergarten playground my request to play on the swings with two white classmates was denied. However, I was not about to take no for an answer. “Why not?” I replied. “Well, the only way you can play with us,” said the other girl, “is if you go behind that fence and paint yourself white!” I looked behind the fence for a bucket of paint that day, not realizing I had encountered my first experience with racism. For many years I did not understand why I had to be a color other than mahogany brown to play with girls who were lighter than myself. The year was 1993 and long gone were the years of Freedom Riders and marches for equality in public schools. Accusations from childhood peers who told me I was too dark and therefore not fit to play with birthed an obscure and definite vulnerability. Racist laws were dead, but the racist mentality was very much alive.

family comes from they have no answer. Why can’t we as African Americans be proud of our kinky curly hair? Our caramel skin? Our silky black skin? The black pride that was so prevalent in the 70’s has disappeared and been replaced with images of long, straight blond hair and black celebrities made lighter with Photoshop. After pre-school I actually did not want to be black. All the white girls in my class received the best treatment from teachers and standing next to them I never felt pretty. I cannot remember the exact moment I got over that feeling, but it passed at around twelve years old. Then I began reading teen magazines like Seventeen and Cosmogirl. The next adolescent angst came when I longed to have the complexion of Halle Berry, Beyoncé or Tyra Banks who graced magazine covers week after week sharing their beauty and confidence tips. Billboards, movies, newspapers, television and the Internet glorified hues with less pigmentation. So how could I as an impressionable knobby kneed, kinky haired, dark skinned girl either lighten my skin tone or become comfortable with how I looked?

“You can’t play with us!”

For the most part, my upbringing in the soybean rich city of Decatur was uneventful. This was the only encounter I’d had with racism. The small factory city prided itself on the ‘Racism: Not in Our Town’ sign placed next to the downtown water fountain. There was even a bold red line through the word racism. I always wondered if this sign was made before or after the Ku Klux Klan marched there in 1989. The peaceful demonstration was deemed lawful and therefore went on as planned, uninterrupted. Every high school party I attended was shut down by the police. I sometimes wonder if we could have kept the party going if we had worn white sheets over our heads. I have encountered many black people who boast about their Native-American or Caucasian ancestry. Yet when asked what tribe or what country their

The day I stopped reading the teenybopper magazines and picked up Essence is the day I fell in love with my mahogany hue. The day I put down the magazines that glorified long, straight blonde hair and picked up the magazine filled with styling tips for my kinky brown hair is the day I fell in love with being a colored girl. That was also the same day I stopped looking for that white paint behind the fence. So I say to every colored girl out there who feels she is too light or too dark because society or the media says so: you come from a culture of different shades and hair types. Take pride in the diversity of your culture. No one should have the power to make you feel unattractive. Be confident. That’s what makes you beautiful. UNLEASHED 45


Summer is approaching fast, so you know what that means... festival season. Festivals encompass music, crafts, food and camping with good friends and good vibes. Summer Camp Music Festival will kick off the festival season Memorial Day weekend with more than 100 bands over four days. Located just outside Peoria, Summer Camp has grown to be one of the biggest music festicals in the midwest with over 15,000 attendees. Headliners this year include Moe, Umphrey’s McGee, Jane’s Addiction, and Pretty Lights. From bluegrass, to electronic, to rock, the festival includes all types of artists and genres to groove to.

MidnightConspiracy UNLEASHED 46


Spread The Word.

This Spring, the mellow sounds of SpreAd earned the right to perform at this year’s Summer Camp. Summer Camp’s On The road Tour, stopped in Carbondale for a special battle at Tres Hombres, where local favorite, SpreAd, won the competition for the 3rd year in a row. Soon to be loved by all, Unleashed will follow SpreAd’s performance as they represent C’dale this year at Summer Camp Music Festival.

the s left of k e e w le er off a coup ur summ o y With only t r a t s al r, plan to sic Festiv u M p semeste m a C Summer ar! right at d this ye e h he s a le n o view t t with U m o c l. stiva tickets. rcampfe e e s m a h m c u r s u Go to and p erage of r lineup v la o u c c e a t iv c s spe xclu iss our e om after m .c d ’t e n h o s d a And yunle read’s mp on m a C r e k out Sp c m e h c Sum e r 1. l & be su readjam a p S iv t / s m e f o the tube.c s at you k . c a r t h fres he peace t d A e r Sp

Photo credit: Jason Kaczorowski

Story by: Allison Matyus photos by: George Lamboley UNLEASHED


Unleahsed Spring 2012  

UNleashed Magazine is an independent magazine produced for and by the students of Southern Illinois University. Our purpose is to inform and...

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