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U N I V E R S I T Y

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N E B R A S K A – L I N C O L N

College of Architecture M a s t e r of A rc hi t e c t u re

( 2 -y e a r )

M a s t e r of A rc hi t e c t u re

( 3 -y e a r )

M S in A rc hi t e c t u r e M S in In t e rior De sig n M a s t e r of C ommu ni t y & Re gion a l P l a nnin g


University of Nebraska - Lincoln

College of Architecture


Haymarket, Downtown Lincoln


Top 10 Downtowns 2012 America’s Best Places to Live & Visit - Livability.com

Livability cited the city’s downtown bars, restaurants, music venues and boutiques, as well as its proximity to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln campus, seasonal farmer’s market, music festivals and soon-to-be-completed arena as reasons for the rank.


Lincoln is located in the middle of everywhere... Omaha, NE Des Moines, IA Kansas City, MO Minneapolis, MN St. Louis, MO Denver, CO Chicago, IL

1 hr 3 hrs, 6 mins 3 hrs, 17 mins 7 hrs, 2 mins 7 hrs, 26 mins 7 hrs, 30 mins 8 hrs, 42 mins (1hr-35m flight)


...with connections to everywhere. Three of the 2012 “Top 250 Architecture Firms� are located in Omaha. #5. HDR Architecture, Omaha Nebraska Offices in Asia, Australia, Europe, Middle East. #15. Leo A. Daly, Omaha, Nebraska Offices in 30 locations worldwide. #26. DLR Group, Omaha, Nebraska Offices in 20 locations in the US and China. Source: Architectural Record


University of Nebraska - Lincoln

College of Architecture The College of Architecture brings together an array of disciplines to address real problems and difficult challenges with innovative and collaborative action. United by a commitment to the transformative power of planning and design, students and faculty come together in a creative environment integrating studiobased teaching, rigorous design-research and creative output, and community-focused engagement. By merging disciplinary theory and professional practice we innovate, add value and give form to all aspects of the designed environment.

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Introduction College Message General Information Graduate Programs Master of Architecture 2M, 3M Prerequisite Courses Gallery of student work Master of Science ARCH Architecture Prerequisite Courses Gallery of student work Master of Science ID Specialization in Interior Design Prerequisite Courses Gallery of student work Master of Community & Regional Planning Prerequisite Courses Gallery of student work Faculty Hyde Chair of Excellence Travel studios College of Architecture / 9


Introduction College Message The mission of the College of Architecture at UNL is “to develop design professionals who will effect cultural, societal and environmental change.” Implicit in this statement is a goal to extend the capacities of our students and faculty beyond the basic mandate of high-quality professional education. We believe that the task of educating young professionals should not be segregated from a collective mission to address real problems and difficult challenges through the innovative processes of planning and design. Consistent with this position, the College values design as a creative and disruptive process, not an aesthetic product. In the context of troublesome economic challenges, persistent ecological crises, and the constancy of social and cultural change, design cannot persist simply as a passive aesthetic ameliorant or as a superficial mask over problems temporarily solved by disciplines in isolation. Design is no longer seen as a way to make products, interiors, buildings, landscapes – environments of all kinds – look better; design is in fact a fundamental engine of 10 / College of Architecture

innovation leading the way in the development of new products and environments that address the real needs of people. At the core of all College programs are the shared values of professional education, disciplinary knowledge, and design thinking. The term “design thinking” refers to a mode of thinking that begins with empathy for the context of an issue, works through multiple iterations of creative ideation and prototyping, and analyzes the results for fitness. Design thinking involves both divergent and convergent thinking. Although design thinking has been popularized by design and strategy firms such as Palo Alto-based IDEO, the College of Architecture is particularly interested in applying the collaborative and interdisciplinary methods of design thinking to the problems of the built environment. Before entering their chosen professional program and focusing on the disciplinary knowledge at its core, undergraduates in the College begin their education with an introduction to design thinking.


This course precedes basic (compositional) design and establishes design as a mode of problem solving that eschews the selection of normative solutions for innovations that creatively redefine problems and produce transformative results. At the graduate and professional level, students work with faculty to deploy design thinking methods while working through complex problems and generating new knowledge. Research can take many forms and all exist in the work of the College, but design-research positions architectural & design explorations as a research protocol situated between the creative agendas of the arts and the technical methodologies of the sciences. Designresearch is unique to our collective disciplines and we privilege it as the source of our most innovative work. Students and faculty collaborate in a creative environment integrating advanced learning strategies, design-research, creative output and community-focused engagement. The graduate and professional programs in the College of Architecture at UNL featured in this book extend the core mission of the College into specific disciplinary areas. However, program overlaps and dual degrees embody the interdisciplinary and collaborative nature of design & planning education

at Nebraska. All professional degrees are fully accredited by the predominant national boards. The M.Arch (2-year and 3-year programs) develop architects capable of working in a multitude of professional environments, including nontraditional and experimental practices. Students graduate with advanced architectural design skills and optional specializations in design computation, history / theory, health, fabrication, and a variety of other areas. The M.CRP (Master of Community & Regional Planning) prepares planners to tackle a variety of policy and community-based challenges through a general degree or a set of established interdepartmental specializations. M.S. degrees in Architecture and Interior Design allow students to pursue focused research at the graduate level. A variety of dual degree options allow students to tailor a cross-disciplinary education to a specific combination of skills. These don’t just serve niche areas in the workforce, but enable graduates to be leaders in the ever more collaborative environment in which they will work. Jeffrey L. Day, AIA, NCARB Interim Director of the Architecture Program Professor of Architecture & Landscape Architecture College of Architecture / 11


General Information Accreditations Architecture National Architecture Accrediting Board Interior Design Council for Interior Design Accreditation Community and Regional Planning Planning Accreditation Board

Computer Requirements All students in the College of Architecture’s Architecture, Interior Design, and Landscape Architecture programs are required to lease, purchase, or have ready access to a laptop computer that meets or exceeds the specifications listed on our website (archweb.unl.edu).Specifications are updated by May 15th each year. Students can choose between the Windows or Mac platform. Equal Opportunity Policy The University of Nebraska-Lincoln does not discriminate based on gender, age, disability, race, color, religion, marital status, veteran’s status, national or ethnic origin, or sexual orientation.

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General Information Facilities Library The Architecture Library contains materials dealing with architecture, community and regional planning, interior design and other directly related fields. Over 100,000 slides in the Visual Slides can be searched by names, companies or subject and may be checked out to faculty. Fabrication Lab The architecture shop is a large, well-equipped space where students can make projects in wood, plastic and metal. A Digital Design Lab has two laser cutters and one 3D printer. Design computation has been identified as one of the areas of strategic focus for the program, so we expect these facilities to continue to develop. We have added new, powerful computer stations loaded with specialty tool path and other software identified by the faculty as important to their research or class activities.

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Print Lab / Media Center The college houses its own media center offering students large format color plotting and small format printing. In addition, large format black and white printing and scanning is available to students and the faculty. The Media Center has both still and video digital cameras available for check out by the students. The Architecture Wood and Metal Shop Over 3,000 square feet house power and hand tools and accessories necessary for wood and metal working and some plastics operations. The facility also house a three axis CNC router. This comprehensive, hands-on learning facility is used by students at all levels of the program and is staffed by a shop master, work-study students, and teaching assistants.


M 16 / Master of Architecture

M.Arch

Master of Architecture (2 Year, 2M) Master of Architecture (3 Year, 3M)


“The Architecture Program at UNL is known for combining technological, disciplinary and computational innovation with a focus on the everyday demands on the profession. We deploy advanced design experimentation in the service of the community.� Jeffrey L. Day, Interim Director of the Architecture Program Professor of Architecture & Landscape Architecture

Master of Architecture / 17


M.Arch 2M

Master of Architecture (2 Year)

The Master in Architecture (2-Year) is the accredited degree by the National Architectural Accreditation Board (NAAB). The 2-year M.Arch professional program is designed for applicants who do not already hold a professional degree in Architecture. Applicants who hold a professional degree in Architecture are welcome to explore the M.S. Arch, M.S. Arch ID, and M.CRP Masters programs. Admitted 2-year M.Arch students begin in the fall term. Two completion tracks are offered for students to select from: a two year vertical Design Research Studio sequence or a combination of Design Research Studios with a two semester Design Thesis in the final year.

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Prerequisite: Applicants to the 2-year M.Arch degree should have a bachelor of science degree in architecture or its equivalent.


First Year, First Semester

Second Year, First Semester

ARCH 510 Design Research Studio (5 cr) ARCH 680 Professional Practice (3 cr) ARCH 683 Programming (3 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (3 cr) TOTAL: 14 CR

(Thesis Option) ARCH 613 Design Thesis (6 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (3 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (2 cr) ELECTIVE Open Elective (3 cr) TOTAL: 14 CR

First Year, Second Semester ARCH 511 Design Research Studio (5 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (3 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (3 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (3 cr) TOTAL: 14 CR

(Studio Option) ARCH 610 Design Research Studio (5 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (3 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (2 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (1 cr) ELECTIVE Open Elective (3 cr) TOTAL: 14 CR Second Year, Second Semester (Thesis Option) ARCH 614 Design Thesis (6 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (3 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (3 cr) TOTAL: 12 CR (Studio Option) ARCH 611 Design Research Studio (5 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (3 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (3 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (1 cr) TOTAL: 12 CR Master of Architecture / 19


M.Arch 3M

Master of Architecture (3 Year)

The 3 Year Master of Architecture program is designed for those students wishing to pursue a masters degree in architecture after having received a bachelors degree in another field. Also accredited by the National Architectural Accreditation Board (NAAB), students graduating from this program are able to work towards becoming a licensed architect. The curriculum integrates Design Research Studios, professional electives, and lecture based courses. Students can select one of the following completion tracks: a sequence of Design Research Studios or a two semester Design Thesis. Depending on the student’s background, courses may be added and/ or deleted from the basic program curriculum as determined by an individual review of the student’s past and subsequent academic progress. Prerequisite: All students must hold a bachelors degree in any field and have completed Calculus I (4 credit course) prior to beginning coursework. 20 / Master of Architecture

Summer Semester M0 Arch Design Studio (5 cr) Representation/ Theory (3 cr) TOTAL: 8 CR


First Year, First Semester

Second Year, First Semester

Third Year, First Semester

M1 Arch Design Studio (5 cr) ARCH 350 Studio Adjunct (3 cr) ARCH 240 History of Arch I (3 cr) ARCH 331 Arch Structures I (3 cr) ARCH 333 Systems I (3 cr) TOTAL: 17 CR

ARCH 510 Design Research Studio (5 cr) ARCH 430 Studio Adjunct (3 cr) ARCH ELEC Arch History/Theory (3 cr) ARCH 680 Professional Practice (3 cr) ARCH 683 Arch Programming (3 cr) TOTAL: 17 CR

(Thesis Option) ARCH 613 Design Thesis (6 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (3 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (3 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (2 cr) TOTAL: 14 CR

First Year, Second Semester

Second Year, Second Semester

(Studio Option) ARCH 610 Design Research Studio (5 cr) M2 Arch Design Studio (5 cr) ARCH 511 Design Research Studio (5 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (3 cr) ARCH 360 Studio Adjunct (3 cr) ARCH 341 Arch Theory (3 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (3 cr) ARCH 241 History of Arch II (3 cr) CRPL 400 Intro. to Planning (3 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (2 cr) ARCH 332 Arch Structures II (3 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (2 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (1 cr) ARCH 334 Systems II (3 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (2 cr) TOTAL: 14 CR TOTAL: 17 CR TOTAL: 15 CR Third Year, Second Semester (Thesis Option) ARCH 614 Design Thesis (6 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (3 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (3 cr) Total: 12 cr (Studio Option) ARCH 611 Design Research Studio (5 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (3 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (3 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (1 cr) TOTAL: 12 CR Master of Architecture / 21


M.Arch Design Research Studio Master of Architecture

The design-research studio positions architectural explorations as a research protocol situated between the creative agendas of the arts and the technical methodologies of the sciences. The studios prepare students to be self-motivated professionals capable of using design to work through complex problems and generate new architectural knowledge. Building on the technical and disciplinary proficiency developed in an undergraduate architecture program or the first-year of the 3M program, students engage design and research agendas of contemporary significance. Students have a choice of semester and year-long studios in a number of emphasis areas. Designresearch studios often involve collaborations with students and professionals from outside the field of architecture.

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M.Arch Design Research Studio Architecture 511/611

Urban Box Store Prototype The ‘Urban Box Store’ Prototype explores architectonic systems through parametric experimentation of material types and beam span limits, eg. timber, steel, and concrete. The final design proposes a ground condition rooted in the tectonic pragmatics and spatial organization of the parking structure. To create a Urban Box Store novelty, a timber construction method fuses small, local retail with large, department store program stacked on top of a ‘warped slab’ parking garage. The design proposal occupies one half of a Lincoln, NE city block (300 ft. x 300 ft.). A unique alley typology is realized when the full city block is occupied by two urban box stores. Steven Hardy Associate Professor of Architecture

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Tara Meador (pages 25-29) 2M Architecture Student


6 7 8 9

Perforated Ventilation System Window Frame + Light Soffit Perforated Metal Sun-Screen Horizontal Louvers

1

Material | Skin Components Material | Skin Components 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Exterior Glazing Structural Frame Upper Operable Ventilation Interior Glazing Vertical Sun Shades Perforated Ventilation System Window Frame + Light Soffit Perforated Metal Sun-Screen Horizontal Louvers

1

2

3 4

5

9

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Exterior Glazing Structural Frame Upper Operable Ventilation Interior Glazing Vertical Sun Shades Perforated Ventilation System Window Frame + Light Soffit Perforated Metal Sun-Screen Horizontal Louvers

7

2

3 4

5

High Performance Facade System: The double skin is a multi-story thermal flue. The facade on the East, South, and West sides of this Urban Box Store (Target) allows for complete transparency while ensuring protection from excessive heat gain, heat loss, and glare.

Energy Savings: The 5 foot airspace can be opened in the summer to prevent heat from entering the building and closed in the winter to create an insulating thermal sleeve.

Energy Savings: The 5 foot airspace can be opened in the summer to prevent heat from entering the building and closed in the winter to create an insulating thermal sleeve.

Natural Light: This facade allows for natural light to enter into both levels of the urban box store controlled by vertical shades on the East and West facades and by horizontal louvers on the South side. The North facade has a single layer of glazing shaded lightly by a perforated metal screen.

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1

6

High Performance Facade System: The double skin is a multi-story thermal flue. The facade on the East, South, and West sides of this Urban Box Store (Target) allows for complete transparency while ensuring protection from excessive heat gain, heat loss, and glare.

Natural Light: This facade allows for natural light to enter into both levels of the urban box store controlled by vertical shades on the East and West facades and by horizontal louvers on the South side. The North facade has a single layer of glazing shaded lightly by a perforated metal screen.

1

Material | Skin Components 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Exterior Glazing Structural Frame Upper Operable Ventilation Interior Glazing Vertical Sun Shades Perforated Ventilation System Window Frame + Light Soffit Perforated Metal Sun-Screen Horizontal Louvers

High Performance Facade System: The double skin is a multi-story thermal flue. The facade on the East, South, and West sides of this Urban Box Store (Target) allows for complete transparency while ensuring protection from excessive heat gain, heat loss, and glare. Energy Savings: The 5 foot airspace can be opened in the summer to prevent heat from entering the building and closed in the winter to create an insulating thermal sleeve.

1

2

Natural Light: This facade allows for natural light to enter into both levels of the urban box store controlled by vertical shades on the East and West facades and by horizontal louvers on the South side. The North facade has a single layer of glazing shaded lightly by a perforated metal screen.

Natural Light: This facade allows for natural light to enter into both levels of the urban box store controlled by vertical shades on the East and West facades and by horizontal louvers on the South side. The North facade has a single layer of glazing shaded lightly by a perforated metal screen. Natural Light: This facade allows for natural light to enter into both levels of the urban box store controlled by vertical shades on the East and West facades and by horizontal louvers on the South side. The North facade has a single layer of glazing shaded lightly by a perforated metal screen.

3 4

5

9

6

8

9

2

3


Representative Span Ranges

Horizontal Structure Long span joist girders:

Timber

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

Planks Joists

50’-0” Standard open-web steel joists:

Laminated beams

50’-0” Roofing membrane: metal decking

Trusses Decking

Vertical Structure

one-way spanning systems

Reinforced concrete: square/round: d = 10” Steel column bay: 50’-0” x 50’-0”

Wide-flange beams

Floor to ceiling height: 30’-0” +

Open-web joists

Organization two-way spanning systems Primary aisles width: 30’-0” Secondary aisle width: 8’-0”-10’-0” One-way slabs Concrete Tertiary aisle width: 5’-0” minimum

Specific Details

5% Vendor + Other: 15%

Joist slabs

Storage Space:

Precast planks

Retail Size + Site Ratio 1:4 12x12 + 250,000 SF - 360,000 + SF

Precast trees

Pedestrain domain, snow removal, truck deliveries, drainage, landscaping, signage, etc. Site + Parking Total SF: 1,580,000 SF 7 /1,000 SF of Retail SF) 2,500 + parking spots

Flat plates Two-way slabs & beams Waffle Slabs

Master of Architecture / 27


+ 78’-6” + 74’-0” + 69’-7”

Mechanical | HVAC Large Retail Second Floor + 48’-6”

Large Retail First Floor

Parking Garage Local Store

Local Store

+ 30’-6” + 26’-0”

Garage Entry

Local Store

Pharmacy

Main Entry Vestibule

Parking Garage Bakery

Local Store

Local Store

+ 19’-6” + 14’-6”

Local Store

0

Section A-A’ | Urban Box Store

10’

Block 68: Lincoln, NE

+ 78’-6” + 74’-0” + 69’-7”

Large Retail Second Floor + 48’-6”

Large Retail First Floor

Parking Garage

Garage Entry

Storage + Distributor

+ 30’-6” + 26’-0” + 19’-6” + 14’-6”

Parking Garage Receiving + Shipping

Hydraulic Lifts

Section B-B’ | Urban Box Store Block 68: Lincoln, NE

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0

10’


M.Arch Design Research Studio Architecture/Landscape Architecture 511/611 Surrounding San Francisco Waterfront revitalization has become a cliché of post-industrial re-urbanization as cities around the world transform industrialized waterfronts into public parks, promenades, commercial developments and other people-friendly environments. Areas that were once the ugly backside of the city have become the aestheticized public edge. In a studio populated by Architecture and Landscape Architecture students, we investigate this phenomenon and propose alternative approaches using the Port of San Francisco as a case study where our primary task is to provide public access to the water while maintaining the working waterfront. We seek to create what Stan Allen calls “an infrastructure of potential.” Jeffrey L. Day Professor of Architecture

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“Coastal Pleat” Erik Leahy (pages 31-35) 2M Architecture Student


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Master of Architecture / 33


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M.Arch Design Research Studio Architecture 511/611 Design Health

Design Health is a collection of professional studio experiences, research courses, and electives focusing on the interrelationship between the built environment and health. Through collaborations with various colleges, Design Health confronts issues and conducts research in order to address stewardship, health, and projective models of healthcare environments. One of the few programs of its kind, a Master of Architecture can be informed by collaborations with Public Health, Planning, Building Science, and other collateral areas of study. As a studio led experience, graduates will enter their professional careers with critical knowledge and specialization, creating value and relevancy within the design professions. Peter Hind Assistant Professor of Architecture

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Matt DeBoer (pages 37-41) 2M Architecture Student


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Master of Architecture / 39


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Master of Architecture / 41


M.Arch Design Thesis Master of Architecture

Recognizing that one’s graduate education is largely self-directed, ARCH 613 / 614: Design Thesis presents 6th year Master of Architecture students the opportunity to conceive and execute an independent investigation in Architecture. Design Thesis investigations are instrumental in their role for future professional development, and may also act as springboards for further academic pursuit. A correctly-formed Design Thesis investigation identifies a subject for inquiry that is of relevance to a larger Architecture audience, researches the subject both through the discovery of scholarly sources and the generation of new creative content, develops a Design Thesis question, and ultimately generates a response that can be supported, argued, and defended in a polemical way.

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M.Arch Design Thesis

Master of Architecture Harry F. Cunningham Bronze Medal Winner

site pla rooms

This thesis aimed to answer the question: “How should architecture enhance one’s experience with water?” Phenomenological research and an investigative site trip in the fall led me to an investigation centered around exploiting the line where air and water meet. Water is constantly in a state of flux even when it appears to be flat. The concept behind the final design pushed and pulled that line of air meeting water and created a hyper paused section through the natural peaks and valleys of moving water. The super verticality of this becomes a commentary on the relative flatness of water. Brittany McClure 2M Architecture Student

roo

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an:

oms

lounge

restaurant

lounge

admin and back of house

lounge

rooms

rooms and vegetation

extrusion intrusion rooms and vegetation

gym and sauna

lobby

lounge

planetarium

rooms

restaurant

Master of Architecture / 45


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Master of Architecture / 47


48 / Master of Architecture


M.Arch Design Thesis

Master of Architecture Harry F. Cunningham Bronze Medal Finalist

One of the largest resources we have today is data. We have information on almost every measurable subject. But what do we do with it? This project explores how data can directly influence architectural form. The results of this exploration into data driven architecture is that of an automated system that based on its given location, users, and surrounding data, can produce an efficient and performative building. Not necessarily performative in purely the ecological sense but rather performative in all measured ways, from user satisfaction, circulation efficiency, types of program, and many other parameters. Zach Soflin 2M Architecture Student

50 / Master of Architecture


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Master of Architecture / 53


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Master of Architecture / 55


M.Arch Design Thesis

Master of Architecture Harry F. Cunningham Bronze Medal Winner

Obsolescence: a decline in the value of equipment or of a product brought about by an introduction of new technology or by changes in demand. This thesis examines two central questions: how to develop the architectural use of an aircraft fuselage and how to utilize this element on a variety of different scales. The inherent tectonic and structural advantage of the fuselage, combined with the abundance of large abandoned airfield sites across the nation and the availability of over 12,000 obsolete aircraft, this thesis project will serve as a case study for how to redevelop obsolete economies into efficient and viable design solutions. Ashley Byars 2M Architecture Student

56 / Master of Architecture


58 / Master of Architecture


Grey areas = not repurposed, but recycled components of an airplane

The frame’s structural role is to transfer dead loads and resist outward pressure loads. Select frames are stronger based on the need to carry larger loads and/or the production of the major assemblies.

Major Assemblies of Typical Commercial Aircraft and their relationship to stronger frames, spars, within the fuselage’s s t r u c t u r e .

Major Assemblies of Typical Commercial Aircraft and their relationship to stronger frames, spars, within the fuselage’s structure.

The nose, tail, and wings are not repurposed because they have a higher ratio of reusable electric and mechanical components than is found in the main fuselage body of a typical commercial airliner.

Master of Architecture / 59


DENSE PACKING OF 737 FUSELAGE

FUSELAGE SPLIT AT MAJOR FRAMES

SUBTRACTION OF 25% OF TOTAL UNITS

CREATION OF TOTAL VIEWING UNITS

INSERTION OF CIRCULATION PATHS

SHIFTING OF CIRCULATION LEVELS

SHIFTING OF CIRCULATION LEVELS

LOCATION OF EGRESS STAIRS

ELEVATION AND STRUCTURAL CORE

CARBON FIBER STRAPS INTERLOCKING WEAVE

UNIT PACKING DEVELOPMENT

ECONOMY OBSOLETE: NAVAL AIR STATION, ALAMEDA, CA

DESIGN NOT ABOUT AESTHETICS BUT ABOUT THE BUT ABOUT THE EXPLORATION OF THE INHERENT TECHNOLOGY AND ECONOMY, ECONOMY OBSOLETE.

SAN FRANSISCO, CA TREASURE ISLAND OAKLAND NAVAL SUPPLY CENTER OAKLAND INNER HARBOR ALAMEDA POINT ALAMEDA NAVAL AIR STATION SAN FRANSICO BAY

TYPICAL TOWER PLAN SCALE = 1:10

SITE PLAN SCALE = 1:1000

737 ONLY SYSTEM

737 WITH 747 SYSTEM

747 ONLY SYSTEM

747 WITH 737 ONLY SYSTEM

TYPICAL 747+737 TOWER NORTH ELEVATION

NORTH-SOUTH SITE SECTION

SCALE = 1:10 AMOUNT OF WEIGHT

SCALE = 1:50

FUSELAGE DENSITY DISTRIBUTION GRAPH

TYPICAL TOWER PLAN

NORTH

BAY MUD CONDITION

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Master of Architecture / 61


M.Arch Electives Master of Architecture

One of the many great reasons students choose to pursue the M.Arch at UNL is because of the wide variety of professional electives we offer. You can choose to focus your studies on specific areas such as history/theory, fabrication, representation, building technology or professional development. Or you can choose to take a wide variety of electives from across the spectrum. Students in the Masters Program will also take one outside elective from an area other than architecture. Our students have chosen to take this elective from a variety of programs at UNL including: Community and Regional Planning, Interior Design, Landscape Architecture, Horticulture, Theater Design, Studio Art, and Graphic Design just to name a few. A sampling of the professional elective courses we offer follows: 62 / Master of Architecture

History / Theory Arch 545 Arch Society & Culture I Arch 546 Theory & Criticism in Architecture > 1945 Arch 547 African Architecture Arch 562 Urban Form Typology Arch 563 Architectural Preservation Arch 581 Women in Design Arch 597 Critical Sustainability Arch 597 Landscapism Arch 597 Hyde Chair Seminar Arch 597 Details Professional Development Arch 597 Marketing Arch 597 Specifications Arch 597 Construction Documents Arch 597 Construction Administration


Building Technology Arch 535 Advanced Lighting Design Arch 536 Daylighting & Energy Arch 537 Arch Acoustics Arch 597 Evidence Based Design Arch 597 Lateral Forces

Representation Arch 524 Advanced Arch Drawing Arch 582 Advanced Color Theory Arch 597 Publications Arch 597 Architecture in Film Arch 597 Arch Representation: Theory & Application

Fabrication / 1:1 Arch 516 Modern Craft Arch 518 FACT (Fabrication And Construction Team) Arch 526 Digital Fabrication Arch 566 Community Design Center

Design Computation Arch 597 Scripting Arch 597 Advanced Digital Design Techniques

Arch 597 Precix Router Arch 597 Metal Fabrication Arch 617 Product Design

Master of Architecture / 63


M.Arch Arch Representation: Theory & Application Master of Architecture

‘Play’ was the projection of an architectural, urban, and cultural experiment that took place in the last half of the 19th century. The Pruitt-Igoe housing development was expected to be a major success, housing several thousand occupants in center city Saint Louis. After 16 years, it met a demise of epic proportions in 1972 as the first of the buildings was demolished. This project asked students to explore the potential of architectural representation as a means of projective risk taking. Students deployed hybrid techniques and considered drawing as a means of expression which might not only happen through movement of a drawing instrument or mouse click.

Erik Leahy, 2M Architecture Student

Brian Kelly Assistant Professor of Architecture

Ricky Hauptmann, 2M Architecture Student 64 / Master of Architecture


Kate Hier, 2M Architecture Student Master of Architecture / 65


M.Arch Digital Fabrication Master of Architecture

The use of digital fabrication in the production and making of architecture is a prevalent vehicle for the design process. As a result, there is a growing demand for computer-aided design (CAD) skills, computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) logic, parametric modeling and digital fabrication in student education. Digital fabrication allows designers to explore fabrication techniques of sectioning, tessellating and folding. Mixing these techniques challenges students to understand the CAD constraints or parameters for modeling, translate ideas for CAM production and deal with real world constraints of materials, time and tectonics. Tim Hemsath Assistant Professor of Architecture

Erik Leahy & Bryce Willis, 2M Architecture Students 66 / Master of Architecture


Master of Architecture / 67


M.Arch Architecture in Film Master of Architecture

With the development of specialized fields came an unexpected and undesirable consequence: an increasing alienation of the expert from the people’s everyday conduct of life in and around the building. In order to re-appropriate the experts’ culture from the standpoint of the life-world, we taped into the mechanisms of the film, which may surpass traditional means of representations in communicating the emotional and psychological effects of architecture. By examining written texts in architectural and film theory, analyzing selected films, and producing short videos, the students explored the ways in which architecture participates in sociocultural and political aspects of human life.

Alex Mastera, 2M Architecture Student

Rumiko Handa Professor of Architecture

Ricky Hauptmann, 2M Architecture Student 68 / Master of Architecture


Master of Architecture / 69


M.Arch FACT Master of Architecture

FACT is the award-winning Fabrication And Construction Team. Working with the architecture firm Min | Day, FACT engages creative, non-profit clients in collaborations that span design and construction. FACT is an academic/professional design lab, a “do-tank� in which ideas and new knowledge are developed though action as well as thought. Through FACT, students explore the interplay of traditional construction practices and contemporary digital fabrication techniques, and often team with non-conventional collaborators (including state prison inmates). Where academic studios focus on ideation, conceptualization and schematic design, FACT students focus on the creative opportunities embedded in the development and realization of projects. Jeffrey L. Day Professor of Architecture InfoShop and Garden Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha 70 / Master of Architecture


Master of Architecture / 71


M.Arch Application Master of Architecture

Required by Architecture Program (http://architecture.unl.edu/programs/arch) Application Program Application. Application Fee $50 Non-Refundable to be paid by credit card or check made out to UNL. Transcripts One copy of all college/university transcripts uploaded to applicant’s MyRed account. Letters of Recommendation Three letters of recommendation required.

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Master of Architecture Profile What are your educational goals and professional aspirations? Portfolio of Design Work Portfolios should be no larger than 8.5” x 11” x 1”. (Optional for 3M applicants)


All required materials should be sent to the College of Architecture directly at: College of Architecture ATTN: Graduate Admissions Coordinator 232 Architecture Hall West University of Nebraska-Lincoln Lincoln, NE 68588-0107 Deadline February 1st annually (postmarked)

International Applicants ONLY TOEFL or IELTS Scores: Required Minimum score requirements are 79 (computer) or 550 (paper) and IELTS score requirement is 6.5. A Bachelors degree from an accredited University within the United States, Canada or England replaces the TOEFL or IELTS requirement. F or J visa If applicant is not a US citizen and expects to hold a F or J visa, fill out Financial Resource Certification (http://www.unl.edu/gradstudies).

Master of Architecture / 73


M 74 / Master of Science in Architecture

M.S. Arch

Master of Science in Architecture


The M.S. Architecture Degree provides an exploratory forum for advanced studies that lie outside of the traditional studio culture. Students research individually tailored topics that range from the theoretical to the tactical, including sustainable communities, historic preservation, digital fabrication, construction and installation, parametricism, animation, and other visualizations. It is an ideal program for those wanting to test the waters before embarking on doctoral architectural studies. Mark Hinchman, AIA, Associate Professor

Master of Science in Architecture / 75


M.S. Arch

Master of Science in Architecture

The Master of Science in Architecture degree is a scholarly, research-orientated curriculum. This 36 credit hour program of study is designed for students who are interested in pursuing teaching and research as a career objective. It is a highly individualized program in which a candidate works closely with a faculty mentor to develop a course of study. Students can pursue an area of study from a variety of architectural options including product design, fabrication, and branding. Joint masters programs are also offered with Business (M.B.A.) and Community and Regional Planning (M.CRP).

76 / Master of Science in Architecture

Prerequisite: An applicant must have an undergraduate degree in architecture, interior design, or a closely related field. Those who seek a professional degree in Architecture should apply to our 2- or 3-year Master of Architecture programs.


Architecture degree Courses: Core Requirements (9 credit hours) Theory (3 cr) Research Methods/Analytical Techniques (6 cr) Electives: 12 credit hours Field Work: 9 credit hours Thesis: 6 credit hours TOTAL: 36 CREDIT HOURS

Master of Science in Architecture / 77


M.S. Arch

Masters of Science in Architecture

In this project, which is scripted in Processingsoftware, we have employed a generative design approach in which we aim to use the computational strategies to integrate the behavior patterns into the form making process. Here the collective behavior pattern, the swarm-intelligence, is explored through three types of agents and their intelligent decision makings in interaction with fields of positive or negative forces (attraction and repulsion). The trails of these agents are recorded and color-coded through what is known as the stigmergy-process which can be used for design purposes. Four alternative differentiations of these patterns are presented here. The project was conducted under the supervision of Professor Janghwan Cheon in the spring of 2012 at UNL. Alireza Karbasioun

78 / Master of Science in Architecture


Master of Science in Architecture / 79


M 80 / Master of Science in Architecture

M.S. ID

Master of Science in Architecture Specialization in Interior Design


Recognized nationally, the M.S. Degree is a post professional degree which provides opportunities for the student to examine current issues in depth. Issues such as branding, design health, senior living, and material culture can be explored. The program has strong interdisciplinary relationships with architecture and landscape architecture. This program is available fully on-line or ‘in class’. Betsy Gabb, EdD, FIDEC, IIDA Professor & Program Director

Master of Science in Architecture / 81


M.S. ID

Master of Science in Architecture Specialization in Interior Design

The Master of Science in Architecture with a Specialization in Interior Design is a research and scholarly based program. Students that enter this program are working towards careers in Interior Design research or academic settings. This 36 hour program is offered both entirely online or on campus which allows students to dictate the program sequence and learning environment. As part of the program curriculum, students are encouraged to gain hands on experience in the field through field work opportunities or an internship. Students engaged in the program have a wide variety of opportunities for specialization within interior design. If interested in designing for aging adults, the program offers a dual Interior Design and Gerontology certificate as part of the required program courses. Additionally, courses can be

82 / Master of Science in Architecture

selected within a student’s area of interest including healthcare, workplace and environmentally conscious design. Prerequisite: An applicant must have an undergraduate degree in architecture, interior design or a closely-related field.


Specialization in Interior Design degree Courses: Core Requirements (9 credits) IDES 886 Evolving Issues in Interior Design (3 cr) IDES 858 Changing Workplace (3 cr) Design Problems in the Interior Built Environment Studio (3-6 cr) OR Teaching Design (3 cr) Discipline/Theory: 6 credit hours To be selected in consultation with student’s advisor Research/Methods: 6 credit hours EDPS 859 Statistics or Qualitative Analysis (3 cr) ARCH 885 Research Methods (3 cr) Campus-Wide Electives: 3-6 credit hours To be selected in consultation with student’s advisor Independent Field Research/Graduate Internship: 3-6 credit hours Thesis: 6 credit hours TOTAL: 36 CREDIT HOURS Master of Science in Architecture / 83


M.S. ID

Master of Science in Architecture Specialization in Interior Design

This multi-use project is a reaction to Omaha’s large refugee population, centering on the office headquarters for a local nonprofit refugee service organization. The intention was to create a positive and comfortable transition from refugee life into American society by designing a space that fosters refugee needs. The first floor thrift store acts as a means of revenue and refugee employment, the second floor is office space, and the third floor houses temporary residences for refugees. An illuminated, semi-transparent abstracted tent form is present in the center of each level, slowly unfolding as the space vertically morphs from public to private. Elyssa Yoneda

84 / Master of Science in Architecture


Master of Science in Architecture / 85


M.S. Arch + iD Application

Master of Science in Architecture Master of Science in Architecture Specialization in Interior Design

Required by Graduate Studies (unl.edu/gradstudies)

Required by the Architecture Program (http://architecture.unl.edu/programs/arch)

Application Online Application for Graduate Admission.

Letters of Recommendation Three letters of recommendation required.

Application Fee $50 Non-Refundable to be paid by credit card or check made out to UNL.

Entrance Exam Graduate Record Exam (GRE).

Transcripts One copy of all college/university transcripts uploaded to applicant’s MyRed account.

Research Goals Why do you want a masters degree? What are your research interests? What are you academic goals? Is there a faculty member with whom you would like to work? Portfolio of Design Work Portfolios should be no larger than 8.5” x 11” x 1”.

86 / Master of Science in Architecture


Portfolios should be sent to the College of Architecture directly at: College of Architecture ATTN: Graduate Admissions Coordinator 232 Architecture Hall West University of Nebraska-Lincoln Lincoln, NE 68588-0107 Deadline M.S. Arch M.S. Arch, Specialization in ID

Rolling Rolling

International Applicants ONLY TOEFL or IELTS Scores: Required Minimum score requirements are 79 (computer) or 550 (paper) and IELTS score requirement is 6.5. A Bachelors degree from an accredited University within the United States, Canada or England replaces the TOEFL or IELTS requirement. F or J visa If applicant is not a US citizen and expects to hold a F or J visa, fill out Financial Resource Certification (http://www.unl.edu/gradstudies).

Master of Science in Architecture / 87


M 88 / Master of Community & Regional Planning

M.CRP

Master of Community & Regional Planning


We want to develop professionals who will effect cultural, societal and environmental change! Kim Wilson, Professor and Program Director Landscape Architecture, Community and Regional Planning

Master of Community & Regional Planning / 89


M.CRP

Master of Community & Regional Planning

The Master of Community & Regional Planning (M.CRP) degree program is a Graduate Degree program in Community and Regional Planning, which is nationally accredited by the Planning Accreditation Board. The coursework for the M.CRP degree program requires completion of 48 graduate credit hours. Students graduating with a M.CRP degree have gone on to pursue a wide variety of careers including rural development, community development, and urban planning. Three dual degree programs are offered in tandem with the M.CRP: Juris Degree (J.D.), Master of Architecture (M.Arch) or Master of Science in Civil Engineering (M.S.CE). Additionally, students can elect to take on and Interdepartmental specialization in Environmental Studies, Great Plains Studies, and Water Resources Planning and management. 90 / Master of Community & Regional Planning

Prerequisite: Some students may be required to completed up to a maximum of 3 Prerequisite courses to overcome deficiencies in Sociology, Economics and Statistics.


M.CRP degree Courses:

Electives

CRPL 800 - Introduction to Planning CRPL 802 - Planning Theory CRPL 804 - Legal Aspects of Planning CRPL 810 - Qualitative Techniques CRPL 830 - Planning with GIS CRPL 840 - Planning Methods and Analysis CRPL 900 - Professional Planning Practice CRPL 990 - Planning Studio

All students in the M.CRP degree program may choose elective courses with the consent of their academic advisors, from the following list:

Each of these course offerings are 3 credit hours each. The total block of core courses comprise 24 graduatelevel credit hours. If Introduction to Planning was taken for undergraduate credit (as a 400-level course), a graduate-level elective course must be substituted in the M.CRP degree program for this course.

Courses offered by the Community and Regional Planning Program at the 800 level See Schedule of classes for courses offered and enroll for the classes approved by the academic advisor. Other Courses by other programs within the College of Architecture and/or Graduate Studies at the 800 or 900 level.

Master of Community & Regional Planning / 91


M.CRP Option Studios

Master of Community & Regional Planning

Community Planning and Design Studio is an interdisciplinary, vertical studio where M.CRP students work alongside landscape architecture and architecture students. Through service-learning, the students engage rural communities in reciprocal partnerships to advance responsible design. Projects and partnerships are diverse and touch some of the most pressing social, civic, and ethical problems and opportunities across Nebraska. Past studios have addressed sustainability practices and energy conservation, agricultural and food literacy, changing demographics, community revitalization plans, flooding and stormwater management, green infrastructure, recreational resources and tourism, and rural quality of life. Kim Wilson Professor and Program Director Landscape Architecture Community and Regional Planning 92 / Master of Community & Regional Planning


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MAP LEGEND Floodway (100-Year Floodplain) Flood Fringe (100-Year Floodplain) Irrigation Center Pivot (Well Pumped Water) 0 - 5% Slope 5 - 8% Slope 8 - 17% Slope 17 - 33% Slope

Effective planning and design of parks, recreation, and open space in and surrounding Crete will be important to meet current and future needs of the community. Prime Agricultural Land - Not suitable for development 100 Year Flood Plain - Not suitable for development Slope Areas of >17% slope - Not suitable for development Landownership - Many owners - more difficult to develop

ZONE 1 2 3 4 5 TOTAL

ACRES Somewhat limited soil buildability

ACRES Very limited soil buildability

167 acres 668 homes 71 acres 284 homes 45 acres 180 homes 77 acres 308 homes 300 acres 1200 homes

62 acres 248 homes 19 acres 76 homes 21 acres 84 homes 66 acres 264 homes 150 acres 600 homes

2640 homes

1308 homes

ROAD SUNSE DR I V T

E PINE R I DG

GOALS | OBJECTIVES

E

5

Natural break in Land ownership= - Boundary for development Elizabeth Goll_M ARCH Lisa Major_M ARCH Chris Rokahr_M ARCH Matt Macchietto_L ARCH Heather Tomasek_L ARCH Dennis Krymuza_M ARCH Zach Klebba_M ARCH

Aaron Kloke_M CRP Brian Anderson_L ARCH Coelette Gruber_M CRP Jacob Kophamer_L ARCH Sarah Hanzel_M CRP Nate Krohn_L ARCH Kim Wilson_PROF

Sources: http://www.crete-ne.gov/documents/ http://www.FEMA.gov http://www.dnr.ne.gov

94 / Master of Community & Regional Planning

CRETE FUTURE DEVELOPMENT PROPOSAL N

“A ‘grassroots’ initiative led by Crete Community Breakfast Group that will result in a plan to revitalize this small rural town and impact change in the county.”

0’

500’

1000’

University of Nebraska - Lincoln_College of Architecture Interdisciplinary Studio_Fall 2012

2000’


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Key destinations in Crete proved to be the the schools, downtown, and the park system. Through the walkability audit, a clear analysis showed the condition of the sidewalks and streets used to connect these destinations. Showing the walkable distance within a quarter mile radius, it is clear that many of the destinations in Crete are a “walkable” distance from one another. However, the analysis of the condition of these connection paths - including tree density, lighting, street surface condition, sidewalk condition, and on street parking - shows very poor walkability ratings on many of these streets. A good place to start improving walkability may be by first fixing the areas that are used the most.

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Elizabeth Goll_M ARCH Lisa Major_M ARCH Chris Rokahr_M ARCH Matt Macchietto_LARCH Heather Tomasek_LARCH Dennis Krymuza_M ARCH Zach Klebba_M ARCH

Aaron Kloke_M CRP Brian Anderson_LARCH Coelette Gruber_M CRP Jacob Kophamer_LARCH Sarah Hanzel_M CRP Nate Krohn_LARCH Kim Wilson_PROF

STREET CONNECTIVITY N

“A ‘grassroots’ initiative led by Crete Community Breakfast Group that will result in a plan to revitalize this small rural town and impact change in the county.”

0’

400’

800’

1600’

University of Nebraska - Lincoln_College of Architecture Interdisciplinary Studio_Fall 2012

Master of Community & Regional Planning / 95


POPULATION RACE & FAMILY

Historic Population

20,097

20,000

18,252

17,866 16,514

72.5%

88.2%

59.1%

94.1%%

16,356

15,010 14,046

15,000

12,542

14,491

13.5% White Some Other Race Asian Black

88.2% 7.8% 3.7% 1.1%

American Indian

1.0%

Native Hawaiian

0.1%

35.7% White Some Other Race Asian Black American Indian Native Hawaiian

White Some Other Race Asian Black American Indian Native Hawaiian

72.5% 24.0% 2.8% 1.5% 1.1% 0.2%

2010 City of Crete

2000 City of Crete

20.2%

6.6% 94.1% 3.9% 1.9% 0.6% 0.6% 0.1%

White Some Other Race Asian Black American Indian Native Hawaiian

59.1% 35.7% 2.5% 0.9% 0.3% 0.3%

Population growth in rural America reflects a balancing act between natural increase (births minus deaths) and net migration (in-migrants minus out-migrants). Both play an important role in rural population chane, but the influence varies across time and location.

The population change of the City of Crete as a whole covered up the great gap between the Non-Hispanic and Hispanic individual population change.

The median age for the City of Crete is much lower then Saline county or the State. The States median age is 43.7 years of age. The largest age group of the City of Crete is 20-24 year olds could this be cuased by the college population.

3,106

2,310

2,199

1870

1890

1900

City of Crete Population

Population growth for City of Crete

+2.6%

14,200

Saline County Population

Population growth for Saline County

+6.7%

-14.2%

Non Hispanic Population

Non Hispanic Population Growth

+205.1%

Hispanic Population

6

4

2

30 to 34 yrs. 20 to 24 yrs. 10 to 14 yrs.

0

2

4

6

8

10

1970

1980

1990

2000

2010

The commuting stastistics of the City of Crete show a heavy reliance on the car to get to work wiht just 12.4 percent of 88.3 % of the people who drive carpooling to work.

8.6% 12.4%

Under 5 yrs.

14 12 10 Percentage

36.4 Yrs.

8

6

4

2

0

36.5 Yrs.

Median Age of Saline County

Median Age of City of Crete

1960

40 to 44 yrs.

10 to 14 yrs.

0

1950

75.9%

50 to 54 yrs.

20 to 24 yrs.

28.5 Yrs.

1,826,341

State of Nebraska Population

Population growth for Nebraska

60 to 64 yrs.

30 to 34 yrs.

Under 5 yrs.

8

1940

COMMUTING 2010

70 to 74 yrs.

40 to 44 yrs.

14 12 10 Percentage

1930

80 to 84 yrs.

A g e

50 to 54 yrs.

2,484

Hispanic Population Growth

4,841

90 yrs & over

60 to 64 yrs.

A g e

1920

1910

The median age for the City of Crete Hispanic population is lower then that of the Non-Hispanic Community even with the college population.

70 to 74 yrs.

4,476

4,872

4,444

3,546

3,692

3,038

City of Crete

1880

FOR 2010

80 to 84 yrs.

6,960

2,865

2,445

2,404

1,870

90 yrs & over

+15.5%

6,960

6,028 5,000

DISTRIBUTION AND MEDIAN AGE OF HISPANIC AND NON-HISPANIC

AGE DISTRIBUTION BY MEDIAN AGE 2010

POPULATION GROWTH OF NON-HISPANIC AND HISPANIC

14,200

12,715

Saline County

2010 Saline County

2000 Saline County

POPULATION GROWTH FROM 2000-2010

13,843

13,131

12,809

10,000

0

2

4

6

8

City of Crete

10

Car - drive alone Carpool Walked Worked at home Other means

22.7Yrs.

Median Age of Crete Hispanic

Median Age of Crete Non-Hispanic

75.9% 12.4% 8.6% 2.7% 0.5%

14.6 minutes - Mean travel time to work

WHY DEMOGRAPHICS ARE IMPORTANT?

EDUCATION LEVEL FROM PEOPLE ABOVE 25 YEARS OLD 2010

EDUCATION LEVEL (> 25 YRS.) OF NON-HISPANIC AND HISPANIC

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME 2010

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME OF NON-HISPANIC AND HISPANIC

WORKER’S TRAVEL TIME TO WORK

Understanding population size, distribution, composition and the processes driving the stability or change in population is crucial in the development and implementation of programs that serve the local community. Demographic analysis is a prerequisite to all parts of the planning process. Information concerning the structure and dynamics of local populations is key to identifying and anticipating problems and community needs, establishing short- and long-range program goals, developing action plans, identifying fiscal and human resources and evaluating the impact of the given effort.

Educational attainment is a powerful predictor of well-being. Young adults who have completed higher levels of education are more likely to achieve economic success than those who have not.

The percentage of the education level below high school diploma of the Non-Hispanics and Hispanics over 25 years of age and how that effects their earning potential.

Median income is the amount which divides the income distribution into two equal groups, half having income above that amount, and half having income below that amount. Mean income (average) is the amount obtained by dividing the total aggregate income of a group by the number of units in that group.

Household median income for non-hispanic and hispanic households in the city of Crete. Non-hispanic inocome is around $2,500 less than the Nebraska median household income and around $9,000 more than the City of Crete’s Hispanic median household income.

The commute time to work was heaviest in the 5 to 9 minute range with 72.3 percent of the workers traveling to work in less than 20 minutes. The workers travel time data was marginally at best due to the margins of error being high,

Information concerning the structure and dynamics of local populations is key to identifying and anticipating problems and communityneeds, establishing short and long-range program goals, developing action plans, identifying fiscal and human resources and evaluating the impact of the given effort.

25.2%

NON HISPANIC OR LATINO 25 years and older

12.2% 32.9% 31.9% 22.8%

Less than high school graduate

Less than high school

30.7%

High school graduate or equivalency

High school Some college graduate, GED, or associate’s or alternative degree

Bachelor’s degree or higher

HISPANIC OR LATINO 25 years and older

60.4% 23.3% 8.1% 8.1%

25.8%

Less than high school

Some college or Associate’s degree

9.3% 9.1%

High school Some college graduate, GED, or associate’s degree or alternative

Bachelor’s degree or higher

ESTIMATED MEDAIN EARNINGS BY ATTAINMENT 25 years and older

Bachelor’s degree

$21,942

Less than high school

Graduate or Professional degree LABOR FORCE BY INDUSTRY 2010

$22,652

High school graduate, GED, or alternative

$33,182

Some college or associate’s degree

with a percentage above 20. Neither of these numbers are surprising with Doane College, Crete School District, and the hospital in the city limits. Retail trade and public adminstration are the next highest catagories with information technology coming in last.Hemisphere and partially in the Southern Hemisphere.

$45,469

Hispanic

20 to 24 minute

1.6%

25 to 29 minutes

1.2% 2.7%

35 to 39 minutes

6.1%

40 to 44 minutes

4.4%

45 to 59 minutes 60 to 89 minutes

Bachelor’s degree or higher

>90 minutes

Crete Area Medical Center was researched to understand how educational level corresponds to position tpe and wage. The Medical Center offers of a wide range of educational levels along with the ability to move up the

2.4% 0.0% 0

2.8% 10

20

30

40

50

DEMOGRAPHIC AND SOCIOECONOMIC ANALYSIS

DIAGRAM OF CRETE AREA MEDICAL CENTER’S POSITION TYPE BY EDUCATION LEVEL AND WAGE

POTENTIAL GROWTH

6.0%

30 to 34 minutes

$49,075

$53,060

SALINE COUNTY

40.0% 18.3%

15 to 19 minutes

$37,846

Saline County

14.0%

10 to 14 minutes

Non- Hispanic

Nebraska

CRETE

The labor force of the City of Crete and Saline County are very similar to each other. This Graph show the industries in the city and county and how many individual employeess they have. Education and Health Care lead the pack with a percentage above 30 and manufacturing comes in second

< 5 minutes 5 to 9 minutes

$46,667

$39,576

City of Crete

position ladder when education level is increased. Education level and type of degree are required for specialized positions. Wage in these position is basis on attainment level and experience.

The overall demographic and socio-economic factors of the overall community do not give a real indication of the socio-economic factors since the range in each demographic or socioeconomic factor for each ethnicity is so varied.

The age distribution shows there are two typical population groups, young families and the Baby Boomer and older population with each group having different needs.

15 10

Percentage

30 25 20

The population growth of Crete between 2000 and 2012 was increased by 15.5% with most of the growth coming from in migration. The diversity of the city increased with this growth.

Entry Level Nutrition and House Services, Maintence and Materials Management

Clerical Patient Access, Financial Services, Health Informantion management, Adminstrative Assistants, and Ward Secretaries

Clinical RN,LPN, Assistants (Medical & Physcal Therapy), Technicians ( IT,Radiology, Lab, & Surgical), Medical Technologist & Dietician

Providers Physical & Occuplational Therapist, APRN, PA, CRNA, Athletic Trainers

Providers Pharmacists and Physicians

Adminstration Management, Director, and Senior Leadership

Education Level

High School diploma

High School diploma or Associate’s degree

Associate’s or Bachelor’s degree

Master’s degree

Doctorate degree

Bachelor’s degree required and Master’s degree preferred

Yearly Wage Average

Entry level 1 $24,398 Entry level 2 $44,920

Clerical $30,620

Clinical $47,838

Providers $47,838 $162,832

Providers $162,832

Adminstration $76,888

5

Position Type

0 Public Adminstration

Other Services

Art & Entainment

Education Health Care

Professional

Finance Insurance

Information

Transportation

Retail Trade

Wholesale Trade

Manufacturing

Construction

Agriculture

3,141 Employed Persons 16 years or older

Elizabeth Goll_M ARCH Lisa Major_M ARCH Chris Rokahr_M ARCH Matt Macchietto_LARCH Heather Tomasek_LARCH Dennis Krymuza_M ARCH Zach Klebba_M ARCH

Aaron Kloke_M CRP Brian Anderson_LARCH Coelette Gruber_M CRP Jacob Kophamer_LARCH Sarah Hanzel_M CRP Nate Krohn_LARCH Kim Wilson_PROFESSOR

Sources: http://www.census.gov/ http://www.city-data.com/ http://www.uaex.edu/Other_Areas/ publications/PDF/MP472.pdf

Typical Caucasian families average three family members where both parent’s working having an education level of some college or associate’s degree and an median household income $46,667. Typical Hispanic families average 4.25 famliy members and extended family may be additional. Both parent’s typically work having an education level High school diploma or less with a household income $37,846. These typical families shared needs include affordable housing, job opportunities, child care services, strong school system, and school and recreational opportunities. Attributes and additional needs Hispanic families might have in addition include strength of family to include extended family, ability to continue education and learn the English Language, and public spaces that address the importance of plazas in the Latino culture for socialization and recreation. Wages correlate to education level to increase jobs in the professional and financial areas the workforce will need to increase their education level.

DEMOGRAPHICS & SOCIO-ECONOMICS http://www.epodunk.com/ Johnson, Kenneth M.. Rural Demographic Change in the New Century, University of New Hampshire, winter 2012, Issue Brief No. 44. web. september 24,2012

96 / Master of Community & Regional Planning

“A ‘grassroots’ initiative led by Crete Community Breakfast Group that will result in a plan to revitalize this small rural town and impact change in the county.”

University of Nebraska - Lincoln_College of Architecture Interdisciplinary Studio_Fall 2012


TENURE FOR THE CITY OF CRETE 2010

TENURE OF CRETE FOR NON-HISPANIC & HISPANIC 2010

VACANCY RATES 2010

HOUSING UNITS CHANGE BETWEEN 2000 & 2010

THE IMPORTANCE OF HOME OWNERSHIP

Housing tenure refers to the financial arrangements under which someone has the right to live in a house or apartment. The most frequent forms are tenancy, in which rent is paid to a landlord, and owner occupancy. Mixed forms of tenure are also possible.

Tenure for Non-Hispanic and HIspanic population is shown as a total of tenure for the City of Crete and shown as a percentage of individual racial group.

Vacancy rates are statistics kept on vacancies in rental properties, homes for sale, and hotels. High vacancy rates are usually viewed as a sign that the market is struggling, while low rates are desirable, because they indicate that property is a hot commodity and that vacancies rarely remain unfilled.

Vacancy rates in the City of Crete increased by 72.7 percent with vacant housing units going from 110 to 190. Housing units increased by 9.2% with housing units in 2000 being 2,188 to 2,389 in 2010 and occupied housing units increasing by 5.2 percent.

Home ownership is defned by the proportion of households that are owner occupied is termed the homeownership rate. It is computed by dividing the number of households that are owned by the total number of occupied households. Vacancy and home ownership data are used extensively by public and private sector organizations to evaluate the need for new housing programs and initiatives. House loans take into account the owner occupancy of an area when reviewing loan papers since owner occupancy is seen as a strength in neighborhood.

Owner occupied

27.3%

23.7%

37.0%

Renter occupied

Owned free and Clear

42.8%

Owner occupied

Owner occupied

+72.7%

Increase in vacant housing units

11.0%

Vacant housing units in Crete

60.0%

Renter occupied

Growth in housing units

46.8%

8.0%

40.0%

15.6%

+9.2%

Vacant housing for Sale

Vacant housing for rent

Renter occupied

10.4%

Renter occupied

15.3%

63.0%

Owner occupied

Vacant housing Saline County

9.5%

Vacant housing Nebraska

HOUSEHOLD & FAMILY SIZE 2010

JOBS TO HOUSING RATIO

Household size is an important factor becuase it determines poverety level. For example, the median income for a household of one will be lower than for a family of six. The bigger your household size, the higher your income can be and still be below the state median income.

Household consist of all people occupying in a housing unit and Family consist of a group of two people or more (one of whom is the householder) related by birth, marriage, or adoption and residing together as one family.

This is a ratio used to see if there is a balance between housing units and jobs in the city. The ratio below indicates that there are a few more housing units then jobs. The ratio show that there are 1.22 jobs for every housing unit.

Household Size

persons City of Crete

0.49 years

0.82years

Under 18 years

2.57

Jobs in the City of Crete

Housing Units in the City of Crete

2.09 years 18 years and over

4.18

persons City of Crete

1.69 years

1.94 years

Under 18 years

OWNER COST AS A PERCENTAGE OF INCOME WITH MORTGAGE

250

for more house value to be purchase. The chart shows the Saline County assessed values for the property and the household income from 2010 U.S. Census data. The orange color shows deficiences in either housing units compared to household incomes or house incomes compared to housing units. House units above the $150,000 range are insufficient.

250

200

200

$299

RENT AS A PERCENTAGE INCOME

150

36.8%

26.4% 20%

36.9% 30%

Rent as Percentage of Income

150 100

100

Recommended target range for ratio of jobs to housing units

18 years and over

HOUSING UNITS IN RELATION TO HOUSEHOLD INCOMES The below chart compares the housing available in grouped price ranges with the incomes which could afford these real estate values underneath. The consentative estimate of how much house can be purchased in relation to income can be estimated by three times the yearly income of an individividual if no other debt is present. The use of the Housing Affordability Index would allow

60.8%

Owner occupied units in Nebraska

300

1.3:1 to 1.7:1

2.38 years

18 years and over

62.0%

Owner occupied units in Saline County

$750

2.1% - Less than

Ratio of jobs to housing units

Under 18 years

2.49years

-3.3%

Change in owner occupied unit in City of Crete

27.1% - Greater than

12.6% - $300 - $499

1.31:1

4.33

persons City of Crete

55.9%

2000 Owner occupied units in City of Crete

300

:

2,389

Under 18 years

18 years and over

OWNER COST AS A PERCENTAGE OF INCOME WITHOUT MORTGAGE

PERCENTAGE OF RENTAL RATES

3,141

2.91

persons City of Crete

1.75 years persons Saline County

Home ownership is influence by many traits such as interest rates, age of buyer, income level, available properties, and even race or ethnicity of buyer.

52.6%

2010 Owner occupied units in City of Crete

58.2% - $500 - $749

Family Size

2.24

persons City of Crete

Occupied housing units in Crete

Renter occupied

HOUSEHOLD SIZE 2010

2.79

201 unit increase from 2000 to 2010

+5.2%

More importantly, decent housing, at an affordable price in a safe environment, is a fundamental need and right. Ensuring this need, which is likely to alleviate poverty and social exclusion. Also, there are four aspects of neighborhoods might be stabilized by homeownership; -Length of tenure of the current residents - Property values - Physical condition of properties - Social conditions in the neighborhood, such as scholl dropout or crime rates

The decline of home ownership in City of Crete was 3.3% between 2000 and 2010 going from 55. 9 percent to 52.6 percent. Crete’s home ownership is 9.4 % lower than that of Saline County and 8.2 percent lower than the State of Nebraska.

Owners

46.8%

Owned with a mortgage or loan

Owners

33.5%

TENURE PERCENTAGE OF INDIVIDUAL ETHNIC GROUP

TENURE PERCENTAGE AS TOTAL FOR CITY OF CRETE

PERCENTAGE OF HOMEOWNERSHIP IN RELATION TO TOTAL UNITS

50

50 Less than 10

10-14.9

15-19.9

20-24.9

25-29.9

30-34.9

Percentage

Less than 20

20-24.9

25-29.9

30-34.9

Percentage

Greater than30

HOUSING AFFORDABILITY INDEX

ASSESSED PROPERTY VALUES $10,000-$49,999

ASSESSED PROPERTY VALUES 50,000-$99,999

ASSESSED PROPERTY VALUES100,000-$149,999

Degree to which a family can afford morgage payment on a typical home

Property values in the $10,000 to $49,999 are dispersed toward the north and around the center of town.

Property values in the $50,000 to $99,999 are dispersed toward the north and around the center of town similiar to $10,000-$49,999 but with bigger dispersion area.

Property values in the $100,000 to $149,999 are dispersed toward the east migrating from the center of town.

ASSESSED PROPERTY VALUES150,000-$199,999

ASSESSED PROPERTY VALUES OVER $200,000

HOUSING ANALYSIS

Property values in the $150,000 to $199,999 are dispersed toward the east in the newer subdividsions with a few dispersed just east of the center of town.

Property values over $200,000 are few in quanitity are dispersed east and south east of town on large lots and edge the golf course.

Housing is a fundamental component of quality of life. Without appropriate shelter, people cannot meet their basic needs and participate adequately in society. Housing issues can have flow-on effects for health, education and community wellbeing. The changing demand for housing and supply constraints can put pressure on an urban area’s natural and social environment and affect a city’s ability to provide suitable infrastructure and services.

181.0 $21,869.60

Interest Rate = 5.5% Median Property Rate according to Assessor = $89,160 Downpayment = 10% Median Income in Crete from Census = $39,576

Qualifing Income

PROPERTY IN THE RANGE

COMMERCIAL

800 700

Number of Houses

600

443

Surplus of Homes under $150,000

714 Units

424

64

Surplus of Housing Units

142 400

Shortage of Homes over $150,000

529 Units

500

Surplus of Housing Units

413 Units

422 Units

28

Deficiency of Housing Units

237

300

Surplus of Housing Units

200

201

Deficiency of Housing Units

100

195

Deficiency of Housing Units

52 Units

House Values

$10,000 - $50,000

$50,000 - $99,999

$100,000 - $149,999

$150,000 - $199,999

$200,000 - $299,999

Greater than $300,000

Household Incomes

$10,000 - $14,999

$15,000 - $32,999

$33,000 - $49,999

$50,000 - $74,999

$75,000 - $99,999

Over $100,000

$

$

$

$

$

$

100 176 Incomes

Number of Households

Notable elements of Crete ‘s Housing can be broken down into two parts, Decreasing Homeownership and the Shortage of housing units. Home ownership in Crete is down by 3.3% since 2000. Crete’s home ownership is 52.6%, which is lower than Saline County’s or the State’s by over 8%. Home ownership is important to both individuals and their community. Individually home ownership reinforces family stability, responsibility, asset building, and self-esteem.

210 Incomes

200

253 Incomes

300 387 Incomes 400

Communities benefit from home ownership by increased tax revenue, greater private investment, and stronger & safer neighborhoods with increased social capital. To see these benefits Crete should work on increasing home ownership and maintaining at level’s equal to the County’s and State’s rates.

450 Incomes

500 600

When comparing total household incomes to total properties available the result shows a shortage of just 19 housing units. However there is a shortage in properties above the $150,000 point of 424 housing units if those household incomes wanted to purchase a property in the corresponding price range. On the other hand, properties in the under $150,000 price range there is surplus of 443 properties with 237 of those properties falling in the $10,000-$50,000 range.

650 Incomes

HOUSING UNITS

700

HOUSEHOLD INCOMES

The information that we collected leads us to believe Crete needs more middle to upper income housing units and the surplus to lower income housing units and vacant units need to be addressed. In the future if city reaches a population of 8,500 people. The city will need an additional of 479 housing units.

DEFICIENCIES

Elizabeth Goll_M ARCH Lisa Major_M ARCH Chris Rokahr_M ARCH Matt Macchietto_LARCH Heather Tomasek_LARCH Dennis Krymuza_M ARCH Zach Klebba_M ARCH

Aaron Kloke_M CRP Brian Anderson_LARCH Coelette Gruber_M CRP Jacob Kophamer_LARCH Sarah Hanzel_M CRP Nate Krohn_LARCH Kim Wilson_PROFESSOR

Sources: http://www.census.gov/ http://www.city-data.com/ http://www.uaex.edu/Other_Areas/ publications/PDF/MP472.pdf

DEMOGRAPHICS & SOCIO-ECONOMICS http://www.epodunk.com/ Johnson, Kenneth M.. Rural Demographic Change in the New Century, University of New Hampshire, winter 2012, Issue Brief No. 44. web. september 24,2012

http://www.abtassociates.com/reports/hisp_homeown7.pdf http://www.bigcities.govt.nz/housing.htm

“A ‘grassroots’ initiative led by Crete Community Breakfast Group that will result in a plan to revitalize this small rural town and impact change in the county.”

University of Nebraska - Lincoln_College of Architecture Interdisciplinary Studio_Fall 2012

Master of Community & Regional Planning / 97


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