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College of Architecture B a c h e l or of S cie nc e in De sign - A rc hi t e c t ur e B a c h e l or of S cie nc e in De sign - In t e rior De sig n B a c h e l or of L a nd s c a p e A rc hi t e c t u r e


University of Nebraska-Lincoln College of Architecture 232 Architecture Hall Lincoln, NE 68588-0107 (402) 472-9233 http://archweb.unl.edu/ All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any manner whatsoever without permission in writing from the University of Nebraska - Lincoln, College of Architecture. Typeset in ChunkFive, Arvil Sans, and Helvetica. Printed by Cornerstone Printing, USA

Every reasonable attempt has been made to identify owners of copyright. Errors or omissions will be corrected in subsequent editions.


University of Nebraska - Lincoln

College of Architecture Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design Bachelor of Landscape Architecture


University of Nebraska - Lincoln - City Campus UNL is one of 150 schools nationwide — 75 public and 75 private undergraduate institutions — to be featured in The Princeton Review book, “The Best Value Colleges: 2013 Edition.” UNL is also the only Nebraska college or university to make the list.


UNL Gameday


Lincoln is located in the middle of everywhere... Omaha, NE Des Moines, IA Kansas City, MO Minneapolis, MN St. Louis, MO Denver, CO Chicago, IL

1 hr 3 hrs, 6 mins 3 hrs, 17 mins 7 hrs, 2 mins 7 hrs, 26 mins 7 hrs, 30 mins 8 hrs, 42 mins (1hr-35m flight)


...with connections to everywhere. Three of the 2012 “Top 250 Architecture Firms� are located in Omaha. #5. HDR Architecture, Omaha Nebraska Offices in Asia, Australia, Europe, Middle East. #15. Leo A. Daly, Omaha, Nebraska Offices in 30 locations worldwide. #26. DLR Group, Omaha, Nebraska Offices in 20 locations in the US and China. Source: Architectural Record

Design your story here ...


University of Nebraska - Lincoln

College of Architecture The College of Architecture brings together an array of disciplines to address real problems and difficult challenges with innovative and collaborative action. United by a commitment to the transformative power of planning and design, students and faculty come together in a creative environment integrating studiobased teaching, rigorous design-research and creative output, and community-focused engagement. By merging disciplinary theory and professional practice we innovate, add value and give form to all aspects of the designed environment.

8 / College of Architecture


Introduction College Message General Information Undergraduate Minors + Dual Degrees Common First Year Bachelor Programs Architecture BSD-Arch Prerequisite Courses Gallery of student work Interior Design BSD-ID Prerequisite Courses Gallery of student work Landscape Architecture BLA Prerequisite Courses Gallery of student work Faculty Hyde Chair of Excellence Education Abroad Internship Student Organizations College of Architecture / 9


Introduction College Message The University of Nebraska-Lincoln College of Architecture is an exciting place to start your story! Located in the middle of the Great Plains, the College considers itself the center for creativity. The College has established a learning environment where we support young designers – architects, interior designers and landscape architects. We help our students develop creative confidence - the freedom and courage to take creative risks and the knowledge and skills to distinguish that all of the ideas created have value. Skilled professionals who possess creative confidence help craft built environments that are ecologically sustainable and resilient, prosperous and fair, healthy, and beautiful. Building creative confidence over four-years begins with a common first year, where all incoming students study design thinking, history and theory, drawing and computing techniques and design-making. Equipped with fundamental design knowledge and skills, students then select a discipline and spend their next two years learning and practicing discipline specific expertise in design studios, lectures, seminars, 10 / College of Architecture

field trips, undergraduate research, communitybased projects and service organizations. Minors, study abroad and internships are offered to enrich and broaden the student’s experience. Finally, in their fourth year, students are prepared to work in interdisciplinary teams to address unprecedented global challenges creatively. We invite you to join the University of Nebraska’s College of Architecture where you can help forge a new vision for an exciting, sustainable future. “Our graduates in architecture, interior design, and landscape architecture are equipped with a spirit of entrepreneurialism and innovation – the willingness to live with risk and uncertainty, adapt to and embrace change, and recognize being a life-long learner is key to their long-term success.” Kim Wilson, Interim Dean, Professor, and Program Director Landscape Architecture, Community and Regional Planning


General Information Accreditations Architecture National Architecture Accrediting Board Interior Design Council for Interior Design Accreditation Landscape Architecture Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board

12 / College of Architecture

Computer Requirements All students in the College of Architecture’s Architecture, Interior Design, and Landscape Architecture programs are required to lease, purchase, or have ready access to a laptop computer that meets or exceeds the specifications listed on our website (archweb.unl.edu). Specifications are updated by May 15th each year. Students can choose between the Windows or Mac platform.


General Information Facilities Library The Architecture Library contains materials dealing with architecture, landscape architecture, interior design and other directly related fields. Over 100,000 slides in the Visual Slides Collection can be searched by names, companies or subject and may be checked out to faculty. Fabrication Lab The architecture shop is a large, well-equipped space where students can make projects in wood, plastic and metal. The Digital Design Lab has two laser cutters and 3D printers. Design computation has been identified as one of the areas of strategic focus for the program, so we expect these facilities to continue to develop. The lab includes powerful computer stations loaded with specialty software identified by the faculty as important to their research or class activities.

14 / College of Architecture

Print Lab / Media Center The College houses its own media center offering students large format color plotting and small format printing. In addition, large format black and white printing and scanning is available to students and the faculty. The Media Center has both still and video digital cameras available for check out by the students. The Architecture Wood and Metal Shop Over 3,000 square feet house power and hand tools and accessories necessary for wood and metal working and some plastics operations. The facility also houses a three axis CNC router. This comprehensive, hands-on learning facility is used by students at all levels of the program and is staffed by a shop master, work-study students, and teaching assistants.


Undergraduate application

UNL College of Architecture - Admissions Requirements

Prospective students must complete the following high school courses to qualify for admission into Pre-Architecture, Pre-Interior Design, and PreLandscape Architecture. If you do not meet these requirements, you may be admitted to UNL as an Undeclared major in the Explore Center. Please see http://admissions.unl.edu for UNL’s general admissions requirements. Students who are admitted to the Explore Center may transfer into the College of Architecture after one semester of study. You must earn a 3.0 GPA to transfer into the College.

16 / College of Architecture


English (4 units) • Intensive reading and writing Mathematics (4 units) • Algebra I • Algebra II • Geometry • 1 unit of Trig/Pre-Calculus OR • 1 unit of Calculus/Advanced Math Social Sciences (3 units) • at least 1 unit of American and/or world history • at least 1 unit of history, American government or geography Natural Sciences (3 units) *One unit is equal to one year of high school coursework.

• at least 2 units from biology, chemistry, physics and earth sciences • one of the units must include a lab Foreign Language (2 units) Admissions Deadlines Fall Freshmen: May 1st (Feb. 1st for College Scholarship Consideration) Spring Admission: December 1st Class Rank or ACT/SAT You must: • graduate in upper 25% of your high school class OR • have an ACT composite score of 22 OR • have an SAT combined score of 1030

College of Architecture / 17


CoA Common First Year Architecture, Interior Design, Landscape Architecture

The Common First Year engages and prepares students for exciting futures in all design fields within the College of Architecture. The Common First Year curriculum offered by the College of Architecture introduces students to design through courses in three areas: Technique (drawing and computer applications), Design Discipline (an introduction to the related design disciplines and design history), and Design Practice (design Thinking and design Making). In addition, students take University courses in Math, English, Communications, and a general education elective. dThink and dMake are sequential hands-on courses where students learn to work in teams to address problems and promote innovation. At the same time, they learn foundational skills in composition, craft, presentation, and idea generation necessary for all design fields. 18 / College of Architecture

At the end of the Common First Year, students have gained an understanding of the broad range of design and are eligible to apply for any of the design programs in the College - Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Interior Design, and Industrial Design (pending program approval). First Year, First Semester Total: 14 CR Intro to Design (2 cr) d. Thinking (3 cr) Design Drawing (3 cr) Math (3 cr) English Comp (3 cr) First Year, Second Semester Total: 16 CR History of Design (3 cr) d. Making (4 cr) Computer Apps in Design (3cr) Communications (3 cr) Elective (3 cr)


dESIGN THINKING Design Thinking at UNL develops creative problem solving abilities in students. Intended for students with little or no design experience, this course introduces central issues and approaches to design as an interdisciplinary process. With an emphasis on creative thinking methods and building creative confidence, students address relevant and real-world challenges through design in an energetic, problem-based learning environment. Brian Kelly Assistant Professor of Architecture

20 / College of Architecture


design Making The Design Making course builds upon the skills acquired in Design Thinking turning the focus to making within the design process as a means to developing an idea. An appreciation for craft will be instilled as a core value and seen as a means to assessing clarity and viability of the idea. Projects will also integrate explicit use of the elements and principles of design as a formal vocabulary. Students are introduced to multiple techniques of communicating ideas through physical and digital modeling, orthographic projection, freehand drawing, and other forms of graphic representation. Brian Kelly Assistant Professor of Architecture

22 / College of Architecture


B 24 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture

BSD-Architecture

Bachelor of Science in Design-Architecture


The mission of the Architecture Program is to provide the educational foundation for articulate, intellectually aware, self-realizing architecture professionals capable of performing effectively in evolving design disciplines. Students enter into the professional program after the Common First Year and proceed through a rigorous and engaging core curriculum that merges architectural design education with disciplinary and professional knowledge. The heart of the 120-credit undergraduate degree is the architectural design studio sequence. To supplement this, the Program includes required courses in the architectural

discipline (history & theory), technology, and technique. In addition to the core, students take several electives and have the opportunity to apply these towards a minor in another field. In the 4th year studios, Architecture students work together with students in other fields on projects that engage real-world issues such as climate change, rapid urbanization, and cultural change. The 120-credit BSD in Architecture leads directly to the 2-year M.Arch, a NAAB accredited professional degree (required to become an architect) emphasizing design and research geared towards real and emerging challenges facing the built environment. Jeffrey L. Day, AIA Architecture Program Director and Professor of Architecture & Landscape Architecture

Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture / 25


BSD-Arch

Bachelor of Science in Design-Architecture - 120 credits

What do Architects do? Architects shape the physical environment to give expression to the values and beliefs of a culture and its people. When a client explains to an architect his or her desires for a building, he or she is also describing his or her values and priorities. It is these beliefs, and those of the architect, that are communicated by architecture. Like most endeavors in the arts and humanities, architects are concerned with forms of expression and the content of a particular message. However, what separates architecture from most other forms of communication is its sheer size, the longevity of its statement and its mass appeal. Simply, architects design buildings. Architects visualize a building but do not directly produce it. They visualize the future through models and drawings. These tools are used to communicate their ideas to others, especially to clients. The architect is the person who creatively envisions a 26 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture

product and then plans for the joining of materials and technique to produce the desired intention. An architect’s process extends from the broad conceptualization to the details of construction and fabrication. Architecture Degree Programs at UNL Architecture is a six-year course of study divided into a Common First Year, a three year core, and a two-year masters program (M.Arch). CoA Undergraduate Minors Offered Landscape Architecture Minor Product Design Minor Community and Regional Planning *See undergraduate Bulletin Requirements. *Minors are not required in CoA.

for

Minor


Second Year, First Semester Total: 15 CR Arch Design Studio (5 cr) Modern History (3 cr) Tectonic Fundamentals (3 cr) Physics (4 cr)

Fourth Year, First Semester Total: 14 CR Arch Design Studio (5 cr) Urbanism (3 cr) Environmental Systems (3 cr) Elective (3 cr)

Second Year, Second Semester Total: 16 CR Arch Design Studio (5 cr) Organizational Type (3 cr) Material Assemblies (3 cr) Computers (2 cr) Elective (3 cr)

Fourth Year, First Semester Total: 14 CR Arch Design Studio (5 cr) Theory (3 cr) Building Integration (3 cr) Elective (3 cr)

Third Year, First Semester Total: 17 CR Arch Design Studio (5 cr) Classical History (3 cr) Structural Mechanics (3 cr) Elective (3 cr) Elective (3 cr) Third Year, Second Semester Total: 14 CR Arch Design Studio (5 cr) Site (3 cr) Structural Optimization (3 cr) Elective (3 cr) Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture / 27


C.F.Y

Fourth

B.S. Design in Architecture (Architecture Core)

1s

MINOR/ ELECTIVE

DESIGN THINKING/ MAKING

DESIGN SYNTHESIS

BUILDING TECH. TECHNIQUE

STUDIO

ARCHITECTURE DISCIPLINE

T IDP

28 / College of Architecture

Third

INTERDISCIPLNARY

Architecture

(Common First Year)

Second


1st MArch

2nd MArch

Master of Architecture

Internship

Licensure

Licensed Architect

PROF. ELECTIVE CONCENTRATION

ARCHITECTURE DISCIPLINE

DESIGN RESEARCH SYNTHESIS BUILDING TECH. TECHNIQUE IDP

~3 yrs.

College of Architecture / 29


BSD-Arch second Year Program of Architecture

Following the common first year design core, the architectural design studio sequence begins in the second year with a rigorous introduction to architectural design methods, processes, and studio culture. Studio projects range from simple and limited-scope architectural design studies to more complex buildings incorporating knowledge of structure, materials and program (function and human events). Students learn to analyze given needs, study relevant precedents and respond with building proposals. To support the studio design work, students take courses in disciplinary knowledge (Modern Architectural History & Building Organization), technology (Structural Fundamentals & Material Assemblies), technique (intermediate computer applications in Parametric & Building Information Modeling), and Physics. Jeffrey L. Day, AIA Architecture Program Director and Professor of Architecture & Landscape Architecture 30 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture


BSD-Arch 210

Elements of Architectural Design I

Abstraction is aggressively deployed through design projects which include concepts of siting, path, intuitive structures, and ordering principles. This work quickly transitions into the design of a small scale wall. The premise behind the wall project is that in order to design a building, one must first explore the opportunities existent within the design of a wall. Topics covered through the site specific design include structure, skin, aperture door and window, and vertical circulation. Embedded throughout the semester is also a grounding in two and three dimensional representational techniques. Brian Kelly Assistant Professor of Architecture

32 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture


AUGMENTED

SURFACE

a

b

c

d

d

e

f

a

e

b

f

c

34 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture

Brianna Murphy ARCH 210 P1.4 David Karle Zack Johnson


Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture / 35


BSD-Arch 211

Elements of Architectural Design II

The final design project for the 2nd year curriculum was a municipal building housing courtrooms, offices, library, and public meeting areas. It began with an investigation of the courthouse typology to draw out crucial issues and relationships. Simultaneously, analysis on both an urban and suburban site highlighted the opportunities and problems with each location. Students were then charged with integrating these various forms of knowledge while designing for diverse user groups with specific needs, including privacy, security, acoustics, and view. The project also encouraged students to engage form, material, and affect as significant factors in the making of social and civic space. Brian Kelly Assistant Professor of Architecture Peter Olshavsky Assistant Professor of Architecture 36 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture

Ariel Peisan


Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture / 37


38 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture


Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture / 39


BSD-Arch third Year Program of Architecture

Starting in the fall of third year, projects increase in scale and complexity. The spring semester studio in third year challenges students to incorporate the influences of site and landscape into building design and introduces relevant site design techniques. In addition to studios each semester, students take courses in disciplinary knowledge (Classical Architectural History & Site), technology (architectural structures: Structural Mechanics & Structural Optimization), and as always, elective courses or courses in a chosen minor field. Jeffrey L. Day, AIA Architecture Program Director and Professor of Architecture & Landscape Architecture

40 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture


BSD-Arch 310

Architectural Design: Systematic Approach 01

The VTOL Urban.Port.Terminal brief explored the hybridization of a new type of urban port terminal. As a post-industrial U.S. will never be able to finance the necessary infrastructure required for highspeed rail to compete with exist air or car travel, students were asked to research the recurring technology of the high-speed airship as a viable and low-carbon alternative. The Vertical Take-Off & Landing aircraft allow for much tighter urban affiliations and potentially reverse the trend of the sprawling suburban airport type. The design brief sought hybridizations between bus stations, train terminals, and airports which also challenged the prevalent shopping model in today’s airports with new leisure-oriented programs. The studio was led as a digitally-driven, performance-based design studio which asked students to consider systemic design methods and computational techniques. Steve Hardy Assistant Professor of Architecture 42 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture

Chantal Bonner (pg. 44-47)


Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture / 43


44 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture


Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture / 45


BSD-Arch 310

Architectural Design: Systematic Approach 02

The first aim of URBANBLOCKmashUp was to explore urban block type mashups and remixes which engage vertical, block-volume, and oblique zoning that prompt multiple programs and mixeduse urban activity. The second aim was to explore and utilize modular construction techniques both as a means to achieve construction and economic efficiencies and as a highly syntactical bottomup & inside-outside design process. The third aim was for designed to be consider a type of Experimental Parametric Pragmatism: a digitallydriven, performance-based design which asked students to consider systemic design methods and elastic/parametric real world design variables. The studio collaborated with developers and the local municipality’s economic and urban development office which served as the client base and offered expertise and critiques throughout the project process. Steve Hardy Assistant Professor of Architecture 46 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture

Benjamin Bedell Micah Davis Andrew Younker (pg. 48-51)


48 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture


Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture / 49


BSD-Arch 350 Process

The truthful story of process behind distinguished architectural works is instrumental in understanding both the nature of design problems themselves and the complexities that are inherent to the execution of built Architecture. Students in ARCH 350 identify the range of constraints that shape architectural design problems, while also identifying the range of heuristics historically used by architects in decisionmaking: These include analogies, anthropometrics, environmental factors, engineering factors, formal languages, and type. Students work in teams to investigate the story of process behind a distinctive architectural work before then examining their own decision-making behind their respective studio project. Chris Ford Associate Professor of Architecture

50 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture

Sarah Hitchcock Case Study House #8, Eames Office, 1949


Andrew Younker Seattle Public Library, OMA / REX, 2004 Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture / 51


BSD-Arch 311

Architectural Design: Ecological Context Interdisciplinary Studio with Landscape Architecture

The studio aim is to gain an understanding of the relationships between landscape to architecture at multiple site scales; consider the effects of construction and ground manipulation on the perception and experience of space; and explore the possibilities of layering and transparency, enclosure and adjacencies, “in-between” spaces and connectors as they relate to building and site. Ultimately, the studio investigated the intersection of landscape design, architecture, and planning in the making of spaces within a natural educational setting. The studio served as a means to explore the possibilities for landscape to shape architecture as a reciprocal activity. Timothy L Hemsath, AIA, LEED AP Associate Professor of Architecture

52 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture

Joey Laughlin Sean O’Brien (pg. 52-55)


54 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture


Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture / 55


BSD-Arch 311

Architectural Design: Ecological Context

This studio fostered a collaborative environment where architecture and landscape architecture students worked towards shared goals. Students related landscape and architecture through projects that asked emerging designers to propose buildings & landscapes as part of a system for organizing activities and natural ecologies. Rather than focusing on the building as isolated object, the studio emphasized the space that surrounds us – a field from which buildings emerge. Students explored these ideas in two projects, including one incorporating exhibit space, live-work artists’ studios and a public park in a flood plain. Students sought techniques for design that merge architectural and landscape architectural processes towards a common goal of integrated, collaborative practice. Jeffrey L. Day, AIA Architecture Program Director and Professor of Architecture & Landscape Architecture 56 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture

Michael Harpster (pg. 56-59)


07

05

01

02

06

13 11 10 12

09 08 04

03

04

05 06

07 10

09

08 11

03 02 01

12

Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture / 57


58 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture


North

1 2 3 4 5 6

5

5

1

2

5

3

4

5

3

6

Cafe / Restaurant Storage Space Hallway Auditorium Walkable Roof Service Access

SURROUNDINGS

ARCH / LARC 311 spring 2011

professors Jeffrey L. Day & Sarah Thomas

Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture / 59


BSD-Arch 360

Limit of Construction

Studio 1

Site

Kentucky Blue Grass

Studio 2

Native Tall Grass

Studio 3 Circulation

New Contour Lines

Completely Graded, no older connecting contours

Architecture 360 introduces students of architecture to the relationship between landscape architecture, site engineering, analysis, and design. The course is taught through both lecture and lab experiences, covering technical skills of topographic manipulation, the relationship between buildings and context, and the poetics of internal and external space. Additionally, the course touches on requirements for architectural registration and introduces the role of the architect in project types ranging from urban to rural conditions. Through a variety of scaled projects, students explore aspects of the built environment through hands-on analysis and design. Investigations include problems relating to accessibility, materials, and an understanding of design synthesis with the natural environment.

Shared Workroom 1

Parking

Peter Hind Associate Professor of Architecture

Studio 4

SURROUNDINGS

ARCH / LARC 311 spring 2011

professors Jeffrey L. Day & Sarah Thomas

Kristen Bender 60 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture

N

P 2.3 Site Plan 1� = 200’ Kristen Bender Tonya Carlson Shilong Su


Possible Buildable Areas

Possible Buildable Areas

Best Elevations/Views

Possible Artist’s Studios Areas

Possible Artist’s Studios Areas

Possible Artist’s Studios Areas Highest Points Best Viewing Areas Towards Urban Context

Possible Artist’s Studios Areas

Best Elevations/Views

Pattern Manipulation / Program Use

Dispersed the more Private Areas Highest Points Best Viewing Areas Towards Urban Context

Pattern Mani

Studio 2

Dispersed the more Private Areas

Storage

Denser towards Public Areas Becoming More Private/Public

Highest Points Best Viewing Areas Towards Residential Context

Outdoor View/Pier Deck Shared Work/ Installation Space

Becoming More Private/Public

Lower Points view interactive Wildlife & Piers Becoming More Private/Public

Highest Points Best Viewing Areas Towards Residential Denser towards Context Public Areas

Outdoor View/Pier Deck

Becoming More Private/Public

Lower Points view interactive Wildlife & Piers Denser towards Public Areas

Denser towards Public Areas

Outdoor View/Pier Deck

Outdoo View/P Shared Work/ Deck Installation Space

Storage Possible Artist’s Studios Areas

SURROUNDINGS

Possible Artist’s Studios Areas

SURROUNDINGS ARCH / LARC 311 spring 2011 professors Jeffrey ARCH L. Day / LARC & Sarah 311Thomas spring 2011

Dispersed the more Private Areas

Dispersed the more Private Areas

Visiting Studio

professors Jeffrey L. Day & Sarah Thomas

Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture / 61


BSD-Arch fourth Year Program of Architecture

Fourth-year Architecture students work together with students in other fields on projects that engage real-world issues such as climate change, rapid urbanization and shifting populations, and cultural change. Projects emphasize architecture in complex contexts. Supplementing the studios, students take courses in disciplinary knowledge (Urbanism & Theory) and technology (Environmental Systems & Building Integration) and electives. In the spring semester Comprehensive Studio students develop designs that incorporate all facets of architectural design including knowledge gained from the disciplinary, technology and technique sequences. Building Integration is paired with the Comprehensive Studio to engage students in the integrative thinking of systems and in developing detailed building documentation. Jeffrey L. Day, AIA Architecture Program Director and Professor of Architecture & Landscape Architecture 62 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture


BSD-Arch 410

Architectural Design: Tectonics

Our architectural discipline must enhance the seriousness with which it responds to design problems, and mature from questions such as “What does your architecture look like?” to more appropriate questions such as “How should your building perform?” As architects, our commitment to utility and function is a minimum disciplinary requirement, however our enthusiastic engagement with the question of Performance guarantees meaningful and purposeful physical qualities that raise the value of architectural design for both current and future users. ARCH 410 is our comprehensive design studio which fosters architectural ideation prior to the plausible resolution of a proposal’s structural, envelope, mechanical and lighting systems. Chris Ford Associate Professor of Architecture Kendra Heimes, Alec Saline & Hannah Schurrer Precedent: British Pavilion Seville by Grimshaw 64 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture


Alec Saline Design: Ducati USA Headquarters, San Francisco CA

66 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture


Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture / 67


BSD-Arch 410

Architectural Design: Tectonics

Architecture has long privileged constructive, additive, and accretive processes in design. This studio proposed the opposite: demolition, subtraction, excavation, erasure, and editing as primary creative acts. Subtractive procedures are evident in projects involving a dominant existing site, such as urban redevelopment or the adaptive reuse of a building, but they are found in any design project. Fundamental to this is the notion that architecture is not “complete� when the contractor leaves; it is always in flux and undergoes its greatest transformation when new uses and tenants layer themselves upon it. As an invited participant in the Lyceum Fellowship Competition, the studio challenged students to design a cultural facility in an abandoned granite quarry in Barre, Vermont. Jeffrey L. Day, AIA Architecture Program Director and Professor of Architecture & Landscape Architecture 68 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture

01 02 03 04

05 06 07 08 09

10 11

12 13

14 15 16

Michael Harpster (pg. 68-71)


01 02 03 04 05

06 07 08 09 10

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

24 25 26

27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35

36 37

Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture / 69


01

03 02 04

05

10 06 07 08

11

13 14

17 19

09

18

20 12 15

16

21

24

70 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture

22

23


Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture / 71


BSD-Arch 430 Technical Applications

FAB LAB Building Envelope System:

Integrative study of structural, building, and environmental technology systems in a building within the context of a design studio dealing with architectural design and building tectonics. Emphasis on the role structure, mechanical systems, and assemblages play in the evolution of an architectural project. Through the course of study students’ illustrate an understanding of the principles which underlie each of the technical systems and demonstrate the ability to apply those principles to the design project. Timothy L Hemsath, AIA, LEED AP Associate Professor of Architecture

Mullions & Curtain Glass

Turnbuckle Horizontal Bracing Louver Supporting Structure

Louvers

Structural System: 1

2

Joe Johnson

72 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture

Primary Horizontal Structure

3

Primary Vertical Structure

4

Steel Colu


Structural System: 1

2

Primary Horizontal Structure

3

Primary Vertical Structure

Steel

4

5 Section: Exploded Axonometric

Secondary Horizontal Structure Secondary Vertical Structure

Code System: Egress Path / Railing Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture / 73

Steel


BSD-Arch 411

Architectural Design: Urban Design

The studio engaged in the processes of systemsthinking research as a tool to identify current and existing conditions within Des Moines, Iowa. The research sought to re-framed projects through the process and design of student work. The studio started analysis and a large framework plan to assess the systems on the ground; the region, transportation, politics, players, economics, ecologies, industries, and built fabric to formulate a project from their findings. Projects emerged from a deep understanding of a broader city system — its interactions, conflicts, strengths, and opportunities. The final interventions ranged in scope and project type providing the city with multiple future visions. Gina Ford, 2012 Visiting Hyde Chair of Excellence Sasaki principal David Karle Assistant Professor of Architecture 74 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture

Justin Langenfeld (pg. 74-77)


Aviva vacany

Office Vacancies

CBD Silicon Sixth Ave

stories: 12 typical floor size: 9,521 sq.ft. Wellmark vacancy

Wellmark vacany

Liberty Building 418 6th Ave

buidling size: 62,496 sq.ft.

space available: 3,875 sq.ft.

Bank of America Building 317 6th Ave (Wellmark

vacancy)

stories: 15 typical floor size: 10,472 sq.ft. buidling size: 157,080 sq.ft.

space available: 44,072 sq.ft.

Liberty Building 418 6th Ave

Vacancy by Floor

stories: 12 Office Vacancies sq.ft.

typical floor size: 8,760 sq.ft. buidling size: 86,052 sq.ft.

Silicon Sixth Office Vacancies sq.ft.

SYSTEM, STRATEGY, SITE: Des Moines

ARCH / LARC 411 spring 2012

76 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture

space available: 19,413 sq.ft. professors David W. Karle & Visiting Hyde Chair Gina Ford

Vacant Office Space Industry Justin Langenfeld, Michael Killeen


Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture / 77


BSD-Arch 461 Urbanism

Chicago City Limits

The course surveys a range of logics to understand a diverse set of methods through both standardized and exploratory urbanism strategies. The course positions urbanism as a dynamic and complex process, not a thing, continually altering the center, middle, and edge. Urbanism is an emergent set of relationships having many influences situated, sustained, and altered by an active and dynamic set of relationships. Transportation, ecologies, buildings, and landscapes are all in dialogue mobilized into a condition or space of the built environment. From logistical operations to forms of survival, urbanism will continue to redefine the role of a development in the twenty-first century.

Chicago City Limits

13.45%

Chicago City Limits

30.25%

$27k or less

$47k or more

21.85% $27-35k

26.05%

8.4%

$40-47k $35-40k McDonalds Distribution by Income

20.37% $27-35k

Chicago Community Areas Income

1.23% $27k or less

8.64%

62.35%

$35-40k

Chicago Community Areas Income Chicago Community Areas $47k or more $40-47K Income

$47k or more

7.41%

$40-47k Starbucks Distribution by Income

$35-40k $27-35k $47k or more $27k or less $40-47K $35-40k $27-35k $27k or less

13.45% 5.88%

no majority

18.49% >80% white

majority black

19.33%

Chicago Community Areas

27.73%

>80% black

Race Chicago Community Areas > 80% white Race majority white Chicago > 80% white > 80% hispanic Community Areas majority white majority hispanic Race> 80% hispanic > 80% black majority hispanic > 80% white majority black >majority 80% black white majority asian majority black > 80% hispanic majority majorityasian hispanic no majority

majority white

10.08% majority hispanic

5.04%

>80% hispanic McDonalds Distribution by Race

9.26% 11.73%

no majority

majority black

17.28% >80% white

1.85%

no> majority 80% black majority black majority asian no majority

>80% black

3.7%

David Karle Assistant Professor of Architecture

majority hispanic

56.17%

majority white Starbucks Distribution by Race

McDonalds locations McDonalds Chicago: 121 Total Stores in McDonalds Total Stores in McDonalds Chicago: 121 McDonalds Total Stores in Total Stores in Chicago: 121 Chicago: 121

78 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture

$47k or more $40-47K $35-40k $27-35k $27k or less

TotalStarbucks Stores in locations Chicago: 158 Starbucks Coffee Total Stores in ffee Chicago: 158 Starbucks Coffee Total Stores in Total Stores in Chicago: 158 Chicago: 158


9

8

9

NYC borough

(key)

DISTRIBUTION

1.6 lincoln, ne

consolidation (1898)

7

6

(key)

M

B

Q

X

SI 25-49 50-99

3.0

7

3.6

6

10.0

6.4

14.4

100-149

5

.04

8

5

19.6

150-199 25.6

200+ 4

persons per acre

4

32.4

40.0 3

3

2

2

1

1

0

city population (millions)

1790

1810

1830

1850

1870

1890

1910

1930

1950

1970

1990

2010

2030

0

persons per sq. mi. (thousands)

48.4

57.6

67.6

78.4

90.0

102.4

Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture / 79


M.Arch 2M

Master of Architecture (2 Year)

The Master in Architecture (2-Year) is the accredited degree by the National Architectural Accreditation Board (NAAB). The 2-year M.Arch professional program is designed for applicants who do not already hold a professional degree in Architecture. Applicants who hold a professional degree in Architecture are welcome to explore the M.S. Arch, M.S. Arch ID, and M.CRP Masters programs. Admitted 2-year M.Arch students begin in the fall term. Two completion tracks are offered for students to select from: a two year vertical Design Research Studio sequence or a combination of Design Research Studios with a two semester Design Thesis in the final year.

80 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture

Prerequisite: Applicants to the 2-year M.Arch degree should have a bachelor of science degree in architecture or its equivalent.


First Year, First Semester

Second Year, First Semester

ARCH 510 Design Research Studio (5 cr) ARCH 680 Professional Practice (3 cr) ARCH 683 Programming (3 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (3 cr) TOTAL: 14 CR

(Thesis Option) ARCH 613 Design Thesis (6 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (3 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (2 cr) ELECTIVE Open Elective (3 cr) TOTAL: 14 CR

First Year, Second Semester ARCH 511 Design Research Studio (5 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (3 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (3 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (3 cr) TOTAL: 14 CR

(Studio Option) ARCH 610 Design Research Studio (5 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (3 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (2 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (1 cr) ELECTIVE Open Elective (3 cr) TOTAL: 14 CR Second Year, Second Semester (Thesis Option) ARCH 614 Design Thesis (6 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (3 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (3 cr) TOTAL: 12 CR (Studio Option) ARCH 611 Design Research Studio (5 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (3 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (3 cr) ELECTIVE Professional Elective (1 cr) TOTAL: 12 CR Bachelor of Science in Design - Architecture / 81


B 82 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design

BSD-Interior Design

Bachelor of Science in Design-Interior Design


As with most career options, having an interest or ‘passion’ for a particular subject is a good indicator for success in that field. Students who have a keen interest in their surroundings and an ability to creatively solve a variety of problems will likely find success in interior design. Since the interior designer works within the confines of the built environment, the ability to visualize 3-dimensional space and manipulate 3-D volumes in their mind while solving spatial problems is a good candidate for a career in interior design. Communication skills, both written and verbal, and an interest in culture and the way people live are also good indicators of potential success in interior design. The Interior Design Program in the College of Architecture is fully accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation and is recognized as among the top programs in North America not only because of the student work, but also for the collaborative relationships with the allied disciplines of architecture and landscape architecture. The four year undergraduate program consists of a Common First Year of courses shared by students in architecture, landscape architecture, and interior design. This year is followed by focused years of study in interior design and a final year that allows

for collaborative work with students in architecture and landscape architecture. Students participate in exploring a full range of design problems in the studios where they develop design solutions that are presented to practicing professionals and for some projects, actual clients. The contact with the profession and clients is continued in the required internship program where students work in professional design firms for academic credit. Through these explorations and related course work in design history, materials, detailing, and professional practice, students develop an understanding of all aspects associated with the multi-dimensional field of interior design. The Bachelor of Science in Design – Interior Design requires 120 semester credit house of coursework.

Betsy Gabb, EdD, FIDEC, IIDA Professor & Program Director Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design / 83


BSD-ID

Bachelor of Science in Design-Interior Design - 120 credits

What do Interior Designers do? One of the most appealing aspects of interior design is the variety of career options available within the discipline. Some designers consistently work on all types of interior projects, while others opt to specialize in some aspect of interior design. Residential design is perhaps the oldest and most widely recognized segment of interior design, but the field of commercial interiors, such as hospitality, healthcare, retail, or institutional, is rapidly growing and requires specialized knowledge and skills.

84 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design

Regardless of the actual type of interior project, designers follow a process for carrying an interior design project to completion. A thorough analysis of client needs is important in order to translate those needs into real spaces, furniture and fixture requirements. The interior designer plans, selects, and specifies interior furnishings and finish materials to meet the client’s dreams and at the same time complies with applicable codes and regulations. Finally, designers are responsible for designing custom components and overseeing their fabrication and installation.


Second Year, First Semester Total: 14 CR Interior Design Studio I (5cr) Modern History (3 cr) Interior Systems I (3 cr) Interior Systems II (3 cr) Second Year, Second Semester Total: 17 CR Interior Design Studio II (5cr) Interior Art History (3 cr) Interior Systems III (2 cr) Environmental Behavior (3 cr) Natural Science Elective (4 cr)

Fourth Year, First Semester Total: 16 CR Interior Design Studio V (5 cr) Professional Practice Interiors (3 cr ) Community Engagement (2 cr) Professional Elective (3 cr ) Internship (3-6 cr) Fourth Year, First Semester Total: 12 CR Interior Design Studio VI (6 cr) Professional Elective (3 cr) Elective (3 cr)

Third Year, First Semester Total: 14 CR Interior Design Studio III (5 cr) History of Furniture (3 cr) Material Application / Color Theory (3 cr) Construction Documents (3 cr) Third Year, Second Semester Total: 17 CR Interior Design Studio IV (5 cr) Systems / Interior Details (3 cr) Evidence-Based Design Base Design (3 cr) Professional History Elective (3 cr ) Professional Elective (3 cr) Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design / 85


BSD-ID Second Year Program of Interior Design

In the second year of the program, students begin their in depth study of the multi-faceted of profession of interior design beginning with residential and small scale commercial design. Projects focus on developing an understanding of the design and function of interior environments. Studio work is supported by courses in the history of architecture, materials, lighting and acoustics, and construction documents. Betsy Gabb, EdD, FIDEC, IIDA Professor & Interior Design Program Director

86 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design


BSD-ID 210

Interior Design Studio I

Using abstract design, the course introduces students to the processes used in the creation of space – analysis, order, and proportion through small scaled projects common to the design disciplines. Students use physical and digital modeling as well as free hand drawing to design and illustrate their work. The project illustrated is the design of a wall demonstrating an understanding of both the structure and the surface. Betsy Gabb, EdD, FIDEC, IIDA Professor & Interior Design Program Director

Kaylyn Neverve 88 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design


ARTIST RETREAT - FISKARS, FINLAND

WHOLE WALL

BOX MANIPULATION PROCESS + CONNECTION

TOP VIEW

PROCESS IDEA 5 90 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design

OVERHANG TO ENTRY


PROCESS MODELS

ENTRY TO RAMP

PLAN VIEW

WALKWAY + RAMP

BENCH

AXON PLAN VIEW

STAIRWAY

ENTRY TO STAIRS

AXON

Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design / 91


BSD-ID 211

Interior Design Studio II

Students were asked to analyze and document the design and architectural condition from an episode of a domestic sitcom. The emphasis was on the interaction of the users with the space. Students documented the episode through a series of representations which captured the essential aspects of the event. The document illustrated the relationships, both shown and implied, and the sequencing, critical objects and rituals associated with the scene. Lindsey Ellsworth-Bahe Associate Professor of Interior Design

Phung Hong 92 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design


Phung Hong 94 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design


Carolina Preciado Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design / 95


BSD-ID Third Year Program of Interior Design

During the third year of study, the scope of the studio projects becomes more complex and includes hospitality and healthcare. Students have the ability to take a wide variety of professional electives to enhance their disciplinary knowledge and/or build a minor. Some popular professional electives include the Changing Workplace, Branding, Product Design, Women in Design, and Evolving Issues. All provide the basis for a more comprehensive understanding of design. Students also prepare for the required professional internship during their Professional Practices course in which they create their resume and portfolio. Betsy Gabb, EdD, FIDEC, IIDA Professor & Interior Design Program Director

96 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design


BSD-ID 350

Interior Design Studio III

IDES 350 focuses on the study of dwelling and the critical analysis and design investigation of the places and spaces in which we live – residential environments. Students study space, form, sequence, light, materiality, context, and program through design problems that range from multifamily transitional housing for a refugee community to single-family dwellings that address issues of suburban sprawl. Nate Bicak Lecturer of Interior Design

Amanda Sasse 98 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design


100 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design


1

HOUSING CONSTRUCTION METHOD IN MIDWEST [2003]

PANELIZED/PRECUT

2

or less

3

1

15%

1985

2+

2

LA

4

Bathroom 9’ x 11’

AVERAGE # OF STORIES [IN MIDWEST]

2

2 1/2 or more

Bathroom 9’ x 11’

2

2

OTHER

1 1/2 or less 1985

2

1985

2 1/2 or more

2011

Living Room 16’ x 16’

Bedroom 10’ x 12’

14%

Laundry Room 9’ x 7’

STICK BUILT

1%

AVERAGE # OF BEDROOMS [IN MIDWEST]

55%

29%

Kitchen 13’ x 16’

4

or more

2+

1 1/2 or less

ODU

M

Master Bedroom 12’ x 16’

or more

2011

11%

R

or less 1985

3

SPLIT

SPLIT 2011

3

2011

or more

1

1

2 Car Garage 19’ x 19’ Dining Room 12’ x 14’

61%

VINYL SIDING

Bedroom 10’ x 12’

11%

FIBER CEMENT

n/a n/a

ca

rp

2%

OTHER

AVERAGE ROOM DIMENSIONS

ort

3+

EXTERIOR MATERIAL USED WITHIN MIDWEST [1985]

EXTERIOR MATERIAL USED IN MIDWEST [2011] AVERAGE # OF BATHROOMS [IN MIDWEST]

TYPE OF PARKING FACILITY USED [IN MIDWEST]

1,820 ft

2

1,785 ft

2

60.3%

1985 United States

Midwest

OF

HOUSING IS

SINGLE-FAMILY DETACHED

2,480 ft

2

2,287 ft

2

?

2011 1980’S RESIDENTIAL INTERIOR MATERIALS

2012’S RESIDENTIAL INTERIOR MATERIALS

Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design / 101


Amanda Balhorn, Matt Masten, Sara Westerman 102 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design


Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design / 103


BSD-ID 351

Interior Design Studio IV

This retail design project is situated in the Old Market district of downtown Omaha. The program includes retail space, a custom cash wrap, fitting rooms and a lounge space for a high-end fashion retailer. Students select a contemporary fashion designer, analyze and rebrand the designer, and design retail spaces based on their new interpretation of the brand. Nate Bicak Lecturer of Interior Design

Amanda Sasse 104 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design


RESTROOM

106 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design

2th Street

SECTION MODEL

SECTION A

SCALE 1’ = 1/8”

SECTION B

SCALE 1’ = 1/8”

SECTION B

ELIE SAAB

SECTION A

SCALE 1’ = 1/8”

FLOOR PLAN

OFFICE

SECTION C

STORAGE

REFLECTED CEILING PLAN SCALE 1’ = 1/16”

12th Street

RESTROOM

SECTION MODEL

SECTION B

SECTION A

Howard Street

Howard Street

SCALE 1’ = 1/16”

REFLECTED CEILING PLAN


FLOOR TILING

[BRECCIA ONICIATA by MTC]

DISPLAY TILING

[CREMA MARFIL MARBLE by MTC]

DISPLAY LAMINATE

[JETT BLACK GLOSSY by NEVAMAR]

UPHOLSTERY

[LARIAT - 013 IVORY by MAHARAM]

TRANSPARENT WALL

[CHROMA WHITE OUT by 3 FORM]

MIRROR WALL

[MIRROR by LINCOLN GLASS]

CURTAIN AND DISPLAY INSERTS [CUSTOM MADE]

WALL AND CEILING PAINT

[HIGH REFLECTIVE WHITE by SHERWIN WILLIAMS]

SECTION C SCALE 1’ = 1/8”

Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design / 107


BSD-ID Fourth Year Program of Interior Design

In the fourth and final year of study, students have the opportunity to again work collaboratively with students in architecture, landscape architecture, and planning on the design of a comprehensive project(s). These projects may focus on a particular subject or may serve a community. The completion of selected professional electives and/ or a minor also occurs during the fourth year. Betsy Gabb, EdD, FIDEC, IIDA Professor & Interior Design Program Director

108 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design


BSD-ID 450

Interior Design Studio V

In this course, students take primary responsibility in the gathering, analyzing, and organization of information used in the design phases. Design solutions demonstrate the student’s ability to apply the design process and to integrate information and theory in order to arrive at creative solutions to complex design problems. An understanding of the architectural building shell will serve as an approach to the expression of the design concept. There is typically four projects during this semester and they emphasize hospitality and healthcare design topics. Tom Allisma Associate Professor of Interior Design

Sarah Hitchcock 110 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design


112 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design


Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design / 113


Melissa Hywood, Rex Sandquist, Cale Lancaster, and Ricardo Camio 114 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design


Lauren Barry and Matthew Jorn Health Care Studio. Bryan LGH East Cancer & Infusion Clinic and Facilities. 116 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design


Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design / 117


BSD-ID 451

Interior Design Studio VI - Capstone

The final semester for all graduating seniors entails a major 15-week-long project which is designed to allow for their individual exploration of a project type of specific interest to them. Master planning of an entire building will occur, with focus on a defined area for development of design and development of associated construction documents. This project is designed to encourage the student’s independence in all aspects of design and project management, to implement knowledge gained during your education to all phases of a design project, and to serve as a link between their academic and professional design career. Tom Allisma Associate Professor of Interior Design

Lisa Oberlander (pg. 118-121) 118 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design


First Floor Plan 1/8” = 1’0”

120 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design

First Floor RCP 1/8” = 1’0”


Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design / 121


Sarah Hitchcock 122 / Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design


Bachelor of Science in Design - Interior Design / 123


B 124 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture

BLA-Landscape Architecture Bachelor of Landscape Architecture


Landscape architecture combines art and environmental sciences. Landscape architects design exterior spaces and places. Those less familiar with landscape architecture tend to think of the profession in relatively basic terms, involving plantings around a building or in a park, for example. The reality is quite different; the profession is much broader, richer, and far-reaching. Landscape architects design at many scales, ranging from a tiny roof deck terrace to thousand of acres of National Forest lands; from the private realm of corporate office courtyard to the public realm of a neighborhood park or community plan; from the specialized creation of a healing garden at a hospital to a customized rehabilitation of a native wetlands. The numerous project types, practice types, along with the professional possibilities available to someone with a background in landscape architecture is almost unlimited. The Landscape Architecture Program is fully accredited by the Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board and is the only four-year accredited program in a four-state region. This program also offers the only collaborative interdisciplinary approach with the allied disciplines of architecture, interior design and planning.

The four-year undergraduate program consists of a common first year of courses shared by students in architecture, interior design, and landscape architecture. This year is followed by two years where students develop disciplinebased knowledge and skills focused on site and building, community planning and design, and urban environments. The final year allows for collaborative work with students in architecture, interior design, and planning in research-based studios. Students participate in exploring a broad range of design problems in the studios where they develop design solutions that are presented to practicing professionals and for some projects, actual clients or partners. Students participate in a myriad of opportunities to support learning in the profession including professional electives, seminars, minors, lecture series, and study abroad. Learning about the profession continues in the required internship program where students work in professional design firms for academic credit. The Bachelor of Landscape Architecture degree requires 120-semester credit hours of coursework. Kim Wilson, Interim Dean, Professor, and Program Director Landscape Architecture, Community and Regional Planning Bachelor of Landscape Architecture / 125


BLA

Bachelor of Landscape Architecture - 120 credits

What do Landscape Architects do? Landscape architecture is a profession broad in scale and scope. Landscape architects receive training in site design, historic preservation and planning, as well as in technical and scientific areas such as grading, drainage, horticulture and environmental sciences. With this diverse background, landscape architects possess a unique blend of abilities to help families, communities and businesses address important local, regional and national priorities. Landscape architects provide sustainable solutions, support active lifestyle, design transportation solutions, assist in historic preservation and manage water resources.

126 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture

The Landscape Architecture professional degree program is unique in its collaborative format. Administered by the College of Architecture, the four year BLA curriculum is led by four landscape architects and collaboratively by the Architecture, Horticulture and Agronomy, and Community and Regional Planning programs. This provides students in the program a broad education through exposure to faculty and many disciplines that impact their field while at the same time establishing a strong design studio core as an integrative environment.


Second Year, First Semester Total: 16 CR LARC Studio I, Process and Methods (4 cr) Landscape Appreciation (3 cr ) Site Systems I, Materiality (3 cr) Plants I (3 cr) HORT 131 (3 cr) Second Year, Second Semester Total: 17 CR LARC Studio II, Site Design (4 cr) History / Theory (3 cr) Site Systems II, Grading and Drainage GD (3 cr ) GIS (3 cr) Soils Resources (4 cr) Third Year, First Semester Total: 14 CR LARC Studio III, Adv. Site Design (5 cr) Intro. Planning (3 cr) Site Systems III, Implementation (3 cr) General Ecology (3 cr)

Third Year, Second Semester Total: 12 CR LARC Studio IV, Community Planning and Design (5 cr) Urbanism (3 cr) Internship Prep. (1 cr) Plants II (3 cr) Fourth Year, First Semester Total: 14 + 3 CR LARC Studio V, Ecological Planning and Design (5 cr) Research Methods (3 cr) Professional Practice (3 cr) Elective (3 cr) Summer Internship + Study Abroad (3-6 cr) Fourth Year, Second Semester Total: 14 CR LARC Studio VI, Capstone (5 cr) Professional Elective (3 cr) Professional Elective (3 cr) Elective (3 cr)

Bachelor of Landscape Architecture / 127


BLA Second Year

Program of Landscape Architecture

Following the common first year design core, the landscape architecture studio sequence begins in the second year with an introduction to landscape architectural methods, process and site design. Studio projects establish an understanding of the role environmental sciences, human behavior and historical context play in determining the best ways to integrate human activity while respecting and responding to environmental and social processes. Students learn to collect, analyze and communicate basic site systems characteristics including topography, soils, hydrology, plants and ecology, as well as cultural characteristics including building/ land uses, circulation components, and all aspects of the built environment. Design theory is focused at the site scale and spatial design expressed using landform, plants and structures. Hand-built models and computer-generated diagrams, plans and sections are used to communicate design ideas and process. To support the studio design work, 128 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture

students take courses in disciplinary knowledge (Landscape Appreciation & History and Theory), technology (Materiality, Grading and Drainage & GIS), and environmental sciences (Plants Science, Plants & Soil Resources). Kim Wilson, Interim Dean, Professor, and Program Director Landscape Architecture, Community and Regional Planning


BLA 210

Studio I, Process and Methods

The practice of landscape architecture is a complex and integrative undertaking, encompassing a myriad of natural, cultural and scientific systems. Analysis, critical questioning and design are all methods by which we, as landscape architects, arrive at creative, responsible solutions. This course introduces students to the processes, methods, terminology, and techniques utilized by landscape architects. Bret Betnar Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture

Eric Rice and Lyle Janicek 130 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture


VISION: VISION: VISION:

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Reintroduce connections between the built environment, vegetation and people by exploiting the unique ecological characteristics of Wilderness Park. 1998 Plant Communities 1998EA EA 1998 Plant EA 1998 Communities Plant EACommunities Plant Communities

12

Pioneers Blvd. 9

9

4

1

8

7

6

9 Cheney Old

10

14th Street

27th Street

27th Street

27th Street 14th Street

14th Street

14th Street

27th Street

27th Street

27th Street 14th Street

14th Street

27th Street

14th Street Old Cheney

Old Cheney

Old Cheney

Old Cheney

Old Cheney

Old

6

6 13

4

4

13

13

14

14

14

6

6 4

4

6

13

13

2

6

4

2

7

4

8

6 Saltillo Rd.

9 2

6

3

6 8

Saltillo Rd.

13

9

7

13 2 10

13 3

6

4

3 8

6 4

7

Rd. 13 3

4

8 12

8

13

8

14th Street

10

8

13 4

10

8

12 6

8

14th Street

3

6

2

10

8

8 12 6 Saltillo 12

13

3

10

8 12

12

Saltillo Rd. 8

10

8

8

10 14

10

10 14

Saltillo Rd.

Saltillo Rd.

Saltillo Rd.

Saltillo Rd.

Saltillo Rd.

Saltillo Rd.

14

Anthony Malone

132 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture Arms of Arms Expansionism ofArms Expansionism of Expansionism Understanding Understanding Understanding Ecologies Ecologies - The Ecologies Floodway - The Floodway - The Floodway

Reestablish Reestablish Bur Reestablish oak BurSavanna oakBur Savanna oak Savanna

Saltillo Rd.

14th Street

13 9 2

6

13

27th Street

13

27th Street

6

2

27th Street

2

14th Street

4

14th Street

6

14th Street

13

7

27th Street

4

6 13 13

7

27th Street

13

7

2

Old Cheney

4 14

6

6 13 13

4

4 14

6

Old Cheney

Old Cheney

6

4

4

Pioneers Blvd.

10

6

14

Pioneers Blvd. Pioneers Blvd.

4

10 4

6

9 Old Cheney

4

6

Pioneers Blvd.

8 7

6

Pioneers Blvd. Pioneers Blvd.

27th Street

7 9

Pioneers Blvd.

4

14th Street

8

4

Pioneers Blvd. Pioneers Blvd.

4

1

4

14th Street

4

4

7

14

14th Street

9 1

Service Service Nursery Service NurseryNur

2 9

7

14

Pioneers Blvd. Pioneers Blvd.

12

2 9

7

Cedars for Cedars Cedars for Removal Cedars for Removal forRemoval Removal

27th Street

2 9

27th Street

12

14

5

27th Street

12

11

27th 14th Street Street

5

11

14

27th Street

12

11

14

14th Street

5

14

Cedar Plague CedarCedar Plague Cedar PlaguePlague

4

14

14th Street

12

4

14

14th Street

4

14


GRASSLAND: VEGETATION ANALYSIS

Understanding Ecologies - The ed, undeveloped land, uninhabited by Floodway

Webster Dictionary, 2010

pable of elevating and delighting us.�

nd the American mind, Roderick Nash, 1982

experience on the Jamacia Trail by

Grasslands are areas where the vegetation is dominated by grasses (Poaceae), however sedge (Cyperaceae) and rush (Juncaceae) families can also be found. Grasslands occur naturally on all continents except Antarctica. In temperate latitudes, such as northwestern Europe and the Great Plains and California in North America, native grasslands are dominated by perennial bunch grass species, whereas in warmer climates annual species form a greater component of the vegetatio

ting vegetative rooms.

ATE CAPITOL

GRASSLAND: Grasslands are areas where the vegetation is dominated by grasses (Poaceae), however sedge (Cyperaceae) and rush (Juncaceae) families can also be found. Grasslands occur naturally on all continents except Antarctica. In temperate latitudes, such as northwestern Europe Saltillo Rd. and the Great Plains and California in North America, native grasslands are dominated by perennial bunch grass species, whereas in warmer climates annual species form a greater component of the vegetatio

14th Street

14th Street

27th Street

Saltillo Rd.

WOODLAND:

Bachelor of Landscape Architecture / 133

Woodland is a low-density forest forming open habitats with plenty of


BLA 211

Studio II, Site Design

This second year studio is structured in a series of three interdependent assignments varying in scope and complexity. One exercises is located on the campus of Doane College, in Crete, NE. The second project is a new public space located in Lincoln’s downtown. Students analyze and design specific projects, considering both their physical and conceptual connections to the larger site context. The aim is for students to gain an understanding of the relationship of landscape to architecture at the site and urban scales; consider the effects of construction and ground manipulation on the perception and experience of space; and explore the possibilities of layering and transparency, enclosure and adjacencies, “in-between” spaces and connectors. Ultimately, the studio investigates the intersection of landscape design, architecture, and planning in the making of spaces within a public landscape. Sarah Thomas Karle Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture 134 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture

Colette Gruber


Nate Krohn 136 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture


Bachelor of Landscape Architecture / 137


Sal Lindquist 138 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture


Bachelor of Landscape Architecture / 139


BLA 230

Site Systems I, Materiality

This course is an introduction to the range of materials used in the built environment by landscape architects: metals, concrete, masonry, glass, plastics and wood. The organization of the class reflects the process oriented and interconnected qualities of landscape design. Rather than focus on material class or type of assembly, it engages the active processes of making, the functional qualities of assemblies as activated on site and the dynamic evolution of materials and material assemblies over the course of their life cycles. The course consists of lectures, group discussions, building exercises, field trips, independent research, drawing and computer drafting, experimentation and evaluation. Sarah Thomas Karle Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture

Matthew Macchietto 140 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture


142 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture


Bachelor of Landscape Architecture / 143


Alison Ingunza, Katie Naumann, and Kaylyn Neverve 144 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture


BLA 231

Site Systems II, Grading and Drainage

Site engineering has the power to coalesce the various components of a site into an integrative system. It is finally, the grounded, built, and cohesive realization of powerful ideas, cultural necessities, and environmental forces. Technical proficiency in understanding both construction technique and representation is a cornerstone of design literacy and a fundamental tool of design. The three primary components of site engineering to be addressed during this semester are Grading, Stormwater Management, and Roadway Alignment. Bret Betnar Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture

146 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture


BLa Third Year

Program of Landscape Architecture

Starting in the fall of the third year, projects increase in scale and complexity. Fall semester, students advance a second year design project by developing a set of construction drawings that include layout, grading, details and specifications. The spring semester studio in the third year challenges students by undertaking a semesterlong service-learning project at a community scale. In addition to the studio courses, students take courses in disciplinary knowledge (Introduction to Planning & Urbanism) and environmental sciences (Ecology & Plants II). The summer following the third year, students complete an approved internship as part of the professional requirements. Students also have the opportunity to participate in an international service-learning studio in Ecuador or FACT summer project. Kim Wilson, Interim Dean, Professor, and Program Director Landscape Architecture, Community and Regional Planning 148 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture


BLA 310

Studio III, Advanced Site Design

The aim of this studio is for students to gain an understanding of the relationships between landscape to architecture at multiple site scales; consider the effects of construction and ground manipulation on the perception and experience of space; and explore the possibilities of layering and transparency, enclosure and adjacencies, “in-between� spaces and connectors as they relate to building and site. Project types include campus plans, public open spaces, infrastructure and urban design. Sarah Thomas Karle Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture

150 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture


Sal Lindquist 152 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture


Bachelor of Landscape Architecture / 153


Alison Ingunza + Tara Meador Mark Hoistad and Kim Wilson Arch / Larc 411 | Urban Studio

Alison Ingunza and Tara Meador 154 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture


27th Street Folkways Blvd.

Bachelor of Landscape Architecture / 155


Peter Kisicki 156 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture


Bachelor of Landscape Architecture / 157


BLA 311

Studio IV, Community Planning and Design

Community Planning and Design Studio is an interdisciplinary, vertical studio where LARC students work alongside architecture and planning students. Through service-learning, the students engage rural communities in reciprocal partnerships to advance responsible design. Projects and partnerships are diverse and touch some of the most pressing social, civic, and ethical problems and opportunities across Nebraska. Past studios have addressed sustainability practices and energy conservation, agricultural and food literacy, changing demographics, community revitalization plans, flooding and stormwater management, green infrastructure, recreational resources and tourism, and rural quality of life. Kim Wilson Interim Dean, Professor, and Program Director Landscape Architecture, Community and Regional Planning 158 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture


Framework Plan

Heather Tomasek (left); Colette Gruber (right) 160 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture


Bachelor of Landscape Architecture / 161


Retail Space / Expansion 1600 sq. ft.

Retail Space / Expansion 1750 sq. ft.

Entrepreneurial Space 1500 sq. ft.

Art Gallery 1400 sq. ft.

Office

330 sq. ft.

Classroom 780 sq. ft.

Conference Room

Classroom

430 sq. ft.

Classroom

Classroom

810 sq. ft.

340 sq. ft.

Classroom 430 sq. ft.

780 sq. ft.

Office

320 sq. ft.

Restroom 165 sq. ft.

Lobby / Commons 1200 sq. ft.

Restroom 165 sq. ft.

Classroom 660 sq. ft.

Classroom 430 sq. ft.

Computer Lab 380 sq. ft.

Computer Lab 380 sq. ft.

Reception

Elizabeth Goll_M ARCH Lisa Major_M ARCH Chris Rokahr_M ARCH Matt Macchietto_LARC Heather Tomasek_M ARCH Dennis Krymuza_M ARCH Zach Klebba_M ARCH

Aaron Kloke_CRPL Brian Anderson_LARC Coelette Gruber_CRPL Jacob Kophamer_LARC Sarah Hanzel_CRPL Nate Krohn_LARC Kim Wilson_PROF

DOANE DOWNTOWN CAMPUS SITE PLAN N

“A ‘grassroots’ initiative led by Crete Community Breakfast Group that will result in a plan to revitalize this small rural town and impact change in the county.”

0’

10’

20’

40’

University of Nebraska - Lincoln_College of Architecture Interdisciplinary Studio_Fall 2012

Matthew Macchietto and Dennis Krymuza 162 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture


Bachelor of Landscape Architecture / 163


164 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture

Nate Krohn


BLA 330

Site Systems III, Implementation

Within the practice of landscape architecture there is often the desire to achieve simple, buildable and long-lasting solutions that also resonate with excitement and originality. Regardless of the grandness of an idea, to truly accomplish a design, one must have a practical plan to reach those ends. The development of construction drawings enable designers to communicate with other interests in the design process. Most importantly, they become a visual and annotated guidebook for the various contractors associated with any given project. This course invites students to think in greater detail about design and to consider the obstacles and opportunities that come with those decisions. Bret Betnar Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture

166 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture


Grading Plan

Planting Plan

Nate Krohn 168 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture


Composite Plan

Bachelor of Landscape Architecture / 169


BLa Fourth Year

Program of Landscape Architecture

Fourth-year students work together with students in other fields on projects that engage realworld issues such as stormwater management, brownfield remediation, climate change, rapid urbanization or cultural change. The final semester, students work individually alongside a faculty mentor on a capstone project where they have the opportunity to demonstrate a comprehensive, indepth knowledge on a selected topic in landscape architecture. Supporting the studio and capstone, students take courses in disciplinary knowledge (Research Methods & Professional Practice), professional electives (Greenroof Design, FACT, or Stormwater Management) and free electives. Kim Wilson, Interim Dean, Professor, and Program Director Landscape Architecture, Community and Regional Planning

170 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture


BLA 410

Studio V, Ecological Planning and Design

This course explores landscape architecture in relation to ecological and cultural landscape systems. Projects that emerge from research explore ecological design and the design and management of infrastructure and natural resources at both the site and regional scales. Bret Betnar Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture

172 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture


Project Overview

Master Plan Alternatives

Ecological Communities

Master Plan Alternative C Nort

hP

Geri

ng C

latt

City of Scottsbluff

eR

l

rth

iver Cen

ana

No

tral

Can

Ge

ring

al

Pla

tte

City of Scottsbluff Riv

er

Ce

ntr

Can

al

Mon

al C

umen

an

al

T

Unio

n Pa

cific

R.R.

B B Community Link Trail Boardwalk

t Valle

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Union

Old CCC Road

thwa

y

Pac

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il

) K ad ad Ro Ro ail ty Tr un n Co ego r O ld

(O

n Tra Orego

K d) ad oa Ro ail R r ty un n T Co ego Or

ld (O

B

Old Country Club Trail

Oregon Trail Experience eTrail

Country Club Road

North Overlook

Scotts Bluff

Scotts Bluff

City of Gering

City of Gering

South Overlook Parking

Oregon Trail Pathway

Saddle Rock Trail

The Ravines Trail Visitor Center

Visitor Center

Prairie View Trail

'U' Street

The Ravines eTrail South Bluff eTrail

South Bluff

Ore

gon

South Bluff

Ore

Tra il

gon

Tra il

Legend

Legend

Vehicular

Eroded Cliff Face/Badlands

Shrubland/Ravines

Sparsely Vegetated Slopes

Coniferous Woodland Riparian/Wetland

Pine-studded Bluffs

North

Native Prairie Grassland

174 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture

0

2,000 ft 1 : 24,000

B

T Tunnel

Existing Trails

Hiking

Existing City Trails

Cycling

Proposed Trails

Oregon Trail Route

Proposed eTrails

Oregon Trail Ruts

Bridge

Power Lines

Parking

Rail Road

Scotts Bluff National Monument Trail Master Plan, National Park Service

North

0

2,000 ft 1 : 24,000


Project Overview

Trail Experience

Master Plan Alternative C

The Ravines + (eTrail) No

rth

Ge

ring

Pla

tte

South Bluff (eTrail) 1

A

City of Scottsbluff

View From Visitor Center

Beginning From Existing Trail

Riv

er

Ce

ntr

Can

al

Mon

al C

umen

an

al

T

B B Community Link Trail Boardwalk

t Valle

y Pa

Union

Old CCC Road

thwa

y

2

B

Pac

ific R .R

.

Oreg ail

on Tr

) K ad ad Ro Ro ail ty Tr un n Co ego r O ld

(O

B

Old Country Club Trail

Oregon Trail Experience eTrail

Utilizing Existing Trail

eTrail Dispersed Trail Use

Country Club Road

North Overlook

C

Seclusion in The Ravines

3

View of Mitchell Pass

Scotts Bluff

City of Gering

South Overlook Parking

E

A

Oregon Trail Pathway

Saddle Rock Trail

Begin eTrail

B The Ravines Trail Visitor Center

Prairie View Trail

'U' Street

1 The Ravines eTrail

C D

5

D

Dispersed Trail Use

4

View of The Ravines and Agriculture

South Bluff eTrail

2

4 South Bluff

3

Ore

gon

Tra il

Legend Vehicular

B

Existing Trails

Hiking

Existing City Trails

Cycling

Proposed Trails

Oregon Trail Route

Proposed eTrails

Oregon Trail Ruts

Bridge

Power Lines

Parking

Rail Road

5

E

T Tunnel

North

0

2,000 ft 1 : 24,000

Connection Back to County Road K Utilizing Existing Trail

Connection to Visitor Center

Bachelor of Landscape Architecture / 175


BLA Capstone

Landscape Architecture Studio VI

The capstone experience is seen as the culmination of one’s study of landscape architecture. In their final year, students conduct a semester-long design project, initiated by the student and under the supervision and guidance of a faculty mentor. Students apply the skills and knowledge from their years of coursework in landscape architecture. Bret Betnar Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture

Paul Neukirch 176 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture


Fairfax Riverfront Trail


Land Cover Zones

Agriculture

Riparian Woodland and Wetland

Prairie Agriculture Wetland Grassland

Woodland Pump drainage 100’ fence offset

178 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture

Swale Crossing Pedestrian trail

Framework


Kansas NRCS Recommended Native Species

Prairie Aquatic Wildflowers

Hydrology Bachelor of Landscape Architecture / 179


Pump Water

Bike Path Sandbar

Missouri River

Fairfax Riverfront Trail 180 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture


Fairfax Riverfront Trail

Bachelor of Landscape Architecture / 181


Eric Silvey 182 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture


Bachelor of Landscape Architecture / 183


184 / Bachelor of Landscape Architecture


Bachelor of Landscape Architecture / 185


CoA Faculty To read more about our outstanding faculty and their research interests please visit (archweb.unl.edu). Architecture Jeffrey L. Day Wayne Drummond Chris Ford Rumiko Handa Steve Hardy Tim Hemsath Peter Hind Mark Hoistad David Karle Brian Kelly Nate Krug Sharon Kuska Thomas Laging Peter Olshavsky

186 / College of Architecture

Landscape Architecture Bret Betnar Steve Rodie Richard Sutton Sarah Thomas Kim Wilson

Interior Design Tom Allisma Lindsey Ellsworth-Bahe Betsy Gabb Mark Hinchman

Retired & Faculty Emeriti Community & Regional Bill Borner Duncan Case Planning Programs Robert Duncan Rodrigo Cantarero Ted Ertl Yunwoo Nam N. Brito Mutunayagam Gordon Scholz Jim Potter Zhenghong Tang Keith Sawyers Cecil Steward

LA + CRP Courtesy Appointments Charles Francis Ed Harvey Dennis McCallister Roy Spaulding Kim Todd Adjunct Faculty Emily Anderson Nathan Bicak Geoff DeOld Mike Hamilton David Hinsley Thomas Huston Molly Macklin Nate Miller Rachel Scheer Chip Stanley Matt Stoffel


CoA Hyde Chair of Excellence Established in 1986, the Hyde Chair of Excellence allows the College of Architecture to attract visiting faculty of national and international distinction. The Hyde Chair of Excellence position is available to designers, architects, and educators from a variety of backgrounds with outstanding and unique credentials. The visiting Hyde Chair attracts emerging voices in design from both practice and teaching. Through this endowment, renowned scholars and practitioners are invited to spend a semester or more in residence at the College, working with and teaching architecture, interior design, and planning students in studios, and in an informal mentor role. The Hyde Chair of Excellence was made possible by the generosity of Mrs. Flora Hyde in honor of the memory of her late husband, A. Leicester Hyde. Mr. Hyde was a 1925 graduate of Architecture and Engineering. 188 / College of Architecture


Daniel Fagerberg (2012-2013) Gina Ford Alan Berger Ulf Meyer Brian Andrews Chris Abel Doug Jackson Paul Preissner Johan Granberg Martin Hogue Julian Bonder Randy Brown Diane Lewis Jeffrey L. Day Hank Hildebrandt William Carpenter Dan Pitera Ron Shiffman Kenneth Reardon

Teresa Cordova Robert Bullard Javier Navarro Susan Sanders Jane Malkin Mark Mack Roger Schluntz Jim Jennings Lawrence Susskind Bruce Stiftel James Richardson John Forester Shirley Blumberg William Turnbull Alan H. Colquhoun Anthony Ames Philip Thiel Michael Sorkin David Gosling

Ivor Richards Bruce Graham Robert Barbach Robert Evans Terry Rankine Charles Redmon Tom Wang Rick Lamb Larry Young Ken DeMay Tsukasa Yamashita David Lewis Tobias Faber Ralph Rapson Wolff Prix Christine Hawley Peter Cook Joseph Esherick (Fall 1986)

College of Architecture / 189


CoA High School Workshop

Career Explorations in Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Interior Design

Each summer, the College hosts a workshop developed specifically for high school students. This workshop provides a unique experience to investigate issues surrounding design and learn more about the design professions of architecture, landscape architecture and interior design. The workshop provides learning opportunities in the form of design studio explorations, seminars and discussions, field trips and video presentations. The central focus of the workshop is a design studio where design issues are explored and creative energies are nurtured. As part of the workshop students will visit professional offices, learn about various career opportunities, and develop fundamental skills necessary for the study of design.

190 / College of Architecture

Students who have completed two or more years of their high school education and have an interest in architecture, landscape architecture or interior design are encouraged to apply. You do not need courses in art or drafting in order to participate. Applicants will be selected on the basis of a review of materials submitted with the application procedure. We have reserved space for 36 students in the workshop and applications are due in April of each year. http://architecture.unl.edu/programs/arch/hs_ workshop.shtml


CoA Internship The College of Architecture strongly encourages students in all fields to seek internships with professional offices during their time at UNL. Internships allow students to earn academic credit during the summer while gaining valuable, paid experience in their chosen discipline or a related field. Each spring the College organizes a career fare to help introduce students to potential employers representing professional offices in all of our constituent disciplines. At the fair, students interested in temporary internships and full-time jobs meet with potential employers and make valuable connections with local, national and international firms. Summer internships often lead to offers of full-time employment after graduation. For Architecture students, internships provide opportunities to begin earning credit towards professional licensure as part of the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards’s (NCARB) Intern Development Program. See http:// www.ncarb.org for more details. To facilitate this, the College has an IDP representative on the faculty 192 / College of Architecture

who advises students about IDP, internship and professional licensure. Students may start earning IDP credit from professional experience as soon as they enroll in the professional Architecture program but most start the internship experience after the 3rd or 4th year and continue during summers while working toward the graduate M.Arch degree. For Interior Design students, the required internship takes place in the summer between the 3rd and 4th years. Most interns work for design firms; those who work in related retail sectors acquire valuable knowledge about a material, product or service. For Landscape Architecture students, the required internship takes place in the summer between the 3rd and 4th years and may extent into the fall semester. Most interns work for small to large design firms as well as local, state, and federal governmental agencies.


CoA Student Organizations AIAS, Alpha Ro Chi, ASLA, ASID, IIDA

The student body at the College of Architecture is actively involved in an extensive array of organizations. These organizations, on both the local and national levels, keep our students current in the growing dialogue and issues confronting our profession today. AIAS - American Institute of Architecture Students AIAS is the official student body organization in the Architecture Program. As the liaison between the students and practicing professionals, the organization provides close contact with the American Institute of Architects and its members as well as student organizations from other universities. ASID - American Society of Interior Designers Students in the interior design program are eligible for membership in the student chapter of the

194 / College of Architecture

American Society of Interior Designers and upon graduation may become allied members of the professional organization. ASLA - Student American Society of Landscape Architects As the liaison between the students and practicing professionals, the organization provides close contact with the local chapter - Great Plains, American Society of Landscape Architects as well as the national chapter - American Society of Landscape Architects. The ASLA makes recommendations to the program, hosts visiting speakers, and organizes various activities. All students in the program are encouraged to actively participate in the organization.


CoA Student Organizations AIAS, Alpha Ro Chi, ASLA, ASID, IDA

APX - Alpha Rho Chi Alpha Rho Chi (APX) is the national coeducational professional fraternity for students of architecture and the allied arts. It is represented at the University of Nebraska by the Pytheos Chapter. Alpha Rho Chi aims to unite students in fellowship in order to promote their artistic, scientific, and practical proficiency. It serves as a catalyst toward achieving academic excellence and professional development within a framework of fraternal opportunities. It also participates in collegiate and community service projects which strive to improve the general welfare and environment of our society. Alpha Rho Chi offers a challenging, stimulating, and rewarding academic and fraternal experience which helps prepare its individual members for responsible participation as leaders in their chosen professional and community life.

196 / College of Architecture

TSD - Tau Sigma Delta Tau Sigma Delta is a national architectural and allied arts honorary society. The purpose of Tau Sigma Delta is to emphasize scholarship, leadership, and character; to stimulate mental achievement and effort; and to acknowledge those students who attain high scholastic standing in architecture and the allied arts of design, by the reward of membership.


CoA Education Abroad The College of Architecture offers various opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students to study abroad. From a 3-week summer intensive experience to traveling studios and semester exchanges abroad. Long standing programs include:

Tianjin, China 2011

Ecuador, South America London, England Paris, France Hannover, Germany Clemont-Ferrand, France Dublin, Ireland Tianjin, China Paris, France 2012 198 / College of Architecture


London, England 2013 College of Architecture / 199


Paris, France 2012

200 / College of Architecture


Ecuador - Galapagos Islands, South America, 2013

College of Architecture / 201


Lincoln is the happiest place in the U.S. Lincoln topped 188 other metropolitan areas in the 2012 Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index, which tallies scores in six measures of well-being.


University of Nebraska - Lincoln

College of Architecture If you would like to receive more information on these programs or schedule a campus visit please contact us. Undergraduate Admissions Coordinator 232 Architecture Hall West University of Nebraska-Lincoln Lincoln NE 68588-0107 USA 402-472-4065 architecture2@unl.edu Printed July 2013


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