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donors support evolution and expansion of programs

medical milestones

Baldwin Family Home Hemodialysis Unit

Donation Sends More Patients Home A leadership gift from the Mathew and Betty-Jean Baldwin Foundation matched the University Hospital Foundation’s commitment to support the physicians’ vision for the dialysis program; to give more patients the opportunity to dialyze at home. Combined, the $2 million investment will allow for the purchase of 45 additional home hemodialysis machines.

Heinz Melle receives help from his wife, Edith, in administering home hemodialysis. Expansion of the program means that more dialysis patients like Heinz can receive the treatment they need in the comfort of their own homes.

Facts About Home Hemodialysis ➤

Hemodialysis helps failing kidneys filter metabolic toxins and excess fluid from blood.

In-hospital dialysis requires a minimum of three, four-hour visits per week.

Nocturnal home dialysis allows patients to receive therapy as they sleep. Spread over five to six nights per week, the treatment is less intense than in-hospital treatment, and far less intrusive in the lives of the patients.

Research shows that nocturnal home dialysis offers survival rates similar to kidney-transplant recipients, typically in the range of 10 – 12 years. By comparison, fewer than 40 per cent of patients on in-hospital hemodialysis survive five years.

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After working a full day, kidney-disease patient Rick Lavalley would check in at the University of Alberta Hospital four times a week for four hours of life-saving dialysis. By the end of the week, he was exhausted. So when Rick’s doctors presented the opportunity to dialyze at home while he slept, Rick quickly answered, “Where do I sign?” Rick’s employers and close family friends, Mathew and Betty-Jean Baldwin, saw the difference the home treatments made, and wanted to provide more dialysis patients with the opportunity to go home.

Patients feel better, have fewer dietary restrictions and can enjoy improved health, more personal freedom and a higher quality of life. “Home hemodialysis is making the transition from what was fringe therapy at first to what we now view as mainstream therapy,” explains Dr. Robert Pauly, a kidney specialist with the Northern Alberta Renal Program (NARP). “Here’s an opportunity to get your therapy during downtime while you’re sleeping rather than getting treatment according to someone else’s schedule.” The Baldwins have long been associated with generosity and community spirit. Active in Edmonton’s business community for over 50 years, Matt also served on the Board of Directors of the Edmonton Eskimos for nine years and is a two-time winner of The Brier in Canadian Men’s Curling. Betty-Jean has been a volunteer, friend and supporter with the University Hospital Foundation’s Festival of Trees since its inaugural event in 1985. Hemodialysis helps failing kidneys filter metabolic toxins and excess fluid from blood. In-clinic dialysis requires that patients travel, often long distances, to a clinic to receive the four-hour treatment a minimum of three times a week. In between treatments, fluid and toxins build up in the blood, causing increased blood pressure, bloating, extreme fatigue and muscle weakness. This intense time commitment takes patients away from their families, limits their travel, and significantly impacts their quality of life. With nocturnal home hemodialysis, patients connect themselves to the equipment as they retire for the night, five or six nights a week. This slower, gentler form of dialysis is easier on the body than the faster, daytime treatments. This means patients feel better, have fewer dietary restrictions and can enjoy improved health, more personal freedom and a higher quality of life.

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL FOUNDATION ANNUAL REPORT 2011 / 2012

University Hospital Foundation Annual Report  

University Hospital Foundation Annual Report

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