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OPINIONS

The University Star Mikala Everett Opinions Editor @mikala_maquella

UniversityStar.com @universitystar

COMIC

ILLUSTRATION BY ISREAL GONZALEZ

RACE

Black Lives Matter—globally

ILLUSTRATION BY ALYSSA CURRY

By Mikala Everett Opinions Editor @mikala_maquella To be honest, I am extremely tired of writing about why black lives should mean something to the rest of the world. I should not have to argue that I have the right to be

alive. There have been two more black men killed in the past week, and in the same breadth a column was published on CNN arguing the Black Lives Matter movement is only about American black lives. Before I get into the fallacy of Vava Tampa’s

column, I would like to stress, once again, all lives are important. black lives, white lives, Hispanic, Asian and all other ethnicities and demographics are included in the phrase “Black Lives Matter.” By asserting that the lowest common denominator in society is important, everyone else’s

value is affirmed. Thanks to European colonialism’s concept of race, black people are victims in society everywhere—not just in America. So when Tampa begins his argument by stating, “When people say ‘Black Lives Matter,’ what they really mean is that Black American Lives

Matter,” I can’t help but roll my eyes. The Black Lives Matter group was started in America on American soil. Since it began in America, obviously the group’s focus would be on what is happening in its immediate area, first and foremost. Yes, black people are being slaughtered in Congo, Brazil and across the world, but how will Americans help them if we cannot help ourselves? To argue the Black Lives Matter movement does not care about black lives in other countries is asinine at best. People tend to care more about things in their immediacy because the impact will be greater on their lives. I’m not worried about being raped in Congo because I do not live there. I am worried I will be pulled over by the wrong cop, on the wrong day and ending up as another dead black American. That may seem like a selfish assertion and in part it is, but if a cop in America kills me, how will I help black lives in places like Africa and Brazil? Of course, black lives in other countries are important—no one person involved in Black Lives

Matter has said that they are not. If anything, those proactive in social justice will be more concerned about the social injustice in other countries, but are preoccupied trying to mend things at home. The Black Lives Matter group has been fragmented since its inception, with members in cities all over the United States fighting for change within their own communities. Because the organization uses a localized, grass-roots approach to protest, it is up to local branches to call for change overseas—and they have been doing just that. For many Americans, Black Lives Matter protests are not out of moral outrage as Tampa would argue, but they are personal demonstrations for fear of our friends and family being hung next on the hanging tree. All lives matter in every nook and cranny of the world. For Tampa to reason that Americans do not care about other countries is an overgeneralization and is extremely unfair. Everyone has the right to live. -Mikala Everett is a mass communications junior

GENDER

Female masturbation should not be taboo By Bridgett Reneau @bridgelynnn Opinions Columnist Sitting down to write about my gender’s sexuality is uncomfortable for me, and it should not be. When I think of typing the word “masturbate” as an act performed by fellow females, the urge to shut my laptop makes it awkward to press the keys. The chronic unease regarding female sexuality is only a testament to the patriarchal ideology of the society we live in—a culture that encourages men to openly express their sexual urges and demoralizes women who do the same. “As a young woman, you don’t learn how to pleasure yourself, you don’t learn what an orgasm should be, you don’t learn that you should have feelings of satisfaction,” actress Shailene Woodley declared in her recent interview with “NetA-Porter” magazine. “If masturbation were taught in schools, I wonder how many [fewer] people would get herpes (at) age 16, or pregnant at 14.” Woodley is not alone in her stance against the

current state of sexual inequality. In 1994, Surgeon General Joycelyn Elders delivered strikingly similar viewpoints. Masturbation “is something that is a part of human sexuality and it’s a part of something that should perhaps be taught,” Elders stated in a 1994 AIDS conference. Soon after the statement was made, she unwillingly resigned from her position as surgeon general because President Bill Clinton reportedly said, “she had to go.” While the idea of masturbation is taboo in itself, the notion of female masturbation is regarded to be essentially unmentionable in our mainstream culture. “To social conservatives, [female masturbation] seems downright dangerous,” writer Ann Friedman, insists. “What’s left to hold our society and nuclear family structure together if even women like sex more than they like babies? There’s no purer example of this than a woman enjoying [masturbation]. And so it remains taboo.” Blogger Daniella Fleischer agrees, “As a culture, we allow men to be agents of

The University Star Editor-in-Chief..................................................Emily Sharp, stareditor@txstate.edu News Editor............................................Bailey Buckingham, starnews@txstate.edu Sports Editor.........................................Autumn Anderson, starsports@txstate.edu Lifestyle Editor......................................Denise Cervantes, starlifestyle@txstate.edu Opinions Editor.........................................Mikala Everett, staropinion@txstate.edu Multimedia Editor..................................Lara Dietrich, starmultimedia@txstate.edu Copy Desk Chief.....................................Claire Abshier, starcopychief@txstate.edu Design Editor...........................................Jessica Strickland, stardesign@txstate.edu

ILLUSTRATION BY MARIA TAHIR

their own sexuality, while women we prefer as objects to be consumed by those agents.” The idea of a woman being comfortable enough to enjoy an orgasm is a threat to society’s current ideology. It also threatens men’s sexual security, which is usually derived from the false belief that they are sexually superior to females. A woman who knows her body is a woman unable to be manipulated. This

goes against the grain of patriarchy, which seeks to keep women subservient to their male counterparts using the guise of biological evidence. But a woman who knows her body is necessary. She is able to make powerful, intelligent decisions. If we began to encourage women to explore their bodies and learn about the way they work, we would likely see immense societal benefits. In Germany, where sex-

ual education is mandatory in schools, and even covers topics such as “the path to orgasm,” the teen birth rate is drastically lower than the United States. The U.S. has a teen birth rate of 52.8 pregnancies for every 1,000 teenagers, where Germany’s rate is 8.2 babies for every 1,000 teens. These statistics prove that educating people about sexuality is beneficial in reducing unwanted pregnancies, as Shailene Woodley

and Joycelyn Elders suggested. Rather than live in fear that awareness of sex and masturbation will somehow poison the minds of young people, we ought to be aware and proactive. Teach people that sexuality is nothing to be afraid or ashamed of. -Bridgett Reneau is a psychology junior.

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Tuesday, September 27, 2016  
Tuesday, September 27, 2016  
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