Page 3

The University Star | Tuesday, November 18, 2014 | 3

SPORTS

UniversityStar.com

FOOTBALL Quick Five is a new University Star segment in which Sports Editor Quixem

Ramirez and Paul Livengood tackle five quick-hitting questions regarding the Texas State football team. Texas State in the uncomfortable spot of needing a late touchdown to tie.

3. I think 35 attempts are a

By Paul Livengood SPORTS REPORTER @IamLivengood

1. The

inability to take advantage of the Jaguars’ turnovers. The Bobcats were practically given the game in the first quarter alone via fumbles on three straight drives that gave them a short field. After South Alabama took the lead, sophomore quarterback Hunter Vaughn threw an interception, which the Bobcats returned to the South Alabama 25-yard line. With a short field once again, the Bobcats only managed a field goal.

2. The

turning point in the game was the 10-play, 63-yard touchdown drive in the fourth quarter to give the Jaguars a 24-17 lead. This was the first moment in the entire game that South Alabama was in the lead and served as a big morale boost for the Jaguars. It was their longest drive of the game and put

bit excessive, but I think 30 is a good number. The run game is definitely the Bobcats’ bread and butter, but I think a 50-50 pass attempt/ rush attempt ratio is ideal. It is certainly noticeable that Jones has matured as a passer over the past two seasons, and when he passes often in games, he seems to be more in rhythm with his receivers.

4. They key to beating Ar-

kansas State will be stopping the run. If the Bobcat defense that showed up to the Georgia Southern game shows up, then I believe they can beat the Red Wolves. On the other hand, if the Bobcat defense from the rest of thee season shows up, it’s a long shot.

5. I don’t see the defense

showing up in this game. I think with the short week and the Red Wolves just being the better team, the Bobcats will lose their final home game 34-24. Aside from the Georgia Southern game, the Bobcats’ run defense has not been up to par. The Red Wolves average 214.7 rushing yards per game, which ranks 31st in the nation.

1. THE BOBCATS EITHER LED OR TIED THE JAGUARS THE ENTIRE GAME UNTIL THE FOURTH QUARTER. WHAT LED TO THE BOBCATS LOSING THE GAME? 2. WHAT WAS THE TURNING POINT? 3. THE BOBCATS ARE 0-4 THIS SEASON WHILE SOPHOMORE QUARTERBACK TYLER JONES ATTEMPTS OVER 35 PASSES IN A GAME. IS THERE SOMETHING TO THIS NUMBER? 4. WHAT’S THE KEY TO BEATING ARKANSAS STATE? 5. WILL THE BOBCATS WIN AGAINST ARKANSAS STATE?

By Quixem Ramirez SPORTS EDITOR @quixem

1. The

offense disappeared. Texas State averaged 5.2 yards per play in the first half and 3.1 yards per play in the second half. The precipitous efficiency drop is indicative of an offense that didn’t generate the big play, with only three plays over 20 yards in the second half. Even with the benefit of a short field, Texas State still stalled. Losing the lead was inevitable.

2. South

Alabama’s first touchdown. The Jaguars’ double pass play, incorporating sophomore quarterback Hunter Vaughn as a receiver, set the tone for the rest of the game. Vaughn settled down, the running game excelled and the defense didn’t give an inch.

3. Definitely.

The offense isn’t equipped to handle a strenuous passing workload. When the team is pressed

into throwing over 35 times, it’s driven by context and not design. Co-Offensive Coordinator Mike Schultz still refers to Tyler Jones, sophomore quarterback, as a “game manager.” You don’t want a game manager flinging the ball all over the field, especially when his receivers aren’t consistently getting separation. Texas State has opened up the playbook, but the running game remains the bedrock of the offense.

4. Arkansas

State has few blemishes. The Red Wolves outscore opponents by 8.5 points per game, the second-highest differential in the conference. (http://sunbeltsports.org/custompages/fbstats/2014/conf ldrs. htm) You have to nitpick to find a legitimate flaw in this team. The key is winning the turnover margin because Arkansas State is a conference best plus-7 in turnover differential. Possessions are a valuable currency, especially against the Red Wolves.

5. No,

though it will be close. Both teams are playing on a short week, and Arkansas State is more vulnerable in that setting. The Sun Belt Conference is difficult to predict week-to-week and the Bobcats, habitual players in close margin games, are no different.

BY THE NUMBERS: COACH KAREN CHISUM

61.1 MARIAH MEDINA ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR

34

years coaching the Texas State program, the longest tenured coach

Career winning percentage

7

Regular season team championships

6th

winningest active Division I volleyball coach

8

Tournament team championships

14th

winningest active Division I volleyball coach

23.5

wins per season, as of today

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

BOBCATS PULL FROM EXPERIENCES AGAINST DUSTDEVILS FOR FUTURE VICTORIES By Brittnie Curtis SPORTS REPORTER @BrittnieeNicole The Bobcats can’t go bowling. After failing to earn their sixth win against South The Texas State women’s basketball team will take on the Texas Tech Red Raiders in Lubbock following its season-opening victory against Texas A&M International. The last game against Texas A&M International was the perfect opportunity for the Bobcats to implement their offensive and defensive plans. Associate Head Coach Susan Serafini said the game was just what the Bobcats needed to get the season started. “We reached out to Texas A&M International last year after they won the Heartland Conference championship at 19-9, and they were gracious enough

to say yes, and for us it was a great start,” Serafini said. “They have a solid player in Keiona Mathews, and certainly Jessica Prieto stepped up, and that gave us two different looks that we’re going to have to contend with when we go to a very physical, very fast and very big Texas Tech Team.” Texas Tech’s team consists of eight new players with five returning. This is the first full recruiting class for second-year head coach Candace Whitaker. “It’s a brand-new team,” Serafini said. “They’ve got eight new players in uniform and have gone through a program transformation with the coaching change last year, so they’re working on their identity and who they’re becoming. I can guarantee that (Whitaker) is going to have them playing very physical, very rough and very solid for a

DENISE CATHEY ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR

full 40 minutes.” The Bobcats will need to pay attention to senior forward Kelsie Baker. Baker tied her career-high of 18 points in the Red Raiders’ 67-59 victory against Jacksonville State. Unlike Texas A&M International, Texas Tech ben-

efits from its size. Baker, like four other of her teammates, is over six feet tall, making the average height for the team 6-foot-1-inch. Kileah Mays, junior center, Carrie Kirchner, sophomore center and Jacqueline Jeffcoat are the only Bobcats over six feet, bringing

the team’s average height to 5-foot-9-inches. “We go from a very undersized team at the moment to a very tall team with Texas Tech,” Serafini said. “It’s going to be a very different look for us.” Whitaker is known for her toughness on the court, and

Serafini says it’s something the Bobcats have been preparing for. Serafini plans on improving containment against the Red Raiders by maintaining control of the offense and being more flexible defensively.

November 18 2014  
November 18 2014  
Advertisement