Page 1

2016–2017 Issue 1

Art & Design at USF


MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

Bigger Thinking— Rooted in the Liberal Arts

Why did I choose to write about this in my

column? First of all, it’s an important, “mission-critical” part of who we are. As importantly and more directly, I wanted to assure you that the liberal arts

Dear Members of the USF Family,

are alive and well, and thriving at USF. Indeed, this issue of Engaging Mind & Spirit provides ample

Welcome to the latest issue of Engaging Mind &

evidence of that. While this issue focuses on art

Spirit—our University of St. Francis magazine and one

and design at the university, those of you who have

way that we strive to remain connected to you:

been on campus in the past few years know that

our alumni, our friends, our parents, our employees,

we also have hundreds of students and community

and our supporters…in short, our USF family.

members engaged in our musical (vocal and instru-

mental) ensembles, as well as in other performing

Our mission statement begins with “As a Catholic

University rooted in the liberal arts,” so we are “up front” about the fact that we aspire to educate

arts productions (plays and musicals). I promise we’ll feature all this in an upcoming issue!

the whole student. That means we educate them with

not only the depth of knowledge necessary in

and enjoy this latest update about what’s happening

their major fields of study but also the breadth of

at your USF. And, as always, please know that I

knowledge that will prepare them to live a full

continue to consider myself incredibly blessed to

and fulfilling life. Indeed, one description of a liberally-

serve as your president and promise to work

educated individual (admittedly, shared at a

hard to earn the trust that you have placed in me.

So, pour yourself a cup of coffee, sit back,

conference of liberal arts college administrators) is

Arvid C. Johnson, Ph.D. President University of St. Francis

that s/he is interesting to speak with at a cocktail party even after they’ve turned 40!

At USF, our General Education or “GenEd”

curriculum seeks to ensure that every student receives a well-rounded education—one that includes literacy, literary inquiry and aesthetic awareness, numerical understanding and scientific inquiry, historical understanding, social awareness, philosophical inquiry, and religious foundations. These studies will prepare our students to be responsible, contributing members of society both today and into the unknown and unpredictable future. Indeed—and with the benefit of “wisdom” that I didn’t have when I was in college— I speak often with our students about how incredibly fortunate they are to study at a school that encourages (insists!) that they sometimes leave their comfort zone and explore the full range…the full beauty…of human knowledge and our world. Through that exploration, we hope they come to more fully understand not only themselves but also our God. I also use these conversations as a chance to encourage students to “pick up a minor (or two)” in a field (or two) outside their major!

Peace and all good things,


IN TH IS IS S U E

Engaging Mind & Spirit is published three times each academic year. Feedback is welcomed and can be sent to Julie Futterer ’93, Director of Marketing Services: 815-740-3826 or jfutterer@stfrancis.edu Content Michael “Chester” Alamo-Costello Michael Austin Julie Futterer Michelle Madura Katie Smith Other USF employees, students & friends Imagery Bersano Photography Cherry Hill Studios Michael “Chester” Alamo-Costello Julie Futterer Other USF employees, students & friends

11 FEATUR E STO RY

Art & Design at the University of St. Francis 2 USF N EWS

4

3 CAL EN DAR O F E V E NTS 8 CO L L EG E O F ARTS & SCIE NCE S 9 CO L L EG E O F BUSINE SS &

16

HEALTH ADM IN I STRATION

Design Adam Middleton Printing & Distribution Courier Graphics / CEREUS—Phoenix Please help us in our efforts to reduce waste. If this is an incorrect address for the intended recipient, if you no longer wish to receive this publication or want to receive it electronically, contact Amanda Quinn, Director of the Annual Fund, at 815-740-4271 or aquinn@ stfrancis.edu to update your records.

10 CO L L EG E O F ED U CATION 11 L EACH CO L L EG E OF NU RSING 12 THE FIG HTIN G SAINTS 13 FAITH, M IS SIO N & DIV E RSIT Y 14 IN TER N ATIO N AL PROGRAMS 15 G IVIN G BACK 16 S TAYIN G CO N N ECTE D

ON THE COVER Instructor Paul Hopkin works with a ceramic student completing her general education requirement in Aesthetic Awareness.

Our Mission As a Catholic university rooted in the liberal arts, we are a welcoming community of learners challenged by Franciscan values and charism, engaged in a continuous pursuit of knowledge, faith, wisdom, and justice, and ever mindful of a tradition that emphasizes reverence for creation,

University of St. Francis 500 Wilcox Street, Joliet, Illinois 60435 800-735-7500 / stfrancis.edu

compassion, and peace-making. We strive for academic excellence in all programs, preparing women and men to contribute to the world through service and leadership.

A Year of Compassion / 2016–2017

1


USF N EWS

USF Accrues New Rankings

The University of St. Francis has accrued several impressive new rankings by organizations who monitor and rate higher education institutions. From academic programs to test scores to campus safety, University of St. Francis continues to float high on the scale for excellence and reliability among other private, Catholic colleges.

“The University of St. Francis is pleased that its commitment to student success—whether

in terms of retention and graduation rates or in terms of in-field job placement—continues to be recognized in national rankings such as these,” commented USF President, Arvid Johnson. “Preparing students to contribute to the world through service and leadership is not only essential to our mission but also a critical part of our value proposition.”

Niche.com ranked nearly 1,000

USF has received attention for its

School by Victory Media since

carries a lot of weight. It recog-

colleges with enrollments of

outstanding job placement rates,

2011. The Military Friendly

nizes the high caliber students

less than 5,000 full-time students

often correlated to excellent test

distinction is only earned by the

that choose St. Francis, it also

gave selected schools a “best

scores on required assessment and

top 15% of colleges, universities

recognizes how satisfied students

small colleges” distinction. USF

licensure exams in certain career

and trade schools that are doing

are in choosing the university

placed sixth of the 25 schools

fields. The 2015 Leach College of

the most to embrace America’s

and the successful outcomes our

chosen. Factors such as accep-

Nursing class achieved a 97% pass

military service members, veterans

students enjoy through gradua-

tance rate, quality of professors,

rate on their National Council

and spouses as students and

tion,” notes Chuck Beutel,

student debt, alumni earnings,

Licensure Exam (NCLEX). In

ensure their success on campus.

Vice President for Admission and

student surveys, diversity and

addition, the 2015–16 College of

campus quality were considered.

Education graduating classes

In its 2016 Student Success

Enrollment Services.

earned a 100% first-time pass rate

Ratings, national research firm

For the fifth year in a row, USF

USF is listed as the fourth safest

on the state mandated Ed-TPA

Eduventures named the University

has been honored as a 2016–17

school in Illinois of the 25 schools

performance assessment, which

of St. Francis among the top

Catholic College of Distinction

selected from 1,600 colleges and

measures a novice teacher’s ability

20 National Private Masters

by collegesofdistinction.com.

universities. Campus crime rates,

to positively impact student

institutions in the U.S. Eduventures

Colleges of Distinction

local crime analysis and student

learning. Most recently, the 2016

analyzed more than 1,100

are honored for providing

opinion were among the factors

Physician Assistant class in

institutions based in the United

an innovative,

considered.

Albuquerque, N.M. received a 100%

States and compared a predicted

engaging

pass rate on the P.A. National

retention rate based on academics,

experience to

University of St. Francis’s commit-

Certification Exam (PANCE). P.A.

affordability and social factors

students that

ment in making our campus

graduates saw a 100% job

with reported retention rates.

prepares them

a safe and secure place to study,

placement rate.

Findings were categorized into

for successful

research/doctoral, masters, and

careers, active

“This ranking speaks to the

live and work, with our proactive efforts in safeguarding the

USF was ranked #29 for Best

baccalaureate in both public and

citizenship

well-being of our entire university

Colleges for Veterans in the

private sectors.

and lifelong

community,” states Joe Kripp,

Midwest by U.S. News & World

learning.

director of USF’s Safety, Security &

Report. The university has also

respected national, independent,

Transportation Department.

been deemed a Military Friendly

higher education research firm

“This ranking by a highly

FOR A FULL LIST OF PAST AND PRESENT RANKINGS, PLEASE VISIT STFRANCIS.EDU/NATIONALLY-RANKED.

2

Engaging Mind & Spirit Magazine


September 2016

SUM M ER IN T H E C I T Y F O R G O L D E N A PP L E S CH O L A R S

2

Alumni: 3rd Annual Saints Twilight 5K Invitational

5

USF Art Gallery: Jennifer Cronin “Spectacularly Ordinary” Opens (through Oct. 21)

8

Online Information Session for Adult Degree Completion & Graduate Students

9

Leach College of Nursing “Blessing of the Hands” Ceremony

24

Alumni Network Meetings

24–25 Homecoming/Reunion Weekend 2016 and Football Game vs. Robert Morris University

Six USF teacher candidates worked to prepare for their future in the

October 2016

Estefani Gonzalez, Mallory Johnson, Esmeralda Melero, Cristal Munguia,

2

Music at Moser: Senior Recital—Claire Halbur, Soprano

3–7

Feast of St. Francis Week at USF

6

USF Art Gallery: Artist Lecture with Jennifer Cronin

Music at Moser: Faculty Recital—Jiafeng Yan, Classical Piano

7

USF’s Annual Day of Giving—stfrancis.edu/dayofgiving

Alumni: Family Mass

10

Bernie Campus Visit Day

14

Alumni: Student Alumni Mentoring (SAM) Inaugural Dinner

15

Make & Take Education Alumni Professional Development Day, Sponsored by REAL

18

Alumni: Chicagoland Brewery Crawl

26

Open House for Transfer, Degree Completion & Graduate Students

28

Music at Moser: Javier Calderon

29

Freshman and Transfer Nursing Campus Visit Day

31

USF Art Gallery: Tytia Habing “This Is Boy” Opens (through Dec. 2)

Kaitlyn Utsch, Irma Sandoval Vizcaino and Ashley Vollmer participated at various stages of the specialized program, which provided as many as 700 more hours of observation and pre-service student teaching than traditionally prepared teachers receive.

The Golden Apple Scholars program is unique to the state of Illinois.

It attracts high school seniors and first- and second-year college students who possess the drive and skill to become excellent teachers in high-need schools. In addition to the summer institutes, the Golden Apple Scholars program provides tuition funding, job placement assistance, and mentoring from Golden Apple Award-winning teachers. The Golden Apple Scholars program is a perfect complement to USF’s curriculum and enhances the personal level of attention received at USF with a statewide network of passionate educators.

“We know that teacher candidates will be more successful if they draw

upon a wide variety of resources, engage with expanded circles of colleagues, and learn from experienced mentors,” explains Tracy Spesia, Field Experience Coordinator and School Partnership Liaison for the College of Education. “The Golden Apple is a strong complement to the network that USF provides, and we are delighted to connect candidates to these additional supports.”

GRA N D O PEN IN G O F G UA RD I A N A N G E L H ALL

USF celebrated the grand opening of Guardian Angel Hall on August 17 with more than 200 people in attendance. The ribbon-cutters, from left to right: Candice Rosen, USF trustee; Arvid Johnson, USF president; Larry Walsh, Will County Executive; Sr. Dolores Zemont, OSF, president of the Sisters of St. Francis of Mary Immaculate; Jessica Farrell, LCON student; Natalie Manley, state representative, John Leach; Jane Leach Winger; Susan Leach; Steven Winger; Debra Bacharz, LCON faculty member; Bob O’Dekirk, mayor of Joliet; Sr. Joyce Shanabarger, OSF, general community leader of the Franciscan Sisters of the Sacred Heart; and Art Scheuber, USF Board of Trustees vice chairperson.

C ALE N DA R O F E V E N TS

classroom through the Golden Apple Scholars Summer Institute.

November 2016 2

Alumni: Disciplinary Literacy—“Creating Natural and Authentic Engagement in the Disciplines” (EAN)

4

Music at Moser: Junior Recital—Chloe Miller, Viola

5

Alumni Network Meetings

6

Freshman Campus Visit Day

9

USF Art Gallery: Artist Lecture with Tytia Habing

10

Alumni: “Understanding Your Health Care Options” Panel Discussion (BAN)

10–12 Music at Moser: Fall Play “The Butler Did It” 12

Distinguished Alumni Brunch & Awards Ceremony

25th Annual English Language and Literatures Conference

13

Music at Moser: Senior Recital—Kaleigh Jerkatis, Piano

15

Transfer Registration

National Philanthropy Day

18

Music at Moser: Vocal Jazz Ensemble featuring the USF Swingin’ Saints

22

Music at Moser: Student Recital I

December 2016 1

Music at Moser: Student Recital II

3

Alumni: Breakfast with Santa

3–4

Music at Moser: 12th Annual Holiday Concert with Joliet Symphony Orchestra at USF

4

Alumni: Christmas Caroling Service Day

9–10

Music at Moser: Christmas at the Motherhouse: 25 Years of Choral Music

16

Leach College of Nursing Honors and Pinning Ceremony

26

Illinois High School Art Competition & Exhibition Opens (through Jan. 21)

For more detailed information or to confirm any changes that may occur with these scheduled events, visit stfrancis.edu/usf-calendar.


From modest to masterpiece: ART & DESIGN at the University of St. Francis

4

Engaging Mind & Spirit Magazine


The University of St. Francis has some secrets. Tales have been told through the years about haunted tunnels, hidden elevators, and other mysterious spaces that have long captivated curious students and employees alike.

With all that said, how many alumni readers can remember trekking to the

4th floor of Tower Hall and peering up the dark, narrow stairway leading up to the bell tower, shuddering and wondering, “What’s up there?” If you were enrolled in Karen Kietzman’s ceramics courses in the early- to mid-90s, you would have known. For others, perhaps sheer bravery answered your inquiry.

T

he creative and fine arts have long been a general education

history and theory, and advanced photography practices. Multi-level

foundation for the university and its College of Arts &

studio courses in drawing, painting, typography, and studio practice are

Sciences. Art classes have been taught since the university’s

offered each semester. Class sizes currently range from 8–15 students

inception, with a formal program first established in 1930.

in studio courses to roughly 25 students in lecture classes. Recent facility

Classes at that time focused on art history and traditional studio courses,

improvements have also led to a professionally-outfitted woodshop,

such as painting and drawing. In the subsequent years, attention was

which sees use for almost every studio art course, as well as upgraded

given to developing a curriculum that was current with contemporary art

ceramics equipment for in-house recycling and reformulation of

practice and current design trends. Painting and drawing classes

clay bodies.

were taught in a studio on the third floor. In the 1980s, ceramics and

pottery courses were introduced and the bell tower became home

changes in approaches to art practice, theory and new technology.

to that quiet ceramics studio.

One of the areas that appears to be in need of regular updating is the

focus upon the web,” Alamo-Costello said. “Our students now create

Between 1999 and 2009, the university realized it needed to raise the

“The curriculum is continually assessed and updated with evolving

bar. Department faculty began to focus on developing a curriculum,

online portfolios and produce a thesis in tangent on specific research.

and with support of administrators, began building art facilities to stay

These items have been central in creating a platform for ours students in

competitive with other institutions and to attract new students. The

their transition to professional life. All recent graduates have used these

department added roughly 30 new courses, and in 2007, administrators

items to locate internships, jobs or post-graduate studies.”

began the process to move the program to facilities in downtown Joliet.

Alamo-Costello and Department Chair Paul Erschen. In addition,

Said veteran faculty member and former department chair, Michael

“Chester” Alamo-Costello, “When I arrived in 1999, we had two traditional

Students benefit from the guidance of two full-time faculty members,

the department oversees a gallery director and nearly 10 adjunct faculty

studios and a small ceramic kiln with three or four throwing wheels.

members, who teach in various disciplines including art history,

Everything was outdated. With the support of the administration, we

ceramics, painting, digital arts and photography. The department feels it

were able to slowly build the program and expand to the new facilities,

is covering just about every facet of the visual arts and feels it’s in a

increasing our size four times from what we had on the main campus.

healthy place in terms of providing students with a broad understanding

Now, we have dedicated spaces for ceramics, a woodshop, two drawing

of art and design practice, coupled with deeper analysis in areas where

and painting studios, a photography darkroom, two photography studio

students require more comprehensive studies.

lighting areas, two digital labs, four individual studios, a large format

printing facility and an art gallery. We feel that our facilities are now

Chicago art and design community. This is where USF students often

some of the best in the region and can properly prepare our students for

secure internships and land their first jobs out of school. The department

serious careers in art, design, photography and art education.”

regularly uses the city for experiential learning by way of visits to

artist’s or designer’s studios, galleries and museums—students have

The department took residence on two floors of the Rialto Square

In addition, the department holds a strong connection with the

Theatre building in downtown Joliet, and has since been named

even attended Erschen’s art openings and music events, bringing the

the “Center for Art & Design.” The expansion has allowed the program

experience full-circle.

to compete with programs at other colleges and universities.

prestigious ACRE art residency program has created opportunities for

Currently, the Art & Design Department offers concentrations in

Regionally, Erschen’s involvement in southwest Wisconsin’s

Graphic Design, Photography and Studio Art. In addition, a Visual Arts

student internships and alumni participation. On a grander scale,

Education program exists in collaboration with the College of Education.

the department utilizes travel courses to enhance student learning.

During Alamo-Costello’s tenure, he has taken students to New York City,

In recent years, faculty members have also offered topics courses

in cartooning, screen printing, documentary film theory, video gaming

Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Holland, Italy and Switzerland. CO NT I NU E D O N T H E NE X T PAG E

A Year of Compassion / 2016–2017

5


JENNA BRONSON CONSTRUCTED A LIFE-SIZE

STEPHANIE ZELINSKI CREATED THE SATIRICAL

BORIS PESHEV COLLABORATED ONLINE

MUSIC PRACTICE SPACE INSTALLATION,

MAGAZINE, #REALTALK, COMPLETE

WITH A LONG-TIME FRIEND WHO RESIDES IN

COMPLETE WITH LIVE MUSICIANS ON

WITH ADVERTISEMENTS, ARTICLES AND

AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND TO CREATE A

OPENING NIGHT, TO OFFER INSIGHT INTO

PHOTOGRAPHY SHE PRODUCED. THE

CONCEPTUAL WORK THAT MERGED MUSIC

THE THRIVING FRINGE MUSIC SCENE IN THE

CONTENT OFFERED CANDID COMMENTARY

AND STATIC VISUAL DESIGNS TO CREATE A

JOLIET AREA.

ON CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL ISSUES

CONCEPTUALLY CHALLENGING INSTALLATION.

AFFECTING THE MILLENNIAL GENERATION.

The proof that it’s all working? Senior thesis.

engage with visual culture on a national and international level as artists

Each senior thesis exhibition is fully unique, and a time for celebrating

and art appreciators, while reinforcing their sense of where they are

the efforts of graduating students. Art & Design faculty members have

from. The gallery also strives, through the quality and scope of its

been fortunate to see a diverse student population completing their

programming, to be a creative resource to its community of students,

rigorous program. The department consistently raises a high bar and the

faculty, staff, alumni and local area artists.

results indicate its success in preparing students for a life beyond USF.

the gallery includes emerging, mid-career, and nationally recognized

In terms of the “vibe” of the current facilities, well, you really need

To demonstrate contemporary art practices in its exhibition program,

to visit. The Center for Art & Design has an industrial, urban feel and has

artists who are producing cutting edge work that formally and themati-

helped forge a real sense of community among students and faculty.

cally engages and stimulates our students, and fosters dialogue within

The students have taken ownership of the space.

the educational process. This work should transcend any concerns

of the art world, or comment upon it in ways that would interest the

“We initially thought that the separation from the main campus

would be a hindrance, however, we’ve encountered quite the opposite.

community. Only work of the highest artistic caliber that is relevant to

This is due to the urban experience afforded by the new space that

the thematic programming of a given academic year is considered.

could never be replicated on the main campus. Now our students have

the opportunity to experience what is found at a traditional four-year

the gallery, its true purpose is to expose the world to student work. In the

university, while also experiencing a similar art setting like Chicago’s.

2016 Senior Thesis exhibition, students presented a range of art, design,

It’s really the best of both worlds.”

and new media projects that investigated contemporary conceptual and

formal issues “with a fervent diligence,” according to Alamo-Costello.

Added Erschen, “We enjoy having a facility that invites a wide range

But don’t be fooled. While there’s a lot of community art exhibited in

of uses and visitors. I frequently come across non-art students who

find the setting of the Center for Art & Design to be an ideal study spot.

addressing,” he said. “Art & Design students are regularly testing new

Additionally, other departments at USF use our facility for meetings,

terrain and providing a specific visual voice as a response to the world

and we continue to host a summer arts camp for elementary students.”

they live in.”

“Each year we see new activities and problems our students are

For example, in the most recent thesis, Stephanie Zelinski produced

The Art Gallery

the satirical social commentary magazine #RealTalk. Jenna Bronson

The university’s primary space for exhibitions was previously located in

built the music project “Practice Space.” Boris Peshev collaborated with

the Moser Performing Arts Center. While that space is still set up for

a friend in New Zealand to produce the time-based installation

art display, in 2013, the university began renting an additional space in

“Time Signatures.”

the Rialto building to house the university’s first official gallery space. Gallery Director Jennifer Moore was soon after hired to schedule exhibits

Where Are They Now?

and lectures, and to curate the gallery.

The Art & Design program has many success stories...after all, the

department’s primary goal is to educate students to be life-long learners.

The USF Art Gallery’s mission boasts that its primary purpose is to

enrich the educational experience of the university’s student population

Graduates have gone on to work as artists and designers at Fortune

by exposing them to current practices in the visual arts, and to the

500 Companies such as Disney and McGraw-Hill Publishing. They’ve

best examples of art in their community. This dual exposure will expand

built independent art-based companies in the region, and pursued

their understanding of what is possible artistically, preparing them to

serious studio art practices in illustration and web development.

6

Engaging Mind & Spirit Magazine


“Art & Design, like all professional disciplines, is constantly in

For a peek at what current Art & Design students have been working

transition,” said Alamo-Costello. “Therefore, we tend to focus on instilling

on, arrange for a visit to the Center for Art & Design or check out

the understanding that one’s career does not end with the initial job.

an exhibition at the USF Art Gallery. Also, check out the department’s

We want our students to be leaders. Therefore, they need to build a

COMP Magazine at thecompmagazine.com. The magazine has been

career rather than become complacent in their practice. Fortunately, via

instrumental in the program’s ongoing development, providing a

social media, we have been better able to stay in contact and see our

classroom tool that allows students to learn about trends while also

student’s success. We now have students working in LA, New York and

getting the opportunity to learn about/cover art and design happenings

throughout the Chicagoland area in key positions.”

in the Chicagoland area.

Q&A

JENNIFER MOORE : : USF ART GALLERY DIRECTOR

What are your responsibilities as gallery

What is gallery programming like currently?

annual High School Art Competition, typically held

director?

There are exhibition receptions, and I have begun

in December/January. I am constantly fascinated

My job entails organizing and curating all shows

to increase programing at the gallery by offering

by the level of skill the high school students

at USF Art Gallery. I am also responsible for

artist talks during each exhibition. The artist talks

display in their work. It is inspiring to see their love

programming such as artist’s lectures, receptions

provide a unique and intimate learning experience

of art and watch their talents grow.

and art competitions, and providing support for

for all, providing students, faculty, staff and

Art & Design students and faculty.

community members a chance to meet each artist

What have you learned, either through

and listen, first-hand, to the artist’s process,

your role or through interaction with faculty

What is your background in the arts?

theory and art-making techniques. These talks

or students?

I have a B.A. in Art History and Photography and a

further extend the quality and scope of the

I have learned that the USF community has a deep

master’s degree in Photography. I spent 10

gallery’s programming, allowing people to learn

love of the arts. I am grateful to my colleagues

years teaching photography and art history and

more about each artist. I’ve arranged more

and supervisors who continually support the arts

working as an artist in Chicago before coming

daytime artist lectures, and am focusing on

at USF and beyond. I have found the dedication

to USF. When I began curating professional and

bringing a wider range of Illinois artists to USF.

of the professors and staff at USF has played an integral role in fostering the love of art.

student exhibits, I found it to be a thoroughly exciting experience.

What is the most interesting work you’ve seen displayed?

Do you make any art when you’re not working

What is the most interesting part of your job?

Every exhibit displayed at the gallery has been

in the gallery? What is your medium?

As gallery director at USF, I am constantly viewing

exciting in its own right. Exhibits change every six

When I am not wearing my gallery director hat,

the work of both local and national artists.

to eight weeks, giving the USF community a

I am a professional artist—a fine art narrative

Meeting them and learning about their work is a

chance to experience a wide variety of art by local

photographer. I spend my off days sketching

wonderful experience that I am able to share

practicing artists. We have exhibited painters,

scenes, scouting locations, prop shopping

with the students and faculty at USF. Connecting

photographers, installation artists, fiber artists…

and arranging shoots with models. I show my

those artists to our community has been one of

the list goes on. Each exhibition has been a true

work nationally and internationally in both solo

the most exciting parts of my job.

pleasure to curate and view. Aside from several

and group exhibitions. I have a great love for

professional shows at the gallery each year,

travel and try to work photo shoots into trips.

I find that I am particularly impressed with the

A Year of Compassion / 2016–2017

7


CO LLEG E O F A RT S & S CI E N CE S

Art & Design News The Art & Design Department offered the

St. Francis over the course of his 17-year tenure.

first video gaming seminar during the spring

The goal is to publish this effort to coincide

2016 semester at USF. In “Video Games &

with the centennial anniversary of the university.

Cyberpunks,” students were introduced to video

See more of his work at alamo-costello.net.

DI GI TAL AUDI O RECORDING AR TS ADDS F ULL-TI ME INSTRUCTOR

gaming history and theory coupled with bi-weekly gameplay. The initial class was full

So far in 2016, The COMP Magazine has

with a waiting list!

covered a wide variety of events that focus on multicultural issues, such as Kerry James

Digital Audio Recording Arts (DARA) instructor

The department held portfolio reviews for area

Marshall’s “Mastry” exhibit at the MCA Chicago,

Alby Odum, who was instrumental in helping

high school students. The reviews, plus the

to mainstream arts activities like Anime

program director Jeff Jaskowiak get DARA

annual High School Art Competition have

Central Midwest’s convention in Rosemont, Ill.

off the ground, has been hired full time.

become a consistent means for area students to

The COMP Magazine was also invited to

Odum has a B.A. in Music Performance from

engage with USF Art & Design faculty members

participate in the rebranding press seminar held

Northern Illinois University and a M.S. in

and to become familiar with USF’s offerings.

by the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago,

Music Technology from IUPUI Indianapolis, Ind.

and maintains a consistently strong social

He is a recording studio owner, engineer,

media presence.

producer (he’s been involved in over 100

Professor Michael “Chester” Alamo-Costello’s

recording projects), guitar instructor, recording

artwork, photography and writing has been published and reviewed in Just Indie Comics

Department Chair Paul Erschen, along with

artist, performer, composer, arranger, and

(Italy), LvL3 Media, Music Tomes, Verve

Gallery Director Jennifer Moore, has taken an

music publisher—wow! USF and DARA are both

Magazine (England), and National Public Radio’s

increased role in student recruitment and

thrilled to have him teaching full time.

848 Program, among other publications. He

scholarship disbursement. He maintains an

was awarded a sabbatical for spring of 2017 to

active studio practice in Chicago, which focuses

complete a three-book slipcase collection

on sculpture, woodworking, printmaking and

entitled “Somewhere In-Between Chicago,”

collecting. During the summers, Erschen tours

and is designing a book of portraits of students,

extensively with his band “Mayor Daley,” and

faculty, and staff made at the University of

also serves as the sculpture studio technician at the ACRE art residency in southwest Wisconsin.

COMMUN I CATI ON & M EDIA AR TS E X PAN DS CURRI C ULUM Communication and Media Arts (CMMA) Professor Terre Layng Rosner, a classicallytrained artist, has begun the dissertation phase of her Ph.D. in Art Education. Rosner is investigating the growing intersection, driven

DEPA RT M EN T O F M U S I C & P E RF O R M I N G ARTS N E WS

by digital technology, of traditional higher

The Department of

The Schola Cantorum, under the direction

education art programs and mass communica-

Music and Performing

of Patrick Brannon, will celebrate its 25th

tion programs. Rosner has been a professor

Arts hired a new

anniversary this season. The Schola Cantorum,

at USF since 1999. Because of her research,

department chair and

along with the USF Concert Chorale (directed

CMMA faculty members are revising curriculum

director for the Joliet

by Willard Thomen) and Singing Saints

to reflect the changes in the industries where

Symphony Orchestra

(also directed by Brannon) will present their

graduates find jobs.

(JSO) at USF: Alexandra

traditional Christmas concert in December.

“CMMA graduates will have a larger set of

basic skills in writing, web, video and audio

Dee, is completing her DMA in the orchestral This spring, USF announced the formation of

as well as the opportunity to focus on individual

a new Jazz Chamber Ensemble. Chamber

areas of interest like photo journalism, visual

The plays this year include “The Butler Did It”

performers are currently being sought and

communication or advertising,” said Department

by Walter Marks and Peter Marks (November)

will be chosen by way of a scholarship

Chair Brien McHugh.

and the musical “Godspell” by John-Michael

program. Visit stfrancis.edu/jazzchamber for

more information.

Foundations 1 faculty to present a lecture on

conducting program at Northwestern University.

Tebelak and Stephen Schwartz (March). Both will be directed by Ernest Ray.

Rosner has also been invited by the

“The History of the Female Figure in Western Culture and around the World” in November.

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Engaging Mind & Spirit Magazine


CO LLEG E O F BU S I N E S S & H E A LT H A D M I N I S T R AT ION

Enactus Champions

COB HA GOE S GLOBAL Dr. Orlando Griego, COBHA dean, traveled extensively this summer. He first visited USF’s

In only its second year at USF, the five-student

Albuquerque, N.M. campus, exploring the

Enactus team was named a Chicago Regional

possibility of bringing select COBHA programs

Champion and advanced to national competi-

to New Mexico. He also traveled to Asia to

tion in St. Louis, Mo. At the regional competition

seek out new international partnerships there,

awards ceremony, Kennedy Braasch was offered

similar to the MBA partnership USF currently

and accepted a summer internship. At the

holds with Brno University of Technology

national competition, all of the students were offered job interviews, with one being offered a full-time position with ADP. Enactus (formerly Students in Free Enterprise), is an

Left to right: Advisor Bonnie Covelli, Princess Clemente, Laura Munoz, Diana Viveros, Shannon Patino and Kennedy Braasch.

international nonprofit organization dedicated

kind of entrepreneurial approach that empowers

to inspiring students to improve the world

people to be a part of their own success.

through entrepreneurial action. It provides a

Among other large companies and foundations,

platform for teams of outstanding university

the Robert W. Plaster Foundation (for whom

students to create community development

USF’s Robert W. Plaster Free Enterprise Center is

projects that put people’s own ingenuity

named), supports Enactus. The team received

and talents at the center of improving their

$1,000 in prize money to support projects and

livelihoods. Guided by educators and supported

activities this upcoming year.

by business leaders, our students take the

in the Czech Republic. More information will be reported once partnerships are finalized.

N E W I N CUB ATOR M EM BER COBHA welcomes E3 Logistics System and owner Edward Wisniowski to the Business Incubator! E3 creates software for the logistics marketplace. The software is cloud-based and focused on helping organizations with large fleets of vehicles manage logistics and fleet mainte-

STU D EN T S REPRE S E N T CO BHA AT CO N F E RE N CE

nance. E3 applications merge traditional

USF students Shannon Walker, Austin Gass and

business processes with existing technology

Hailey Peterbok (pictured at left) attended

to create tools which allow businesses to do

the Midwest Business Administration Association

more with less.

(MBAA) International Conference in April at

Website

Palmer House Hilton in Chicago. While there,

goeeethree.com

they presented their paper, “The Expanding Role of Social Media in Traditional Business Marketing: How Emerging Social Media and Big

Blog goeeethree.blogspot.com

Data are Rapidly Changing the Role and

Twitter

Responsibilities of Marketing Professionals.”

twitter.com/eeeThree_ed Facebook facebook.com/E3-systems-109661919122796

FACU LT Y N EW S

YouTube

COBHA welcomes the addition of faculty members Amanda Dore, a visiting accounting professor,

youtube.com/channel/

and Dr. Bonnie Covelli, who is teaching training and development courses. In addition, the

UC2HuKxwlt4vxFg6h0GMrJjA/

department welcomes back Dr. Rich Vaughan from sabbatical, while bidding adieu to Dr. David

feed?view_as=public

Gordon, who is on sabbatical this fall. Gordon’s research will focus on the role that Christianity,

Google+

specifically Catholicism, played in the development of free market type economies across much of

plus.google.com/+Goeeethree

the world. Gordon plans to study the origins of capitalism and the history of Christianity and Catholicism, and hopes to produce at least one academic journal article.

A Year of Compassion / 2016–2017

9


CO LLEG E O F E D U CAT I O N

Ann Draksler ’16: Inspired to Educate Others Through Art Ann Draksler

enjoyed sharing knowledge with people and

examples on how to better reach students,

chose to attend

helping them accomplish new things. It was not

and I plan to apply their advice and first-hand

USF because she

until high school, however, that she became

knowledge in my future classrooms.”

had heard that

interested in pursuing art education. She credits

it was known

art classes in high school for not only teaching

Draksler was fortunate enough to have a

for its excellent

her about the visual arts but also for recognizing

teachable moment with a student who realized

education

how the process of creating and sharing

how to use information gained in class outside

program and felt

her own art helped increase her confidence.

the classroom. During a lesson where students

While completing her field experience,

it was important to select a school that would allow her to be close to her family. Having been taught by several amazing USF College of Education

“Art is not what you see, but what you make others see.” E D G A R D E G A S

alums during her time in elementary and high school, she wanted to enroll in a program that

Art encouraged Draksler to grow as a person,

were asked to analyze and critique a few

could help her become the same kind of caring

and she wants to share that experience

photographs, the student raised her hand and

and supportive educator.

with others.

explained that since they started critiquing

photographs, she also started looking more

The most definable moment in Draksler’s

There are many experiences from her time

decision-making process was hearing firsthand

at USF that Draksler knows will help her become

critically at images she saw every day. Draksler

from her sister, Kate Draksler ’14, about

a successful educator. She shared that Chrysalis,

explained that the student went on to share

Kate’s positive experience at USF. “Kate was in

a retreat for education majors, had a profound

that she now knows to look at images more

her second year at USF, studying to be an

impact on her personal and professional goals.

closely to determine why they make her feel

elementary teacher, when I was trying to decide

Chrysalis essentially helps teacher candidates

on which college to attend. From what I

determine what it means to be an educator

heard from her about several of the professors

and, more importantly, what kind of educators

are important, as they teach students to look

and classes, I knew I also wanted to attend

they want to be. “I attended Chrysalis three

more critically at the objects surrounding

this school.“

times (as both a participant and student leader),

them and learn to express their ideas on a visual

and each time I learned something new. The

format,” said Draksler.

Draksler knew at a young age that she

wanted to go into education; she has always

Favorite Artist “Claude Monet. I have always loved the use of color in his pieces. I find it so fascinating how he could paint the same landscape but give the piece such a distinct mood because of the different colors and time of day in which he painted the piece.” Cherished Work of Art “‘Starry Night’ by Vincent Van Gogh. I love the movement in the piece and the color of the blue sky against the bright yellow of the stars. This piece also holds a

10

Engaging Mind & Spirit Magazine

professors who lead the retreat provide so many

special place in my heart as it was one of the first famous art pieces I learned about when I was a child.” Must-Visit Museum “The Art Institute of Chicago is my favorite museum. I love the variety of pieces available to see there. I have been to a few other art museums in the Chicagoland area, but they just don’t have as many pieces as the Art Institute.”

a certain way or remind her of different events. “I have always believed that the visual arts


LEAC H CO L L EG E O F N U RS I N G

USF Alumna Receives 40 under 40 Emerging Nurse Leader Award Amanda

have helped her be successful in her career.

Buechel, BSN,

She also credits her mentors, who supported

R.N. was recently

her during nursing school. “Kate Weigel

recognized

was my mentor through the end of my nursing

as one of the

school career.

40 under 40

Emerging Nurse

the Student Nurses Association faculty

Leaders in

advisor. She helped me so much while I was

Illinois. The 40

trying to find my way in nursing,” says Beuchel.

She was one of my instructors at USF and

under 40 Emerging Nurse Leader Award is

sponsored by the Illinois Nurses Foundation and

she says. “The instructors in the Leach College

is annually presented. The award intends to

of Nursing push you to strive for your best.

celebrate the dedicated service of nurses to the

The nursing curriculum prepared me with all

population and encourage exemplary dedica-

the knowledge I needed to start out as a

tion to the nursing profession, and promote

new nurse.”

growth in leadership for the advancement of

nursing in Illinois.

Nurse Leader Award is a great vehicle to help

support young nurses and their achievements.

Beuchel is an intensive care float nurse at

Advocate Christ Medical Center. She is part

“USF’s curriculum is one like no other,”

Beuchel feels the 40 under 40 Emerging

“This award is helping to create recognition

of the clinical resource unit and floats between

for nurses, early on, for all the things they are

the four ICU units, three step down units,

doing to positively impact nursing and the

emergency room, post-anesthesia care unit or

community,” Beuchel explains. “I hope that by

other areas where she is needed. “My responsi-

my receiving this award as a young nurse,

bility is to help units when their staffing requires

other new nurses will see they can take on

additional nurses to take care of their patient

leadership roles early on in their career and be

census. I come in and take care of a team

recognized for their contributions.”

of patients as if I was part of their floor,” explains

Beuchel. Beuchel is humbled to have received

Nurse Leaders list will be published in

this award. “There are so many deserving

completed a community service project, collecting canned food, diapers, and other items for the South Suburban Family Shelter. Their donation was well-received by SSFS Executive Director Diane Bedrosian. Student Doreen Begley’s paper on Florence Nightingale was published in the May 2016 Nevada Nurses Association paper, “Nevada RNformation.” LCON alumni April Kubinski, FNP-BC and Amy Vertin, FNP-C have opened their own urgent care centers called “Emediate Cure,” located in Shorewood and Naperville. April graduated from LCON’s BSN and MSN-FNP programs, and Amy from USF’s MSN-FNP program. LCON celebrated the grand opening of its new facilities at Guardian Angel Hall at St. Clare Campus on Aug. 17. Classes began there on Aug. 22. The new facilities include four sim labs, two skills labs, classrooms, and more.

“The Nursing Voice” and on the American Nursing Association of Illinois website.

them,” she says.

All awardees will be honored at a recognition

ceremony in September.

multi-tasking are traits she has identified that

Freshman & Transfer Nursing Campus Visit Day

LCON’s Nursing 250 spring semester students

The second annual 40 under 40 Emerging

nurses in Illinois and I am honored to be one of Being open to new opportunities and

LCON N E WS

Guests will tour the new nursing facilities and hear a presentation by Dr. Maria Connolly, Ph.D., CNE, APN/CNS, FCCM, ANEF, adjunct nursing professor at Loyola University and former dean of nursing at USF. Register at stfrancis.edu/visit.

Above: Student Savannah Agnich gives a sim lab demonstration to Caden and Addy Savoia, children of LCON instructor Jennifer Wills-Savoia. Right: Student Jessica Farrell addresses guests.

A Year of Compassion / 2016–2017

11


T HE FIG HTING SA I NTS

Former USF Coach Promotes Book with help of COBHA Student Former Saints who were coached by Pat

project…after all, Pat is practically

Sullivan know he’s a wise sage: not only on the

famous in the Saints community.

basketball court, but also in life.

However, while he was commu-

nicating with lots of people

When Sullivan retired from USF in 2010,

he had lots of ideas he wanted to share. One of

he knew, he was having a hard

them was about leadership—the same kind

time reaching the newer

of leadership that he, himself, had exhibited

generation of Saints and individ-

through his many years as a USF coach, athletic

uals outside the USF community

director, fundraiser and mentor. He decided

who might be interested in

to try his hand at inspirational speaking, and was

his message.

soon booking local and national speaking

engagements at schools, businesses, and even

Vaughan in the College of

some very large organizations like Nike, IMB,

Business & Health Administration

and Notre Dame.

for assistance. Vaughan used Sullivan’s quest as

a class project, assigning four teams to

One of his former athletes, Tom Kennedy

Sullivan approached Rich

Current USF student Jeffry Nichols and Pat Sullivan.

’86, suggested that Sullivan write a book about

research the project and make recommenda-

his thoughts and experiences.

tions for improvement. The teams “ripped apart”

Sullivan’s methodology (according to Sullivan)

in the classroom have been put directly to the

have started,” explained Sullivan. “He knew

and developed new plans which included

test. All the ideologies taught by Professors

that I had started doing speaking engagements,

the use of social media, to help Sullivan reach a

Vaughan, Ferrallo and Hearn were spot-on with

and he said, ‘Why don’t you write a book?’”

new demographic.

what I needed in order to succeed with this

project. Having instructors with professional

“If it weren’t for Tom, none of this would

Sullivan self-published his book, “Attitude:

After reading through the students’

“The marketing concepts that I learned

The Cornerstone of Leadership” in 2013.

proposals, Sullivan was excited about many

experience and the ability to put that into

of their suggestions but had no idea how

the coursework and projects they assign has

The most important thing an athlete brings

to even begin the process of initiating these

been very beneficial,” says Nichols.

to the athletic arena, the most important thing a

new processes.

student brings to academic arena, and the

a job with a company that will allow him to not

most important thing that a leader brings to his

said Sullivan, laughing,

only grow in his career but also grow as an

or her leadership position is their daily attitude.

individual. As captain of the USF bowling team,

So in my book, I use the word ‘attitude’ as an

senior year at USF as a marketing major while

Nichols says he would love to stay involved

acronym, giving each letter a characteristic that

also pursuing a logistics minor. When Vaughan

with sports or something else that interests

might make for a quality leader. I illustrate

announced that Sullivan wanted to take

him. His hobbies include listening to music,

my points using examples from three leaders

various ideas from the proposals and put them

hanging out with friends, watching sports, and

who I feel are best leaders I’ve met in my

in action by way of hiring an intern from

bowling, of course. He is a Saints Ambassador,

lifetime: former president of USF, Jack Orr;

the class, Nichols “sent an email in about two

a leader in the Student Alumni Mentoring

obviously coach Gordie Gillespie; and former

minutes,” offering his assistance to Sullivan.

program, and in a leadership position on the

Joliet Bishop Roger Kaffer. If you find better

The match was a success.

Student-Athlete Advisory Committee.

leaders than those three, you’re going to have

“Jeffry has been a perfect addition. Tom

to go a long way,” says Sullivan.

Kennedy continues to help with the newsletter

of working with Pat. His knowledge is so

“I really believe that attitude is everything.

“You can’t teach an old dog new tricks,” Enter Jeffry Nichols, currently entering his

After graduation, Nichols hopes to find

Said Nichols, “I have enjoyed every moment

I publish, and Jeffry can speak to Tom in a

extensive that there could probably be another

soon realized he was having difficulty reaching

way I can’t. I am really lucky to have his help,”

book just on what he has forgotten!”

certain audiences. Up until that point, all of his

says Sullivan.

publicity was done by word of mouth, which

actually served him quite well at the start of the

ample experience to take on Sullivan’s project.

Sullivan started publicizing the book, but

Nichols feels his coursework has given him

For more information about Sullivan, his book, his speaking engagements or more, visit his website at leadersattitude.com.

12

Engaging Mind & Spirit Magazine


FAI TH, MISSI O N & DI VER SI T Y

Pay It Forward Program Invites Local High Schoolers to Get in the Spirit Through Service University Ministry’s summer “Pay It Forward” program, coordinated by USF Chaplain Fr. Terry Deffenbaugh, gave area high school students an opportunity to gain service hours in a meaningful way. During the four-day experience, participants learned about the university’s four values of respect, integrity, service and compassion and put them in action. They learned about communitybuilding, sharing gifts and caring for the needs of others. Empathy, forgiveness, peace, and reverence for the gift of creation were pondered and promoted. Students learned about the importance of fulfilling responsibilities and developing a commitment to truth and justice.

At the beginning of each day, participants engaged

in learning activities that focused on understanding the aspects of service through the lens of our USF values and Catholic social teaching. They reflected on how service benefits not only the individual who is serving, but also the larger community. Then, the majority of each day was spent performing service at various locations in the region including a food pantry, a senior citizen’s center, an outdoor public space in need of cleaning and a building in need of repair. The students were divided into work teams and were taken to the service sites on USF buses. Each team visited each of the sites over the four-day program.

Said Renee Gauchat from the Will County Forest

Preserve, “The students were great and worked very hard. Each team cleared a half-acre of invasive vegetation a day. It was a great program, and we hope to participate again next summer.”

A Year of Compassion / 2016–2017

13


INTERN ATIO NA L P R O G R A MS

Rob Morley Joins USF as New International Admissions Counselor Rob Morley joined the USF family as

I developed a ‘classroom voice’ that I have been able to put into practice

an International Admissions Counselor in

with phone communication. I’m very conscious of the speed at which

October 2015. He’s looking forward to

I speak and the vocabulary that I choose when communicating with certain

beginning his first full year in his new role

students. I have also become very good at ‘bending my ear’ and taking

helping international students become

context into account to work through communication gaps. It would be

USF students.

very rare that we would get an applicant that cannot speak any English

After graduating from DePaul

at all, so there is normally a way to work through any difficulties.”

University in 2008, he moved to Thailand

to teach English at a Catholic university.

research has suggested that our school would be most appealing to those

USF focuses on a number of areas for recruitment because market

While in Thailand, he eventually switched roles and began working in

populations. However, USF’s aim is to create a diverse international

admissions to recruit international students for a Thai hospitality school,

student population. The recruitment staff tries to “cast a wide net” and do

then for a satellite campus of a British management school.

not exclude any countries from their efforts.

Hiring someone to fill this role was extremely necessary. The interna-

USF currently serves about 60 international students. The current

tional admissions process is intense, and previously the duties were

majority is from China and Saudi Arabia, but many other countries

being shared by several people. Centralizing everything into a new role

are represented on campus. Most of those students will stay for four years,

has allowed the admission staff to streamline their processes and respond

and an increasing number are choosing to stay to pursue graduate

to students in a timelier manner.

degrees after receiving their bachelor’s degree.

To be accepted at a U.S. school, international students are held to the

One might wonder how enticing USF is to foreign students. “Why do

same academic standards as domestic students. The major difference

they want to come to Joliet?”

is that English is a second language for the majority of USF’s international

students. In order to be admitted, they must pass English proficiency

international students are interested in. Joliet’s proximity to Chicago

exams. In some cases, students are not able to meet the required scores

and easy access via Metra is a major selling point, but the fact that Joliet is

and must receive extra help through our English Language for Academic

not directly in the city is attractive to some students as well. Students

Purposes (ELAP) program. Some students have to study in the ELAP

are able to enjoy the slower pace of a suburb during the week, while also

program for up to one year before they can move into an academic

having the option to venture into the city for weekend excitement.”

program. The other thing to note is that international students do not

qualify for financial aid, so the price of tuition is a primary concern

that many of our current international students also enjoy the fact that we

for many of them. Fortunately, USF offers several merit-based scholarships

are a small, faith based institution. Students seem to appreciate the sense

that are available to international students. This not only helps alleviate

of community that we have at USF and the fact that their teachers and

the cost of tuition, but also helps us attract high performing students.

classmates know them on a first name basis. Despite the fact that many of

Morley isn’t afraid of communicating.

our international students come from varying religious backgrounds,

“Luckily, I spent several years as an ESL teacher so I have a great deal

the majority have expressed a fondness for the type of atmosphere that a

of experience navigating through language barriers. While living in Asia,

USF W ELCO M ES AUST RIA N M ED IC A L STU D EN T S A N D INST RU CT O RS FO R SUM M ER PRO GR A M

Says Morley, “There are definitely some nice things about Joliet that

He continued, “Aside from USF’s geographic location, I have found

faith based institution—inspired by Franciscan values—can create.”

In June, USF welcomed its first group of students and faculty from Medical University of Graz, Austria, for a short-term international Nursing and Social Work Course. Austrian students studied alongside American students and their instructors co-taught with USF faculty. The program will continue to be offered at USF in even years and in Graz in odd years. For information, contact the International Programs Office at internationalprograms@stfrancis.edu

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Engaging Mind & Spirit Magazine


G IVIN G BAC K DO NO R NEWS

Guardian Angel Hall Grand Opening On Aug. 17, USF was proud to welcome students and employees from the Leach College of Nursing (LCON), key donors and community supporters to the grand opening of Guardian Angel Hall at St. Clare Campus. More than 200 people attended and toured the newly renovated facility that will now house LCON and other ancillary offices for the university.

Special recognition was given to donors including

Eileen and Packey Webb family, trustee Diane and Bill Habiger, trustee Candice and Dr. Steven Rosen, trustee Cheryl Stepney, and trustee Tom and Michele Vana. Additionally, continued gratitude was extended to Cecily and John Leach, the Sisters of St. Francis of Mary Immaculate and the Franciscan Sisters of the Sacred Heart.

Earlier in the day, trustee Candice Rosen kicked

off the festivities with a campus presentation titled “Healing the Health Care Professional.”

Above: Sr. Grace Henneberry, OP and Sr. Peggy Quinn, OSF; top right: Linda and James Hathaway; bottom right: Debra Bacharz and Candice Rosen.

Trustee Diane Habiger Honored by Joliet Region Chamber of Commerce Alumna and USF trustee, Diane (Felbinger) Habiger ’77, has been honored by the Joliet Region Chamber of Commerce and Industry and the Council for Working Women with the 2016 Athena Award. The award, established in 1982, recognizes women leaders who demonstrate professional excellence, give back to their communities and assist other women in realizing their full potential. It is distributed by community organizations internationally and has been given by the chamber since 1988. Habiger has been a member of USF’s Board of Trustees since 2008 and is chair of the Trusteeship Committee. She has also been a mentor for numerous incoming new trustees.

OA K T REE D O N AT E D BY M A R T I N W HA L E N Move over, Three Oaks. Martin Whalen Office Solutions has donated a new Oak tree for USF’s campus, and it has been planted outside the Safety & Security exit of Tower Hall along Taylor Street. This gift is a nice example of a non-monetary gift that can make a big difference to the daily experience of USF students. Thanks is extended for this thoughtful gift!

S AV E T H E D AT E F O R U N I V E R S I T Y O F S T. F R A N C I S ’ T H I R D A N N U A L D AY O F G I V I N G —TA K I N G P L A C E D U R I N G F E A S T O F S T. F R A N C I S W E E K . T H I S I S YO U R C H A N C E TO I N S P I R E U S F S T U D E N T S B Y D E M O N S T R AT I N G T H E S P I R I T O F G E N E RO S I T Y T H AT S U P P O R T S T H E M A N D MAKES A DIFFERENCE IN THEIR LIVES F O R Y E A R S TO C O M E . W E LO O K F O R WA R D TO YO U R PA R T I C I PAT I O N ! V I S I T S T F R A N C I S . E D U / D AYO F G I V I N G F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N O R TO D O N AT E .

A Year of Compassion / 2016–2017

15


STAYIN G CO NNEC TED A LU MN I N E W S

Spotlight: Meghann (Mudron) O’Hara ’01 Childhood Experiences Provide Inspiration for Alumna’s Artwork There’s the notion that all children are

artists, and some of them lose their ability

castle, on a nautical life preserver, among storybook letters of the

only when they become adults.

alphabet, or in some other tableau that a child or parent can dream up.

The real artists, who work at it well

It was almost by chance that O’Hara ended up at USF, and at the

into adulthood, often draw from their child-

start, the road to becoming a professional artist was not so clear. When

hood experiences to create their work.

high school ended, all she knew was that she loved art, that she had

Others, like Meghann O’Hara, take it even

to go to college and that a dedicated art school wasn’t for her. Her parents

a step further, turning out work specifically

convinced her to try USF for a year.

intended for kids.

Her customized artwork could feature a child’s name near a sand

One of her greatest childhood memories was being read to at

“It became a perfect fit,” she says. “Every course played a positive

role in my growth as a student. Every professor had so much passion for

bedtime. A love of children’s books grew in her, and eventually a love of

their subject matter that my motivation for learning was revived after

drawing and painting led her to the work she does today. Her animal-

week one. I went from being a mildly enthused student to hard-working.

focused images adorn the walls of children’s bedrooms across the

I flourished at USF, and I am grateful for that experience.”

country, and are available via her website, My Good Night, and through

the online store Oopsy Daisy Fine Art for Kids. The work has also been

Thanks to her talent and drive, she found herself working in that world

featured at Pottery Barn Kids, Target and Chasing Fireflies. And it all

almost immediately. But she quickly determined that the politics and

began—in adulthood, anyway—at USF, where O’Hara was one of the newly

compromises of book publishing were not for her.

formed Art & Design Department’s early students and graduates, earning a degree in Visual Art with a concentration in studio art and graphic design.

Growing up, Georgia O’Keeffe was her favorite, and as she got older

After graduation she thought she would become an illustrator.

“At that time it was hard for me to depart from my style,” she says.

“I felt like every time an art director saw my work they wanted to turn it into something else—a collaboration of my work and their vision based

and matured as an artist, she identified more with Paul Klee and other

on something they had seen before. It was hard for me to meet

modern masters. Her love of simple shapes and an uncluttered style is part

those expectations and feel true to my vision. It just was not the right

of what caused her to gravitate toward animals for the majority of her

path for me.”

subject matter. Also, there was plenty there to work with.

upon Oopsy Daisy. Before she knew it, she was licensing and selling

“I found out I could put so much personality into an animal portrait,”

So she began looking for other opportunities, and soon happened

she says. “I could assign each one human-like expression with those last

her work. Today she creates her work without pencils or paintbrushes,

brushstrokes...their eyes. I wanted to see how far I could push that ability.”

which isn’t surprising, as illuminated screens are everywhere. What is surprising, however, is that when she is not creating artwork on a computer tablet with a pen she is doing it on her phone with her finger. A person can grow up, and the world can continue to evolve in surprising ways, but for someone possessing real creativity, the childhood artist remains.

Her designs are available in canvas wall art or paper prints, on hanging

O’Hara is currently searching for the next phase of her creative work,

growth charts or fabric wall decals, and even on night lights. They feature

and it just may bring her full-circle. An avid bedtime storyteller to her

whimsical images of animals and classic life-of-a-child icons, including

daughters, she has been thinking of children’s books lately. Perhaps the

monkeys, sand pails and shovels, tigers, giraffes, lions, starfish, sand

thoughts that are flowing out of her hearken back to the magical nights of

dollars, dogs, cats, songbirds, sea turtles, bears, geese, wolves, swans,

her own childhood when she was tucked in and read to sleep.

skunks, hedgehogs, baby chicks, mama hens, fish and coral, horses, cows,

pigs and piglets, walruses, goats and zebras. Twirling ballerinas, too. 16

Engaging Mind & Spirit Magazine

“I would love to write and illustrate my own story,” she says.


ALUMNI ASSOCIATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS President

Shawn Walsh ‘00, ‘15 President-Elect

Keith Schomig ‘13 Past President

Artsy Alumni Endeavors

Karen Ciarlette ’94. ’97 Vice President for Constitution

Joseph Ferrallo ’85, ’06, ’07

COM M U N ICAT ION & ME D I A A R T S 40T H A N N IVERSA RY C E L E BR AT I O N

PI CTORI AL CALE N DAR AN D PHOTO CON TE ST

Vice President for Programs

The Department of Communication & Media Arts (formerly Mass

Order your official 2017

Judy Bulat ’72

Communications) is celebrating its 40th anniversary during Homecoming

University of St. Francis pictorial

weekend. Journalism, Mass Communications, and Communication

calendar today, complete with

Vice President for Young Alumni & Student Engagement

and Media Arts alumni, please join us for a reunion reception on Saturday,

12 beautiful USF-related photos.

Secretary

Sept. 24 from 5:30–7 p.m. on the 4th floor of Tower Hall. Professors

Proceeds will benefit USF’s Francis

Wihelmine Vidmar ’68

Rick Lorenc, Scott Marshall, Brien McHugh and Terre Rosner will be in

Fund, which supports student

Sisters of St. Francis Representative

attendance. USF’s beautifully-renovated WCSF-FM radio station studio

scholarships. In addition, if you’ve

will be toured and showcased and drinks and hors d’oeuvres will be

got got a good eye, consider

provided. Alumni from these majors are invited to join a new alumni

entering our calendar photography

network: Mass Communications Alumni Network (MCAN), which will

contest! Submit your favorite

have its first meeting on Saturday, Sept. 24 at 10:30 a.m. in C222

USF picture any time at stfrancis.

(Motherhouse 2nd floor). To RSVP: 877-811-ALUM, alumni@stfrancis.edu

edu/calendar.

or stfrancis.edu/alumni/hcrw

T HE PH A N T O M O F T HE O P E R A A N D LU N C H AT PET T ERIN O ’ S

Caroline Portlock ’02, ’04 Vice President for Scholarships

Candice Quinerly ’10

Sr. Lois Prebil, OSF ’61 Alumni & Family Relations Office Administrators

Aubrey Knight ’04, ’07, Director Valerie Penn, Assistant Director Student Representatives

Haley Collins Jeremy Grachan Taylor Ringo

GENERAL BOARD MEMBERS

Dominique Annis ’00, ’02 Matthew Bisek ’10

The Alumni & Family Relations Office will host a day trip to Chicago’s

Patricia Bracken ’73, ’86, ’94

theater district on Wednesday, Jan. 4. Guests will depart via USF

Sharon Dewart ’78

transportation at 10:45 a.m. and head to Petterino’s for lunch, followed

Elmer F. Eddy ’80

by The Phantom of the Opera at Cadillac Palace Theatre. Critics are

Jacqueline A. Edmonson ’63, ’88, ’94

raving that this breathtaking production will be “bigger and better than

Laura Eggert ’09, ’13

ever before.” USF transportation will have everyone back to campus by

Ysenia Gallegos ’13

approximately 6 p.m. Before Oct. 31, tickets are $80 per person.

H. Richard Hagen, J.D., ’90 Linda M. Kilroy ’72

After Oct. 31, tickets are $90 per person. ($5 of every ticket is a USF donation; limited tickets available.) To RSVP: 877-811-ALUM, alumni@ stfrancis.edu or stfrancis.edu/alumni/events

ART & DE SI GN ALUMN I PORTF OLI OS

Eric Lawhead ’07 Lynley Louzensky ’10 Erika Martinez ’11, ’15

Jessica Cuevas

Frances H. Naal Sczepaniak ’58

jessicacuevas.com

Jan Novotny ’67

Jordan Halata

L. Scott Pekol ’99 Alan Randolph ’07

behance.net/jordanhalata

Corey Richardson ’09

Emily Johnson

Susan Rogina ’94, ’99

emilyljohnson.com

Anne-Christine Tompkins ’14, ’15

Christopher Jones christopherjonesphoto.com Megan Mowery megan-mowery.com

stfrancis.edu/alumni/hcrw

Egzon Shaqiri egzonshaqiri.com Stephanie Zelinski

STAY IN TOUCH

Send news and class notes to alumni@stfrancis.edu or call 877-811-ALUM. To read about what other alumni and old friends have been doing, visit stfrancis.edu/alumni/success-stories

stephaniezelinski.com A Year of Compassion / 2016–2017

17


NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. POSTAGE P A I D UNIVERSITY OF ST. FRANCIS

500 West Wilcox Joliet, Illinois 60435

Admissions event information or registration 800-735-7500 • admissions@stfrancis.edu

SATURDAY I NF O SESSI O NS Brief Saturday campus visits which include a short tour. Space is limited to three per family. SEPTEMBER 10, 17 & 24 • OCTOBER 1, 8, 15 & 22 NOVEMBER 12 & 19 • DECEMBER 3 & 10 k RSVP by calling 815-740-2270

stfrancis.edu/visit OR /openhouse Alumni event information or registration 877-811-ALUM • alumni@stfrancis.edu stfrancis.edu/alumni/events Athletics information or game schedules 815-740-3464 • gofightingsaints.com USF Art Gallery exhibitions 815-740-3787 • jmoore@stfrancis.edu Gallery Hours: Tuesday–Friday 10 a.m.–2 p.m., and by appointment. For information about all other university events and activities 800-735-7500 • stfrancis.edu

S T F R A N CI S.EDU

Engaging Mind & Spirit - 2016-2017, Issue 1  

The official magazine of the University of St. Francis

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