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DA CAPO 2015-2016 Alumni Magazine

Inside: Read about re-imagining the future of the music school. 1


2015–2016

In This Issue

Da Capo is the annual alumni magazine of the University of South Carolina School of Music.

Da Capo Online

More Faculty News 17 More Student News 20 More Alumni News 23 School of Music Donors 26

Have news?

4-5

A Commitment to Music of Our Time

6-7

Re-Imagining the Future of the Music School

Send your alumni updates to ewoodoff@mozart.sc.edu.

On the cover Southern Exposure collaborates with the Indie Grits Festival for a kick-off event on the river. Eighth blackbird members Nathalie Joachim, flutes; Michael J. Maccaferri, clarinets; Yvonne Lam, violin and viola; Nicholas Photinos, cello; Matthew Duvall, percussion; and Lisa Kaplan, piano. Story on page 5.

Tayloe Harding, dean, executive editor Ellen Woodoff, writer/editor/art director

#EmployedMusician

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Major Faculty Grants and Awards

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#Employed Musicians@SCERN

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Student Research and National Recognition

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Faculty News

Are you a USC music graduate working in the music field? LET US KNOW AT

EmployedMusician@mozart.sc.edu.

sc.edu/music 2

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Alumni Spotlights

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Student Spotlights


At the USC School of Music the power and promise of music have no limits.

A message from Dean Tayloe Harding Our School of Music is unique, laudatory and vital. We have achieved a great deal of excellence and renown locally, regionally, nationally and internationally. While it is a source of great pride for thousands of people, it is not perfect. The School is in need of a great many things to reach its potential – these needs can only be met, however, with a deeper and more committed effort to endow our achievements and aspirations. And to pursue that end, our school is poised for an exceptional and influential future that requires a strategic focus on and an investment in what makes us both outstanding and distinctive. To more fully capture and advance these qualities and our pursuit of excellence, we have established this vision for our School… The USC School of Music seeks to be a model public higher education music school for America. To be a model public music school our unit must: • Be the music school that our students and our university require; • Be the music school that our state requires; • Be the music school that our art and our society require. To achieve this vision, we have articulated our five core values and have initiated a planning process to fully embrace them by recognizing goals and actions that manifest them, and to do so over the next 10 years, 2015-2025. Two of these five most core values are traditional at Carolina… Excellence - A School of Music cannot be a model without being musically, academically and artistically excellent. Student Success - At the USC School of Music, we invest in the success of every student. We do not assume that some students will fail — we instead commit ourselves to assisting every enrolled student to achieve success. … and three new ones that distinguish us and combine with the above values to make these five core values that propel us toward our vision. These three new distinctive values, ones that the School’s faculty have identified through a rigorous review process of our activities and our beliefs, are: The Preparation of Music Leaders - We acknowledge that our budding professional musicians will need to be prepared with more than just purely musical and traditional academic skills and dispositions but also with skills and behaviors that will assist their musical function into tomorrow’s world. The Preparation of Musicians as Educators & Educators as Musicians – We have long been a leader in music education, realized in effective teacher training programs, elite instrumental and vocal pedagogy programs at all levels, and by renowned research and scholarship on music teaching and learning. The Preparation of Diversely Skilled Musicians - We recognize the changing world and marketplace for professional musicians who wish to make music their life’s work, and we value the necessary skills we feel our graduates will need to improve and sustain, in music, their own lives and the vitality and fulfillment of people in their communities. I do not have the space here to describe them, but we will be updating their descriptions and the goals and actions we will undertake to actualize them on our website, sc.edu/music.

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A Commitment to Music

of

Our Time

Learning to Listen

Experimental music class brings surprising results When students take Greg Stuart’s Experimental Music Workshop class, surprising things happen. Like when The New York Times praised the group’s performance at the Columbia Museum of Art as “patient, unpredictable, [and] exceedingly beautiful.” Or that one of today’s premier experimental music labels, Edition Wandelweiser Records, is releasing the class’ debut recording this fall. But most surprising is that the majority of students in the group are not music majors. Offered through the South Carolina Honors College, the class is open to students of all musical abilities and backgrounds, a collaborative and egalitarian dynamic that lies at the heart of the experimental music tradition. Stuart, a percussionist whose work draws upon a mixture of music from this tradition, is a proponent of collaboration and has worked extensively with renowned composer Michael Pisaro. Students in the course are treated as equal collaborators and each semester perform in concerts with Stuart and renowned guest artists. To date they have worked with violinist Erik Carlson, percussionists Tatsuya Nakatani, Tim Feeney and Sarah Hennies, and composers Nomi Epstein, Michael Pisaro and Jürg Frey, on world premiere performances that have achieved national attention. The course asks students to rethink the very way they listen and what music is. The compositions Stuart uses in class challenge students’ preconceived notions of form, duration and notation. Rather than strictly determining various musical parameters, experimental works suggest, with varying levels of concreteness, how a performer might work with things like pitch, rhythm or timbre. Students use a combination of con4

ventional and unconventional instruments in realizing these kinds of pieces. This sense of openness allows for unforeseen combinations of sounds to come together, producing moments of singular intensity and beauty. Stuart believes that working with experimental music has effects beyond the class itself. For example, listening is a central component of the course. His students report developing a heightened awareness of sound and duration through the daily classroom performance activities. Students also begin to hear their everyday sonic environments in new ways, says Stuart. These experiences with experimental music in the classroom change how students hear the world and how they locate themselves in it through sound. The Experimental Music Workshop has been invited to perform the music of Michael Pisaro with the International Contemporary Ensemble in New York City at Abrons Arts Center September 2016.


A Commitment to Music

of

Our Time

The Marriage of Sound and Image A bold and beautiful exploration

What do grits, rivers and films have to do with contemporary classical? Not much until two staples of Columbia’s progressive cultural life teamed up for a collaborative event on an April evening along the Congaree River. Southern Exposure New Music Series at USC is devoted to exploring the rich variety of contemporary classical and world music. The Indie Grits festival gives novice to advanced media makers a venue for sharing their interest in independent media making. Together, the two kicked off the annual Indie Grits festival with an exploration of music and film that captivated a diverse audience.

winning sextet. With the finesse of a string quartet and the energy and audacity of a rock band, the ensemble played against a backdrop of live orchestrated visuals by Indie Grits filmmaker Patrick Nugent. Nugent’s stunning site-specific visual installation featured archival footage from Carolina’s “Moving Image Research Collection” and found footage from the “Waterlines” video archive collected from the recent catastrophic flooding that hit Columbia in October 2015. The success and sheer joy of the Indie Grits kick-off event proved the collaboration was a match made in heaven, crosspollinating audiences and exposing many new people to contemporary classical music.

Southern Exposure hosted the performance of eighth blackbird, the Chicago-based, four-time Grammy Award5


Re-Imagining the Future of the Music School

SPARK: Carolina’s Music Leadership Laboratory

Susan Zhang and Nick Luby have traveled around Columbia in their creation, The Concert Truck, spreading their love of piano music in unusual places. The Concert Truck brought classical music to students at Keels Elementary School.

TEACHING INNOVATION GRANTS Teaching Innovation Grants, a new initiative of Spark, are designed to fund innovation in existing music courses. The $1500 grants support faculty who want to try new ideas and encourage an entrepreneurial culture that distinguishes the School of Music as a national leader. The winning proposals:

Helping D.M.A. Pianists Develop Diverse Musical Skills Through Chamber Music – Phillip Bush

Pilot project to provide opportunities to work with professional string and wind players in the learning and preparation of landmark works of the chamber music repertoire.

MUSC 749: Defining and Designing Success

David Cutler, Ana Dubnjakovic, Joe Rackers and Greg Stuart Redesigning research methods to help doctoral students

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increase their potential for professional success and to make a difference in communities.

MUSC 776: Special Topics in Piano Pedagogy The Healthy and Prepared Performer – Sara Ernst

Development of new topics course to provide graduate students with a forum for optimizing personal well-being and performance outcomes.  

USC Percussion Recording – Scott Herring

Purchase key audio hardware allowing students to record lessons, rehearsals and pre-screen audition materials to improve performance potential.

Innovations in Flute Pedagogy Courses Through Observed Teaching and Community Engagement – Jennifer Parker-Harley

Develop innovations in flute pedagogy courses MUSC 801 and MUSC 399 through observed teaching and partnership with local middle and high school band programs.


Re-Imagining the Future of the Music School

21st Century Music School Design CREATIVITY IN MUSIC AWARDS Also new are Spark’s Creativity in Music Awards that support students pursuing inventive projects and encourage expanding boundaries with cash prizes. First place winners are Susan Zhang and Nick Luby who have been traveling the city in The Concert Truck, a mobile concert hall designed and equipped with a foldout stage, lights, backdrop, sound projection and grand piano. Their mission is to bring high quality live performances of classical music to unexpected audiences. Daniel Olszewski took second place with Guitars Sounding Out, an interactive performance outreach initiative for middle and high schools. The project commissions new works for guitar quartet with video introductions. Philip Snyder’s third place proposal is “around-pastaway,” an album-length field recording focused on creating the perception of progression through a natural, sonic environment permeated by flute sounds. Nusheen Farahani and Seán Heely’s runner up project, Celtic Fiddle Summer Extravaganza, teaches Celtic tunes to all ages, teaching by ear rather than by notes. Runner up Travis Baird is using online marketing to launch Immersive Music Series, a program offering interactive concerts for children and families.

With 230 attendees from 48 states, Canada, Europe and Australia, “21st Century Music School Design” was unlike the familiar academic conference. Sponsored by The College Music Society and hosted by USC, music educators shared ideas, learned from one another and collaborated, focusing on three questions: Why are we here? What should we teach? How do we make this change happen? The three-day summit in June considered solutions music schools can take to best prepare students for today’s realities – not through an inflexible formula – but by defining and designing distinct approaches relevant to each music program’s mission. Participants emerged with a concrete framework for advancing change within their home institutions. CMS Summit represents the kind of experiential “andThis collaborative engagement that our profession so badly

needs,” said Dean Tayloe Harding. “In the history of the music in higher education industry there has never been an event like this. We are so pleased to have been able to leverage the University of South Carolina’s School of Music and its national leadership role in progressive education for tomorrow’s music professionals. By partnering with the College Music Society to use its dynamic summit format, we gathered many leaders in music higher education to focus on the three topics — making the designs of our music schools more sensitive to and influencing of the future. Together and in teams we explored and discovered methods for pursuing change and evolution in musical instruction – both purely musical and not purely musical – that our students must experience and that society already demands of us.

Summit director David Cutler, associate professor of music entrepreneurship, and an impressive roster of 90 presenters representing the full range of disciplines and institution types helped shape the conversation. 7


Faculty Major Grants & Awards

Music and the New Hollywood Era Uncovering the stories behind the soundtracks

“Many of the films from this period reveal great experimentation with the soundtrack, both in the capturing of dialogue and effects during production but also the manipulation of sound and music in post-production.”

– Dr. Julie Hubbert

Julie Hubbert is the rare music historian to delve into the topic of film music. She won a coveted National Endowment for the Humanities competitive Summer Stipend award for a project that took her to Hollywood this summer to comb through documents of legendary filmmakers from the New Hollywood era, also known as the American New Wave. Hollywood films are critiqued and analyzed for their visual aesthetics, but until recently few researchers have studied their music. Advances in film technology, mainly digital reproductions and access to archival material, has accelerated the research and made it easier to piece together the production histories of films and the development of soundtracks. Dr. Hubbert says the study of film music is very recent. Even as recently as five or 10 years ago, very few in film studies were researching music because they didn’t feel trained, and very few in music history were researching film music because most music historians thought film was frivolous. Hubbert is particularly interested in the use of pre-existing 8

music in film soundtracks like Kubrick’s “2001 A Space Odyssey,” which used a compilation soundtrack instead of a new score. Although a score was written, Kubrick rejected it in favor of Richard Strauss’ “Also Sprach Zarathustra” and other existing orchestral works. Hubbert’s Los Angeles residency took her to the Margaret Herrick Library at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the Louis B. Mayer Library at the American Film Institute, and the Warner Brothers Archive at the University of Southern California where she had access to extensive production notes on the aesthetic and practical choices directors and sound personnel made for the music in these films. Hubbert is using the research for her current book project, “The Auteur as Audiophile: Music in New Hollywood Films.” The book will also focus on the influence the high fidelity movement of the 1950s and ‘60s had on the film soundtrack, the advent of magnetic tape technology that introduced new editing and layering techniques, and how labor unions and their control of recorded music had an effect on the content of movie soundtracks.


Faculty Major Grants & Awards

Dr. Bain is developing software to create musical analogues of spontaneous mutations that illustrate genetic mutations.

Mutational Music

Music enhances learning in STEM education When biology professor Jeff Dudycha approached Reginald Bain, professor of composition and music theory, about collaborating on a National Science Foundation grant, Bain jumped at the prospect.

copying errors in the context of music. When students learn genetics, they often begin with misconceptions about mutations. But illustrating properties of mutations are difficult to show in class settings.

“My previous experience in musical sonification and my deep interest in mathematics and computer science made this a very natural collaboration,” Bain said.

The software being developed under the Mutational Music project will be used as an interactive teaching tool that creates musical analogues of spontaneous mutations and more. Users will be able to create music by allowing an initial musical “seed” to mutate for a number of generations and then compare the ancestral and descendent music aurally. The software will be based on established approaches to data sonification and computer music, and algorithms will be defined by information on the rate and characteristics of biological mutations.

Genetic differences arise due to errors made when copying DNA, the molecule in which genetic information is stored. If the errors happen during cell divisions that lead to offspring, the differences will be inherited by future generations. Understanding these spontaneous mutations is a fundamental goal of biologists. Bain, who directs the Experimental Music Studio at USC, is developing software that simulates genetic

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Student Research & National Recognition “

This symposium was not only the best attended of all, it was also the best organized. You’ve set a high standard for future symposiums. – Gary Ingle, Music

Teachers National Association CEO

The MAGELLAN SCHOLAR PROGRAM enriched these undergrads with research opportunities through faculty mentoring and professional research experiences: Jordan Bartow /Mentor: Robert Jesselson A Study on the Production, Parameters, and Pedagogy of Vibrato on the Cello Ian Giocondo /Mentor: Julie Hubbert Nadia Boulanger’s Final Years (1950-1979) Mimi Harding /Mentor: Julie Hubbert Music and Politics – A Study of the Argentinian Tango Brittany Stone /Mentor: Wendy Valerio Examining the Implementation of a Music Learning Theory for Newborn and Young Children Across Cultures INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL GRANTS allowed these students to follow their passion: Mimi Harding - first place ($2500) for her proposal, Music and Politics — A Study of the Argentinean Tango in Argentina. Michael Brown - second place ($1500) for his proposal, Kasha-Do Teacher Training and Opera Academy in Härnösand, Sweden. Lindsey Vickers - third place ($1000) for the proposal, Music Fest Perugia in Perugia Italy. Culley Lesch - fourth place ($500) for Theory and Analysis of Contemporary Music in Paris, France. Mugel Hijar - fourth place ($500) for the proposal, Vianden Festival in Vianden, Luxembourg.

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L to R: Lindsey Vickers, Song E. Kim, Philip Castro, Katherine Chandler, Azusa Bies

A triumph for Carolina’s MTNA Collegiate Chapter Piano pedagogy students organize successful national conference

The idea of a national conference for Music Teachers National Association (MTNA) Collegiate Chapters was founded in the spirit of collaboration when a group of students from different universities came together at the 2011 MTNA National Conference in Milwaukee to find ways to communicate and share activity. Since then, the conference has traveled to a different university every year, giving different collegiate chapters the opportunity to organize a professional, national event. The 2016 MTNA Collegiate Chapter Piano Pedagogy Symposium was hosted by the USC Collegiate Chapter in January. The chapter members were responsible for all organizational aspects of the two-day conference where more than 180 student members and faculty advisors from across the U.S. attended and presented research, teaching workshops and research posters. Scott Price, professor of piano and piano pedagogy, could not have been more proud of our students and the high level of work they presented at the event. Not only did they perform and present research, but they also handled all logistical aspects of the conference including transportation, meals, lodging, programming and technical needs. “Our students proved that they can hold their own in any professional arena, and I am so proud to be able to work with them,” said Price. “Chapter president Katie Chandler and conference co-organizer Philip Castro led a team of students who did top-notch work and learned leadership skills that will serve them very well as they move into their professional careers.”


#EmployedMusicians

The USC School of Music’s South Carolina Public Radio Connection If you listen to a SC Public Radio station, you no doubt have heard hosts with a connection to the School of Music. Our students and alumni are responsible for six of the dynamic music programs regularly heard on the classical stations.

mentalism – with thoughtful insight supplementing each selection. The program features interviews with local, regional and national composers, musicians, musicologists and theorists. Kate graduated in 2014 with a B.A. in performance.

Recent graduate “Classics of the with a B.A. in music, Cinema,” produced Eva Bennett, is and hosted by Liz host and producer Olson, highlights of “Classical famous classical Unknown,” which film scores in movie she developed as Kate McKinney interviews Susan Zhang and Nick Luby about history. Although an intern with the The Concert Truck on Sonatas & Soundscapes. Liz, a recent graduate station. “As I was with a 2016 B.M. in brainstorming ideas, music theory, hosted her last show at I really wanted to focus on bringing Listen on SC Public Radio the station before moving away, she something new and innovative to the said, “The show allowed me to really audience. So I came up with the idea Sonatas & Soundscapes channel my creativity and make it to have a show based on lesser known Mon-Thu, 11 a.m.-1:00 p.m.; Fri, 11 a.m.–noon my own. I had a good deal of freedom classical composers and pieces. Voices in Harmony to choose what direction I wanted Some of the composers I feature are Classical Stations: Tue, 9-10 p.m. my show to take, and the hands-on modern, but some are composers experience with the equipment will be that have slipped through the cracks Classical Unknown Classical Stations: Thu, 9-10 p.m. a skill set that I can carry throughout throughout musical history.” my journey.” On the Keys Eva also produces and hosts the Classical Stations: Thu, 8-9 p.m. School of Music alum David Kiser is weekly “Voices in Harmony,” host and producer of “On the Keys,” an hour-long program devoted Legacy of Opera Classical Stations: Sat, 4:30 - 5 p.m. an hour of piano music played by to exploring the wide range and virtuoso pianists. The show explores capability of the human voice. She the genres of piano music from says that the voice training she chamber to the concerto with special attention to rare and old received while a student helped her refine her broadcasting recordings. The show also regularly features pianists studying voice. “I’m able to exercise a lot of control over it and make my at USC. voice sound a certain way on the air.” Kate McKinney is the producer and host of “Sonatas and Soundscapes,” a daily, live, two-hour show that explores instrumental music – everything from baroque to experi-

Doctoral piano pedagogy candidate Michelle Wachter produces and hosts “Legacy of Opera,” exploring the widespread influences of opera throughout the centuries. 11


CRAIG BUTTERFIELD

J. DANIEL JENKINS

ELLEN DOUGLAS SCHLAEFER

Faculty News Craig Butterfield, associate professor of double bass, won the Jasper Magazine 2015 Jay Award for Artist of the Year in Music in November. J. Daniel Jenkins’ book, “Schoenberg’s Program Notes and Musical Analyses,” has been published by Oxford University Press, the most prominent academic music publisher. The book, edited by Jenkins, associate professor of music theory, is the most comprehensive study of the composer’s program notes and analyses of his own music yet published. It illuminates 42 of Schoenberg’s compositions through his own writings and emphasizes his deep concern for communication with and educating his audience. The book contains a wide range of documents produced by the composer about his own music in almost every medium available to him during his lifetime, and it demonstrates Schoenberg’s sincere effort to communicate to his audiences about his works. This book is part of the multi-volume series Schoenberg in Words under the general editorship of Sabine Feisst and Severine Neff. In addition, Jenkins has been appointed the chair of the Society of Music Theory Committee on Diversity for the next two years. Ellen Douglas Schlaefer, director of Opera Studies, won the Cantey Outstanding Faculty Award presented to a faculty member who has demonstrated exemplary dedication to

USC biology professor and good friend of the School of Music, John M. Herr, Jr., passed away on June 19, 2016. His long and prestigious career at Carolina earned him many awards and recognition, but it could be his work as a composer that was his most unique gift to the university. In 2005 Dr. Herr set about composing a tune for Carolina’s alma mater, performed by the USC Concert Choir in 2009. The experience of having his tune brought to life helped build a deep relationship with the School of Music, and he and his wife established the annual John and Lucrecia Herr Composition Award, open to all music students. 12

GREGORY SPRINGER

TINA MILHORN STALLARD

the School of Music in the areas of teaching, performance, scholarship or service. This past year Schlaefer directed Le Nozze di Figaro for Opera on the James (Lynchburg, VA), Madama Butterfly (Quisisana, Maine), Il barbiere di Siviglia (Brott Opera, Hamilton, Ontario Canada), Tosca (The Dallas Opera) and The Little Prince (Houston Grand Opera).  Founder and general director of FBN Productions Opera for Kids, Schlaefer produced and directed its 22nd season for a three-state tour. Gregory Springer, assistant professor of music education, was elected for a national leadership position in NAfME’s Affective Response Special Research Interest Group (AR-SRIG). He will serve as chair-elect for a two-year term, followed by a two-year term as chair. Springer also had research articles published in the International Journal of Music Education, Psychology of Music, Journal of Music Teacher Education, and College Music Symposium and delivered research presentations at the NAfME Music Research and Teacher Education Conference, the Society for Music Perception and Cognition National Conference, the Symposium on Music Teacher Education, the Ohio Music Educators Association Conference, and the South Carolina Music Educators Association Conference. Tina Milhorn Stallard was the recipient of the Encore Award, presented to an outstanding classical alumnus from the Belmont University School of Music.

Luise Eitel Peake, beloved by many, passed away on January 14, 2016. Dr. Peake taught classes at the USC School of Music on every aspect of music history and literature and supervised the writing of many doctoral documents until her retirement in 1994. Coming to USC in 1968, Dr. Peake was the only musicologist in the state for years. Hired first to supervise the music department’s collection of scores, books and records, she designed the organization that became the foundation of the present Music Library. She founded and conducted a Collegium Musicum, gathering early-music enthusiasts from the university and the community.


Lifetime Achievements

Welcome New Faculty and Staff Mezzo-soprano Rachel Calloway, adjunct instructor of voice, is an internationally recognized leading interpreter of contemporary and modern music. Her work has been praised by The New York Times for “penetrating clarity” and “considerable depth of expression” and by Opera News for her “adept musicianship and dramatic flair.”

LARRY WYATT

DONALD PORTNOY

Nationally recognized for his excellence in choral conducting, Larry Wyatt, professor and director of choral studies, received the prestigious American Choral Directors Association’s Southern Division Award of Excellence at the annual conference in Chattanooga in March. The award is presented to only one person every two years from a membership of 4,000. Donald Portnoy has received countless accolades throughout his 30 years conducting the university’s top orchestra, like this one from the Free Times music critic, “Donald Portnoy’s leadership draws out their very best efforts. The orchestra was spectacular, switching effortlessly from sumptuous and sultry to brilliant and brassy. Portnoy switched easily from contrasting conducting roles of Mr. Cool to Conductor on Fire.” Maestro Portnoy, the Ira McKissick Koger Professor of Fine Arts and USC Symphony Orchestra director, conducts his Farewell Season 2016-2017. The professor of conducting and violin retires as director of the USC Symphony Orchestra and orchestral studies after the 2016-2017 academic year. He will continue to teach conducting and violin and direct the Conductors Institute of SC at USC.

Donors and more faculty, alumni & student news at Da Capo Online:

sc.edu/music

Jillian Carey, academic advisor for undergraduate students, received degrees in theatre for the musical stage and drama/theatre for the young. After contracts across the country with children’s theatres, she worked at the University of Michigan as a student services administrator before joining USC. David Kirkland Garner, assistant professor of theory and composition, writes chamber, orchestral, electroacoustic and vocal works, often drawing on other music as a point of departure from Beethoven to bluegrass. A frequent source of inspiration is the music of the American South. Michaela Helms, administrative assistant to bands, received her bachelor’s degree in music education from USC in 2011. Prior to joining the School of Music, she served as an admissions counselor and coordinator for transfer initiatives in the office of undergraduate admissions. Polly Laffitte, director of development, is a veteran fundraiser with seven years of experience at Carolina and eight in higher education and music fundraising in Knoxville, TN, with the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra and the University of Tennessee where she was responsible for major gifts for arts and humanities. Ari Streisfeld, assistant professor of violin and violin pedagogy, has garnered critical acclaim worldwide for his performances and has established himself as one of the foremost interpreters of contemporary classical music. Praised for his “dazzling performance” by The New York Times and “scintillating playing” by New York Classical Review, Streisfeld is a founding member of the world renowned JACK Quartet. Stephen Wilson, adjunct instructor of trombone, has more than 40 years of experience as a professional trombonist and has performed with Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett, Sammy Davis Jr., George Benson and Natalie Cole, among others. 13


Alumni Spotlights CEDRIC ADDERLEY was named the fourth president of the SC Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities in Greenville, SC. He has earned numerous accolades throughout the U.S. including winning the Detroit Symphony Orchestra’s annual composer search for his Symphony No.1 and being selected as Composer of the Year by the South Carolina Music Teachers Association. An accomplished composer and music educator, Adderley earned his Doctor of Musical Arts in composition from USC with additional studies at Harvard University and DePaul University. He has significant experience in accreditation-related activities and has published, composed and recorded extensively. He has taught on all levels and served in various administrative positions in both K-12 and higher education. 1992 M.M.; 1997 D.M.A. composition

NOVÉ DEYPALAN received the Special Commendation Award in a conducting competition in London with the London Classical Soloists in January 2016. Deypalan was a Prize Winner and awarded the Highest Distinction in the International Masterclass “Conducting Tchaikovsky” with the St. Petersburg Chamber Philharmonic in Russia in 2014. In addition to conducting, Deypalan is the founder and president of the Los Angeles Conducting Institute, created to reestablish Southern California’s role in developing the next generation of great conductors. 2012 D.M.A. orchestral conducting

BRIANA LEAMAN earned her Master Professionnel de Composition et Interprétation Musicale (master’s in oboe performance) in France. The program is part of the Haute École des Arts du Rhin, the superior academy of the arts in Alsace, which links the University of Strasbourg and the Strasbourg Conservatory to grant an internationally-recognized degree. While working

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toward her degree, Leaman performed as second oboe with the Orchestre Philharmonique de Strasbourg, one of the top professional orchestras in France, through the Conservatoire’s Orchestra Academy. She has also performed with the school for the Opéra National du Rhin and with local music ensembles and in solo concerts for audiences including diplomats of the European Parliament. She now resides in Melbourne, Australia, where she plans to pursue her solo and orchestral career. 2013 B.M. performance JOSE MANUEL LEZCANO performed premieres as guitarist-composer, including a solo performance at Havana Cuba’s Identidades International Festival, Feb. 2016, where he played his second double concerto for flute, guitar and strings, “Sojourners,” at the Basilica Menor de San Fransisco de Asisi with Antipe di Stella and Ivan Valiente conducting the Orquesta Solistas de la Habana; with cellist Rebecca Hartka at the Boston Guitar Society Ensembles Festival, March 2016, in the Boston premiere of his Sonata for Cello and Guitar; and attended the New York premiere of his “Postcards” for flute and piano at the Spectrum NYC Composers Now Festival with Lisa Hansen and Max Lifchitz of North-South Consonance Feb., 2016. Lezcano is a professor of music at Keene State College, NH, and was named a recipient of a 2016 Ruth and James Ewing Award by The Keene Sentinel, which recognizes excellence in the arts in the Monadnock Region. 1983 M.M. guitar performance

DAVID CLAY METTENS’ work has been recognized with a 2016 ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Award, the 2015 SCI/ASCAP graduate student commission, and a commission from the American Opera Initiative, which premiered in December 2015 by the Washington National Opera at the Kennedy Center. His orchestra

piece, “Sleeping I am carried...” will be performed by the Brussels Philharmonic in December 2016. 2013 B.M.

formance, and their final concert resulted in Powell being named a finalist for the 2015 American Prize in Conducting.

composition

2004 D.M.A. choral conducting

CAITLYN OENBRINK, NYC and Boston-based actor, recently performed the role of Miss Dorothy in “Thoroughly Modern Millie” with Reagle Music Theatre in Boston. This year she was nominated for Leading Actress of the Year in the Professional Theatre category for the 2015 Central New York Salt Awards (Syracuse Area Live Theater) for her work as Julie in “Carousel,” a program recognizing exemplary and outstanding performances in professional and non-professional theater in Central New York. Oenbrink made her New York concert debut with the Brooklyn Philharmonic performing the world premiere of “Liebovar” at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in Manhattan. Green Room Reviews wrote, “... Her voice is a joy to listen to – controlled yet emotive, soft one moment and filling the theater the next.” 2012 B.M.

MICHAEL MOORE (2005 Ph.D. music

voice performance

TIMOTHY MICHAEL POWELL, director of choral activities and music education at Martin Methodist College in Pulaski, TN, was honored as a semifinalist for the 2016 Grammy Music Educator Award, one of 25 educators in the nation to receive that distinction. His choir’s 2015 recording was a finalist for the 2015 American Prize in Choral Per-

education; 2004 M.M. instrumental conducting) joined fellow Gamecock

PHIL GOLSON (2001 D.M.A. instrumental conducting; 1999 M.M. music education) for

a series of community upliftment initiatives in Knynsa, South Africa. During the two-week visit, Moore partnered with Golson to conduct music clinics in a local school and in impoverished communities where music serves as a means of hope for disadvantaged residents of Knysna. Both former students of William J. Moody and James K. Copenhaver, Golson and Moore share a vision for using their passion for music education as a platform for outreach. Golson is in his third year in Knysna, where he has established multiple music education initiatives through his non-profit GRACE (Garden Route Arts, Communication, and Education). One of those initiatives is “Playing It Forward,” a project to donate used or unwanted instruments to schools for students who wouldn’t otherwise have access to instrumental music education. Moore, professor and chair of the department of music education at Bob Jones University in Greenville, SC, made the trip to South Africa to establish a cross-cultural internship program for university students interested in teaching music abroad.

Donors and more alumni, student & faculty news at Da Capo Online:

sc.edu/music


Student Spotlights texture and musical space that he was unaccustomed to filling. Now, because the group is getting more performances and community strum-alongs lined up, Hall is in the process of training and recruiting other teachers to help lead the ukulele band. 2014 B.M., current M.M. student

The American String Teachers Association (ASTA) awarded USC students and Gail Barnes, professor of music education, with the ASTA String Project of the Year Award at the National Conference in Tampa, Florida, in March: CARSON DIXON, TESS HARTIS, JANE KATHRYN HUCKS, KRYSTIN JOHNSON, AUSTIN JOHNSON, ANDREW JONES, CATEY LACASSE, KATELYNN LOWE, OLIVIA MORRIS, CHRISTINE NIXON, BETH REED, MARY VAVRA STEVEN BRUNDAGE presented at the most recent CMS Mid-Atlantic Conference at Winthrop University and won the Ruskin Cooper Award for best student presentation. The Music Teachers National Association awarded Brundage the American Music Teacher magazine’s Article of the Year Award for 2015. The Award recognizes outstanding contributions to MTNA’s professional journal. He was recognized for the top-level honor at the 2016 national conference in San Antonio. “’The Art of Possibility’ seeks to make sense of talent in music teaching and learning by examining Malcolm Gladwell’s ‘10,000-Hour Rule’ [that states natural ability requires a huge investment of time in order to be made manifest] and by exploring current and historical research by psychologists John B. Watson and Carol Dweck, philosophers Francis Galton and John Locke, and authors Matthew Syed and Daniel Coyle, among others,” said Brundage. “The article questions whether greatness is truly the result of unique genetics or unique upbringings, what value rests in the ‘10,000-Hour Rule,’ why we equate genius with precocity, what role innate intelligence plays in the development of expert skill, and ultimately, what is the real key to musical success?” D.M.A. piano pedagogy candidate

IAN GIOCONDO won second prize for the University Libraries Award for Undergraduate Research for his paper, “A OneMan Revolution: Stravinsky’s Metamorphoses of Style.” His other major awards this year are the Walker Institute Award and a Magellan Award – he was in Paris this summer to do archival research on Nadia Boulanger – her teaching activities and influence on post-war composers from 1950-79. B.M. music education winds (trombone)

TIMOTHY HALL was awarded a College Music Society Yamaha In-Residence Fellowship grant and has used funds to establish The Cola Ukulele Band. Hall says he’s drawn to projects that include people from, not only different academic disciplines or musical areas, but people who may not have reason to interact in any other place. He wanted his project to be a community ensemble that could include anyone, including beginners. “I saw it as a challenge to bring together total amateurs, music students and professional musicians,” said Hall. “…art, and music specifically, offer a unique way for strangers to interact and build a sense of unity within a community.” Hall fosters a fun but challenging musical environment for the group. For instance, as the ukulele players strummed harmonies for an excerpt from a Bach Brandenburg Concerto, Hall asked a jazz trumpet player to solo over that form, a different

EUNSEOK SEO was one of 14 finalists selected out of 370 applicants from 64 countries for the prestigious Mahler Competition in Germany in May 2016. D.M.A. orchestral conducting candidate

Orchestra and the New York Philharmonic. He will teach English, music theory, and he will be the staff conductor for the academy repertoire ensemble. He will also work with schools and universities in the Shanghai area as a conductor and music coach. “The most interesting thing for me,” says Wise, “has been the realization that no matter how different two cultures can be, the love and passion for music is still the same. My favorite moment has been putting together Beethoven’s Overture to Egmont with a youth orchestra, and once we got past the initial ensemble challenges, you could see the excitement of the students who had just played Beethoven for the first time. Sharing music around the world. It’s a dream come true for me.” D.M.A. orchestral conducting candidate

Three national flute performance competitions can boast winners from the USC. All three competitors were selected as finalists based on recordings, and were selected as a winners during the competitive, live finals: SAMANTHA MARSHALL winner of the Flute Society of Washington Collegiate Soloist Competition. BRITTANY STONE received a Magellan Scholar Award ($2500) for “Examining the Implementation of a Music Learning Theory for Newborn and Young Children Across Cultures.” She is investigating Music Play programs at USC and in Barcelona and Madrid, Spain. While in Spain, Stone observed and participated in the application and exploration of Gordon’s Music Learning Theory through Music Play classes led by Spanish music educators for children, infants to age 5. During her research she observed several cultural differences between Spanish and American Music Play classes, finding Spanish music for young children to be far more syncopated than typical American music. She and the Spanish Music Play teachers worked on further adapting Gordon’s theory to Spanish and Catalan to promote young children’s vocalizations in music classes. When Stone was not researching she enjoyed exploring the vibrant cities and serenity of the surrounding mountains. B.M. music education

B.M. flute performance; graduated 2016

PHILIP SNYDER, winner of the Flute Society of Kentucky Young Artist Competition. D.M.A. performance candidate; 2015 M.M. performance

ZACHARY WARREN, winner of the Florida Flute Association Young Artist Competition. B.M. performance

ALEX WISE has accepted a position as adjunct professor of music and English with the Shanghai Orchestra Academy, a cooperative training program between the Shanghai Symphony

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Spotlight On Our Donors Music is a family affair for Annette and Steve Francis, and they are committed to paying it forward here at USC. In 2015 they established a scholarship in the School of Music in honor of Annette’s parents, Roy and Nancy West. In 2016 they will create another, making a Carolina music education more affordable for talented students. It was Roy’s career as a musician and piano technician that inspired his daughter to pursue a similar path. Annette West Francis earned her master of music education degree from USC in 1977 and, until 1988, taught elementary school music in Richland School District 1. She has been named Teacher of the Year twice – once in 1980 and then in 1990 while she was teaching elementary music in the Fort Jackson Schools. Under her guidance, Pinkney School at Fort Jackson became one of the elementary schools in the state selected to become an Arts In Basic Curriculum (ABC) Project. In recognition of her work in arts education, Annette received a 2007 Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Award in the Arts from the South Carolina Arts Commission and Governor Sanford. Supporting his wife all along the way has been Steve, whose career path was as a Vice President of Human Resources for AgFirst Farm Credit Bank and whose passion is also music. Steve joins the Board of the Friends of the School of Music this fall, lending his expertise and experience to our volunteer organization. 16

Dedication to music and young musicians has been the life’s work of Frances Webb. She has, in fact, founded two competitions for young musicians – one in piano and one in organ – and as a member of the SC Philharmonic’s Symphony League, she chairs the Arthur Fraser International Competition committee, which partners with the School of Music’s Southeastern Piano Festival, to sponsor that competition annually. Through her generous annual gifts, her tireless volunteerism and a recent bequest commitment to the School of Music, Frances is ensuring that the Southeastern Piano Festival will continue to thrive today and beyond her lifetime. A native of Manning, SC, Frances Mitchum Webb earned her bachelor’s degree in piano pedagogy from Coker College and her master’s degree from Indiana University in piano performance. Her 36-year teaching career was spent at Texas State University in San Marcos, TX, where she taught applied piano and piano literature. It was at Texas State that she founded their Young Pianist Competition. Upon retirement in 2006, Frances returned to SC and became active in Columbia’s musical organizations and a substitute organist for many area churches. She serves as the dean of the Greater Columbia Chapter of the American Guild of Organists, where in 2011, she spearheaded the formation of the Young Organist Competition. “The future of the performing arts rests with these talented young musicians. I am so pleased to be a small part of promoting their budding careers.” – Frances Mitchum Webb


2015-2016 Faculty News James Ackley, who is part of the acclaimed and award winning brass quintet Bala Brass, recently collaborated with performers from around the nation to create a new operatic listening experience. They recorded and released a CD titled, “Deus Ex Machina,” which won three Global Music Awards. He has also won a 2016 Global Music Award for his CD titled, “New American Music for Trumpet.” Reginald Bain received a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to support the five-year Mutational Music project, a collaboration with scientist Jeff Dudycha of USC’s Department of Biological Sciences. This project is the broader impact component of the NSF grant “Mutational Variance of the Transcriptome and the Origins of Phenotypic Plasticity.” It will include the development of a computer-based musical sonification application that simulates genetic copying errors in the context of music, the development of an application for mobile devices that uses computer-based music to simulate spontaneous mutations, as well as an educational program appropriate for use in introductory genetics laboratories. Gail Barnes and the String Project teachers were honored with the ASTA String Project of the Year award presented at the national conference in March. Barnes recently published books and articles: “Measures of Success for Strings, volume 2”; “Parental involvement and home environment in music: Current and former students from selected community music programs in Brazil and the United States,” International Journal of Music Education; “School orchestra and string teachers Facebook group: an online community of practice.” International Journal of Community Music; “The effect of experience, performance level, and presentation medium on string musicians’ evaluations of string orchestra performances.” Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education. Barnes presented in Orange County, FL; Norfolk, VA; Chicago, Ill; Boulder, CO; Colorado Springs, CO; and Tampa, FL. Phillip Bush completed a nine-year stint as artistic director of the Bennington Chamber Music Conference (VT) with the summer 2015 season. In his years at the helm, Bush programmed 55 chamber music concerts for the artist-faculty concert series. Each season he was responsible for assembling a faculty of more than 50 performing/teaching artists and overseeing the coaching program with approximately 250 participants each summer. Autumn 2015 saw the release (on New World Records) of Michael Pisaro’s “a mist is a collection of points” with fellow faculty member Greg Stuart (percussion); the two celebrated the release with a live performance of the hour-long work at REDCAT at Disney Hall in Los Angeles in November. The recording made both Alex Ross’ (New Yorker) and Steve Smith’s (Boston Globe) “Ten Best of 2015” lists. Bush joined cellist Edward Arron, violinist Ara Gregorian,

and violist Nicholas Cords in December for a chamber music tour of Connecticut and several venues in South Carolina, including Camden, USC-Beaufort, and the Chamber Music on Main series at the Columbia Museum of Art. In February 2016 Bush appeared as soloist with the South Carolina Philharmonic and conductor Morihiko Nakahara on their Masterworks Series, performing both Ravel’s G Major Piano Concerto and Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue.” In March he made his 23rd visit to Japan, for a whirlwind nine-city tour with violinist Iwao Furusawa, violist Paul Coletti, and cellist Francis Gouton, culminating with two sold-out shows at Tokyo’s Hakuju Hall. In April he gave master classes at Cornell University and a solo recital there and at the DiMenna Center for Classical Music in New York City. His 2016 season wrapped up with a return to the Fayetteville Chamber Music Festival in Texas, where he collaborated in chamber music performances with artists violist Dimitri Murrath and cellist Bion Tsang. Craig Butterfield won the Jasper Magazine 2015 Jay Award for Artist of the Year in Music in November. Distinguished Professor Emeritus Gordon (Dick) Goodwin continues to produce a string of new pieces. The Columbia Choral Society premiered a work in May for chorus and jazz ensemble titled “Jasmine Rhythms” with text by Paddy Bell. Also on the program was a new SATB and piano version of his “Mark Twain Remarks.” (The first incarnation of that piece was with the Palmetto Mastersingers and the SC Philharmonic.) Performances were at the Columbia Museum of Art and at the Fine Arts Center of Kershaw County (Camden). Lillian Quackenbush (USC D.M.A.) conducted. Goodwin’s Big Band, featuring emeriti professors Jim Hall and Doug Graham, played a concert at the Lourie Center on July 24. Since 2014 Dean Tayloe Harding has been elected Secretary of the National Association of Schools of Music (NASM) and has installed four new chapters of the national music honorary society, Pi Kappa Lambda (PKL) at colleges and universities across the country. He delivered numerous presentations and three keynote speeches to regional and national conferences of the National Association of Music Merchandisers (NAMM), PKL, and the College Music Society (CMS) and retired as president of the Society’s foundation, The CMS Fund after seven years of service. Harding served as visiting evaluator or consultant for music schools at six different institutions and fulfilled two new commissions for compositions with premiers, multiple tour performances, and three recordings. Additionally, Harding delivered a presentation at TedX Columbia www. youtube.com/watch?v=lKZKGJflwyI. Southern Exposure, directed by Michael Harley, was the winner of 21CM’s Pop Picks in 2015. 21st Century Musician guest 17


curators call out innovative people, organizations and projects advancing the art form. Peter A. Hoyt, adjunct associate professor of music history and past president of the Mozart Society of America, gave a pre-concert lecture at the The Lincoln Center’s Great Performances series in February. In April he was part of the panel, “Shakespeare vs. Mozart,” at Lincoln Center’s Mostly Mozart series. Julie Hubbert won a competitive Summer Stipend award by the National Endowment for the Humanities. All Summer Stipends applications are evaluated by peer review panels and by the National Council on the Humanities. This year they received over 800 applications and only 10 percent were funded. J. Daniel Jenkins has been appointed the chair of the Society of Music Theory Committee on Diversity for the next two years. His book, “Schoenberg’s Program Notes and Musical Analyses” has been published by Oxford University Press, the most prominent academic music publisher. The book, edited by Jenkins, is the most comprehensive study of the composer’s program notes and analyses of his own music yet published; illuminates 42 of Schoenberg’s compositions through his own writings; and emphasizes Schoenberg’s deep concern for communication with and educating his audience. The book contains a wide range of documents produced by the composer about his own music in almost every medium available to him during his life time, and it demonstrates Schoenberg’s sincere effort and desire to communicate to his audiences about his works. This book is part of the multi-volume series “Schoenberg in Words” under the general editorship of Sabine Feisst and Severine Neff.  Robert Jesselson’s blog “100 Cello Warm-ups and Exercises” appears on the popular CelloBello website at cellobello.com/ blog. Jesselson gave several sessions at the ASTA national conference, and a Cello Bootcamp session at the SCMEA and KMEA conferences. He performed recitals and gave master classes in China and Korea in October 2015; played recitals in Georgia and Pennsylvania; Performed Tchaikovsky “Souvenir de Florence” with the Parker Quartet at USC in March 2016; and participated in the CelloSpeak festival at Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. Jesselson is part of the organizing committee to create a public charter school in Columbia, SC, called the Midlands Arts Conservatory. Jesselson continues on the Board of the National String Project Consortium, which he helped found. Birgitta Johnson was awarded a 2015-2016 Walker Institute of International and Area Studies Faculty Conference Travel Grant; published “This is Not the Warm Up Act!: Praise and Worship Expanding Liturgical Traditions, Theology, and Identities in an African American Megachurch” in The Spirit of Praise: Music and Worship in the Pentecostal-Charismat18

ic Tradition (Penn State University Press), edited by Amos Young and Monique Ingalls; presented “At the Cross(roads) with Beyoncé: Gospel Music, Spirituality and Convergence Culture in YouTube Cover Songs” at the annual conference of the Southeast and Caribbean Chapter of the Society for Ethnomusicology in March, San Fernando, Trinidad and Tobago; “The Gospel of Beyoncé: Religious Remixes of the Ultra Secular in the Social Media Age” at the annual Conference of the Society for Ethnomusicology in December, Austin, Texas; “Baraka’s Blues People At 50: Race, Rhythm, and Views in the Study of African American Music Culture Today,” round table position paper; 100th meeting of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History in September, Atlanta, Georgia; “This is not the warm up act!: Praise and Worship Expanding Traditions, Theology and Identities in an African American Megachurch” at Christian Congregational Music: Local and Global Perspectives in August, Ripon College Cuddesdon, Oxford, United Kingdom. Invited lectures and round tables: “Hip-Politics: Hip-Hop’s Impact on American Politics & Policy” by Anton Gunn; invited panelist for community presentation and talk at Tapps Arts Center in Columbia, SC, in April; “Research and Careers in Ethnomusicology” talk for music seminar course at Allen University, Columbia, SC, in October; Fresh Dressed Film screening panelist with director Sacha Jenkins, Blaktastik Festival (Black Films, Art, and Music festival) at the Nickelodeon Theatre in July. In February, Clifford Leaman and Scott Herring performed a concert at Jerusalem Lutheran Church in Rothsville, PA; at Landis Homes Retirement Community in Lancaster, PA; travelled to Susquehanna University in Selinsgrove, PA, where they presented clinics to the saxophone and percussion students; presented clinics and performed at West Chester University in West Chester, PA; performed and presented clinics at Wilson High School in Reading, PA. Two of the works performed were world premieres “Want It, Need It, Have It” by Adam Silverman and “Devil’s Garden/Angels Landing” by Robbert Maggio, both composers on faculty at West Chester University. In the 2015-16 season Marina Lomazov performed Rachmaninoff Concerto No. 2 with Plymouth Philharmonic (MA), New Bedford Symphony in Massachusetts (MA), Florence Symphony Orchestra (SC), Alicante Symphony Orchestra in Perugia (Italy) and Mendelssohn Double Concerto for violin and piano with Wuhan Symphony Orchestra in China. Lomazov divided her time equally between being featured as a solo guest artist at the Young Artist World Piano Festival, Missouri Central Piano Festival, Northeastern State University (OK), Coastal Carolina Cultural Arts Concert Series (SC), Campbell University Concert Series, Texas State International Concert Series, Temple University Concert Series and as Lomazov/Rackers piano duo in concerts in Seattle (WA), Lenox (MA), Augusta (GA), Perugia (Italy), Texas State International Piano Festival, Indiana University Summer Piano Academy (Bloomington,


IN), University of Montana Celebrate Piano Series, and at the 18th Annual Franz Liszt Festival. She was also invited to adjudicate Dallas International Piano Competition, Seattle Young Artist Music Festival, Thousand Islands International Piano Competition, Arthur Dann Piano Competition at Oberlin (OH), Cleveland International Piano Competition, and came back for the seventh year as a chair of the YoungArts National Foundation for Advancement of the Arts music panel in Miami (FL). In March 2015 she was one of the featured speakers at the national MTNA conference in Las Vegas, NV. John McKay and J. Daniel Jenkins delivered conference papers at the Society for Music Theory Conference on their current research: “From Verstehen to Fasslichkeit: Schoenberg, Recording Technology, Liner Notes, and Public Musicology” and “The Origin of Modern Combinatorics in 17th-Century Music Theory Treatises.” John McKay has been appointed statistician of the American Musicological Society. He gave a paper at the Society for Music Theory Conference on the “Pope Marcellus Mass” as part of the newly formed Early Music Study Group. Scott Price, professor of piano and piano pedagogy, was elected to his second term as president of the Board of Trustees of the Frances Clark Center for Keyboard Pedagogy. He presented a plenary session on teaching improvisation and composition to students with autism and other special needs at the National Conference on Keyboard Pedagogy, and was invited to present lectures on teaching students with autism at the national conference of the Music Teachers National Association, and The New School for Music Study. He was the invited guest clinician for the University of Nebraska-Kearney Spring Piano Workshop where he presented two workshops for piano teachers, performed two recitals, and presented a piano master class. Dr. Price inaugurated a serious of “sensory-friendly” concerts for the special needs community that will continue into the coming year. He also presented a “Schumann Piano Evening” concert performing Robert Schumann’s Kreisleriana Op. 16, Fantasie Op. 17, Humoresque Op. 20, and Carnaval Op. 9 in one evening. He continues to serve as creator and editor-in-chief of the online Piano Pedagogy Forum academic journal, and as founder and instructor of the Carolina LifeSong Initiative - a program providing piano lessons and music experiences for students with autism and other special needs. Dr. Price serves as faculty advisor of the USC Collegiate Chapter of the Music Teachers National Association. Student chapter members hosted and presented at the MTNA Collegiate Chapter Piano Pedagogy Symposium held at USC. Chapter members were also selected to present a session and research posters at the Music Teachers National Association national conference in San Antonio, TX. 

member who has demonstrated exemplary dedication to the School of Music in the areas of teaching, performance, scholarship or service. This past year Schlaefer directed Le Nozze di Figaro for Opera on the James (Lynchburg, VA), Madama Butterfly (Quisisana, Maine), Il barbiere di Siviglia (Brott Opera, Hamilton, Ontario Canada), Tosca (The Dallas Opera) and The Little Prince (Houston Grand Opera). Founder and general director of FBN Productions Opera for Kids, Schlaefer produced and directed its 22nd season for a three-state tour. Gregory Springer, assistant professor of music education, was elected for a national leadership position in NAfME’s Affective Response Special Research Interest Group (AR-SRIG). He will serve as chair-elect for a two-year term, followed by a twoyear term as chair. Springer had research articles published in the International Journal of Music Education, Psychology of Music, Journal of Music Teacher Education, and College Music Symposium. He also delivered research presentations at the NAfME Music Research and Teacher Education Conference, the Society for Music Perception and Cognition National Conference, the Symposium on Music Teacher Education, the Ohio Music Educators Association Conference, and the South Carolina Music Educators Association Conference. Tina Milhorn Stallard was the recipient of the Encore Award, presented to an outstanding classical alumnus from the Belmont University School of Music. Greg Stuart and the 100 percussionists, Speak Percussion, gave the world premiere of Michael Pisaro’s “A wave and waves” as part of the 30th anniversary of the Melbourne Festival. The performance was selected by ArtsHub Australia in its “Best of Performing Arts 2015” list. Stuart won a ‘Deutscheschallplattenkritikspreis’ (German Record Critic’s Award) for best new music release of 2015. He performed with students at Columbia Museum of Art’s Baker and Baker series concert featuring the music of visiting Swiss composer and clarinetist, Jürg Frey. Along with the composer, violinist Erik Carlson (International Contemporary Ensemble/UCSD) joined Stuart and a large contingent of musicians from the School of Music and the South Carolina Honors College performing Frey’s “Circular Music No. 6,” the newly commissioned “Ephemeral Constructions” for violin, percussion and ensemble, and more.  Daniel Sweany gave recitals and master classes at Vanderbilt University, Middle Tennessee State University, The Interlochen Arts Academy, University of Colorado and University of Northern Colorado. Larry Wyatt received the American Choral Directors Association’s Southern Division Award of Excellence, presented to one person every two years, at the annual conference in Chattanooga in March.

Ellen Douglas Schlaefer, director of Opera Studies, won the Cantey Outstanding Faculty Award presented to a faculty 19


2015-2016 Student News The ASTA Student Chapter was well represented at the March American String Teachers Association (ASTA) National Conference in Tampa, Florida, as presenters, co-presenters and presiders, as well as observers. These students and Gail Barnes were honored with the ASTA “String Project of the Year” award: Carson Dixon, Tess Hartis, Jane Kathryn Hucks, Krystin Johnson, Austin Johnson, Andrew Jones, Catey Lacasse, Katelynn Lowe, Olivia Morris, Christine Nixon, Beth Reed and Mary Vavra. Jordan Bartow received a Magellan Award for his proposal “A Study about the Production, Parameters, and Pedagogy of Vibrato on the Cello” that he will pursue during his participation in the Green Mountain Chamber Music Festival this summer in Burlington, Vermont. Madeline Beitel, Nicholas Hawkins and James Siarris were selected for three of the four spots in the prestigious GLOW Apprentice Artist Program (GAAP) for GLOW Lyric Theatre’s 2016 summer festival season. USC Jazz students, Gabe Bertolini and Hunter Brons represented USC by participating in the SEC Symposium in Atlanta, GA, in September. Steven Brundage, D.M.A. piano pedagogy candidate, presented at the most recent CMS Mid-Atlantic Conference at Winthrop University and won the Ruskin Cooper Award for best student presentation. The Music Teachers National Association awarded Brundage the American Music Teacher magazine’s Article of the Year Award for 2015. The Award recognizes outstanding contributions to MTNA’s professional journal. He was recognized for the top-level honor at the 2016 national conference in San Antonio, Texas. “The Art of Possibility” questions whether greatness is truly the result of unique genetics or unique upbringings, what value rests in Mathew Gladwell’s ‘10,000-Hour Rule,’ why we equate genius with precocity, what role innate intelligence plays in the development of expert skill, and ultimately, what is the real key to musical success? Dorion Burkett won the Music Clubs Scholarship Fund Competition in Columbia, SC. Vallencia Callens won the encouragement award at the Metropolitan Opera Regional Competition. Additionally, she performed in the ensemble of “Porgy and Bess” at the 2016 Spoleto Festival in Charleston, SC. Kalim Campos, D.M.A. cello performance, was selected to play the David Popper’s “Hungarian Rhapsody” in the Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall in New York. He was the First Place 20

Winner of the American Protégé International Piano & Strings Competition 2016. He is principal cellist of the USC Symphony, USC Chamber Orchestra, and member of the USC Cello Choir and the Opera at USC Orchestra. Elizabeth Dempsey presented her study, “A Phenomenological Study of Music Educator Attrition,” at the Society of Music Teacher Education in Greensboro, NC, in September. Solomon Eichner competed among 16 participants from the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Russia, South Korea, Italy, Poland and Germany, and was awarded third place in the professional category of the Debut International Piano Competition. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in April, was accepted to the Hastings International Competition in England, played with the Discovery Orchestra in New Jersey and his ensemble, Ivory Trio, made their Piccolo Spoleto debut in Charleston, SC, in May. Johnnie Felder performed in the ensemble of “Porgy and Bess” at the 2016 Spoleto Festival in Charleston, SC. Ian Giocondo won second prize for the University Libraries Award for Undergraduate Research for his paper, “A One-Man Revolution: Stravinsky’s Metamorphoses of Style.” His other major awards this year are the Walker Institute Award and a Magellan Award – he was in Paris this summer to do archival research on Nadia Boulanger – her teaching activities and influence on post-war composers from 1950-79.    Timothy Hall was awarded a College Music Society Yamaha In-Residence Fellowship grant and has used the funds to establish The Cola Ukulele Band. Hall says he’s drawn to projects that include people from not only different academic disciplines or musical areas, but people who may not have reason to interact in any other place. He wanted his project to be a community ensemble that could include anyone, including beginners, and so came up with the winning idea. “I saw it as a challenge to bring together total amateurs, music students and professional musicians,” said Hall. “…art, and music specifically, offer a unique way for strangers to interact and build a sense of unity within a community.” Hall fosters a fun but challenging musical environment for the group. For instance, as the ukulele players strummed harmonies for an excerpt from a Bach Brandenburg Concerto, Hall asked a jazz trumpet player to solo over that form, a different texture and musical space that he was unaccustomed to filling. Now, because the group is getting more performances and community strum-alongs lined up, Hall is in the process of training and recruiting other teachers to help lead the ukulele band. Mimi Harding was awarded a Magellan Scholar Award to


travel to Argentina to work on her research project: “Music and Politics: A Study of the Argentinian Tango.” USC violin students Seán Heely and Nusheen Farahani won first and second place finishes in the Scottish Fiddling Competition at the Charleston Scottish Games and Highland Gathering. Saxophone students competed in the South Carolina MTNA State level competitions: Jonathan Kierspe, winner, Young Artist Competition Brian Bethea, alternate, Young Artist Competition Aubrey Leaman took a top prize in the Undergraduate Research Awards. Three different national flute performance competitions can boast winners from the University of South Carolina. Zachary Warren was the winner of the Florida Flute Association Young Artist Competition; Samantha Marshall the winner of the Flute Society of Washington Collegiate Soloist Competition; and Philip Snyder the winner of the Flute Society of Kentucky Young Artist Competition. All three competitors were selected as finalists based on recordings they submitted. Each then traveled to their respective competition to compete in the live final rounds. Eunseok Seo was one of 14 finalists selected out of 370 applicants from 64 countries for the prestigious Mahler Competition in Germany in May 2016. Brittany Stone, B.M. music education, received a Magellan Scholar Award ($2500) for her proposal “Examining the Implementation of a Music Learning Theory for Newborn and Young Children Across Cultures.” She is investigating Music Play programs at USC and in Barcelona and Madrid, Spain. While in Spain Brittany observed and participated in the application and exploration of Gordon’s Music Learning Theory through Music Play classes led by Spanish music educators for children, infants-age 5). During her research she observed several cultural differences between Spanish and American Music Play classes, finding Spanish music for young children to be far more syncopated than typical American music. She and the Spanish Music Play teachers worked on further adapting Gordon’s theory to Spanish and Catalan to promote young children’s vocalizations in music classes. Alex Wise has accepted a position as adjunct professor of Music and English with the Shanghai Orchestra Academy, a cooperative training program between the Shanghai Symphony Orchestra and the New York Philharmonic. He will be teaching English, music theory, and will be the staff conductor for the academy repertoire ensemble. In addition, he will also work with various schools and universities in the Shanghai area as a conductor and music coach.

Students in University Chorus were invited to perform a concert at Carnegie Hall that included Mozart’s Missa Brevis in F, K. 192, and the World Premier of Daniel Elder’s work for choir and orchestra, “World Without End.” Performing in New York with them were nearly 100 outstanding singers from local high schools. Participating USC students: Madison Ballengee, Eva Bennet, Sarah Clive, David Cochrane, Sarah Connell, Hayes Davis, Justin DuRant, Jimmy Gatch, Paige Gould, Ely Graham, Olivia Halvorson, Anna S. Holley, Jessie Jacobs, Cameron Johnson, Chelse Lawson, Chien-Yi Li, Amanda Miller, Arianne Norman, Liz Olson, McKenzie Outz, Zach Parisher, Damarah Reid, Logan Rice, Nick Sembrat, Kristen Shealy, James Siarris, Anna Steinhilper, Lauren Streeter, Shelby Swearingen, Frank Turner, Aaron Walker, Levi Walker, Robert Wilkinson, Emma Young. 2015-2016 USC Concerto-Aria Competition Winners: Liangjun Zhou, violin (Sibelius Violin Concerto, movement III) Jake Mann, clarinet (Debussy Premiere Rhapsody) Winners performed with the USC Symphony on March 22. Kevin Allen and Hannah Blackwell graduated Cum Laude.  Johannes Linnan graduated Magna Cum Laude. The USC collegiate chapter of MTNA organized the fifth MTNA National Collegiate Chapter Piano Pedagogy Symposium. This was an entirely student-run event that welcomed 180+ chapter members from around the country who presented 68 research sessions, workshops, lightening talks and poster sessions over the course of two days. Our chapter members organized the program, logistical arrangements, ground transportation, lunches and some accommodations for the attendees – most of the students presented on the program and performed in the chapter showcase. Special thanks to Katherine Chandler and Philip Castro for expertly managing their teams, and to our officers Lindsey Vickers, Xu Khuc, Huiyun Liang, and to Azusa Bies, and Adrian Quiroga. The symposium ran seamlessly and we received many compliments and thanks from the national office leadership who were in attendance, and the attending students and chapter advisors. Our students represented us in a manner equal to what would be expected from organizers at a nationallevel event. Graduate conducting students Franklin Turner and David Cochrane assisted with the advance planning and onsite management of the Southern Division ACDA conference. Students attended sessions designed specifically for collegiate members taught by Betsy Cook Weber from the University of Houston. Five of the students were selected to perform in the Demonstration Choir for her sessions: Liz Olson, Emma Young, Jimmy Gatch, Erik Potteiger and Robert Spearman. A total of 12 undergraduates attended the conference in Chattanooga, volunteering, serving as guides and helping with setup of 21


venues and stage management at the main performance hall. Some students hosted the headliner performers, Voces8, an internationally known choral group from Great Britain. Others had the opportunity to interact with composers Ola Gjeilo and J.A.C. Redford. These students were granted School of Music International Travel Grants: Mimi Harding - awarded the first place award of $2500 as a result of her proposal, “Music and Politics — A Study of the Argentinean Tango in Argentina.” Michael Brown - awarded a second place award of $1500 for his proposal, “Kasha-Do Teacher Training and Opera Academy in Härnösand, Sweden.” Lindsey Vickers - awarded a third place award of $1000 for “Music Fest Perugio, in Perugio Italy” Culley Lesch – awarded one of two fourth place awards of $500 for the proposal, “Theory and analysis of Contemporary Music in Paris, France.” Mugel Hijar – awarded one of two fourth place awards of $500 for the proposal, “Vianden Festival in Vianden, Luxembourg.” These students won School of Music annual awards: Arthur M. Fraser Award — Aubrey Leaman Cantey Award for Excellence — Jake Mann Presser Scholar Award — Claire Bogdan Robert Pruzin Music Leadership Award — Aubrey Leaman Robert Van Doren Award — Zoe Rosner Cello Fund Award — Jordan Bartow, Cayla Bass and Hannah Riley Christopher Berg Guitar Award — Kathryn French John and Lucrecia Herr Award for Composition — Rachel Whelan LeDare Robinson Undergraduate Award for Academic Excellence — Aubrey Leaman LeDare Robinson Graduate Award for Academic Excellence — William Talley SAI Scholastic Award — Rebecca Foltz SAI Honor Award — Aubrey Nelson Performance Certificate Candidates: Allison Espada, Samantha Crandall, Ryan Everette, Jimmy Gatch, Rich Harbison, Krystin Johnson, Christian Kiser, Anne Martin, Eric Potteiger, Lizzy Rickel, Zoe Rosner, Andrew Young Pi Kappa Lambda Inductees: Xavier Carteret, Davis DykesLaird, Peter Geldrich, Jonathan Hall, Sheldon Johnson, Hye Jee Jang, Jordan Laird, Kathryn Macleod, Emily Stumpf, Bianca Walker Fall 2016 Magellan Scholars: Jordan Bartow, “A Study on the Production, Parameter, and

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Pedagogy of Vibrato on the Cello” - Mentor: Robert Jesselson Ian Giocondo, “Nadia Boulanger’s Final Years (1950-1979)” Mentor: Julie Hubbert Mimi Harding, “Music and Politics — A Study of the Argentinean Tango” - Mentor: Julie Hubbert Brittany Stone, “Examining the Implementation of A Music Learning Theory for Newborn and Young Children Across Cultures” - Mentor: Wendy Valerio


2015-2016 Alumni News Cedric Adderley was named executive director of the South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities. 1992 M.M.; 1997 D.M.A. composition Mary Lindsey [Campbell] Bailey joined the faculty at the University of Alabama as assistant professor of oboe. 2002 B.M. music education Stephanie Beinlich joined the music faculty at University of Texas Rio Grande Valley as a Lecturer of Voice. 2011 M.M. voice; 2015 D.M.A. voice Hunter Brons has accepted a position as trumpet player for Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines. 2016 B.M. jazz studies William Carswell has been promoted to vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty at Coker College. 2000 D.M.A. choral Caleb Coker has been named Music Educator at Edventure Children’s Museum. 2016 B.M. music education strings Joshua Day has been named Music Educator at Richland School District One at Mill Creek Elementary School. 2013 B.M. music education choral; 2016 M.M.E. elementary music Nové Deypalan received the Special Commendation Award in a conducting competition in London with the London Classical Soloists in January 2016. Deypalan was a Prize Winner and awarded the Highest Distinction in the International Masterclass “Conducting Tchaikovsky” with the St. Petersburg Chamber Philharmonic in Russia. In addition to conducting, Deypalan is the founder and president of the Los Angeles Conducting Institute, created to reestablish Southern California’s role in developing the next generation of great conductors. 2012 D.M.A. orchestral conducting Stephen Eaves has accepted the position of Dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts at Belmont University in Nashville. 1999 D.M.A. choral Katherine Blair Francis began a position with the New World Symphony in Miami, Florida, in August. Previously she played with the New York Philharmonic, joining them on tours to Shanghai, California and Vail, Colorado. 2012 B.M. performance Bryan Gibson traveled the world accompanying Chris Cornell in support of his newest solo album, “Higher Truth.” Gibson spent the latter part of 2015 touring the U.S., Canada, New Zealand and Australia with Cornell in a whirlwind of performances including appearances on Jimmy Fallon, Ellen

DeGeneres and Jimmy Kimmel. Among his favorite highlights was a performance of “Fell On Black Days” that they did for Sirius XM radio. Currently, Gibson is arranging strings for Atlanta-based Ruby Velle & The Soulphonics’ upcoming release. 2004 B.M. music education instrumental Ann Louise Glasser joined the Siwanoy Elementary School in Pelham, NY, as the elementary music teacher. 2011 B.M. performance Brian Glosh joined the music staff at the National Cathedral in Washington, DC. 2008 B.M. music education choral Reed Hanna was appointed principal bassoon of Symphony Orchestra Augusta. 2015 D.M.A. Stacey Holliday has joined Singing Sergeants of the United States Air force as mezzo-soprano. 2006 M.M. piano Erika Hubbell has accepted the position of music educator at Babeck Early Childhood Center and Seven Mile Elementary School in Trenton, Ohio. 2016, M.M.E. Kevin Jones completed his jazz D.M.A. work at the University of Texas at Austin and has accepted a position as assistant professor in jazz studies at Florida State. 2008 M.M. jazz studies Jenie Kechulius has been hired as the operations and personnel manager of Champaign-Urbana’s Sinfonia da Camera orchestra, under the direction of Ian Hobson. The full-time position is affiliated with the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts at the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana. 2014 M.M. saxophone performance Jack Kohl published “That Iron String,” a philosophical thriller novel about the world of pianists and the crisis surrounding the overpopulation of qualified pianists produced by the modern competition circuit. M.M. 1996; D.M.A. 2000 piano   Mark Laughlin presented “Video Game Music: The Great Teaching Experiment” at the NAfME National In-Service Conference. The session highlighted the successes and failures of teaching an online video game music course to the studentat-large. It addressed how to use video games to empower and expand your creative pedagogical prowess. 2015 D.M.A. piano pedagogy Briana Leaman earned her Master Professionnel de Composition et Interprétation Musicale (Master’s in oboe performance) in France. The program is part of the Haute École des Arts du Rhin, the superior academy of the arts in Alsace, which links 23


the University of Strasbourg and the Strasbourg Conservatory to grant an internationally-recognized degree. While working toward her degree, Leaman performed as second oboe with the Orchestre Philharmonique de Strasbourg, one of the top professional orchestras in France, through the Conservatoire’s Orchestra Academy. She has also performed with the school for the Opéra National du Rhin and with local music ensembles and in solo concerts for audiences including diplomats of the European Parliament. She now resides in Melbourne, Australia, where she plans to pursue her solo and orchestral career. 2013 B.M. performance. Jose Manuel Lezcano performed premieres as guitarist-composer, including a solo performance at Havana Cuba’s Identidades International Festival, Feb. 2016, where he played his second double concerto for flute, guitar and strings, “Sojourners” at the Basilica Menor de San Fransisco de Asisi with Antipe di Stella and Ivan Valiente conducting the Orquesta Solistas de la Habana; with cellist Rebecca Hartka at the Boston Guitar Society Ensembles Festival, March 2016, in the Boston premiere of his Sonata for Cello and Guitar; and attended the New York premiere of his “Postcards” for flute and piano at the Spectrum NYC Composers Now Festival, with Lisa Hansen and Max Lifchitz of North-South Consonance Feb., 2016. Lezcano is a professor of music at Keene State College, New Hampshire, and was named a recipient of a 2016 Ruth and James Ewing Award by The Keene Sentinel, which recognizes excellence in the arts in the Monadnock Region. Lezcano is a 1983 graduate of USC where he earned his M.M. in guitar performance under Christopher Berg.

Dorian Neuendorf has accepted a position as operations manager of the Hendersonville Symphony Youth Orchestra, Henderson, NC. 2015 M.M. orchestral conducting

James Lindroth has been accepted into the master’s program in ethnomusicology at the Ohio State University. He will be double majoring in percussion performance and ethnomusicology. 2015 B.M. performance

Caitlyn Oenbrink, NYC and Boston-based actor, recently performed the role Miss Dorothy in Thoroughly Modern Millie with Reagle Music Theatre in Boston. This year she was nominated for Leading Actress of the Year in the Professional Theatre category for the 2015 Central New York Salt Awards (Syracuse Area Live Theater) for her work as Julie in Carousel, a program recognizing exemplary and outstanding performances in professional and non-professional theater in Central New York. Oenbrink made her New York concert debut with the Brooklyn Philharmonic performing the world premiere of “Liebovar” at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in Manhattan. Green Room Reviews wrote, “... Her voice is a joy to listen to – controlled yet emotive, soft one moment and filling the theater the next.” 2012 B.M. voice performance

Krystin Lynn has been named assistant orchestra director at Sumter High School and orchestra director at Bates Middle School. 2016 B.M.

Cheyanne Osaria won first place in the National Upper Level College Musical Theater competition held at the National Convention in Chicago this past July. 2006 D.M.A.

David Clay Mettens’ work has been recognized with a 2016 ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Award, the 2015 SCI/ ASCAP graduate student commission, and a commission from the American Opera Initiative, which premiered in December 2015 by the Washington National Opera at the Kennedy Center. His orchestra piece, “Sleeping I am carried...” will be performed by the Brussels Philharmonic in December 2016. 2013 B.M. composition

Dustin Ousley has been named assistant professor and director of choral activities at Coker College. 2015 D.M.A. choral conducting

Michael Moore (2005 Ph.D. music education; 2004 M.M. instrumental conducting) joined fellow Gamecock Phil Golson (2001 D.M.A. instrumental conducting; 1999 M.M. music education) for a series of community upliftment initiatives in Knynsa, South Africa. During the two-week visit, Moore partnered with Golson to conduct music clinics in a local 24

school and in impoverished communities where music serves as a means of hope for disadvantaged residents of Knysna. Both former students of William J. Moody and James K. Copenhaver, Golson and Moore share a vision for using their passion for music education as a platform for outreach. Golson is in his third year in Knysna, where he has established multiple music education initiatives through his non-profit GRACE (Garden Route Arts, Communication, and Education). One of those initiatives is “Playing It Forward,” a project to donate used or unwanted instruments to schools for students who wouldn’t otherwise have access to instrumental music education. Moore, professor and chair of the department of music education at Bob Jones University in Greenville, SC, made the trip to South Africa to establish a cross-cultural internship program for university students interested in teaching music abroad.

Erik Potteiger has accepted a position as director of choirs at South Aiken High School, Aiken, SC. 2016 B.M. MUED Timothy Michael Powell, director of choral activities and music education at Martin Methodist College in Pulaski, TN, was honored as a semifinalist for the 2016 Grammy Music Educator Award, one of 25 educators in the nation to receive that distinction. His choir’s 2015 recording with Powell was a finalist for the 2015 American Prize in Choral Performance, and their final concert resulted in Powell being named a finalist for the 2015 American Prize in Conducting. 2004 D.M.A. choral conducting


Robert Rearden won the second horn slot in the National Symphony Orchestra, Washington D.C. 2003 B.M. performance Elizabeth (Lizzy) Rickel has accepted a position as elementary music educator at Eagles Nest Elementary and Fort Dorchester Elementary in Dorchester School District Two. 2016 B.M. MUED Rudy Volkmann has recently published a number of compositions for chamber winds of various combinations (largely brass quintets), including his saxophone quartet “Gadsden Suite,” which was composed while he was in school at USC. To date, he has contracted with TBQ Press, William Grant Still Music Press, Ken Dorn Music Publications, and Cimarron Music Press for release of over three dozen titles. In 2014, following a second open-hear surgery, his interest in music returned, and he has been composing and performing again; hence the interest in publishing his many works, including works for orchestra, band and jazz big band. Volkmann is also well known for his performances with the Oktoberfest troupe, The Channellheimer Oompah Band, which performs throughout the Southeast each October. 1987 D.M.A. Sarah Moncer Wahl, is the general music and choral director at Beech Springs Intermediate School, Duncan, S.C. 2009 B.M. music education choral James Watson has accepted a position at Defiance College in Ohio. 2016 D.M.A. choral Andrew Young has accepted a position as band director at Clinton High, Clinton, SC. 2016 B.M. MUED Matthew Younglove is director of athletic bands/applied saxophone at Wayne State University, Detroit, MI. B.M. 2005 Susan Zhang joined Towson University as pianist for the Towson Chorale and Townson Men’s Chorus. She will continue her studies this fall at the Peabody Conservatory with Boris Slutsky. 2010 B.M. piano performance

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2015-2016 Donors July 1, 2015 to June 30, 2016

$10,000+ Mr. James K. Copenhaver Darden Trust Prof. and Ms. Richard E. Day Mr. and Mrs. Stephen A. Francis Central Carolina Community Foundation Dr. and Mrs. Benjamin M. Gimarc Mrs. Shirley M. Knox Henry and Sylvia Yaschik Foundation, Inc. $5,000 to $9,999 Anonymous Anonymous Community Foundation of the Lowcountry, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth M. Corbett The Howard Gilman Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Dennis R. Nolan Mr. and Mrs. Mano Solinski Mrs. Marian Stanley Tucker Mrs. Elizabeth G. Van Doren Mr. and Mrs. James A. Weiss $1,000 to $4,999 Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Ackerman Adair Piano LLC ArtistWorks, Inc. Bank of America Dr. and Mrs. G. Michael Beaver Dr. Ruta K. Bly and Dr. Robert S. Bly Mr. and Mrs. Michael M. Bull Mr. and Mrs. John J. Chase Mr. and Mrs. Emory Wendell Clark Columbia Arts Academy LLC Columbia Film Society Mrs. Barbara B. Darden First Baptist Church First Presbyterian Church Dr. Charles L. Fugo Dr. and Mrs. Gregory A. Hand Dr. and Mrs. C. Tayloe Harding, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Randall Herald Mrs. Lucrecia Herr Mr. and Mrs. Carl T. Hoefel Hootie & the Blowfish Foundation Dr. Alice Bee Kasakoff Dr. Ann E. Ruderman and Dr. William Richard Keane Lexington School of Music LLC Mr. and Mrs. R. C. McEntire, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Kenneth M. Nelson The Palmetto Mastersingers 26

The Presser Foundation Mr. and Mrs. William Priester Mr. and Mrs. Charles Curtis Rone, Jr. Prof. Ellen Douglas Schlaefer Dr. Bernadette Scott South Arts, Inc. Dr. and Mrs. Les Sternberg Still Hopes Episcopal Retirement Community Mr. and Mrs. Gary Stone Symphony League Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. Tinker Dr. Vincent Van Brunt Dr. Susie H. VanHuss and Mr. Patrick VanHuss Mr. and Mrs. Robert Vincent Ms. Glenda J. Lanik and Mr. Gerald T. Whelan, Jr. Ms. A. Robin Williams Mrs. Barbara M. Williams Dr. Harriet G. Williams and Mr. Gerald W. Hagenmaier Yamaha Corporation of America $500 to $999 Mr. and Mrs. William E. Ackerman Mr. and Mrs. Boyd C. Black Dr. and Mrs. Byron Boyd Mr. and Mrs. Jay Ethan Collins Mr. and Mrs. Alan I. Conway David A. Lawson Associates, LLC Mr. and Mrs. Richard G. Day Dr. and Mrs. John Mark Dean Mr. David D. Douglas Ms. Janet O. Ferguson Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Fetner III Mr. Gerald D. Floyd Ms. Catherine Glen Forbes and Mr. Pitsch Karrer Dr. and Mrs. Robert A. Foster Fruhauf Uniforms, Inc. Golden K. Kiwanis Club of Columbia Ms. Ann Marie Graber and Mr. John L. Weathers Dr. and Mrs. Donald N. Gray Mr. and Mrs. James S. Guignard Indian River Development Company, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. George S. King, Jr. Knights Apparel, Inc. Ms. Elizabeth L. Knoth Mr. and Mrs. John F. Kososki The Law Office of Matthew M. McCord Dr. Marina Lomazov and Dr. Joseph P. Rackers Ms. Patricia Green Lovit Lutheran Church By The Lake Dr. and Mrs. Ruben L. Mayer


Mrs. Faye G. Miller Mr. and Mrs. Marshall V. Minchey Mr. Omer Roland Morin Morning Music Club Dr. and Mrs. Herbert B. Niestat Performing Arts Consortium, Inc CAPT Rene E. Plante SCANA Services, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Frederick Smith Mr. Phillip H. Smith, Jr. Dr. Tina M. Stallard and Dr. David Stallard Dr. Suzanne R. Thorpe and Dr. John W. Baynes Prof. Mary Laury Christie and Mr. David B. Vaughan Dr. and Mrs. Hoyt Noland Wheeler Dr. and Mrs. Leland H. Williams $250 to $499 Mrs. Gillian Scalici-Albrecht and Dr. Helmut Albrecht American Lodging Resources, Inc. Ms. Caroline Wyche Dixon Bartman Mr. Steven W. Brown Mr. and Mrs. John H. Brunelli Mr. and Mrs. James Fennell Burgess, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Warren R. Cain Cogsdill Tool Products, Inc. Ms. Debra B. Cohn Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Collins, Jr. Columbia Music Teachers Association Commercial Music Productions Inc Dr. and Mrs. David John Cutler Dr. and Mrs. Keith E. Davis Dr. Max Dent Mr. and Mrs. Gene L. Dinkins Mr. and Mrs. Arthur R. Doughty Mr. and Mrs. William H. Duncan Ms. Michelle G. Edgar Mr. and Mrs. V. E. Edwards III Ernst & Young Foundation Essex Homes Southeast, Incorporated Food Truck Festivals of New England LLC Mr. and Mrs. John Russell Gentry Colonel and Mrs. Richard F. B. Gimmi Dr. and Mrs. Jack H. Gottlieb Mrs. Virginia M. Grose Mr. John F. Hamilton Mr. and Mrs. Richard N. Hevener, Jr. Ms. Jennifer Jablonski Mr. Michael E. Kaiser Dr. Prashanth Jayaram Kamath Dr. Helen I. Doerpinghaus and Dr. Wayne Campbell Kannaday Ms. Susan Fraser and Mr. Thomas F. Law Dr. and Mrs. Clifford L. Leaman Mr. and Mrs. Deryl D. Leaphart Dr. and Mrs. David M. Lovit Dr. and Mrs. Charles A. McNeill

Musical Innovations Mr. and Mrs. J. Richard Palyok Mr. and Mrs. Jyotindra M. Parekh Dr. John David Patrick Riley Pope & Laney, LLC Dr. Joseph Rubin Mr. and Mrs. Robert Edward Schaeffer Mr. and Mrs. Mark R. Seeley Mr. and Mrs. A. Richard Silver Mr. and Mrs. George R. Simonson Mrs. Harriett D. Smith Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Sobieralski Ms. Audrey B. Trujillano Mr. and Mrs. Johann Vaz Mr. and Mrs. David Jeffrey Verver Mr. Richard E. Watkins Dr. Sharon W. Webb Whitener & Wharton, PA Dean and Mrs. Robert M. Wilcox $100 to $249 ACE Charitable Foundation Mr. and Mrs. John Eldon Adair Ms. Rebekah Adams Alta Gracia Hold Company Dr. and Mrs. Rathna P. Amarnath Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Ashmore Dr. and Mrs. Reginald Frank Bain, Jr. Dr. Drucilla K. Barker Mr. and Mrs. Richard Redman Barton Ms. Betty Blackerby Mr. and Mrs. Vince Bond Ms. Molly G. Bonnell Mrs. Barbara C. Bowers Dr. and Mrs. James Alan Boylston Mr. and Mrs. Duane Alan Briggs Mr. and Mrs. Gerald W. Brown Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Buice, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Christopher C. S. Bussell Carol Saunders Gallery Carolina Collegiate Federal Credit Union Dr. and Mrs. John Belton Caughman II Mr. and Mrs. David J. Chiarella Ms. Iris Loretta Clark Mr. and Mrs. Bryan A. Copeland Mrs. Carolyn Sapp-Daniels and Mr. Charles Alexander Daniels David M. Lovit DMD, LLC. Dr. John H. Dawson Ms. Linda B. Dickerson Dr. Caroline M. Eastman Eat More Tees Ms. Ann K. Edwards Mr. and Mrs. Jim Elliott Mr. John T. Ervin Mr. Bob Evans 27


Ms. Marya J. Fancey Dr. Naomi Beth Farber and Mr. Steven E. Grosby Prof. and Mrs. Robert Felix Ms. Kathryn Rebecca Floor-Gee Mr. and Mrs. Reginald B. Freeman, Jr. Dr. Martha C. Freibert Frog Prince Productions Ms. Sally D. Garrick Dr. and Mrs. Charles Edward Gatch, Jr. Gear For Sports Ms. Tara Felicia George Ms. Lucy Elwell and Mr. John Glancy Mr. and Mrs. Adam D. Goldberg Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Goldberg Mr. Alan Sean Hackett Mr. Stephen Scott Hait Ms. Eleonore E. Hansen Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Hart, Jr. Mrs. Alix D. Hay Mr. Venkatesh L. Hegde Dr. and Mrs. Richard M. Helman Mr. and Mrs. Samuel-David Tenison Hendrix Mrs. Alexandra Long Henson Dr. and Mrs. David Scott Herring Dr. Donald H. Holland Mr. Thomas Williams Howell Mr. Charles T. Huckabee Image One Dr. J. Daniel Jenkins and Mr. Kunio Hara J.W. Hunt & Company, LLP Dr. Susan Marie Kelly and Dr. Allan Baker Mr. Joshua A. Kimsey Ms. Lynn R. Kompass and Mr. Phillip Russell Bush Ms. Mary R. Bull and Dr. Craig Kridel Mr. and Mrs. Ronald C. Kuebler, CCC-SLP ABDA Ms. Pauline Todd Laffitte Mr. and Mrs. Russell E. LaVoy Mrs. Fredna T. Lee Ms. M. Malissa Burnette and Mr. Michael Grant LeFever Mr. and Mrs. Jack Lieb Mr. and Mrs. Richard C. Litwin Dr. and Mrs. Gregory W. Long Ms. Suzanne Long Lutheran Homes of South Carolina Mr. and Mrs. Jess William MacCallum Mr. Bryan L. Mack Dr. and Mrs. Morgan D. MacLachlan Dr. Terry N. Magee Dr. and Mrs. James A. Marshall Dr. Patricia E. Mason and Mr. Don C. Rosick Mr. Kenneth W. May Mr. and Mrs. Mark J. Mayson Ms. Nancy C. McCormick Ms. Harriet McMaster and Dr. Craig W. Davis Ms. Bonnie Bouldin McNeill 28

Dr. and Mrs. Julian V. Minghi Dr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Moncrief Mr. Andrew John Montes Mr. Christopher Allen Montmeny Mr. and Mrs. Alan R. Morris Dr. Gail M. Morrison Mr. R. Brian Murrell Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Musgrave Ms. Sara Najjar-Wilson and Mr. Robert C. Wilson The Neal Firm, CPA, P.A. Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Ray Nevitt New World Graphics Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Nixon Mr. and Mrs. John C. Norton Mr. and Mrs. Dennis G. O’Connor Ms. Caitlyn Anne Oenbrink Dr. Sun-Joo Oh Dr. Sharon Buddin O’Keefe and Mr. Dennis J. O’Keefe Mr. and Mrs. James K. Owens Mr. and Mrs. Tommy K. Padgett, Jr. Ms. Pauline M. Pagliocca Mrs. Leila Ann S. Palmer Dr. Wilfred Palmer Park Street Baptist Church Ms. Cornelia S. Pasky Dr. and Mrs. Lance E. Paulman Dr. and Mrs. Edgar H. Peacock, Jr. Pecknel Music Company, Inc. Ms. Sharon Mary Phipps Mr. and Mrs. Charles K. Polk Dr. Ellen F. Potter and Mr. David C. Potter Ms. Gloria McK Prevost Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Putnam Dr. and Mrs. Kirk Andrew Randazzo Dr. and Mrs. S. Hunter Rentz, Sr. Dr. and Mrs. F. Lee Richards Mr. and Mrs. Stewart H. Rodman Dr. Susan K. Roe and W. Wayne Roe Dr. John F. Rogers Ms. Kristin D. Rollin Dr. John C. Ropp III Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Rubin, Jr. Dr. Ralph E. Rynes Mrs. Carol C. Saunders Mr. and Mrs. D. Edwin Schmelzer School Cuts Screening & Embroidery Ms. M. Alicia Sikes Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Simensen Mr. Paul Knapp Simons, Jr. Southern Food Marketing, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Minot Earl Stanton III Mr. Wayne Stephens Mr. and Mrs. Colin M. Stewart Dr. Christina Marie Friend and Mr. Bradley Don Stratton Ms. Kerry G. Stubbs and Mr. Tyson Neil Boheler


Dr. Yi Sun and Dr. Mandy Fang Mr. and Mrs. W. Marshall Taylor, Jr. The Chamber Pots Ms. Krista M. Hampton and Mr. Charles Clairborne Thompson Ms. Sophie Kelly Thompson Mr. and Mrs. Ryan W. Tinker Mr. John Eric Tjaarda and Mrs. Allyson M. Smith Mr. and Mrs. Michael F. Tolley Dr. and Mrs. Ace Tubbs Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Wall Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Wamser Mr. and Mrs. David A. Welch Mrs. Beverly O. Weymouth Mr. and Mrs. E. Jacob Will, Jr. Mrs. Rosa C. Williams Dr. Carolyn J. Wilson Ms. Allison M. Wingate Ms. Ellen Y. Woodoff Dr. Lynn P. Wright and Dr. Daniel L. Wright Dr. and Mrs. Christopher A. Yeakel Ms. Margaret Anne Zeigler Dr. Natalie A. Oransky and Dr. Mark C. Zrull

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Profile for University of South Carolina School of Music

Da Capo Online 2015-16  

The annual alumni magazine of the University of South Carolina School of Music.

Da Capo Online 2015-16  

The annual alumni magazine of the University of South Carolina School of Music.

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