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UNIVERSITY OF SAN DIEGO CAREER DEVELOPMENT CENTER ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017


LETTER FROM THE DIRECTOR One of the Career Development Center’s primary goals is to help students make lifelong, meaningful connections. We begin engaging with students soon after they come to campus, and maintain that commitment with counseling, events, online portals and other approaches. To boost opportunities to engage with students, we have increased staffing, strategically opened offices around USD and developed a Career Ambassador program to offer peer-to-peer outreach. Our center has worked closely with faculty, admissions, academic affairs and other groups to increase support. This outreach extends well beyond our campus. We have implemented programs to help students connect with different career choices: mentors, industry speakers and Torero Treks, to name a few. Alumni Relations, the Parent Association Board, our Employer Advisory Board and other groups have provided critical support to help these efforts succeed. In the past year, we upgraded our online career management portal. The Handshake platform gives students, alumni and employers more flexibility and increases their ability to connect to our global network of career opportunities. Our efforts with these programs are paying off. Our most recent First Destinations survey showed that 2016 USD graduates had more internship and other experiential learning opportunities, were highly satisfied with their initial career steps and received higher salary offers than previous classes. There are so many people who want our students to succeed: faculty, staff, alumni, employers and, of course, parents. By helping bring these forces together, we provide a firm launch pad for USD students to take off into the wider world.

Robin Darmon Senior Director, Career Development Center

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While the Career Development Center is concerned with each student’s lifelong career path, we are particularly focused on the challenging transition to life after graduation. This process begins the first year at the University of San Diego and can continue after students receive their diplomas.

first

destinations Each year, the center surveys recent graduates to determine where they landed, how they feel about their destination and what helped them. The First Destinations survey provides valuable information to guide our programming and help us forge continuing relationships with our Toreros. For the Class of 2016, we saw a dramatic increase in survey responses, due in part to rigorous follow-up from the Career Development Center team. This outreach also helps maintain our culture of care long after the student has left USD.

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The 2016 survey showed USD graduates had increased their average opening salaries by over $3,000, and more than 87 percent were passionate about their work. Others had gone on to graduate school, military careers or full-time volunteer positions. The information to the right represents data gathered from multiple sources for 74 percent of undergraduate students who graduated between August 2015 and May 2016.


68.9%

14.7%

71%

EMPLOYED FULL TIME

ATTENDING GRADUATE SCHOOL

RECEIVED FIRST OFFER BEFORE GRADUATING

92%

2.1%

0.4%

CURRENT POSITION ALIGNS WITH CAREER GOALS

FULL-TIME VOLUNTEER SERVICE

MILITARY

87.6%

$51,559

PASSIONATE ABOUT THEIR WORK

AVERAGE SALARY

SAMPLE EMPLOYERS

SAMPLE GRADUATE SCHOOLS

20th Century Fox Film Adobe Amazon Deloitte E&J Gallo Ernst & Young General Atomics Houzz Illumina Jesuit Volunteer Corps KPMG PwC Rady Children’s Hospital Teach for America

Columbia University Cornell University Georgetown University London School of Economics Stanford University Tufts University University of California, Los Angeles University of Michigan Law School University of Southern California University of Virginia Vanderbilt University


STUDENT PROFILE

“ Being successful during your USD experience and after graduation is all about making connections and I think that’s an area where the Career Development Center really comes in handy.” Alec Hartman ’16 (BA) Jesuit Volunteer Corps, Nashville

the tools  


for career success

Through opportunities to attend career fairs, graduate school fairs, Torero Treks and other events, Toreros can follow their passions and connect to companies, organizations and schools. Ultimately, the Career Development Center provides a bridge from students to their dream career by giving them the tools to get there. My time after graduation has been deeply shaped by the Career Development Center. As a first-semester junior, with very little idea of what the future would hold after graduation, I wandered into the Graduate School Fair and the Adventures in Service Non-Profit Career Fair, hoping that something would stick out for me. It was at the Graduate School Fair that I first connected with the admissions team at Boston College School of Theology and Ministry. At the nonprofit fair, I gathered more information about the Jesuit Volunteer Corps.

I wouldn’t feel fully qualified at my job without my experience as a Career Ambassador. I am now serving with the Jesuit Volunteer Corps in Nashville at a homeless shelter called Room In The Inn. I find that the skills I acquired as an ambassador, such as advising others one-on-one and presenting to groups, are extremely helpful. I use these skills every day with the people I serve. I still access USD’s online career resources, which are available in the Handshake portal. These have helped me apply to grad schools and graduate assistantships. The Career Guide has helped me with résumés, interviewing skills and email etiquette following interviews. With help from these resources, I have recently accepted a full ride to Boston College School of Theology and Ministry, along with a Campus Ministry graduate assistantship.

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Many students come to the Career Development Center’s main space in Manchester Hall, or one of our offices in the School of Business (Olin Hall), Shiley-Marcos School of Engineering (Loma Hall) or College of Arts and Sciences (Serra Hall). This hub-and-spokes approach provides students better access to career services, increasing our visibility and long-term impact.

outre career

FOCUSED EVENTS

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CAREER AMBASSADORS

PARTNERSHIPS

To expand our reach, we have recruited and trained a small team of student Career Ambassadors. This committed group provides an extra level of support for students as they navigate their options. Career Ambassadors helped support 61 events during the school year. On average, two Career Ambassadors attended each of these events, providing peer-to-peer guidance to assist our career professionals.

The center collaborates with numerous on- and off-campus groups to increase opportunities for students. The USD Office of Alumni Relations has provided critical support for many of our most important events, particularly Torero Treks and the mentorship program. We have also worked closely with the Parent Association Board and our own Employer Advisory Board to better align the center’s programs with industry needs.

One of the best ways to engage students is through career events. These include large fairs, such as the all-campus Torero Talent Job and Internship Fair, and more intimate ones, such as forums with industry professionals and the Senior Seminar. These events provide real-world insights for students and forge new connections with employers and alumni.


“ I really wanted to give back to a school that gave me so much opportunity. I couldn’t think of a more incredible cause than to come back and work with the young students here.”

each Celeste Blodget, ’86 (BA), ’87 (MEd) VP of Human Resources, L&D and KB ESET North America

ALUMNI MENTORSHIP

INDIVIDUALIZED CAREER COUNSELING Our commitment begins with personalized counseling. To help students assess their opportunities, our counselors leverage their extensive training, personal insights and a variety of assessments, such as the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. They provide coaching and support as students choose their majors, prepare for internships and interviews, polish résumés and cover letters and perform the many incremental actions that support career success.

Through a robust mentorship program, we have increased connections between students and USD alumni. The Career Development Center matches students with appropriate alumni based on shared career interests. From there, alumni meet with students frequently in person and via phone or email to answer questions, offer guidance and provide unique insights into their particular career path.

3,124

1,532

302

20,183

26

COUNSELING APPOINTMENTS

STUDENT ATTENDANCE AT LARGE EVENTS

EMPLOYERS AT LARGE EVENTS

JOB AND INTERNSHIP POSTINGS

MENTOR-STUDENT MATCHES IN TORERO CONNECTIONS PROGRAM


students+ employers connecting

TORERO RÉSUMÉ BOOKS

COMPREHENSIVE CAREER GUIDE

TORERO TREKS

The more that employers learn about USD students, the more that they want to hire them. Résumé books expose companies to prospective employees and give students even more motivation to polish their documents. We have created résumé books in a variety of disciplines and distributed them to 1,107 companies, increasing our worldwide reach. Employer response has been fantastic — these books provide large samples of well-qualified students who are interested in their industry.

There are so many different ways to communicate with prospective employers: résumés, cover letter, emails, LinkedIn queries and thank you notes among them. Some students tend to agonize over format, tone, and even salutation. The Torero Career Guide was developed to provide industryspecific examples of what this type of correspondence should look like. Demand has been incredible — more than 5,000 have been distributed and many more are available through online channels.

We continue to expand the Torero Trek program — from five in 2015-2016 to 15 in 2016-2017 — giving students more opportunities to visit companies, make new contacts and experience corporate cultures. In 2016-2017, our students visited New York, Seattle, Portland, Los Angeles and other cities. These visits have been an amazing success: 100 percent of Trek participants would recommend them to a friend. In addition, Treks enhance collaboration between employers, parents, alumni and faculty.

345

77%

14,526

16,104

10,068

STUDENTS ON TORERO TREKS

INTERNSHIP OR EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

STUDENT/ALUMNI HANDSHAKE USERS

HANDSHAKE EMPLOYMENT APPLICATIONS

EMPLOYER CONTACTS IN HANDSHAKE


Quite often, students meet with an alumnus, visit a company or chat with one of our counselors and have a career epiphany. They see a path and instantly know it’s theirs. This can happen on their first experience or their 30th. The same is true of employers looking for the right fit. Our job is to give students and companies “more shots on goal.”

LINKEDIN

HANDSHAKE

The preeminent business social media platform, LinkedIn, provides invaluable connections to industries, companies and individuals. The Career Development Center provides free LinkedIn Premium accounts to all seniors, giving them even greater access to industry professionals, helping them to widen their lifetime networks and increasing USD’s online presence. More than 700 seniors took advantage of this powerful networking tool and job board to find opportunities far beyond San Diego.

We have upgraded our online career management portal to Handshake, a leader in personalized career management software. Handshake is one of the most important tools for students, career development staff and employers. It is a one-stop shop for students and alumni to make counseling appointments, search and apply for positions, browse upcoming events, seek out mentoring, download the Torero Career Guide and much more. Students and alumni can create profiles, which makes them more visible to employers and provides valuable insight about the positions they are seeking. Users can also research companies, practice mock interviews or apply for a Torero Trek. Each week, students receive a career newsletter tailored to their interests that lists hot jobs, promotes events and encourages them to make a counseling appointment. Handshake also guides the Career Development Center’s outreach efforts. Data from the portal helps us to target students and groups that may not be taking full advantage of our services. In addition, we have reached out to students and faculty during Handshake Week and other events to get them trained on the software and increase their comfort levels.

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EMPLOYER PROFILE

the impact of  

The University of San Diego produces well-rounded graduates, exactly the type of employees we desire. Our recruiting approach at USD is simple: take the ball and run. We set clear recruiting goals and work with purpose to achieve them. With the Career Development Center as our hub, we strategically invest time and energy throughout campus. Our partners in the career center know our company well, understand our objectives and style and direct us to target-rich environments. There are more than 30 Toreros at E&J Gallo. These employees range from two weeks on the job to nearly 15 years. USD alumni fill a vast array of critical positions: brand marketing,

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direct-to-consumer sales, restaurant and hotel sales, training and recruiting, distributor management and senior sales leadership. Their majors range from business and marketing to philosophy and English. The Career Development Center helps make our recruiting goals a reality. We wanted to hire 12 Toreros during the 2016-2017 school year, and sat down with the career team in September to set that vision and determine how we could find the best talent on campus. With their partnership and creativity, we met our goal. We can’t wait to see what these new hires will accomplish.


“ USD educates for more than department or discipline; USD educates for life. The university develops students who are prepared for the work force, and to meet and exceed the next challenges in life.” Casey Scharetg ’04 (BA) E&J Gallo Winery

  partnership


CAREER TEAM

Robin Darmon Senior Director rdarmon@sandiego.edu (619) 260-4654 Niki Barrios Assistant Director of Marketing, Communication and Events nikievenbarrios@sandiego.edu (619) 260-4600 ext. 6641 Emily Baxt Assistant Director, First- and Second-Year Experience ebaxt@sandiego.edu (619) 260-4654 Katie Freedman Assistant Director, College of Arts and Sciences Career Development Center kfreedman@sandiego.edu (619) 260-4654 Linda Gayhart Administrative Assistant lgayhart@sandiego.edu (619) 260-4654

Rhonda Harley Assistant Director, School of Engineering Career Development Center rharley@sandiego.edu (619) 260-4654

Abbey Racelis Assistant Director, School of Business Career Development Center aracelis@sandiego.edu (619) 260-4600 ext. 4186

Sue Kelly Assistant Director, First- and Second-Year Experience kelly@sandiego.edu (619) 260-4654

Sheila Schaffzin Assistant Director, Employer Relations sschaffzin@sandiego.edu (619) 260-4600 ext. 6687

Alexander Lo Assistant Director, Diversity and Graduate Student Networks alexlo@sandiego.edu (619) 260-4654

Kelsey Schultz Career Counselor, College of Arts and Sciences kelseyschultz@sandiego.edu (619) 260-4654

Judd Mateo Technology Resource Analyst jmateo@sandiego.edu (619) 260-4600 ext. 6773

Maya Sykes Experiential Learning Coordinator msykes@sandiego.edu 619-260-4600 ext. 2101

Kelly Morton Career Counselor, School of Business kellymorton@sandiego.edu (619) 260-4600 ext. 7902

Connie Wilson Employer Experience Specialist conniew@sandiego.edu (619) 260-4654

Timothy Novara Assistant Director, Assessment and Planning tnovara@sandiego.edu (619) 260-4600 ext. 6769


career development center

Career Development Center 5998 Alcalá Park • Manchester 101 • San Diego, CA 92110 (619) 260-4654 • careers@sandiego.edu • sandiego.edu/careers

USD Career Development Center Annual Report 2016-17  

University of San Diego Career Development Center Annual Report 2016-17

USD Career Development Center Annual Report 2016-17  

University of San Diego Career Development Center Annual Report 2016-17