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ENGINEERING

Find yourself

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WELCOME Welcome to the Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment at the University of Newcastle. It is here that your journey to a career in engineering begins. Did you look into the sky as a kid and wonder if you could build a tower to reach the clouds? Did you craft time-machines or try to fly? If you’ve always thought big, loved challenges and wanted to help change the world, a degree in engineering could be for you. Our exciting degree programs give students the tools and practical knowledge to become creative, innovative, well-trained graduates, fully equipped to turn visions into reality and take on all the challenges of this big world we live in. We invite you to explore the possibilities. Real-world experience We are a research-intensive faculty. This means that during your studies, you’ll experience a high level of contact with our teaching and research staff, many of whom are acknowledged as international research leaders working to solve real-world problems. Our emphasis on research-led teaching also gives us close contact with industry partners and industry-based scholarships which are an important part of most of our undergraduate programs. Additionally, our faculty provides scholarships to help students study and work abroad. Strong industry recognition University of Newcastle engineering graduates are sought after worldwide, with their skills recognised as among the best. Our degree programs in engineering, architecture and the built environment are all accredited by their respective peak national professional bodies, and once out in the field, our graduates are able to contribute significantly to the Australian economy through their work on the nation’s infrastructure. Engineering: a creative and challenging career Engineering is an exciting profession that lets you use your vision and creativity to improve the world and become part of the global effort working on solutions to the challenges we face in the new century. As a civil engineer, I can attest to the wonderful experiences and opportunities that are out there for engineers, particularly for those who have completed their degrees at well-respected institutions like the University of Newcastle. In this light, I encourage you to consider a career in engineering and to complete your degree at the University of Newcastle.

Professor John Carter Pro Vice-Chancellor Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment

Professor John Carter According to Professor John Carter, the Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment at the University of Newcastle is “literally full of hot shot researchers achieving amazing things”. One could say he is a hot shot himself, with more than 30 years of work dedicated to the field of geotechnical engineering, and a reputation that places him at the top of his field. As a geotechnical engineer, Professor Carter’s expertise helps keep oil and gas production platforms in the middle of the

ocean standing through storms as strong as category 5 cyclones. His expert understanding of ground behaviour was even called upon during the investigation into the 1997 Thredbo landslide, to help the inquest understand how this terrible disaster could have occurred. These days, as Pro Vice-Chancellor of the Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Professor Carter enjoys leading an Australian engineering faculty that he claims is “without a doubt, up there with the world’s best.”


TO CHOOSE THE UNIVERSITY OF

NEWCASTLE

AUSTRALIA

CONTENTS  

People who study here do well We produce self-confident, well-equipped, ‘job-ready’ graduates. Employment rates and starting salaries for University of Newcastle graduates are higher than the national average. We are hands-on and responsive in the way we teach Our degree programs focus on both academic and professional training. You will be taught in a variety of methods and can gain real-life experience from field excursions and industrial experience projects.

We provide a great environment for study We have a student population of more than 30,000, including some 3,500 international students from more than 80 countries. Our campuses at Newcastle and the Central Coast are all set in bushland settings and are close to some of Australia’s most beautiful beaches.

This is a place of opportunity Whether you want to broaden your mind, advance your career, increase your knowledge, travel the globe or change the world, the University of Newcastle can provide you with the opportunity and real life skills to do it.

World class research is done here The University sits in the top 10 universities in Australia, in terms of our research funding performance. The University of Newcastle has been ranked as one of the world’s top 100 universities for engineering technology and computer sciences. (Shanghai Jiao Tong University Academic Ranking 2007)

Pro Vice-Chancellor’s Welcome

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What is engineering?

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What do engineers do?

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Why become an engineer and how important is engineering?

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Women in engineering

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Where can engineering take you?

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What are the different types of engineers and what do they do? Chemical Civil Computer Computer Science Electrical Environmental Mechanical Mechatronics Mining Software Surveying Telecommunications

24 How do I become an engineer? What makes a good engineer? What subjects should I do for the HSC? What tertiary qualifications do I need? Are there any professional industry associations? 26 Engineering at the University of Newcastle Why study with us? What programs do we offer? 28 HOW DO I FIND OUT MORE ABOUT Engineering

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WHAT IS ENGINEERING?

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Engineers are the people who make great ideas happen – problem solvers who search for quicker, better and more efficient ways to use the forces and materials of nature to bring to life exciting new innovations like lightningspeed mobile technology, towering buildings that stretch into the sky and roller coasters that twist and turn through seemingly impossible curves. Some of the greatest technological achievements of the 20th century, such as electrification, automobiles, health technologies, space travel and high performance materials, are part of our lives today because engineers have used their mathematical and scientific knowledge to make them a reality. And if you’ve always thought engineering was just calculations and equations, you need to think again! Answers – and ideas – don’t come to life without flashes of inspiration! The Macquarie Dictionary defines engineering this way: the art or science of making practical application of the knowledge of pure sciences such as physics, chemistry and biology.

ENGINEERING

FACT

As of 2010, the tallest building in the world is the Burj Khalifa in Dubai, UAE. It reaches an incredible 828 metres (2717 feet) in height. Engineers and architects, some from Australia, worked together to develop the building form and the structural system, resulting in a tower which efficiently manages its response to the wind, while maintaining the integrity of the design concept. The project was a massive undertaking, one that had paired bold vision with a courageous leap into the engineering unknown.

Imagine that dream house you’d like to build, a bridge spanning your favourite river or a wild and spine-tingling ride at an amusement park. You can see it inside your mind, but can it really be done? How would you make the walls of the house stay up? How would the bridge support its traffic? Your degree in engineering will equip you with the skills and practical knowledge to rise to similar challenges and bring real solutions to life. Creativity. Fun. Good money. Good people. Travel. Great jobs. A chance to make your dreams realities. Engineering.

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ENGINEERING

FACT

Did you know that... an engineer created the slippery part of the water slide? Civil engineers design pumping systems to circulate just the right amount of water to a slide’s pitched chute or flume. Without the right flow of water, there is no ride. Additionally, structural engineers design the slide and its supporting frame to withstand the weight of people, the weight of the water and even the force of wind blowing on it.

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WHAT DO ENGINEERS DO? Your work as an engineer will see you facing exciting challenges and using your judgement, scientific understanding and risk assessment skills every day. For this, you’ll be valued and well rewarded. Using lateral thinking and communication skills, professional engineers lead teams or work within teams to develop the best possible solutions to the challenges presented to them. As an engineer, you’ll be expected to make critical judgements that balance design improvement, cost, risk and environmental impact.

Maybe they want to build a skyscraper or start a software company. Maybe they want to build the world’s fastest racing car. Or maybe they want to become a biomedical engineer and create artificial body parts to drastically improve life for people with a disability. Maybe they love music and know that computer engineers are the people driving today’s electronic music craze. Or maybe they love the idea of designing water purification systems to provide clean water to remote villages in Cambodia. Whatever the dream, a career in the big world of engineering can help make it happen.

Diversity is one of the great attractions of the job and engineers work on a huge range of tasks in many different environments. Every year many new students enrol in engineering programs across the world. Each one of them has probably dreamed a different dream.

Graduate

Profile MURRAY HEIGHT

Murray’s path to engineering started when he was a boy growing up in Newcastle. An early fascination with anything involving mechanical and/or electronic parts and nothing short of fanaticism for aeroplanes were initial indications of a kid bound to one day become an engineer. Throughout his school years Murray developed a strong interest in chemistry, physics and mathematics and ultimately the decision to study engineering was a natural choice to combine a passion for science with real-world applications.

Murray graduated from the University of Newcastle with a combined degree in chemical engineering and mathematics in 1998. In 1999, he was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to pursue his interest in research and commenced graduate studies in the Chemical Engineering Department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the United States. In 2005, Murray co-founded HeiQ Materials, a Swiss company that started as an ETH Zürich spin-off company that was based on a lab development of a novel material. Murray and HeiQ Materials have been awarded a number of prizes in Switzerland for entrepreneurship and innovation including the Swiss Venture Leaders award and the W.A. de Vigier Foundation entrepreneurship prize. HeiQ Materials currently employs 23 people and is actively selling a range of products to the European, US and Asian markets.

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ENGINEERING

FACT

The word engine and engineer (as well as ingenious) developed in parallel from the Latin root ingeniosus meaning ‘skilled’. An engineer is thus a clever, practical, problem solver. The spelling of engineer was later influenced by back-formation from engine. The term later evolved to include all fields where the skills of application of the scientific method are used.

WHY BECOME AN ENGINEER

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Engineering has never been more important to Australia’s prosperity and the well-being of its people. Its benefits are everywhere – in health, the built and natural environments, foods, medicine and aerospace. But at the moment, there is a shortage of qualified engineers in Australia and many employers offering graduate programs are unable to fill places. This means engineering graduates are often in a position to negotiate better starting salaries and packages than graduates from other disciplines. Engineering offers a whole range of options and career choices. Because it is such a vast and complex field, it gives you the opportunity to specialise in an area that really interests you – such as electrical engineering, mechanical or even chemical. Few career paths offer such exciting and rewarding opportunities.


Women

in Engineering Many people think engineers are mostly men. It’s true that traditionally there are more male engineers than females, but today’s women are challenging the old stereotypes! These days, there are thousands of professional female engineers with a career they love – a job they find intellectually and creatively stimulating and challenging. Women

are a dynamic addition to the engineering world because they bring another mindset to a traditionally male dominated field and are able to tackle challenges from a new perspective. Engineering can be a wonderful career and many women’s support and professional organisations exist among engineers. These include the Engineers Australia’s Women in Engineering group, and the professional

Graduate

Profile

Tania RiTchie – Graduate student in Chemical Engineering and employed with CSIRO Energy Technology.

“Growing up, my dreams were to go into space and visit Antarctica. Studying chemical engineering and science has given me a taste

women’s network run by APESMA (the Association for Professional Engineers, Scientists and Managers, Australia). There is also financial assistance for women studying engineering, with the University of Newcastle offering many such scholarships. In addition, there are public assistance programs such as the ABC Women in Engineering Scholarship scheme.

of both. At university I carried out research related to the way fires behave on spacecraft in zero gravity, and I spent a summer working with an astronaut in a research institute in the USA. I also had the chance to spend an unforgettable few months in Antarctica working on a scientific project.” “Nowadays I believe that the greatest adventure is not in space, but right here on Earth confronting big challenges like climate, water, energy and resources. Engineers will be at the forefront of finding solutions and I’m excited to be working in solar thermal energy – a technology that could supply us with clean, inexhaustible power well into the future.” www.newcastle.edu.au | 07


A career in engineering can take you from the top of the tallest building to the depths of the ocean, the far reaches of outer space and inside the most microscopic structures of the human cell. In fact, wherever innovation occurs, engineers are at work.

Laureate Professor Graham Goodwin Noted as one of Australia’s 100 most influential engineers, Laureate Professor Graham Goodwin is a global leader in his field of electrical engineering. His research in signal processing and automation systems has earned him worldwide recognition and enough distinguished appointments, awards and qualifications to fill two walls of his sizeable office at the University of Newcastle.

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No doubt thanks to a truly remarkable reputation, Professor Goodwin was awarded a membership with the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences – the organisation that is responsible for awarding the Nobel prizes in physics and chemistry. Currently Professor Goodwin can be found cruising the streets of Newcastle on his classic 1977 R100/7 BMW motorbike, and working on his engineering research projects at the University of Newcastle, which he says is “the best job on the planet”.


Where can Engineering take you? Engineering’s diversity brings its skills to many industries including electronics, food, manufacturing, mining, construction, environmental, health, transportation and public utility. Engineers also work on energy and automotive solutions, aerospace and pharmaceutical technologies, as well as pipe and architectural design. What’s more, engineers are employed across all sectors – public and private – within the government, research, industry, armed forces, management and consultation areas.

The amazing opportunities you’ll find as an engineer don’t stop in Australia. Engineering is a global career that could see you in personally rewarding roles in many different regions. As a qualified Australian engineer, you could travel the world and work on projects like rebuilding roads in East Timor, designing water treatment plants in third world countries, designing high-rises in Dubai, or managing the engineering process in an aluminium smelter in Norway – the world really is your oyster.

Australian engineering graduates are in high demand at home and around the world. What’s more, engineers are often employed on starting salaries higher than the national average. According to APESMA’s 2008 Graduate Engineering Employment Survey Report, a graduate can expect to earn approximately $53,500 a year, although some fields of engineering may pay even more. For example, according to the same survey, a mining engineering graduate can expect to earn an average of approximately $82,000. If you are keen to know more about engineering salaries, check out job advertisements in newspapers and online job search websites.

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Chemical Engineering What is chemical engineering? Chemical engineers draw upon the vast and powerful science of chemistry to solve a wide range of problems. While very comfortable with chemistry, their role is far-reaching and, like all engineers, they use mathematics, science and creativity to overcome technical problems in a safe and economical fashion. Chemical engineers need to be extremely versatile and able to handle a wide range of technical problems. By turning raw matter into something we can use, chemical engineers create and improve consumer products, solving problems that stand in the way of improving nearly everything we use. Where do we find chemical engineers? Chemical engineers work in chemical plants manufacturing products like plastics, fertilizers, consumables, pharmaceuticals and paints. They also play a major role in the developing fields of environmental control, resource utilisation, renewable energy, waste management, recycling, new materials development, biotechnology and semiconductor production. Careers in chemical engineering

What are the different types of Engineers and

what do they do? Laureate Professor Graeme Jameson Laureate Professor Graeme Jameson created the most financially successful Australian invention in 20 years when he discovered how to use bubbles to separate valuable particles from waste in the minerals industry.

As populations boom and the global supply of resources and energy dwindles, the demand for chemical engineers increases, making your options almost endless and the challenges highly rewarding. As a chemical engineer you could: n

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contribute to the development and manufacture of “smart� products using advanced science and technology like nanotechnology, cryogenics and zero-gravity processing participate in the growing advanced biomanufacturing industry underpinning developments in biotechnology, food processing and pharmaceuticals do the environment a favour and drive the development of environmentally clean technologies for manufacturing and power generation.

The Jameson Cell now saves the minerals industry a small fortune and is reported to be worth around $2 billion in exports each year to the Australian economy. Today there are more than 280 Jameson Cells in operation in more than 20 countries.

His invention, the Jameson Cell, takes the fine coal and clay it is mixed with when it is mined, suspends the mixture in water and blows air bubbles through it. The coal particles stick to the bubbles and rise to the surface whilst the clay falls to the bottom and drains out. www.newcastle.edu.au | 11


ENGINEERING

FACT

One of Newcastle’s own civil engineering graduates, Mark Arkinstall, was a part of the team from the engineering firm Arup, which created the ‘Watercube’ – the National Swimming Centre built for the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. The huge box-shaped building, seemingly filled with soap bubbles, is built from more than 22,000 irregular sized beams and is a remarkable engineering feat.

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Civil Engineering What is civil engineering? Civil engineers design, build, maintain, manage and oversee the operation of the infrastructure that keeps society ticking over, with the world of the civil engineer revolving around highways and railways, buildings and structures, foundations, tunnels, airports, road systems, power generation facilities, water and wastewater treatment plants, distribution systems and harbour transport facilities.

Careers in civil engineering Because their field of expertise covers the many facets of everyday life and its associated infrastructure, not surprisingly, civil engineers enjoy excellent career prospects. Civil engineers can specialise in fields such as: n

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Without civil engineers, modern societies simply couldn’t function. Where do we find civil engineers? Civil engineers work for construction companies, consulting firms, project management companies, transport companies and governments. Others are employed in the environmental field, assessing the impact of large scale projects, designing wastewater, sewage and industrial wastes, or working in pollution control, environmental control and resource protection and management.

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Structural engineering – designing buildings, bridges, airports, railways, towers, off-shore platforms and tunnels, ensuring their stability in of stresses like wind, waves and earthquakes. Water engineering – managing water supply systems for people, agriculture and industry, developing projects to control flood waters, designing dams, spillways and pipe networks, managing rivers and developing systems to collect and treat wastewater and stormwater. Transport and traffic engineering – planning for the transport needs of city and country areas, investigating alternative transport technologies and maximising the safety and efficiency of existing systems. Geotechnical engineering – advising on foundation design, support structures, stability of slopes, tunnel design and construction and the suitability of materials for infrastructure projects.


Computer Engineering What is computer engineering? The rapidly growing field of computer engineering involves the use of digital and computing technologies to solve problems in industrial systems, and in areas such as information processing, data transfer, communications, commerce and travel. With society now so dependant on computer systems for solutions to emerging problems and challenges, computer engineers are becoming pivotal in the modern world and are engaged in many facets of engineering, science and other technology-based disciplines. Computer engineers are skilled to develop both hardware and software for electronic and microprocessor based systems which can be applied in a range of areas. Areas of focus for computer engineers are electronics design, digital electronics, computer architecture, embedded systems, signal processing and systems software.

Where do we find computer engineers? Computer engineers generally find employment in areas such as embedded microprocessor systems, digital control systems, image processing, digital signal processing, tracking and surveillance, measurement and sensing, data processing systems, software engineering, biomedical engineering, power systems and heavy industry. Careers in computer engineering Computer engineers can be found in various industries working on projects such as: n

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Computer design and development – in this area, computer engineers design, develop and analyse computer systems from simple desktops to complex aviation computers.

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Defence applications – defence related organisations employ computer engineers in a range of specialised applications. Healthcare systems – computer engineers find employment in this industry in different specialised positions. Communication networks/internet – working in a range of computer networking and internet related organisations jobs for computer engineers including research and development (R&D), applications development and systems management.

Employment prospects for computer engineering graduates are excellent, with strong demand both in Australia and abroad. Many students are even offered employment before they complete their degrees.

Instrumentation and control – computer engineers find jobs designing, developing, maintaining and managing in these industries. ICT infrastructure – with many small and large organisations using the ICT infrastructure to run their daily business activities, many computer engineers are employed to develop, support and manage infrastructures.

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NUbots The University of Newcastle’s robotic soccer competition team, NUbots were world champions of the Nao Standard Platform League at the 2008 RoboCup competition in China. The Standard Platform League replaced the Four-Legged League, in which the University of Newcastle reached international fame for its success with the soccer playing robotic dogs. Only the 16 most experienced teams from around the world were invited to compete in the new league. The NUbots brought home the world cup in 2006 from Germany and followed up in 2007 with second place in the United States. The ultimate aim of the NUbots is to develop and program robots that can support humans with routine, as well as dangerous and expert tasks.

ENGINEERING

FACT

Did you know that... computer scientists and computer engineers help create the dazzling visual effects in movies such as Avatar, Harry Potter and The Lord of the Rings? When filmmakers can’t depict action, scenery or characters in a movie using traditional photographic equipment, they call on computer scientists, and computer engineers for their many sophisticated techniques to create visual effects wizardry. The computer-generated imagery, or CGI, that you see on the big screen is the work of dozens of individuals. In Harry Potter films, CGI is responsible for the Hogwarts School’s elaborate gothic backdrop and all the magic and mayhem.

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Computer Science What is computer science? Computer science encompasses the design and implementation of software with an emphasis on developing new techniques and methodologies. This field spans a wide range of areas, including algorithmic problem solving, artificial intelligence, bioinformatics, computer graphics, data security, distributed computing, programming and robotics. Computer scientists work on challenging programming tasks, supervise other programmers, devise new ways to use computers and develop effective solutions for computing problems. The hallmark of a computer scientist is a set of generic skills including the ability to solve problems, effective communication, the capacity to work in a team and an appreciation of life-long learning.

Where do we find computer scientists? Computer science graduates work in businesses across the world, including in software development companies, financial institutions, government departments and research organisations. In these businesses, their roles vary, with common tasks encompassing programming, systems analysis, design and the management of computer resources. Careers in computer science Computer science graduates can gain jobs in a wide range of fields. Some career opportunities include: n computer games development n graphics and animation development for movies and TV n development and enhancement of defence and security systems n projects in bio-informatics and the human genome n development of adaptive robotics systems n systems engineering n new software systems development for business and engineering n health informatics n internet web engineering.


ENGINEERING

FACT

Did you know that... the snowboard was invented by an engineer? From its humble origins as a piece of plywood with an attached rope for steering and balance, to its current ‘rock star’ status, the snowboard has become a marvel of geometry, chemistry, and biomechanics. Because its design promotes sharper turning with less effort, ski manufacturers have adopted some snowboard innovations.

Electrical Engineering What is electrical engineering? Electrical engineering is the science of power generation and distribution, signal processing, and analogue and digital electronics. It is an extremely diverse field, taking in electronics, computer systems, telecommunications, bioengineering, control, robotics and electrical power engineering. Concerned with the way electrical energy is produced and used in homes, the community and industry, electrical engineers design and build the systems and machines that generate, transmit, measure, control and use electrical energy essential to modern life. They investigate, plan, design, develop, construct, test, market and maintain a wide range of products and systems. Electrical engineering is crucial to the smooth running of any developed nation and is becoming increasingly vital in countries that are working to improve their capacity in the new and emerging technologies.

Where do we find electrical engineers?

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Electrical engineers are employed across the board – in utilities, industry, manufacturing, consulting services and electronic design and development. Graduate opportunities exist both nationally and internationally in industrial and power electronics, automation systems, robotics, health care, water and energy industries. Many electrical engineers work in large public and private telecommunications, manufacturing and electrical power companies, while others work for defence and intelligence organisations. Careers in electrical engineering At the moment, the demand for electrical engineers exceeds the supply, which means that as an electrical engineer, there are many possibilities for you and the type of work you could do. Some examples are: n

Electronics engineering – designing, developing and manufacturing computers, integrated circuits, audio, visual, broadcasting and telecommunications equipment, process control systems, navigation, guidance and detection systems, prosthetic devices and pollution monitoring instruments.

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Automation and control engineering – designing, building and operating the automatics systems that control our water supply, chemical plants, oil refineries, factories, mines and even traffic lights. They also design the many automatic systems in medial equipment, aircraft, ships and cars, and in domestic appliances such as dishwashers. Power generation and distribution engineering – providing a reliable and safe electricity network for our everyday needs. They plan, develop, test, install and maintain the equipment and systems that produce, distribute and use electricity. Robotic engineering – designing and programming systems that perform functions associated with human intelligence like voice recognition, mechanical tasks such as sorting or assembling and making predictions on the basis of experience.

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ENGINEERING

FACT

Did you know that ‌engineers design athletic shoes for protection, performance and comfort? Mechanical engineers understand that elite athletes select their shoes based on performance criteria; among those criteria – lightness, flexibility, cushioning, breathability and stability. Mechanical engineers address these issues by selecting materials that provide lateral support and creating designs that distribute the force that travels from the ground through the shoe evenly from heel to toe.

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Environmental Engineering What is environmental engineering? By minimising environmental problems through sustainable development, environmental engineers design and manage solutions to the complex environmental challenges our planet faces. Environmental engineering involves the implementation and management of sustainable engineering practices that have a profound impact on our health and quality of life. The environmental engineering philosophy centres on minimising waste and reducing energy and resource use as communities develop and grow. It is an exceptionally important discipline – as we all know, sustainable solutions are crucial to the survival of the world as we know it. Where do we find environmental engineers? The continual increase in population and living standards provide many local and international employment opportunities for environmental engineers in government organisations, consultancies, contracting firms, research and development organisations, education and technology transfer. Environmental engineers are also employed at large manufacturers, universities and the CSIRO in interdisciplinary teams managing problems through the application of scientific, engineering and interpersonal skills.

Careers in environmental engineering Employment prospects for graduates are excellent, with strong demand in this region and throughout Australia. Graduates can work on environmental issues such as: n

air pollution control

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hazardous waste management

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toxic materials control

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water supply

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water resource management

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stormwater and wastewater management

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solid waste disposal

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environmental management systems

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impact assessment.

All of these careers involve interaction with the environment and with people, making written and oral communication skills essential.


SAE Team The Formula SAE team conceives, designs, fabricates and races with a small formula style racing car in the SAE-Australasian Formula competition each year. A number of restrictions are placed on the teams so that the creativity, knowledge and imagination of the students are challenged. Formula SAE is a competition for university students that started in the United States of America over 20 years ago by the Society of Automotive Engineers. The event has been running in Australia under the jurisdiction of SAE-Australasia since 2001.

Mechanical Engineering What is mechanical engineering? Mechanical engineering is probably the broadest of all engineering disciplines. In simple terms, it’s about turning energy into motion and power. More formally, mechanical engineering covers the generation, conversion, transmission and use of mechanical and thermal energy, and includes the design, construction, and operation of devices and systems. It also involves studying the behaviour of solids, liquids and gases under various conditions. Mechanical engineers do more than you can possibly imagine, designing and developing everything from door locks to space shuttles. They work on power plants, renewable energy systems, electrical generators, robots, propulsions systems, computer systems,

climate control systems, engine cooling, respirator and air-conditioning systems, aircraft engines and automobiles.

Given this broad range, there are great opportunities for mechanical engineers.

New areas of investigation include prosthetic limb and joint design, noise and vibration restriction, high-performance composite materials development, flexible manufacturing, mechanical design automation and industrial pollution control.

Employment prospects for graduates are excellent, both in Australia and internationally. Most mechanical engineers work in design, supervision or management and typical professional positions include:

Where do we find mechanical engineers? Almost all industries need mechanical equipment, and in turn, mechanical engineers. Broadly, mechanical engineers work in the petrochemical, manufacturing, transportation, automotive, aerospace, electronic, mining, and robot industries, and in growth sectors like communications, banking, public utilities, consulting practices and entertainment. Mechanical engineers are also employed at universities, government research organisations and in the public service.

Graduate

Profile Yasser Hamed Mechanical Engineering

After completing his HSC at Merewether High School, Yasser completed a degree in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Newcastle. Yasser graduated in 2003 and now works as a specialist in digital effects for Sony Pictures – a career that matches his ambition to be both an artist and a mathematician. Yasser was a technical engineer on the Oscar winning film

Careers in mechanical engineering

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engineering design construction and commissioning of mechanical systems management of operating plant and projects supervision and maintenance of manufacturing processes and automated systems.

“Happy Feet” – an opportunity he received partly as a result of his final year engineering project at the University of Newcastle. The software he developed was used to create digital effects like waves and avalanches. “The image processing techniques used in my final year project are directly related to the type of research and development done in film visual effects and animation”. Yasser is now based in Los Angeles and last year worked as a shader writer on the movie “Beowulf”. “I love that my job combines both creative and technical skill. I am able to choose movies that I’m interested in working on. I love that I can travel the world – the University of Newcastle gave me the foundation for my career. You never know where your degree can take you.” www.newcastle.edu.au | 17


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Mechatronics What is mechatronics? Put simply, mechatronics is the combination of information technology with mechanical, electrical and electronic systems, with its formal definition being “the efficient and effective integration of mechanical systems and electronics”. Mechatronics engineers use mechanical and electronic processes as well as computers to develop new solutions to industrial problems. They are concerned with the technical design, automation and operational performance of electro-mechanical systems, often in the creation of new products. Mechatronic systems are almost everywhere you look, with examples including aircraft, dishwashers, motor vehicles, automated manufacturing plants, medical and surgical devices and systems, robots, toys and artificial organs. The future is virtually unlimited for mechatronics. It is expected that the next two decades will see an explosion of automated mechatronic systems – improving our quality of life and our knowledge of the world and universe we live in. Where do we find mechatronics engineers? Mechatronics is used in industries ranging from service to manufacturing and medicine. Additionally, mechatronics engineers often specialise in integrated computer controlled mechanical and electrical systems found in the manufacturing and mining industries. They are also employed in electrical plants and companies where automation and process control is required. Careers in mechatronics Mechatronics is an exciting and rapidly growing new area of engineering – career prospects are excellent in Australia and internationally, with the demand for qualified professionals with combined mechanical and electronic systems skills on the increase. Career opportunities in this dynamic field exist in both private industry and publicly funded enterprises. Graduates can take up careers in a wide spectrum of industries including: n

robotics

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aerospace

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chemical

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defence

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automotive

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manufacturing

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finance.

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Mining Engineering What is mining engineering? Mining refers to the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth, usually (but not always) from an ore body, vein or coal seam. The need for mineral extraction and production is an essential activity of any technically proficient society. Mining involves the recovery of materials including bauxite, coal, copper, gold, silver, diamonds, iron, precious metals, lead, limestone, nickel, phosphate, oil shale, rock salt, tin and uranium. Any material that cannot be grown from agricultural processes or created artificially in a laboratory or factory is usually mined. Mining engineering is the design, supervision and management of open cut and underground coal, mineral and metal mines and their associated infrastructure. Mining and mining engineering have been an integral part of Australia’s economy for the best part of a century and mining is still one of the country’s leading wealth producers.

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Because minerals are being mined from a natural setting, the environment will always be disturbed during the process. Modern mining engineers therefore work on how to minimise damage or changes to an environment as a result of production as well as on the optimum production and processing of the mined matter. Where do we find mining engineers? Capable mining engineers are always in demand, in Australia and many other parts of the world. The mining sector is dominated by large and often multinational companies. The industry is split into two sectors – one specialising in exploration for new resources, and the other specialising in mining those resources. The exploration sector is usually made up of individuals and small mineral resource companies, while the mining sector is typically large and multi-national companies. Mining engineers usually work in one of the two primary types of mine – underground mines and open-pit mines. Minerals that exist relatively deep underground (e.g. some coal seams, gold and some metalliferous ores) are

generally mined using underground mining methods. Minerals like iron ore, shallow coal seams and bauxite are usually recovered from the surface by open pit mining. Careers in mining engineering The careers that can be pursued as a mining engineer can be broadly classified into several areas. Broadly, these track the development of a mine from discovery of a mineral resource through to design, commissioning operations and beyond. They are: n

open-cut or underground hard-rock mining

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mine management

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drilling

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blasting

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planning

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environmental planning.

Employment in the mining industry offers highly competitive wages and benefits, especially in rural or remote areas, with many engineering students able to secure employment as a graduate engineer by the middle of their final year of study.


Software Engineering What is software engineering? Software engineering is the science of analysing, designing and implementing complex computer software systems. Software engineers employ the modern techniques of software development, such as object-oriented analysis and design, software process improvement, web engineering, design patterns and software architecture to create precision solutions in a timely and budget-conscious delivery. Where do we find software engineers? It is feasible to expect that in the future, many of society’s interesting and exciting problems will be solved by large software applications, making this another career that can take you all over the globe, while also offering diverse opportunities nationally. Software engineers are employed in many areas, including industry, government, commerce and research.

Careers in software engineering Employment can be expected in areas like: n

software product development

n

banking and finance

n

defence and security

n

industrial systems

n

telecommunications

n

internet and web engineering

n

marketing

n

consulting.

Employment prospects for graduates are excellent. Some employers offer scholarships or cadetships for trainees and many students are offered positions before they complete their degrees.

www.newcastle.edu.au | 21


Surveying What is surveying? Experts in measurement and its systems, surveyors transform ideas into plans, and plans into reality.

ENGINEERING

FACT

Did you know that...many engineers get their thrills working in the theme park industry? Behind your favourite amusement park attraction is an engineer. Civil, mechanical and electrical engineers all play their parts. These theme park engineers design the cars you ride in, the tracks they ride over and the supporting structure. They design acoustical, visual and lighting systems for stage shows and spectacles.

22

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Everyone has seen surveyors on the streets, hammering pegs into the ground and looking through tripod-mounted telescopes. But a surveyor’s horizons can be much wider than the streets of suburbia, with surveyors also working on predicting earthquakes, monitoring environmental change and mapping the ocean floor. It is important that we can measure, present and understand the size and shape of our world and that is precisely what surveying does. It includes the collection, manipulation, storage and sharing of spatial data in relation to land, sea, space, forensics, medicine and many areas of industry. Where do we find surveyors? This is a career that can lead you anywhere, and at the moment, it is a profession that is experiencing an explosion in high-tech data management, with typical applications ranging from aerial surveying through to machine tooling and even work in the medical field. A University of Newcastle surveying degree is recognised by most countries, making a host of opportunities available nationally and internationally – in consultancies, private practice, the mining industry, and government organisations, to name a few.

Careers in surveying At the moment, there are not enough surveyors in Australia to meet demand, and, as a result, graduates generally enjoy 100% employment rates with very high starting salaries. Some of the different areas are: n

cadastral surveying

n

engineering surveying

n

hydrographic surveying

n

mining surveying

n

geographic information systems

n

photogrammetrists

n

remote sensing

n

geodesy

n

land information.


Telecommunications Engineering What is telecommunications engineering? Telecommunications engineering is the science of designing, implementing and managing telecommunications hardware, software and systems for processing and transmitting information. Telecommunications engineers focus on communication technologies used to transmit, receive, store and process different types of electronic information signals. Using their knowledge of electronics, computer hardware and software, signal processing and networking techniques, telecommunications engineers are involved in a range of voice, data and multimedia communication activities. Today, our society is dependant on Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) for versatile and efficient solutions for our rapidly changing lifestyle. This gives telecommunications engineers a pivotal role in modern societies. A practical example is the design of a cellular mobile telephone network, which requires knowledge of high frequency electronics, radio signal propagation, signal processing and networking techniques for operation.

Where do we find telecommunications engineers? Telecommunications engineers are likely be employed in large telecommunications services like Optus, SingTel or Telstra, or in the broadcasting and road traffic industries. Telecommunications engineers also work in broader areas such as electronic engineering, instrumentation engineering, computer engineering, systems analyses and control engineering. Employment prospects for graduates are excellent, with strong demand throughout Australia, as well as internationally. Careers in telecommunications engineering Telecommunications engineering graduates have excellent employment prospects because they are part of one of the fastest growing IT areas. These include: n

n

computer networking and the internet mobile and wireless communications (the fastest growth area for telecommunications engineering)

n

telecommunications services

n

broadcasting

n

road traffic informatics.

ENGINEERING

FACT

The Grand Canyon Skywalk presented some unique engineering challenges. This extraordinary glass-bottomed cantilever bridge spans 70 feet (21.34 meters) over the Grand Canyon’s rim and sits 4,000 feet (1219 meters) above the Colorado River and was built with more than a million pounds (455000kg) of steel beams. It is designed to support the equivalent of 72 Boeing jets and withstand an 8.0 magnitude earthquake 50 miles (80kms) away. The skywalk is designed to withstand winds in excess of 100mph (160kms).

www.newcastle.edu.au | 23


HOW DO I BECOME

AN ENGINEER? 24

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ENGINEERING

FACT

The Millau Viaduct, located in the south of France, is the tallest bridge in the world. This bridge comes in at an enormous height of over 340 meters and at its highest point is taller that the Eiffel Tower. The construction of this mega structure pushed the boundaries of engineering to the limits... and beyond.

It’s a big world out there for engineers, brimming with diverse career paths and rich and rewarding opportunities, both in Australia and overseas. If you have always wanted to see more and find out just how far you could push your horizons, now is your chance to make your dreams a reality and step on to the path that will lead you to a career that is full of possibilities. What makes a good engineer? People who like pulling objects apart, putting them back together and figuring out how they work generally make great engineers. But being an engineer also requires other qualities, like the ability to solve problems, a technical mind and natural curiosity. Additionally, you need to be creative and be able to think outside the square. To qualify for a University of Newcastle engineering program, you will need good grades, particularly in mathematics and science. It’s in these areas an engineering course will be demanding and you need to score as highly as you can. Ideally, you should rank towards the top half of your high school class. What subjects should I do for the HSC? It is recommended that you study the following subjects for your HSC: n

Mathematics (Band 5) or HSC Mathematics Extension 1 (Band E1 or above)

n

Physics

n

Chemistry

n

English.

While this may sound daunting now, particularly for those who aren’t so maths or science savvy, mastering these subjects will make you a very valuable asset and a lot more options will be available for you.

These subjects will also help you enrich your problem solving skills – what’s more, engineering institutions expect you to have good grades in algebra, geometry, trigonometry, science, English and social studies. Other useful subjects include engineering studies, industrial arts and computer studies, and because engineers convey ideas graphically and need to visualise threedimensionally, courses in graphics, drafting or design are helpful as well. What tertiary qualifications do I need?

Engineering In Australia there are several support bodies for engineers. They include: n

n

n

n

Engineers Australia: www.engineersaustralia.org.au The Association of Consulting Engineers Australia: www.acea.com.au The Association of Professional Engineers, Scientists and Managers Australia: www.apesma.asn.au Institute of Public Works Engineering Australia: www.ipwea.org.au

To become a professional engineer, you need be accepted into a Bachelor of Engineering degree in one of the different engineering disciplines, such as civil engineering, computer engineering and so on.

The University of Newcastle’s engineering degrees are accredited by Engineers Australia and affiliated industry and international organisations.

You will need to apply for one of these programs and achieve a specified ATAR score to be accepted. (You can check your UAC Guide to find out what this was last year.) Remember that if you aren’t accepted the first time you apply you still have other options and pathways to a university engineering degree such as accepting one of your lesser ranking UAC preferences, and working hard to transfer to an engineering program or completing a TAFE diploma first.

The main industry body supporting Information and Communications Technology (ICT) professionals is the Australian Computer Society, which recognises the University of Newcastle’s computer science, computer engineering and software engineering degrees, all of which meet the body’s highest academic accreditation standards.

Check out the engineering study options on offer at the University of Newcastle on page 27 of this publication or visit www.newcastle.edu.au to find out more. Are there any professional industry associations? As with most professions, there are several engineering bodies that have been set up to support professionals through networking opportunities, as well as to cater to special interest groups. These bodies ensure that training courses offered through the country are properly accredited so they are recognised in Australia and other relevant countries.

Computer science and computer and software engineering

Surveying Surveying professionals are predominantly supported by the Institution of Surveyors Australia. Graduates of the Bachelor of Surveying at the University of Newcastle are entitled to membership of the Institution of Surveyors, NSW, and its affiliated national and international organisations. Our surveying degree is recognised by the Board of Surveying and Spatial Information of NSW and also meets the requirements of the Reciprocating Board of Surveyors of Australia and New Zealand.

www.newcastle.edu.au | 25


ENGINEERING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF NEWCASTLE Why study with us? Deciding where you will complete your engineering degree is a significant decision to make and being informed is very important. To help you, we have put together some information about our engineering courses. Be rewarded The University of Newcastle is committed to rewarding high achieving HSC students. Commencing in 2009, the HSC Bonus Points Scheme is for applicants applying to specific programs at the University of Newcastle. Visit the University’s website for details on which HSC subjects and bands attract bonus points in specific programs: www.newcastle.edu.au Be recognised The University of Newcastle is one of only four Australian universities in the world’s top 100 for engineering, technology and computer science. This is set out by the Shanghai Jiao Tong University Academic Ranking System – a universally accepted system that assesses

universities worldwide and ranks them according to performance. This ranking means that University of Newcastle engineering graduates are highly regarded on an international and national level. World-class training With a reputation for high quality training and research, the Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment focuses on real-world solutions. Understanding and shaping the world, and finding smart solutions for society’s problems – from the everyday to the more out-of-thesquare. This fluid interaction between teaching and research directly benefits our students. Optimum Opportunities Our degree programs lead graduates to employment in highly regarded fields. Our Top 100 engineering universities ranking gives students an advantage in the professional market and employers are always keen to interview our graduates. Additionally, our employment rate extends well beyond the national average.

Graduate

Profile Dominic Shillington – UNISS Scholar

Our industry scholarship scheme plays an important role in the University’s hands-on approach to learning. Dominic Shillington, a civil engineering student, recently travelled to the Middle East to work with Newcastle firm JML Engineered Facades on Dubai’s international airport. 26

| www.newcastle.edu.au

Scholarships We offer a range of scholarship options to provide students with financial support while they study. Particularly popular with engineering students is the University of Newcastle Industry Scholarship Scheme (UNISS). UNISS is an integrated program of industry placement and study that can give you a head-start on your career. To receive a scholarship, you must complete an application. For the full list of available scholarships and information about applying, go to www.newcastle.edu.au/uniss . Closing dates vary so keep an eye out to ensure you don’t miss out! What programs do we offer? The Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment offers varied and flexible programs for engineering students. The following courses are offered as part of the School of Engineering and the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

“The UNISS program has given me the opportunity to experience the world of engineering before I’ve even graduated. My sponsor company, JML Engineered Facades, sent me for three months to work on the construction of the Dubai international airport. It was an amazing experience, not only did I learn how to apply what I’ve learnt in lectures to real engineering problems, but I also learned what it was like to live with one the biggest construction projects in the world and experience Middle-Eastern culture. “The UNISS program involves working for 10 weeks a year and I’ve found that working between university semesters gives meaning to the theory I learn. I would encourage anyone interested in engineering to apply for the UNISS scholarship.”


Specialisations are offered in chemical, civil, computer, electrical, environmental, mechanical, mechatronics, software and telecommunications engineering. Students select their specialisation at the beginning of their first year, with transfers possible down the track under certain conditions.

Combined degrees

Further detail is available on our website: www.newcastle.edu.au/faculty/engineering

For more details on combined engineering degrees, visit www.newcastle.edu.au/ what-can-i-study

If you are keen to broaden your study options, a combined engineering degree is something to consider. This allows you to graduate with two degrees, increasing your employment options and optimising your academic and professional skills and qualities.

Program name

Study duration (F/T)

Course content

Bachelor of Engineering (Chemical)

4 years

Engineering studies, mathematics, physics, heat and mass transfer, thermo-fluid engineering, particle technology, reaction engineering, separations involving solids, liquids, and gases, process control, plant design for clean and economical processes, project management and research.

Bachelor of Computer Science

3 years

Engineering studies, mathematics, physics, algorithms, artificial intelligence, compilers, computer graphics, computer networks, database systems, data security, graphical user interfaces, object oriented technologies, operating systems, theory of computation and web engineering.

Bachelor of Engineering (Civil)

4 years

Engineering studies, mathematics, physics, surveying, computer programming, mechanics, properties of solids and fluids, structural engineering, geotechnical, water engineering.

Bachelor of Engineering (Computer)

4 years

Engineering studies, mathematics, physics, computer engineering, digital systems, software engineering, signal processing, electronics, control systems, communication networks and systems, software engineering and computer science.

Bachelor of Engineering (Electrical)

4 years

Engineering studies, mathematics, physics, power generation and distribution, telecommunications equipment, signal processing, and analogue and digital electronics.

Bachelor of Engineering (Environmental)

4 years

Engineering studies, mathematics, physics, environmental engineering, water engineering, chemical engineering, geotechnical engineering or natural science biology, chemistry, environmental planning and design, fluid mechanics, land and water management, surface and groundwater pollutant transport, waste treatment.

Bachelor of Engineering (Mechanical)

4 years

Engineering studies, mathematics, physics, advanced materials and manufacturing, bulk solids handling, design, engineering management, mechanics, fluid dynamics and thermodynamics, computer aided engineering.

Bachelor of Engineering (Mechatronics)

4 years

Engineering studies, mathematics, physics, mechanical and electrical engineering, control systems, electronic design, mechanical engineering design, mechanics of fluids, solids, sensors and actuators, computer-integrated manufacturing, computer networks, electrical systems, engineering management, finite element analysis, heat transfer, microprocessor systems, modelling, simulation.

Bachelor of Engineering (Mining Transfer)

2 years transfer program with UNSW or Wollongong*

Engineering studies, mathematics, physics, structural and environmental mechanics, geomechanics, technology and human values, surveying, computer programming, underground mining, surface mining, blasting, geology, mine ventilation, mine economics, mine planning, mine water, environmental impact, regulations and safety.

Bachelor of Engineering (Software)

4 years

Engineering studies, mathematics, physics, software engineering, computer engineering, computer science, computer architecture, distributed processing, object oriented technologies, real time systems, software architecture, software process and metrics, software verification, system software, user interface design, web engineering.

Bachelor of Surveying

4 years

Engineering studies, mathematics, physics, surveying, fluid mechanics, electronic surveying, geomechanics, transportation engineering and design, survey computing, hydrology, photogrammetry, water engineering, spatial data systems and remote sensing, land boundary definition, industrial surveying, astronomy and sat positioning.

Bachelor of Engineering (Telecommunications)

4 years

Engineering studies, mathematics, physics, electrical engineering, electronics, computer engineering, communication systems and networks, software engineering, wireless systems.

*The Bachelor of Engineering (Mining Transfer Program) is offered in conjunction with the University of New South Wales and the University of Wollongong. Students complete the first two years of the Bachelor of Engineering (Civil) program at the University of Newcastle, and then transfer to either the University of New South Wales or the University of Wollongong for the final two years. www.newcastle.edu.au | 27


How do I find out more about Engineering?

If you are keen to learn more about the world of engineering and its exciting possibilities, here are some suggestions: Research, research, research There are lots of sources of information on Engineering available to you. Try contacting the various professional engineering support organisations (see page 25). Or do a search on the internet – there is a host of interesting facts and information about engineering across the web. Ask questions Don’t be afraid to ask questions. A genuine interest in engineering is invaluable and anyone in the field is more than happy to share information with a kindred spirit. If you or your parents know any engineers, talk to them about their job, the studies they did, and what they like about their career. Your careers advisor can also help you to find out more about engineering and the study pathways open to you. We recommend finding out what you will need to study as early as Year 9 or Year 10. This will allow you to step on to the right path from the beginning, make informed decisions and select the appropriate subjects for the HSC.

Try it out Why not get a little taste of engineering now? Work experience is a great way to familiarise yourself with the on-the-ground work of engineers. What’s more, keen work experience students often develop long-term relationships with employers, which can lead to scholarships, cadetships and employment upon graduation. If you know an engineer, ask them if their company has a work experience program. Even if you don’t have a contact, getting in touch with engineering firms and organisations to request work experience is a fantastic way to get your foot in the door and your initiative is sure to impress. Your careers advisor should also be able to help you. Contact us Go online www.newcastle.edu.au/faculty/engineering or email us at EnquiryCentre@newcastle.edu.au

Graduate

Profile Grant completed a Bachelor of Computer Science at the University of Newcastle in 1995. His skills have taken him around Australia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, USA and France. “I have worked in a lot of industries including research, software development, media, logistics and retail in small, large, corporate and creative companies, each presenting their own unique challenges.”

Grant Street Computer science 28

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Grant is currently working as a Senior Systems Engineer with Animal Logic, the

Sydney based design, animation and visual effects studio. He began working with Animal Logic in 2005, during the production of the Oscar winning animated feature film “Happy Feet”. Since then Grant has worked on numerous high profile projects including the films “300”, “World Trade Center” and “Australia”. “Animal Logic runs the only Australian super computer in the top 500 worldwide. This provides a range of unique challenges from storage, networking, monitoring and management, each pushed to the limit to ensure we deliver the best quality product.” “My time at Newcastle Uni gave me the start in my career path, which has taken me overseas, into industries that I had never considered. My current role exposes me to new challenges every day. I always found I.T. interesting, but I could never have foreseen the enjoyment I gain through my work.”


Why the seahorse? The University’s emblem since 1965 has been a mythical seahorse, based on the naval coat of arms of Lieutenant John Shortland, who chartered and named Hunter’s River in 1797. Our seahorse today looks back to our heritage and the history of Newcastle; and it looks ahead, recognising our status as one of Australia’s most forwardlooking universities.

Disclaimer The University of Newcastle reserves the right at all times to withdraw or vary programs listed within this publication. In the event that a program within this publication has to be changed or withdrawn, applicants will be advised by mail to the address specified by them on their UAC application before the last date for the change of preferences for the main round. All information is correct at May 2011, but is subject to change as program content is reviewed and updated.


Any questions and enquiries should be directed to: Newcastle campus University Drive Callaghan NSW 2308 T 02 4921 5000 Central Coast campus Chittaway Road Ourimbah NSW 2258 T 02 4348 4030 Port Macquarie Cnr Oxley Highway and Widderson Street Port Macquarie NSW 2444 T 02 4921 5000 Information in this publication is correct as at May 2011. UoN 2011/1094

The University reserves the right to: withdraw any program or course; change the content or other aspects of any program or course; limit enrolments in any program or course; and/or alter the tuition fees for any program or course described in this publication.

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Engineering handbook  

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